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Dodge City times. [volume] (Dodge City, Kan.) 1876-1892, June 02, 1887, Image 1

Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84029838/1887-06-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Dodge
DODGE CITY, KANSAS, THURSDAY, JtfiSTE 2, 1887.
V t -
ELEVENTH YEAE.
576
City
Times
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WESTERN KANSAS.
The Lyons Republican speaking of
Kansas saj-s: "But it is of the western
part of the state the desert proper, not
its suburbs of -which we would more
particularly speak. It is this that invites
the almost penniless home seeker, and
gives him a fine farm for a few years of
well directed energy. Here is many a
stretch of fine fertile prairie which can be
bought for from three to five dollars per
acre on such'tcrms that the payments can
be made from the crops grown. It is
rather paradoxical, we know, to say that
desert lauds can pay for themselves with
one or two crops they bring; but facts are
facts nevertheless. Energy and enter
prise, thrift and economy are needed, but
. there are large'returns sure to be received.
Hundreds of thousands of acres here will
bring from fifty to seventy bushels of
corn per acre in return for a judicious
outlay of time and strength. As 6ome
one else has said "a poor man may live
richer, and a rich man easier and better in
the Kansas desert than almost anywhere
elseon earth." Many a farmer coming here
with but little money, through Uncle
Sam's generosity has secured a home
stead and a tree claim, 320 acres in all,
has pui chased a few head of cattle, and
in a few j'cars has found himself in inde
pendent circumstances, if not absolutely
wealthy. In the past much of this rich
region of western Kansas has been un
known because of the absence of rail
roads. But this cannot much longer be
said. More miles of railroad was built in
Kansas last year than in any other state
or territory, and last year's building is
but the prelude of what is to be done in
that line this year."
"There are many looking for homes
who ask for something more than fertile
farms and railroad facilities. They ask
for a morality and a degree of intelligence
in their neighbors and an opportunity to
secure these things for their families.
Kansas ranks as one of the highest in
educational matters of the western states.
There is not an organized county in the
state which does not have""schools and
churches.
In fact these things are the first which
Kansas looks after, and we have many,
both of schools and churches which, both
as to buildings and the teachers and
preachers employed in them, are equal to
any found elsewhere. At the same time
it is necessarily true that in the frontier
places where the coyote and buffalo have
been the only inhabitants until within the
last year or so, church and school advan
tnges are not as plentr nor good as thev
will be in a few 3'cars. The standard of
moials is high. There is a class of peo
ple to whom the name of Kansas seems to
bring up visions of cow-boys, out-laws
andIndians only this and nothing more
except, the two or three individual
friends whom they have in that state.
But ask them what kind of people have
gone to Kansas from their vicinity and
they, remembering their friends, will an
swer "our best."
So "the best" have gone from other lo
calities until Kansas is made up of many
"bests," which makes it a pretty good
place to live in. Another reason it is a
prohibition state, and "prohibition pro
hibits," though it does not absolutely
prevent. Saloons and doggeries being
minus quantities, the low, vile rabble
which both breed and are bred by them
are conspicuous by their absence. They
arc not attracted to such a state, and the
state is better off without them. "We
have among us those who drink, those
who commit deeds of violence, those who
scoff at virtue and scorn the right; but
they arc less numerous than in states not
blessed with a prohibitory law and a pub
lic sentiment which sustains and upholds
it.
COTTON IN KANSAS.
The Garden City Sentinel says:
There is not a particle of doubt about
our ability to raise cotton in Kansas, but
there is doubt whether it will pay better
than other crops that we are more accus
tomed to. That can be found out by tri
al. All our southern counties will grow
it first rate, and if the right kind of seed
is planted a good crop may be had as
surely as a corn crop. There are as many
varieties of cotton as of corn, some small
and early, others large and late. They
raise good corn iu New Hampshire, Ver
mont, Wisconsin and Minnesota, but it is
the small, yellow variety, growing not
more than six or eight feet high while
here in Kansas we grow the large Dent
corn, which is frequently seen growing
from fifteen to eighteen feet high.
Just so with cotton, the "Green Seed"
variety grown by the early settlers in In
dian), Illinois and Missouri, may be
planted as late as the first of June, and it
will ripen before frost and yield hand
somely. It is too soon to look for it in
August, but in September and October
good picking may be had, and if exteri
enced hands can be had it may pay well.
No harm in trying it on a small scale
at any rate. Children can pick it as well
as grown persons and in that way tum
their labor into money.
As we have said before, the cotton
grown by the writer in Douglass county
in 18G3 brought $1.50 per pound, which
was within ten cents of the highest price
paid at the time. All the early settlers in
southern Illinois and Indiana raised cot
ton, ginned, spun and wove it on their
own premises, and in that way made it
pay.
Emporia News: A city's standing
cau be pretty accurately estimated by
the patiouagejbestowed on its newspa-
.w.
rinnrx
$te r
PROHIBITIOX EFFECTS.
TorEKA, Kas., May 19. Over one hun
dred letters have been received at the ex
ecutive office lately from points in Texas
askfng questions concerning the enforce
ment of the prohibitory law in Kansas,
and the general effect. GovernorJMartin
has answered these making an argument
in favor of the amendment, presenting
facts to sustain the point, also mailing a
copy of his last message to each one. In
several of these letters the writers have
referred to the fact that they have al
ready carefully pursued the governor's
amendment made some six years ago and
now they would like to hear the other
side of the question discussed by him.
At Topeka the new Murray law is
working to perfection, it being absolutely
impossible for a man to get a drop of beer,
whisky or any intoxicating liquor with
out going through the legal formula and
there are very few men who will go into
a drug store in this city and solemnly
swear to a lie for the purpose of obtain
ing a drink. There are no dives around
secluded places. Still families who nev
er had beer and wine in the house now
have it on their table every day. A
prominent citizen said that before the
Murray law went into effect he kept a
case of beer at home and it would last all
the way from two months to fourteen
weeks, but now a case scarcely lasts him
and his family over three days, and this
is true of hundreds of families.
At Wichita it is understood that liquor
of all kinds is easily obtained. The at
torney general will in all probability be
called to this point in the near future to
close the joints.
At Arkansas City and Winfield a very
poor quality of beer is sold openly in bil
liard halls under the name of "malt" at
thirty cents per bottle. It is miserable
stuff. In Kiowa, a cattle town in Barber
county, saloons and gambling rooms are
run wide open. The town is the succes
sor of Dodge City, and it is useless to at
tempt to enforce the law.
In Leavenworth liquor of all kinds is
obtained at club rooms and at several of
the hotels, but it is not sold openly.
There are other towns in Kansas where
liquor is-more or less easily obtained, but
there are few of them where everything
is as tight in this particular as is Topeka.
TIIE USE OF NUMBERS.
The statistical editor of the Farmers'
Reiew is kindly critical toward our quo
tations from exchanges always. Recently
the expression, "millions of acres have
been planted in trees" has called out the
following:
"Now, a million acres is just 1,560
square miles, equal to 43 townships of six
miles square. Taking the expression
'millions' to mean not less than three
millions, it would equal a solid body of
129 townships each six miles square, or
4,536 square miles, or a body of land 67
miles square. We don't believe any such
amount of planting has been done. Yet
we find the above statement of 'millions
of acres planted' copied in the Indus
trialist, published at the Kansas State
Agricultural College, at Manhattan, with
out any comment on the extravagance of
the statements."
Evidently our friendly critic eas never
graduated out of arithmetic into rhetoric
and cannot comprehend the use of "mil
lions" to indicate an indefinite, uncount
ed quantity. Perhaps he docs not know
that the average human intellect has little
comprehension of actual figures above
one hundred, and that few people know
how many or how few "a thousand" rep
resents. To the mass of readers, then,
the expression "millions" means simply
a vast multitude, more nearly in accord
ance with actual facts, in the impression
made, than any exact calculation which
should result in the figures 234,586.
When Bayard Taylor was in Arabia,
he found it necessary, in order to convey
the truth, to use the Arabic exaggeration
in describing his own country. So, in
some degree, the editor who will reach
the people with his facts must talk in the
common terms that represent the common
thought. In fact, numbers, like other
terms, are used both scientifically and
rhetorically; in mathematics they are
symbols of exact quantity often far be
yond comprehension, to be sure, but
still as accurate as calculation can make
them. In the rhetoric of common speech,
large numbers present simply multitudes,
uncounted and unaccountable to the one
who uses them.
Morover, the fact is patent that more
than the "67 miles square" of the Review
has felt the effects of tree-planting in pro
tection and adornment, which add so ma
terially to value. Even statistics could
not accurately present in measured terms
the advantage to these prairies and the
youth who inhabit them of a single Ar
bor Day. The whole truth is not con
fined to the statistical use of figures.
Manhattan Industrialist.
GRIT.
A daughter of Major Hudson, proprie
tor of the Topeka Capital, was out driving
last Sunday when her horse ran away,
throwing her out. She sustained injuries
which neccessitated a painful surgical op
eration. Her physician prescribed a dose
of whiskey to keep up her strength but
she positively refused to take a drop, say
ing Jhat she would rather bare the pain
than touch the whiskey. Who says the
American girl is degenerating? The grit
exhibited by Miss Anna Hudson in pre
ferring to endure physical pain rather
than sacrifice her temperance principles
is worthy of the days of old when women
went to the stake rather than give up the
truth. Hutchiuson News.
KEEP TOUR BOYS OFF THE
STREETS AT NIGHT.
Every evening we see a crowd of
from 15 to 50 boys of all sizes, from
the babies just big enough to waddle, to
the great big sap-head of 15 years loaf
ing on the streets or in the back end of
some grocery or drug store, or running
and howling like a pack of dogs through
the streets, and frequently they find
their way into the billiard hall. Par
ents, the devil waits in the streets for
your boys. It is there that he teaches
them to steal, to smoke, to chew, to lie,
to swear. Tis there he leads them to
become enraged and cherish thoughts
of murder. 'Tis there they learn ob
scenity, vuleantv and rudeness. Here
it is that crimes are started and sooner
or latter brings the gray hairs of too in
dulgent parents with sorrow to the
grave. Here it is that legions of acci
dents happen that sweep some mother's
darling boy, or some fond father's pride
and joy, from time to eternity. Only
last week a 13 year old lad, who had
been in the habit of spending his even
ings and sometimes his nights almost,
upon the streets, left his home at Fort
Scott after supper, and started for the
streets as usual. This time, however,
happening along the K. B, track as a
train was moving along, undertook to
climb on to a freight car, slipped and
was thrown under the wheels and was
so badly crushed and mangled that he
died before they could get him home
again. This is only one out of the hun
dreds of instances that fill daily papers.
It has always seemed strange to us
that parents who appear to love their
boys, should allow them to wander into
such daneerous habits. .No bov has
any business on the streets after dark.
All the errands can be done before dark,
then make your home as attractive as
you possibly can mothers, and keep
your boys there after dark. -Clark Coun
Clipper. THE SUN FIiOWER STATE.
Kansas enjoys the pleasing pseudonym
of the "Sunflower State." The beautiful
flower of that part of the genus Helian
thus, turns on the steam to catch the first
rays of the morning sun, and with its
broad disc and yellow rays follows the
great orb of day. So Kansas turns to
catch the first rays of every advancing
thought, or civilized agency, and with
her broad prairies and golden fields wel
comes and follows the light. Garden
City Herald.
The Immigration to Kansas is as active
as ever this spring, and the trains coming
into the state are crowded and packed
full. The man who comes to Kansas in
stead of the northwest is sensible and
lucky. He has ten months of the year
to work in, and any farmer knows what
an advantage there is in that. His stock
has ten months of mild weather and nat
ural food. His crops can be anything he
chooses to plant. He does not have to
look for five months of deep snow and
starving cattle. He does not have to de
pend on wheat alone when wheat is too
cheap'to pay for the time spent in pre
paring the soil. The Kansas farmer is
always in possession of a paying market.
Not only is the soil of Kansas fertile and
level, but the institutions which man has
planted are excellent. Pride in her
schools and churches has not only been a
source of satisfation but it has made
wealth. It has appealed to the best in
men and the best of men have responded.
The strongest, the most energetic and
most intelligent part of the general tide
of immigration has settled within the bor
ders of Kansas, the most progressive state
in the Union. The magic development of
the state, the rapid increase in popula
tion, and the enterprise of her citizens
have caused Kansas to be known as the
greatest phenomena of the age.
DON'T EXPERIMENT.
Yon cannot afford to waste time In experiment
ing when your lungs are in danger. Consumption
always seems at firet,only a cold. Do not permit
any dealer to impose upon yon With some cheap
imitation of Dr. King's New Discovery for Con
gnmption.Conghs and Colds, but be sure yon get
the genuine. Because he can make more profit he
may tell yon he has something just as good, or jnst
the same. Don't be deceived, but insist upon get
tine Dr. King's New Discovery, which is guaran
teed to give relief in all Throat, Lnng and Chest
affections. Trial bottles free at City Drug Store.
SAVED HIS LIFE.
Mr. D. I. Wilcoxson, of Horse Cae, Ky., says he
was, for many years, badly afflicted with Phthisic,
also Diabets; the pains were almost unendurable
and would sometimes almost throw him into con
vulsions. He tried Electric Bitters and got relief
from the first bottle and after taking six bottles,
was entirely cured, and had gained in flesh eigh
teen pounds. Sars he posith ely believes he wonld
have died, had it not been for the relief afforded
by Electric Bitters. Sold at fifty cents a bottle by
City Drag Store.
Abstract of Titles
Of Lands in Ford and adjoining coun
ties furnished by us
L. E. McGrARRY & Co.,
PIONEER LOAN AND TRUST CO.
If you want to secure a loan of money on real
estate, at low rates, money ready when papers are
made out, call on the Pioneer Loan and Trust Co.,
of Dodge City. B. F. Milton, Secy.
TAKE NO RISK!
The City Drug Store, corner of Front and Bridge
streets, is the oldest and most reliable dispenser
of medicines in Southwestern Kansas.
Their stock is the largest, and their goods are
always the very best. Great care is used in dis
pensing, and yon can depend on every article com
ing from them, being exactly what it should be
Theyalsokeep books, newspapers, stationery,
and very fine cigars. nor 25
Bucklen's Arnica Salve.
The best Salve in the world for Cuts,
Braises, Sores. Ulcers, Salt Rheum. Ferer
Sores, Tetter, Chapped Hands, Chilblains
Corns, and all Skin Eruptions, and posi
tivly eores Piles, or no Day required. It
is ptaraateed to give perfect satisfaction,
or moey refunded. Price 25 eta. per box,
For sale at City Drag; Store. ,
Enterprise Addition
'.tmaBBBBBBLBBBmw
aaaMEjMafrJTr5BIr
TO
DODGE CITY.
This is a'beautifnl tract of land divided into lots and is situated only eight
blocks north-west of the POST OFFICE.
It has the MOST DESIRABLE BUILDING SITES to be found in or
around Dodge City.
ENTERPRISE ADDITION has a destiny which approaching events will in
a brief time work out to the decided advantage of every one holding lots in this
addition.
If you want to secure a lot on which to BUILD A HOME, from the door of
which you can look down upon the city around you and beyond into the most
beautiful country and forest scenery, better than from any part of the city, go to
ENTERPRISE ADDITION, it can furnish homes good enough for the most
fastideous.
For Price and Terms, See or Address
. Tr M. COLLAR, Proprietor.
Dodge City, Kansas.
A COMMON MISTAKE.
Why do so many intelligent persons stubbornly
refuse to take any kind of.meuicme for slight ill
ness, when first takem sick, and w hen the great
est benefit may be derhed from plain simple treat
ment. Nearly always the first act ol a physician
when called, is to prescribe remedies to nunc the
bowels, to regulate the Iner, open the secretions
ana am nature, wnyuonot intelligent persons
take the same plain treatment in time themselves,
try it, and take St Patrick's Pills, they are guar
anteed to gie satisfaction. They act mildly with
out griping or irritation, and are thorough in their
effect, they are a perfect physic for men, v, omen
or children.- Sold by City Drug Store.
Fifty cents ie a small doctor bill, but that is all
it will cost yon to cure any ordinary case of rheu
matism if you take onr advice and nse Chamber
lain's Pain Balm. Everybody that tries it once,
continues to use it whenecr they are in need of a
remedy for sprains, painful sw ellings, lame back,
or sore throat. It is highly recommended by all
v, ho have tried it. Sold by City Drug Store.
While Mr. T. J. Richey, of Altona, Mo., was
traveling in Kansas, he was taken uolcntly ill
with cholera morbus, he called at n drug store to
get some medicine and the druggist recommended
Chamberlain's Cholic, Cholera and Diarrhoea Rem
edy so highly he concluded to try it, the result w as
immediate relief, and a few doses cured him com
pletely. It is made for bowel complaint and no
thing else. It nctcr fail. Sold by City Drug
Store.
J. F. Frankey. n. McGany.
-TTlItANJKBir & DIcGABRV,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
DODGE CITY, KAS.
Will make collections. Practice in all courts and
U. S. Land Denartment
JOHN B.
MOFFETT,
Attorney Counsellor-At-Law,
Dodge City, Kansas.
r a. SIMPSON,
DENTAL ROOMS
IN BANK OF
DODGE BUILDING, I
DODGE CITY, K1S.
T W. WADE, JH. .,
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
Dodge City, - . Kansas.
OFFICE Boom No. 4, Gluck'd building,
rs.
RESIDENCE : Opposite Methodist Church.
South Side Hotel
G. F. McKlNNEY and JOHN TABOR, Props.
(South Side of Hher)
D9DGE CITY. KANSAS.
New Hotel. Good Accommodation. SI Per Day.
DODGE CITY BOTTLING
WORKS.
HENRY STURM,
Manufacturer of
Soda Water,
Champagne Cider
-AND-
GINGER ALE.
OFFICE AT
mTmri.iTAir bkvg stke,
Coner 1st ATenue Chestnut Street,
Dodge City,
Kansas.
D.D. S.
,jil, jJL
CHAS. F. MACLAEY & CO.
Real Estate
and Loan Agents.
FORD CITY, FORD CO.,
KANSAS.
1 (id ACRES deeded land, good honsc, &c,
XUV4ralies from Ford Citj, SS00.0O, half can
remain.
"I ft A ACRES s School land, one mile from
X3f Corbctt, 8000.00. Sccnrc this bargain.
1 fift ACRES. 50 in cultivation, 500 peach
I"" trees good buildings, &c, 20 acres in
nhcat. S90000 SJOO.OO cash, balance remain.
1AO ACRES, 80 m cultivation, good build
XUVinjrs. &c. 23 acres wheat. 81000.00 S100
cash, balance remain.
1 (id ACRES, 50 in cultivation, 2 V2 miles to a
- V V thnv mg tov n. 1,500.00, easy terms.
Cil AA BUYS a good timber claim, 160 acres,
V-"- v vjicar Garden City.
Q KO 1JUYS a good timber claim, 160 acres 6
tptlVfjmles to lailroad station, Wallace coonty.
0OA ACRES grass JLd timber land inLou
uUOVisiana. bell or exchange, 83.00 per
acre. '
1 (l( ACRES school land, 5 miles from Ford
JLUVcitj. $400.00 takes it.
1 (i A ACRES, 20 in cultn ation, good box house,
AUV&c. S750 00. easy terms.
1 ii( ACRES, well improved, one mile to Ford
A" VCity. 1,500.00, easy terms.
160 ACRES' v,cU imPed. $000.00, half
tiifi ACRES, v ell improv cd, yt mile from Ford
XUVf City. 1,500.00, half remain.
J2T These are a few of the many bargains vvc
have. Corre-ponaencu fcohcited.
CHAS. F. 3LVCLARY &, CO.,
Ford City, Kansas.
AWATJDOWN !
FOR GOOD AND CHEAP
GROCERIES
Cillat the
CORNER OF CHESTNUT STREET
AND THIRD AVENTE,
DODCE CITY,
KANSAS.
J. G. WILKINSON &SON.
J. H, CRAWFOKD & CO.
DEALERS IN
GROCERIES & PROVISIONS
A few doors north ot PostoGce.
DODGE CITY, KAS.
GKAKD DUKE,
wfa
WHUOWBHHJ
Bred by Elliott Fuller, Ashland Neb. Owned
by L. Barber, Carthage, HI. Colors-black and
white. Sire Ashland Prince, No. 409. Dam Ash
land Dclle,No. &U. Has been accepted for registry,
as thoroughbred, in the flfth volume of the Hol
stein Herd Cook.
Any one wishing. to breed to this splendid an
nimal, call on H. D. SMITH, Speareville, Kaa. or
L MCDGETT, Sec 10 tp. 25, K. 23 w., 5 miles NW
of Speareville.
Term. ?5-00 to insure. Fine range and ex
perienced men to take care of stock.
L. W. CHERINGTON & CO.,
REAL ESTATE & LOAN CO.,
have
100 fKiO ACRE Pf Improved and Unim
JJJVJ proved Lands and city eroperty.
OFFICE : Post
AUG, CRTJMBAUGH,
!I4Ii 1SSMI, hOM & IHSUBAHCI
FAEMS LAND and CITY LOTS FOR SALE.
Taxes Paid, Houses to Rent Contests
and all Business before the
U. S. LAND OFFICE
Given prompt attention. Office on Front St., over
Glnck's Jewelry Store
W.J. FITZGERALD.
REAL ESTATE,
I I
LOAN
-AND-
I J I I
INSURANCE
AGENT-
Has first-class facilities for selling land
and relinquishments.
100,000
TO LOAN ON IMPROVED LANDS IN
FORD AND ADJOINING COUNNLES-
CHEAP MONEY
TO liOAN ON BUSINESS AND BBS
1DENCE PBOPEKTY.
Parties desiring to sell or requiring money to
MAKE FINAL PROOF
and Payment on their Claims, will find
it to their interest to consult me.
EOffiee in Dodge Citv Bank bnilding.
Dodge City, Kansas.
CENTRA! HOTEL.
Will. STATES, Prop.
NEWLY FITTED.
CENTRALLY LOCATED.
FIRST-CLASS in every Paticular.
Free ' to and from nil Trains,
PLEASANT AND COMMODIOUS SAMPLE
ROOMS in BUSINESS PART of CITY.
DODGE cnr.
KANSAS.
MOEEIS COLLAR,
DEALER IN
CITY AND SUBURBAN
REAL ESTATE,
DODGE CITY. KAS.
"P D. KSE, lit. .,
Physician and Surgeon.
Office: Wilks & Co.'s drag store, Bridge street
Office Ilonrs: 2 to 4, p. m., all other times at
South-Side Hotel DODGE CITY, KAS.
DDTTM & SOPEB.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
DODGE CITY.
KANSAS
E. N. Wicks, H. H. Harrington.
County Attorney.
XTTICKS ft MAKKIJGTHr,
ATTORNEYS,
DODGE CITY, - KANSAS.
tS" Office East of Bee Hive Store. "tS
E. D.Swas,
OWAlfft
J. Moxbok Lloyd
ATTOBKEY AT LAW,
General CoUeetioa and Real Estate AgenU
. DODGE CITY, KANSAS.
for sale
-T T
PH fit
Office Block,
HSa
MERCHANTS STATE
BANK.
ORGANIZED FEB. 18, 1880.
Capital Stock, - - $50,000.
DOES GENERAL BANKING BUSINESS
McCarty'd block,
DODGE CITY, KAS.
GEO. B. COX, President,
F. C. ZIMMERMANN, Vice President.
JAMES LANGTON, Cashier.
Directors Geo. S. Emerson, T. L. McCarty, O.
Marsh, J. II. Crawford, W.G. Sherlock, N. G. Col
1 JOB PRINTING
NEATLY EXECUTED
At the TIMES OF PICK.
w. a shinst,
DEALER IN
CITY AND SUBURBAN
Real Estate
DODGE CITY. KAS.
BOYER & HOBBLE,
INSURANCE
AND
REAL ESTATE AGENTS
DODGE CITY. KANSAS.
DO TOV SUFFER WITH PILES?
Use Dr. Tablera"
BUCKEYE PILE OINTMENT
Avoid the uai of Vie knife, if you love life.
Try BUCKEYE PDLE OINTMENT
made from the Common Buckeye
which combined with other "valu
able ingredients make a sure and
CERTAIN PILE CURE.
yf"Trr it with assurance that you will receirea
benefit. Tablers Buckaje Pile
Ointment 3SS2fB,d"b,uB6l,,'wlw
ASK YOUR DRUGGIST OR STORE-KEEPER.
Sent by mail in Tabes 75 cents, Bottles 50 ctt.
COUSSENS &TABLER MEDICINE CO.,
St. Louis. Mo.
Believe Your
HILDEEN
WORMS
CHILDREN. I't I l'Lv
or before you are aware very se
rious results may follow. If the
CONSTTTUTIOlf
be weakened in childhood
the body will not develop into
A PerPeet Man op Woman
A LIFE OF MISERY may be pre
vented by the timely use of
WHITES' CREAM VERMIFUGE
the PUREST and BEST medicine
that money can bay.
If ytmt ckildren are fretfaland peevisnsctswffl
restore tkeaa to health if 70m invest it m WHITES'
CREAM VERMIFUGE M sure to Drag ww
fnmawomv ckfld as water is to run dam 1
Hit
fiti There
riiic
Ask yasr Store-keeper or Dregsst.
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