OCR Interpretation


Albuquerque morning journal. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1903-1926, October 13, 1905, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of New Mexico

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84031081/1905-10-13/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

o
-..1
ALMJQUEBQUE MOKNING
V I
i
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, FRIDAY, OCTOBER IJ, 1905.
B' MICE 5 CENTS
STATESMEN
GO DOWN
JpiNE
Tawney and Parly See the
Sights in Tombstone.
ROYALLY ENTERTAINED IN
TUCSON AND PHOENIX
BANKERS
FAVOR
TO HANDLE
CASTROWITH
WES
France Will Be Patient But
Determined. 1
MOST RECENT LIKENESS OF RICHEST MAN IN THE WORLD
COMMITTEE
CENSURES
OFFICERS
For Unbusinesslike Manage
, WHO IS ALSO MOST TALKED OF MAN IN AMERICA
SUBSIDIES
To Build Up American Her
chant Marine.
ment of Fair.
n
After Trip Through Salt River Valley
to See Agricultural Possibilities
Visitors Go to
Prescott.
Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. 1? Tombstone
nd Tucson were visited today by the
congressional party Investigating
Statehood conditions In Arizona. At
Tombstone, under the leadership of
Frank M. Murphy, the mines of the
Tombstone Consolidated Mining Co.
were visited and the visitors were tak
en down the shaft eight hundred feet
and viewed a pumping plant which Is
lifting four million Rallona of water to
the surface every twenty-four hours.
Tombstone has an interesting history
and in the past has produced gold and
silver to the amount of more than
twenty million dollars.
The public schools were visited and
the visitors were much pleased with
their trip. The train reached Tucson
at noon. The visitors were met by a
. large iparty of citizens and were taken
for a drive to the Territorial University
and through the city. Lunch was
provided. The party arrived In Phoe
nix this afternoon and will remain
here 'tomorrow for a trip through the
Bait. River valley, going to Prescott
Saturday morning.
; The citizens of Phoenix are prepar
ing to give the congressmen every op
portunity to learn the agricultural
possibilities of this territory. Ail the
congressmen agree that many erron
eous stories have been reported In the
east concerning the industrial condi
tions in Arisona.
FILIPINOS YaÑT FREE
TRADE WITH AMERICA
LONG TALKS TO l'KKSIDENT OX
NEKPS OF IXSULAIt
POSSESSION'S.
' "Washington, OOrt. 12.--In the opinion..-
Senator Long, otí Kansas, who
made " the trip to the far east ' with
Secretary Taft and party, the greatest
need of the FIHplnos Is freer trade
with the United States. The senator
talked with th? president today about
the needs of the Philippines. He told
the president that In his Judgment the
islands would 'be In a serious financial
condition until a reduction of dues
on their products entering the United
States was made.
"Recently," said the senator, "The
Filipinos have suffered from typhoons
and drouth. As a consequence their
crops have either failed or been wiped
out and the people are becoming dis
contented. Their discontent does not
take a revolutionary form, but Is simp,
ly the result of existing conditions."
Senator Long discussed railroad leg
islation with the president briefly. He
expreesed the belief that the matter
would bo disposed of early In the ap
proaching session. -r
GARVIN fI'goVERNOR
0FC0iNNEC1I'CUT
FOHMF.lt EXECUTIVE UNANI
MOUSLY NAMED HY DEMO
CRATIC CONVENTION.
Providence, R. I., Olt. 12. Former
Governor L. A. C. Garvin was today
nominated for governor by acclama
tion by the democratic state conven
tion. The remainder of the ticket airo
was nominated by acclamation as
follows:
Lieutenant Governor James T
J
hurston, of Providence.
Secretary of State Frank E. Fitz-
slmmons, of Lincoln.
Attorney General Thomas A. Car
roll, of Providence.
General Treasurer Albert H. Oi
ney, of Providence,
COLORADO'S RECORD
UNEQUALLED IN WORLD
NEW CltUISEU'S (JUNNEKY SUIl
. PASSES ANY PREVIOUS PER
FORMANCE IN ANY NAVY.
Newport, R, I., Oct. 12. The re
markable success which attended the
recent target practice of the new
cruiser Colorado was hown In the fig
ures given out today by an officer of
the ship. It Is claimed that the rec
ord has never been equaled by a war
ship In the United States navy or by
any warship in the world.
, With the six-Inch breech-loading
gut ata range of 3.600 yards the tar
get being of triangular canvas, forty
hots were fired, and forty hits were
made. The percentage of accuracy
was 98 per cent. Ten shots were tired
, from each of the four eight-Inch
breech-loading rifles and but three
mirses were recorded.
Miss Cornolla Dow Dead.
Portland, Me., Oct. 12. Miss Cor
nelia M. Dow, a well known worker
in the field of charity, philanthropy
and reform, died at her home In this
city aged 63 years. She had held va
rious cftlces In the state and national
W. C. T. U. She we a daughter of the
late General Neal Dow. "
- .
Diplomado Appointments.
GuaUuiula city. Oct. 12. General
Plaza ha been appointed minister of
Guatemala to Mexico, Cuba, France,
It- v -rt Hwltzerland.
Senor Valverdo, former secretary of
f iiemn HIT ill's, has been nppolnted
minister at Kin Janeiro, Hrazll.
RESOLUTIONS ADOPTED BY
AN OVERWHELMING VOTE
National Association Will Use Influ
ence to Get Congress to Pass
Suitable law to Pro
duce Result.
Washington. Oct. 12. The Amerl
can Association of P.ankers today put
Itself squarely on record a3 favoring
government subsidies for the up-butld-
ing or the American merchant marine.
Resolutions reviewing the growth of
American commerce and the decline
in American shipping and pledging the
association to throw the weight of its
influence toward the enactment of a
ship subsidy law were presented by
the executive, council of the association
and adopted by a rising vote In which
It was estimated that three quarters of
the delegates took the affirmative side.
The report of 'the currency commit
tee was received, but no action taken
thereon. The report followed the
suggestions made yesterday by Secre
tary Shaw in his address before the
convention for an emergency currency.
The enthusiasm of the day was vent
ed on the shiip subsidy proposition. The
five enacting clauses of the resolution
are as follows:
"Resolved by the American Bankers
Association assembled:
"First That members of this as
sociation are deeply Interested in any
measure which will promote the in
terest of the whole country commerci
ally and industrially, and especially
with reference to our foreign com
merce. Second That we favor and most re
spectfully urge the passage by con
gress of some measure to foster and
encourage the up-building of our mer
chant marine, and give us back the
prestige upon the high seas which we
once enjoyed.
''Third That we favor the ship sub
sidy measure, which has received con
sideration ty congress, which, we
think, would tend to restore our flag
upon the seas and build up our mer
chant marine to the extent that the
necessities óf our -trade now and in
the future may demand.
-"Fourth That we recommend that
uur senators and congressmen favor a
Just and equitable measure that will
bring about results and afford the re
lief above suggested.
"Fifth That through our executive
committee we memorialize the senate
nd house of representatives with a
sopy of these resolutions."
WOULD INDICT OFFICERS
OFINSURANCECOMPANIES
NEW YORK MERCHANTS ASK JE
ROME TO INVESTIGATE FEA
SIBILITY OF ACTION.
New York, Oct. 12. The Merchants'
association of New York, through its
board of directors today adopted reso
lutions calling on the district attor
ney of New York county to ascertain
whether or not an Indictment can be
found against the officers of the life
Insurance companies who have con
tributed the funds of the company to
political campaigns. The association
ilso asks that civil action be Instituted
by the state attorney general looking
to the restitution of the money bo
contributed. In addition to the ad
option of the resolutions the Mer
chants association anounced that
District Attorney Jerome would be
requested to reconsider his determina
tion not to osk for a special session
of the grand Jury to consider the
matter at this time.
COLORADO MAY DEMAND
RECOVERY OF FUNDS
New York. Oct. 12. On behalf of
Thomas J. O'Donnell of Denver and
other Colorado policyholders of the
Mutual Life Insurance company, W.
H. Crisp, a lawyer of this city, today
wrote to Attorney General Meyer of
New York state, asking that he Insti
tute civil proceedings at once to com
pel the officers of the Mutual to make
restitution of the sum of $92,600
which they admit has been contribut
ed to political campaign commltees
in recent years. MrCrisp offers to
lend the attorney general any assist
ance he may desire in the matter.
WlRELESSTlLEORAPH '
FORPHILIPPINES
CHIEF SIGNAL OFFICER GREE
LEY DECIDES TO INSTALL
SYSTEM.
Washington. Oct. 12. General
Greeley, chief signal offirer of the ar
my, has decided to Install a wireless
telegraph systern between Zamboagno
and Jolo, Philippine Islands. The
strong tides that flow between the
islands wear the cables against the
coral mid they are frequently cut and
rendered useless. It Is expected that
the new system will 'be in operation In
about three months.
, Jobr-rt PlonliwiU'itflnry.
Washington, Oct. 12. Kmlle C. Jo
bert, who has been charge d'uffairs of
the Dominican republic for the past
year, was today presented to presi
dent Roosevelt as minister plenlpoten-
Uary' . v..-
Russian A lie un I,cad.
Washington. Oct. 12. The report
of the bureau of Immigration for Au
gust, Issued today, shows that (3,409
aliens landed during the month, as
compared with 69.777 for August,
1904. The greatest number arrived
from Russia, with Italy second and
Austria third.
ROOT-AND JUSSERAND
CONFER OVIR VENEZUELA
Both Governments Will Bide Their
" Time But Refractory Dicta
tor Must Come to
Terms.
Washington, Oct. 12. Venezuela
was the subject of an Important con
versation at the state department to
day between Secretary Root and Mr
Jusserand, French ambassador. The
latter has been awaiting the arrival
here of the report of Mr. Calhoun
American special commissioner, be
fore recommending to hi government
a course of action. Calhoun has re
ported verbally to the president and
the secretary, but he has not yet com
pleted his formal report on the condi
tions he found existing In Venezuela
Enough is known, however, to show
the similarity between the grievances
of the Paris and Washington govern
ments. Whether this similarity shall
find a corollary In a parallel action
on the part of the two governments to
right their grievances has not yet been
decided. France has informed the
United States that the course she has
shaped is one of extreme patience, but
of even greater firmness. It can be
announced that the French govern
ment has already -considered severa'
courses of action, nny one of which It
is believed would bring President Cas
tro to terms. None will be adopted,
however, until Secretary Root and Mr
Jusserand have further considered the
report of Calhoun. In the meantime
both governments will bide their time
letting It be known ( that both are
equally determined to obtain an early
Justice for their citizens.
MEXICAN CENTRAL STILL
IIASJTS TROUBLES
STATE AUTHORITIES ORDER THE
FIREMEN TO GO TO WORK OR
LEAVE JN TIIHEK DAYS.
Monterey. Mexico, Oct. '12.-i-Nl-
wlthstandlng the furnishing by the
governor of a number of rurales to
act as guards on the engines of the
Mexican Central for the protection of
any firemen that tlie company might
secure, the officials have nut yet suc
ceeded In resuming traffic. In all
probability there will be no change
for the next three days for the state
authorities have now taken the mat
ter In hand and have given the firemen
that length of time In which to decide
to return to work or get out of the
city.
ROCKEFELLER WANTS
ALL MEfTSJOOD WILL
FELLS CLFVEI-AXD CHURCH PEO
FIJ5 HIS IDEA OF HEAVEN
ON EARTH.
Cleveland, Oct. 12. John D. Rocke
feller told of the ambition of his life
In an address to the young people of
the Euclid avenue Baptist church. It
was, he said, to have good will to
ward all men. He declared that he
could not say too much to his hearers
on this subject, because if all worked
to those ends heaven would exist on
earth. v
Mr. Rockefeller's subject was In
troduced by the statement that he
had harvested three thousand bushels
of outs from his fields at Forest hill.
He declared that there were several
other crops which, if rightly tended.
would bring more satisfaction to the
workers than anything that came up
from the ground. He mentioned pa
tience and charity, sayjng they would
flourish in the paved streets of Cleve
land and New York equally well.
'The crop which I consider and
have always thought to be the most.
precious, he said, "Is the good will
of all mankind, bringing as It does
the greatest comfort to all mankind.
This is the most valuable thing to be
had on earth. I cannot say too much
to Impress this upon your minds."
William Rockefeller to Rest.
New York. Oct. 12. William Rock
efeller, a brother of John D. Rocke
feller, who went abroad last miring on
advice of his physicians, It Is an
nounced, may be obliged to remain
abroad the entire winter for his health.
His son. W. G. Rockefeller, said to
day there Is nothing serious in his
fathers condition but he was In
need of extended rest.
BANK CLERK FINDS
JOKE IS SERIOUS
MAN WHO JOSHED NATIONAL
CITY BANK INDK7TED FOR
LARCENY.
New York. Oct. 12. Harry A. Leon
ard, the young bank clerk, who took
1259.000 worth of securities from the
National City Bank by means of a
forged check, today was Indicted for
larceny In the first degree.
Teddys' Cousin Wol.
Chicago, Oct. 12. Andre Roosevelt,
of St. Louis, cousin of President Roose
veit, was married tonlghlt to Miss Ade.
lalde Lange.
Miss Lange, who Is a graduate In
acchHecture of the Zurich Polltechni
que, assisted In drawing the plans for
the mines buildings at the St. Louis
exposition, and It was while engaged
In this work that she met Mr. Roose
velt.
PRESIDENT TALKS
ABOUT OIL WITH
KANSAS MAN
Campbell Says Trust
Is
Badly Jolted.
SIX MILLIONS TO BUILD
' INDIPENDENT PIPE LINE
Washington, Oct. 12. Railroad
legislation and the oil situation, witli
special reference, to the middle west
field, were discussed today by the pres
ident and Representative Campbell, of
Kansas. Canvpliell talked briefly of
railroad rates and of the contest be
tween the state of Kansas anil the oil
combine.
He assured the president that the
people of Kansas stood squarely at his
back on the question of railroad leg
islation and there was no doubt he
would have the unqualified support of
the Kansas congressional delegation.
The president expressed Interest in
the oil situation.
A Gil-tit Oil Field.
"The middle wet has the greatest
oil field In the world." said Campbell.
T(ie prospects now are brighter for the
Industry than ever before. Independ
ent refineries are springing up over
the Held. Already two tire In operation
and several others will be tit work
within sixty days. The oil combina
tion never has had such a shock from
the people as It has recelve during
the past eight months. Hercrufore it
simply has overrun all competition or
Ignored it entirely. Now it Is obliged to
reckon with It. The Kansas oil pro
ducers are doing very well. An Inde
pendent pipe line has been llnanced
by Cuilnhy lirterests. It will exlend
from the Kaunas and Indian .Territory
fields to St. Louis, where a big refin
ery will ho erected.' ine pipo Une
enterprise will Involve mi' expenditure
of about $8.000,000 and all necessary
money has been provided. The price
of 'oil has gone up recently about 10
cents a barrel and producers In our
western fields are optimistic of the
future."
Simpson's Condition Unchanged.
Wichita, Kas.. Oct. 12. The poll
ution of Kx-Congressman Jerry Simp
son was unchanged today.
RUSSIA'S GREATEST LIBERAL
TROUBETSKOY IS DEAD
St. Petersburg, Oct. 12. Prince
Serlgus Trouhetskoy was stricken with
apoplexy tonight while attending a
conference with M. Olasoff, minister
of education. He died in two hours.
Prince Trobetskoy was regarded as
the foremost liberal of Russia. For u
long time he was president of the
semstvo congress of Moscow, nd
headed the delegation which last
June presented the petition of the all
Russian congress of semslvoists and
municipalities to Emperor Nicholas.
John. D. Rocke-felle-P
SAYS UNITARIANS ARE NOT
STRICTLY
Secretary of National Church Federation Gives Rea
sons for Excluding Denomination From Fellow
ship of Great Protestant Organization.
New York, Oct. 12. At a meeting of
the executive committer of the' inter-,
church '. conference on federation in
Ibis city today, it was decided to make
public the correspondence out of
which has grown the discussion on
the subject of the exclusion of the l"ni
tirian denomination from the confer
ence. The Inter-church conference
will be held In this city In November.
The American Unitarian association.
the national organization of the de
nomination, elected three delegates to
attend the conference, namely, Kd
ward Kverett Hale, chaplain of the
I'nlted States pénate; ex-Secretary of
the Navy John 1. Long, of Massachu
setts', and Dr. Samuel A. lvlllolt, who is
a son of President Klllott of Harvard.
Members of the executive committee
which was presided over by Rev, W, II.
Roberts, of Philadelphia, declare the
original teller of invitation was not
sent to the Unitarians, Universalista or
Rodman Catholics. Neither of the lat
ter two denominations. It was asserted,
has taken any action In the matter.
The correspondence given out In
cludes the original letter of Invitation
and I he text of letters exchanged be
tween Ilr. Klllott of the proposed Uni
tarian delegation, and Dr. K. H. San
ford, secretary of the National federa
tion of churches, who Is acting for the
Inter-church conference. Dr. Klllott
said that as the free Christian church
es were Included In. the membership
of the stute federations of Massachu
setts and Rhode Island, the Unitarians
had .imiinied the general Invitation to
the Inter-church conference included
that denomination. Dining the. sum
mer, however, he had learned that the
Unitarians might not be welcomed,
and he wrote to ask if these rumors
had any JusMllcatlon.
Dr. Klllott declared it was Impos
sible for him to believe that the com
ing conference would exclude repre
sentatives of the churches that stand
particularly for the unsectarlan prin
ciple In American religious llfn. Dr.
Klliott called attention to the person
nel of the Unitarian delegation, say
lg that ex-Secretary Long and Dr. Hale
On September 15 last he was cleete.l
rector of the University of Moscow
by a largn mnjorlty, being the first
elected head of a Russian university,
since 18H0 when the government as
sumed the right of nomination, Tho
election of the prlnc removed him
from the list of candidates for tin
national assembly, in which It was
hoped he would be one of the prom
inent leaders and perhaps its presi
dent. Tho prince was a marshal of lh
nobility.
EVANGELICAL
werf among (he most beloved and
trusted of Christian leaders.
llaurord's Reply.
Replying to this letter, Secretary
II infoic.1 wrote:
"The committee of correspondence
felt constrained to limit to some extent
the sending out of Invitations to de
i.omluatlonat bodies asking them toap.
point delegates to the coming inter
church conference on federation. This
action was taken after very serious con
sideration, and I am contldent that the
committee would decline to reopen
the dixcundon of the matter. I need
scarcely add that this decision was In
no way personal.
"Surely there are few persons In our
American life whom we all delight to
honor more than those you mention.
Your regret cannot be more sincere
than that of the committee on corre
spondence that the way did-not seem
clear to Invite your national associa
tion to appoint delegates to the confer
ence." It was stated today that the letter ol
Dr. Sanfoid had been formally ap
proved by the executive committee.
Dr. Roberts1 made the following state
ment about the matter:
"The Invitation to the conference
were Issued to churches which it was
felt were1 in sufficient agreement with
one another to secure results In the
line of federation. The work of Issu
ing the Invitations and organising tihe
conference has been under way for twe
years. There Is no purpose to antago
nize any church but to bring together
for the discussion of plans of co-operation,
such of the churches as are
now In done Christian fellowship, and
for the attainment of great moral and
spiritual ends.
"The conference represents elgh
Urn million communicants and at
least fifty millions of adherents of the
distinctly protestant and evangélica
grouts of Christian churches. Unltar
lans do not belong to this group. Thlt
Is a suflli lent reason why they were
not Invited. We respect highly the
gentlemen appointed by the Unitarians
as delegates, but do not feel that theli
presence in the conference would be
helpful to the Interests involved."
( .ludge I'iixson Dead.
Philadelphia. Pa.. Oct. 12. Former
Chief Justice Kdward M. Puxson, of
tho Pennsylvania supremo court, died
today at his home In Ilycot, I'a. Ills
death was due to a complication cf
diseases. He was a native of Penn
sylvanla. 81 years of age. In early life
ho published newspapers In Newto.i
Pa., and here. He was a member of
the supreme bench . from 1874 to
lx3, resigning to accept the receiver
ship of the Reading railroad.
Suicide Under Cloud.
Philadelphia. Pa., Oct. 12. Arml
tage Matthews, secretary of the re
publican rounty committee, committed
suicido this morning hy'jurnplng from
a winuow or bis residence. Ills tria
on the charge of looting the Wiesse
estate was to have begun today. The
case grew out of tin, wrecking of a
reuerai bank.
TOTAL DEFICIT MOUNTS IP TO
NEARLY FIVE THOUSAND DOLLARS
Exhaustive Report of Iovestifatln;
and Auditing Committee Adopted
Unanimously by Executive
Board.
The executive commitee of the Ter
ritorial Fair association held a meet
ing last night at which the report of
the special auditing and investigating;
committee which was appointed to
look Into the management of this
year's fair was presented. After the
report had been taken up In sections
and carefully considered, It was
unanimously adopted as presented
with the exception of a few minor
changes.
The report, which was a severe ar
ralgnment of the fair management,
when first read was unanimously
adopted as a whole. The vote was
then reconsidered and the report was
taken up seriatim, discussed in its de
tails and adopted, with a few of Its
more pungent paragraphs toned down
slightly.
Having the situation concisely re
duced to dollars and cents and th
whole matter clearly summarized, the
next question which arose was as to
what steps to take toward placing the.
association on Its feet, preparatory to
undertaking a fair next year.
The now famous deficit was dis
cussed from nil sides and suggestions
made as to the best plan to pursuo
under the circumstances with a view
to paying the bills outstanding and
making a fresh start. No conclusion
was arrived at however, and another
meeting will probably be held today
to consider the mutter further.
Those present at the meeting were
President W. H. (Ireer. secretary D.
K. B. Sellers, George A mot and J. It.
Herndon, officers: and Felix H. Lester,
P. F. McCanna, W. T. McCrclght, D.
A. Macpherson, George P. Leurni.r 1,
Maynard Gunsul, Joe Harnett, Fu
A. Hubbell. O. N. Marrón, M. Nubu
and Scott Knight.
The report of the committee ns
adopted , last night wua In full as
follows:
The Coininlttwn Hcit.
,To-tJirt Kxerutive .Cpmmlttee of . the .
Twenty-fifth Annual TcrrltorUil
Fair:
Gentlemen. We, your committee,
chosen for the purpose of nuditlng tho
books and accounts and examining
into the management of the Twenty
fifth Annual Territorial fair, beg leave
to submit the following report:
we have examined all the accounts,
ouchers, checks, books and records
of the said association for the 1905
tair, and have also taken the testl
ony of various witnesses. Including the
testimony of tho president, W. H.
ireer, and the secretary. D. K. II.
Sellers, relative to all matters pertain
ing to the management of the said fair
and after a thorough and complete In
vestigation your committee finds as
follows.
We find that the association for tho
year 1804 received Tor the bar privi
leges the sum of Í276; for the peanut,
popcorn, candy and soft drink privi
lege, the sum of $150. and for the
lunch privilege the sum of $30, mak
ing a total of $455. We also find
that none of these privileges were sold
this year, nnd that they should hav
netted the association at least an equal
imount, nnd that the secretary should
be censured for his failure to dispose
of same. We further find that these
privileges were used this year by thn
Casino Amusement company, which
is owned by Mr. W. H. Greer, without
iny intention of paying the associa
tion for the use of the same, and we
recommend that the Casino Amuse
ment company be compelled to pay u
reasonable amount for their use.
We find thut the managers of pre
vious fairs have been able to secure us
much as six hundred dollars from out
side sources for stake races, and that
the Spring Racing association secured
$1,475 for such races, and we further
find that the proper effort was not
made this year to secure such races,
and that the president and secretary
ihould be censured for grossly ne
glecting this feature.
We find that the secretary should
he censured for contracting and pay
ing $40 for two motor cycle races,
when the sentiment of the executlva
committee was clearly and emphati
cally expressed against it.
We find that it was the expressed
policy of the president and the sec
retary of the association to make con
tracts for various features of the fair.
without advising or consulting with
the executive committee regarding the
same, and we further find that the
only appropriations authorlxed by thf
executive committee were those for
base ball, bicycle races and fruit ex
hibits. We find that the president and the
secretary should have followed th
policy adopted by the managers of
previous fiirs arid waited until all bills
ugalnst thrt association had been pro
rented, burring hills for purses, prism
and labor, sn that It could be deter
mined whether they could be paid In
full, and we further find that there
are at present checks outstanding to
the amount of $712.16, issued to par
ties outside the city, for which there
are no funds in the hank, and that
several of these checks have been pre
sente'd for payment and payment re
fused and the credit of the association
greatly injured thereby.
We find that the secretary of the
association should not have drn'n
$360 of his salary before the fa r
week, and before It could be 'deter
mined whether all bills against thl
association could be paid In full.
We find that the secretary was ex
travagant In ordering goods shipped
by express, which should have been
shipped by freight.
We nnd that the mbscrlptiim li"t
this year was not as large as It
siluulu have been, und that the proper
! .

xml | txt