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Albuquerque morning journal. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1903-1926, October 17, 1905, Image 1

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AJUBÜQUMEQUJE: MOBMIMCr JOUMNA?
TWENTY-SEVENTH YEAR
ALBUQUERQUE, NEW MEXICO, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, If 05.
Br KoS Mv" PCE 5 CENTS
STANDARD
GETS ABOUT
ALL PROFITS
Waters-Pierce Oil Company
But a Figurehead.
:V '
TWO-THIRDS OF EARNINGS
"WAIT. TILL HE TRIES LEADING AN ORCHESTRA The Kaiser
BURTON'S
TRIAL IS
RESUMED
Kansas Senator Appears in
St. Louis Court.
WARDROBE
COST HIM
A MILLION
Prince Philip Wants Divorce
at Once.
. , Vrl- TOfTlr
. - ATM iV H0tr' V 1 i I i
. GO TO JOHN ROCKEFELLER
Attorney for he Missouri Branch of
the Trust Goes to Jail
oo the Charge of
Contempt.
St. Louis, Oct. 16. Inquiry Into the
affairs of the Standard, Republic, and
Water-Pierce oil companies wa.i
reached here today,
AYnong the principal witnesses sum
moned were C. H. Pierce, president of
the Waters-Pierce company; C. H.
Ackert, C. D. Ackert, and A. II. Find
lay, officers of the company, and
President Reyer of the Republic Oil
company. The hearing is being con
ducted by Attorney General Bradley
, on the grounds of alleged violation of
the anti-trust statutes.
Evidence that two-thirds of the
profits of the Waters-Pierce Oil com
pany are paid to the Standard Oil
company annually, was brought out In
the Inquiry today. H. Clay Pearce,
until recently president of the com-
pany. It was said, received monthly
dividends amounting to 28 to 50 per
cent on 397 shares, or all but four
of .- the Waters-Pierce company, and
his secretary sends two-thirds of this
amount to the Standard.
Immediately after the hearing
Charles M.'. Adams, secretary of the
Waters-Pearcecampany, who had been
on the witness stand during the after
noon, was constructively placed under
arrest on a contempt charge.
. After Mr. Adams had readily an
swered questions relative to his official
position with the Waters-fierce com
pany, Attorney General Hadley asked
Mr, Adams to name 4he stockholders
of. the company, lie declined to re
ply. '
' In defending the witness' course,
his counsel stated that the witness
might by his answer subject himself
and others to legal proceedings, and
that he had the constitutional right
not to answer.
' ."Then I ask that ho be committed
to custody," said the att'orney general,
"And you can apply for a writ of hab
eas corpus, which will give an oppor
tunity for a left of this question in
court." .
OHIO BANKING
INSTITUTION CLOSED
' lUCMXT OF ACTION kiV ATTOR
NEY GF.NEHAL FOR VIOLATION
OF STATE I-AWS.
Cleveland, O., Oct. 16. The Indem
nity Savings & Loon company, a bank
ing house in Superior street, failed to
open Its doors today. The following
notice was posted at the entrance:
"This company has made assignment
for the benefit of its creditors to H.
R. Sanborn, who will maae a financial
statement as soon as an Inventor)' can
be made."
The concern was one against which
Attorney General Bliss began quo
warranto proceedings In the circuit
court on Saturday last, with a view of
preventing the company continuing
business in this state. The attorney
general charges that the company vio
lated the.Jtate banking laws. H. It.
8anborn Is president of the company.
The officers of the Institution de
clare that It Is absolutely solvent and
the depositors can readily be .paid In
full. They also state the attorney
general's action was without due
cause.
" Sweden linn New Flag.
Stockholm, Sweden. Oct. 16. The
union , between Norway and Sweden
existing since 1S14, has been dissolved,
. both houses of the Rtksdag having
passed the government bill repealing
the act of union and recognizing Nor
way, "as a state separate from union
with Sweden." Both houses subse
quently passed a new flag. The flag
, will be a yellow cross on a blue
ground, the same as existed prior to
1114, the union mark now showing In
the upper left hand corner being
eliminated. .
r He Stands forCliurlty.
New Haven, Conn.. Oct. 1Í. Rev.
George H. Ferris, pastor of the Bap
tin church, declined yesterday to be
a delegate to the coming meeting of
the, Federated Churches In Philadel
phia, because of the refusal to admit
Unitarian churches. He declared
such an action uncharitable and un
christian. THREE DEAD IN
CALIFORNIA WRECK
DAMTARDLY WORK OF CRIMI
NAL IN TRF SOI'THKRN PACI
FIC YARDS AT FRESNO.
Bíkcrsfleld. Cal.. Oct. 16. The
northbound Owl train. No. 25. was
wrecked at the yard entrance at Fres
no nt 1:30 this morning. Engineer
Cole, Fireman Butts and an unknown
tramp were killed. The wreck was
due to a misplaced switch, the work
of criminals. The lock was broken
with a rock which wua found near
the switch. '
Seventeen Hurt In Colorado Wreck.
Pueblo, Colo., Oct. 16. Seventeen
persons were injured, one perhaps fa
tally, by the wrecking of the west
bound Missouri Pacific passenger
train No. 7 nt Kltburn. sixty-nine
miles east of Pueblo at 6:30 thlr
morning. The accident whs caused by
a ;ireudlng of the rails. The last
three cars of the train, the Pullman
sleeper, tourist sleeper snd a day
conch wsre overturned. The most se
riously Injured was W. J. Windle, of
Salem, Kan., who may die.
FOLK APPEALS FOR
GOOD GOVERNMENT
Governor of Missouri Urges Clean People of Phila
delphia to Persevere in Great Fight for
Elimination of Graft.
"THERE IS MORE AGRKSSIVK IIOTTENNFSK '.X); M?SS AGRES-
SIVE PATRIOTISM IN OUR LARGE
IF THE PATRIOTISM CAN BE MADE AS AGGRESSIVE AS THE ROT
TENNESS, THE PROBLEM OF GOOD GOVERNMENT WOULD RE
SOLVED BY THE PEOPLE TAKING THE GOVERNMENT INTO THEIR
OWN HANDS.
"IF CORRUPTION IS TO HE ERADICATED. TH E PEOPLE
ALONE CAN DO IT.
"THE MAN WHO IS WILLING TO LIVE FOR HIS CITY AND STATE
EVERY DAY IS THE MAN THAT ISXEEDED JUST NOW.
"THERE MAY . BE Jl ST AS MICH PATRIOTISM IX GIVING
ONE'S TIME TO THE BETTERMENT OF CIVIC CONDITIONS AND
ELECTION OF GOOD MEN TO OFFICE AND PURIFYING THE BAL
LOT AS IX BARING ONE'S BREAST TO THE BULLETS OF THE
ENEMY." From Governor Folk's Speech at I'hiladclihla.
Philadelphia, Pa., Oct. 16. The
great battle between the republican
organization and the city party, the
municipal reform organization re
cently formed here, was enlivened to
day by the visit of Governor Folk, of
Missouri, who came to lend his voice
in the interest of good government.
He spoke under the auspices of the
City club, which claims no connection
wtth the City party. Governor Folk
had an exceedingly busy day, and his
reception wherever ne appeared dur
ing the day and evening was a flutter
ing one.
The crowd that attempted to gain
entrance to the Academy of Music to
night was so great that the door
were closed before the meeting began
Several thousand persons who could
not get In, were addressed by City par
ty speakers. While the curb stone
mass meotlng was In progress. Gov
ernor Folk arrived, and the assem
blage could not permit him to enter
the building until he had addressed
them. He ' made a short speech.
When he entered the academy "the au
dience stood up to welcome him.
With him on the stage were Governor
Burham, Jr., president of the City
club: former Postmaster General
Charles Emory Smith, former United
States Attorney General Wayne Mc-
Veagh. William Power, and aDoui a
hundred other citizens of prominence.
Mayor Weaver occupied a proscenium
box and waa given a warm welcome
when he appeared.
President Burnnam in explaining
the objects of the club, said the or
ganization was allied to no party, that
It neither endorsed nor named candi
dates, but stood ready to help any
genuine movement for' good govern
ment. He presented wayne mc
Veaah. who made a brief speech, In
troducing Governor Folk.
Governor Folk said In pari:
"The most conspicuous fact of mu
nicipal governments In the Unltea
States today Is that they are govern
ments by' the few. and not by the peo
ple. There Is more aggressive rotten
ni and Itss aearessive patriotism in
our large cities than anywhere else.
If the natr otlsm can be maae as ag
gressive as the rottenness, the problem
of good government would be solved
by the people taking tne government
Into their own hands. If corruption
exlfts In Philadelphia, the people are
to blame: if corruption Is to be eraai-
cated the people alone can do it. The
fight you are making is a batue wnicn
will be felt by every town, city ond
state. The benefit of a victory ior
good government will be universal and
the evil effects of a defeat will demor
alize those who believe In good gov
ernment by the people. The average
man does not appreciate the solemn
duty he owes his city, state and his
country;
"The moral revolution now sweep
ing over the land means the patriot
Ism that comes from the heart, not
from he head. Many men would be
willing. If ' need be, to give up their
lives for their city or state If they are
needed, sometimes, and this kind of
patrltm cannot be too highly com'
CITIES THAN ANYWHERE EI .HE.
mended, but the man who Is willing to
live for his city and state every day
Is the man that is needed just now.
There may be as much patriotism in
giving one's time to the betterment of
civic conditions and the election of
good men to offices and purifying the
ballot, as in baring one's breast to the
bullets of an enemy. There never
was a time when the need for patriotic
men in public affairs was greater than
now. . We need more men actuated
alone by the public good and fewer of
those who are In politics merely for
revenue."
Cyril Suffer for Ills Mnrrlnge.
St. Petersburg, Oct. 16 The official
Messenger today published the offi
cial imperial ukase dated October 15
dismissing the Grand Duke Cyril
from the service because of his recent
marriage to the Princess Victoria, the
divorced wife of the Grand Duke of
Hesse. The ukaxe also deprives the
grand duke of his decorations and
other honorB.
EX-GOVERNOR OF COLORADO
UNDER SERIOUS CHARGE
Council Bluffs, la., Out. 16. An at
tack on the professional conduct of
former Governor C. S. Thomas of Col
orado, an attorney In the noted Port
land mining suit for stocks and divi
dends to the value or 11.000,000, is
contained In an affidavit by J. Ii.
ninchoff, of Colorado Springs, which
has Just been filed here. lilschon
charges In effect that Mr. Thomas
suggested the alteration of the Port
land Gold Mining company's records
In order to prevent James Doyle, the
pli'liitirf, In the case, from recovering
2.000 sbarea that the books allowed
were his property.
MISSOURI'S INSURANCE .
MAN DEMANDS TO BE SHOWN
Jefferson City, Mo., Qct. 16. W." D.
Vandtver, superintendent of the state
Insurance department,1 tonight sent
an official communication to the St.
LouU attorneys of the New York Life
Insurance company. In which he as
sumes that a letter received from
them I an answer to his demand
that there be on Immediate change In
the management and that certain mo
neys refunded If the company Is to
be allowed to continue Jn business
In Missouri.
PRINCE CHARLES
OF DENMARK TO BE
Believed He Will Accept
the Vacant Throne.
SEPlif LICANS URGE A
ANS URGE A
GOVERNMENT BY THE PEOPfR
Christiana. Norway. Oct. 16. King
Oscar's official refusal of the offer of
Hip Norwegian throne for a prince of
the House of Uernadotte is expected
tomorrow, when the government .will:
Immediately ask the Storthing' to
authorize an invitation to Prince
Charles of Denmark to become king.
It is wild that the reply whl be fa.v
orahle and that immedlatelv upon its
receipt the Storthing will proceed to
his election.
The republicans are making des
perate efforts to secure a plebiscite.
Tonight they published a manifesto
tirotcstlng against tho election of a
king and favoring n -epubllcun form
of government, it is understood that
republicans now I com ol 30 votes in
thie Storthing, 4ii)d It is feared that
Prince Charles Will di cllno if the re
publican minority s sufficiently
strong to be wfnthy r consideration
In government i circle J however. It is
declared that Vfie opstlon will be
settled before thff-rfid of the preseit
wpfik.
Denies Hiding J lis Brother.
New York. Oct. 16. Denial was
made yesterday by Herman Schlffer
that his brother, Abraham, who was
conecled with the defunct bank in
Alamosa, Colo., was hiding In Schlf
fer's house In this city. Herman
Schlffer said he had not seen hi
brother sinco September 2Sth and
that ho did not know where he was.
In the trial of the Portland suit last
spring. Bischoff was a witness for
James F. nurns. the defendant, having
previously served as a private secre
tary to Burns and also as bookkeeper
of the company. He now states that
he had a conversation with Burn and
Thomas over the 2,000 shares. Thom
as la quoted as saying: "That Is em
barrassing for us, and I will never be
satistled until the stock ledger Is re
written'.' Bischoff claims Thomas Intimated to
him that he was the only man compe
tent to re-wrttn the ledger, as the
original was In his hand-writing.
Mr. Vandlver' letter says that the
communication from the Insurance
company's attorneys Is neither a de
nial or on admission of the facts
which he alleged In hls letter to the
company, and states that under a de
cision of the supreme court, the Mis
souri superintendent of Insurance has
the absolute authority to act In the
matter. Mr. Vandlver offers to give
another hearing to the representa
tive of the New York Life Wednes
day or Thursday.
-From the New York Herald.
SEAMEN TELL A '
HARROWING TALE
OF SHIPWRECK
Six
of Eight Castaways
Died of Thirst.
TWO SURVIVORS REACH PORT
ArTER HEART BREAKINÓSTItlP
Boston. Mums.. Oct. 18. A story of
a .orti .tiaiillc shipwreck In which
eight Hciiiiicii suffered so fearfully
from evMsine, hunger and thirst
that six of them either dlexl outright,
were washed away or, mixed by tlielr
fearful cxHTlcnee, threw themselves
Into the sen. whs told Unlay by the
two survivors of the coasting schoon
er Vim Name and King of New Hav
en, which wns beaten to pieces by n
gale off the South Carolina coast on
October 0.
The two men who lived through
tht five days and were rescued by the
schooner Stillman of the Kelly, which
arrived here late today, are William
Thomas und William G. Warner, both
about 39 years old, six feet three
Inches tall and hall from ' Antigua,
British West Indies. The six, who one
by one succumbed, were:
Captain William A. ' Maxwell, of
New Jersey; Mate, K. A. Chase, home
unknown; colored seamen, Wllilim
Orlswell Hnd Alfred Arthur, both ol
America.
The Van Name and King which has
been plying up and down the coast
since 1 KK6, left Charleston, S. C, 'or
New York on October 4 with a carsro
of hard pine. Two days later she ran
Into a heavy galo and after wallowing
about in the great seaa for several
hoors sprang a leak. The pumps wire
started, but within a short time the
engine room waa flooded and the
pumps choked. ,
At 8 o'clock on the morning of Oc
tober n, wltn her hold full of water.
the little-schooner whs hove down on
her beam ends. ,
The crew clambered up on he
weathef side and lashed themselves
to the bulwarks. There they remain
ed, washed by the was that broke
mercilessly over them, all day Friday.
That night the storm Increased in
rury and one (great wave crashed
aboard, breaking' both legs Of Snu
man Arthur and sweeping Grlswell
from his fastenings. Arthur's cam
panlnos could no nothing to ease hi
sufferings, but when on Saturday the
scnuoner turned completely over
they managed to cut his lashings ind
drag hlrn on a place of the after
house. It was several hours befare
they were ail huddled together on
their little raft. That night Arthur
died In the arms of Captain Maxwell,
and "his body was dropped overboard.
Sunday brought a ray of hope when
a craft was alghted, but the gloom
shut in again as she passed by with
out heeding the little group of sea
men who frantically signalled her.
That night the waves subsided and
a lltlie rain fell which was eagerly
caught in. a tarpaulin und brought
foine relief. It was only temporary
and not long after Mate Chase's mind
gave way entirely and the craft wa
again lightened when he Jumped In
to '.he sea.
The next victim was Captain Max
well, who on Monday forenoon be
came violently Insano and followed
his mate's example of self-destruction
ns h relief to his sufferings.
The spectacle of two men throwing
themselves Into the sea proved too
much for the German engineer and a
few hours after Captain Maxwell'
death he too leaped to his death.
The last victim, was the head atew
nrd who died Monday and whose body
wua consigned to the waters by the
two remaining seamen.
Relief came twelve hours later
wi.nr, the schooner Stillman of the
Kelly, bound up coast from Ceylon
lia., in this port, sighted the little
craft and hove to alongside.
ARGUMENT ON DEMURRER TO
SENSATIONAL INDICTMENT
Counsel for Defense Seeks to Show
Postoffice Department Without
Authority to Make
Investigation.
St. Louis, Oct. 16. The hearing of
arguments by Judge Van Deventer In
the L'nlted States circuit court on the
demurrer of United States Senator
Burton, of Kansas, to the indictment
charging him with having used his
Influence In behalf of the Kialto Grain
and Securities company, of St. Louis,
before the postofllce department, was
begun today. Mr. Burton was re
manded last spring after his case had
been sent back by the supreme court.
md the Indictment charges him with
knowingly receiving a compensation
while a United States senator for ser
vices rendered In a case then pending
in which the government waa inter
ested.
Attorney Haynes, of Chicago, coun
sel for Burton, declared today that
the Indictment fails to charge that
Burton knew of the case then pending
against the Rlalto Grain company. Hi
contended that the word "knowingly"
in the Indictment only extends to the
question of his having accepted a com
pensation, and that it cannot be ex
tended o an allegation that Burton
knew of the case pending.
Attorney Haynes argued further
that while the Indictment charges that
Senator Burton agreed to receive com
pensation for his services, It does not
et out wMh whom he agreed. The In-
lictment, he argued, does not specif.v
is to the services rendered or wlien
the services were to be rendered.
it Is alleged by the Indictment.
Haynes stated, that the question being
Investigated by the postofllce depart
ment was whether the Hialto Grain
company had violated section 6180 ol
the criminal statutes. The only power
that makes such an Investigation pos
sible, he argued. Is a court, and If the
postoffice department vas makine
such an Investigation It was without
right.
Senator Burton was In court and sat
quietly beside his counsel.
IRVING TOlÍÉWITH
ENGLAND'S MOUS DE ID
GltllAT AtTOIl'S Itl.M IS TO BF
PUUKD IN WF.STMJN1STKH
ABBF.Y.
London. Oct. 16. The Dean of
Westminister, Very ltev. Joseph Arm
itage Hoblnson, announced this even
ing that having a request signed by
leading members of the dramatic pro
fession and other persons of distinc
tion, he had consented to the Inter
ment of the body of Sir Henry Irv
ing In Westminster Abbey. Baron
es Burdett-Coutts, who for many
vears had been a friend of Sir Henry,
besides signing the request to the
dean haa offered to place her house In
St rat ton street, Piccadilly, at dispos
al of the Irving family on the day of
the funeral.
DECLINE ADVANCE
THE CASEOF POWERS
I'NITKD STATUS SCPItFMF. COFKT
HKITSFS TO Fl ltTIII.lt F.XPF.
D1TK KKNTFCKY II KA KING.
Washington, Oct. 16. A motion to
advance the hearing in the case of Gú
state of Kentucky vs. James How
ard, convicted of complicity to mur
der Governor Oobcl made In the su
preme court of the United States last
Tuesday, was today denied by the
court. Tho case already has an ad
vanced place on the docket and (prob
ably will be heard In December In the
regular course of business,
Inter-Slate Water Suit Set.
Washington, Oct. 16 The supreme
court of the United States today
named October 2nd, 1 906. as the date
for the argument of the Irrigation an It
of Kansan against Colorado. The
Kansas authorities are to have three
months from date to file their brief,
those of Colorado three months mnro
and those of tho United States still
three month more.
japaneseTmperor
PKOPI.F Mil', COI D TO THF.
CHIF.F OF Till" PFACi;
COMMISSION.
Tokio, Oct. 16. The empror show
ed exceptional honor to Baron Ko
mura and at the close of the audience
the emperor presented him with a writ
ten personal message, a thing highly
prized hy Japanese statesmen. The
message expressed satisfaction at the
fact that peace was concluded and
commended Komura's uble services as
shown during the negotiations.
Cold Itct-cpHdi, From people.
Tokio, Vcl. 16. Baron Koinura
foreign minister, who acted for Japan
has arrived here from Vancouver, B
C. His1 reception at the railroad sta
tion was not enthusiastic, thofte pres
cnt being principally government dig
nitaries. The streets were strongly
guarded by troops, police add gen
darmes. Tho baron drove to the pal
ace in tne imperial carriage.
Sovereign I 'over Must Hule.
Tokio, Oct. lí. M. Terabutchl. min
ister of war, has Issued an order 1n
stroctlng the Japanese army in the
field to abstain from i-rttlclsing the
terms or peace, on the grounds that
the declaration of peace and of war
are entirely the outcome of the ov-
ereign power.
V,
PRINCESS HAD 60 PARASOLS
AND ONE HUNDRED HATS
One Hundred and Ninety Five Pairs
of Shoes, a Few Admirers
and Half Million
of Debts.
Gotha, Du.'hy of Saxe-Coburg and
Gotha, Oct. 16. The suit brought by
Prince Philip of Suxe-Coburg and
Gotha for an absolute divorce from
his wife, Princess Louise and for an
adjustment of their Joint property In
terests, began here today before the
ordinary court for the trial of divorce
cases ,the prince having waived his
technical right to have the case tried
by a special court as provided for un '
der tho laws of his family.
Both principals were absent, but
the Austrian officer, Lieutenant Keg
levitch Mattnslch, with whom the
princess eloped, was present. The
court asked of the prince's attorneys
If they wished to make any motions.
They replied that the prince had .o
objection to the proceedings being
DUblic. The attorneys for tno prin
cess also declined to require privacy.
Sn-k Amicable Separation.
The president then began the pro
ceedings by proposing to the lawyer
that the two parties seek to bring
about a reconciliation, explaining that
this wad not meant to get the prin
cess or prince to live together again,
but to agree to an amicable separa
tion and satisfactory agreement re
garding the property. The lawyera
agreed to take the matter under con
sideration nml asked for an Intermis
sion for that purpose.
The prince's lawyers said l'i
prince asked for an absolute divoi
In order to secure a complete separ
ation of the couple.
During the recess the lawyera
agreed to an arrangement on the fol
lowing basis:
The prince to guarantee the pay
ment to the princess of a yearly al
lowance of $1S, 000 and also to pay to
her a lump sum of 130,000, provided
she abandon all of her rlalm against
the irlneu and that titer the di
vorce she adopt the name and title of
Louise, Princes of Belgium.
After these terms were laid before
the court, a recess was taken In or
der that tho princess might be tele
graphed for her consent to the agree
ment. Inter In the day the lawyers for the
princess attacked tho competence of
the court to decide the case at all.
The court then adjourned until Oc
tober 30 to study the question of Its
competence, to got an answer from
Princesa Louise and to settle the ap
plicability of the Austrian law to
Prince Philip's agreement that the
court avoid raising the question as
to which party Is guilty.
The tiriiH-e's bill of complaint be
sides allegln- the princess' miscon
duct with Keglcvitcli MattaslHch, says
that although the princess received
yearly allowance she bad contracted
debts which In 1H05 amounted to
7II.HI2 or which the mince has ald
S'JIH.OOO, and that In ber wanlrolK
were found 75 pair of silk shoe, 120
pairs of other shoes, 0 parasols and
about 100 bats.
carnegieTheIero
0FST. ANDREWS
STFIX MAGNATK AND DISTIN-
GI ISIIKD AMKHICANS TO UK
CFJVK HONORAHY JF.GHFJ.
St. -Andrews, Scotland, Oct. 16.
Andrew Carnegie, who will tomorrow
igaln bp Installed as lord rector of the
University of St. Andrews, arrived
here this afternoon, accompanied by
Charlemagne Tower. American ambas,
sudor at Berlin, and Mrs. Tower, and
by Stephen H. Potter of New York.
The students, wealing their scarlet
gowns, were assembled at the station
ind detached the horses from Mr.
Carnegie's carriage, which they
Iragged through the streets to the
residence of Dr. James Donaldson.
vice chancellor and principal of the
university. Tonight the students held
torchlight procession and visited
the houses of the president and of Mr.
Donaldson. Mr. Carnegie briefly ad
dressed the students.
Whllelaw Held, ambassador to Great
Britain, will arrive here tomorrow.
Following the Installation of Mr.
Carnegie, the University of St. An
drews will confer honorary degrees
of Doctor of Laws on Mr. Carnegie.
Mr. Heed. Mr. Tower. Bishop Pottor.
Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, president
of Columbln university, of New York;
and Dr. William J. Holland, director
of the Carnegie museum at Pitts
burg.
Blackmailer Falls to Show Up.
New York,. Oct. 16. Charles Ahle,
who was Indicted last Friday on the
Irharge of attempting to extort money
last summer by attempting to. sell,
subscript lo.is of the American rimart
Sot for $500 to Edwin M. Post, failed
to appear In the court of genersl ses
sions today, and his ball was declared
forfeited. Ahle'a lawyer told tne
Judge he did not know whet his cli
ent had gone.
The lawyer was given until wedtn -
day to And Ahle.
JKIlllY SIMPSON IS
N FAIt THK KND
Wichita. Kas Oct. 16.- Kx-
Congressman Jerry Simpson was
very low tonight. The hemor
rhage attack today wat unusually
severe and left him In a ery
weak condition. He Is unable to
take nourishment of any kind.
Slight hemorrhages have orcurr-
ed this evening at frequent Inter-
vnls.
'
J

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