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Albuquerque morning journal. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1903-1926, July 02, 1917, CITY EDITION, Image 2

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Albuquerque Morning Journal, Monday, July 2, 1917.
Woman Lawyer Who Showed Up New York Police,
WHEN YOU NEED
Girl Murder Victim, and Italian Who I Wanted
I! HARDWARE!
n SOCIALISTS
MARCH ill -PEACE
sue i , 'mwIiiwiiii;, m.m mmnLamifl.-vsa;,-! i .... t ---
OF FRANCE GREET
CALL ON US
Oin STOCK IS LARGE OVK PRICKS AM) SERVIOK WILL
PLEASE YOl'.
RIOTS BREAK OUT
MAIMED SOLDIERS
GENERAL
PERSHNG
5 !
i.
i 1
f
if.
a
1 it
" si V
i Raabe &
"if" IT'S HRIVARi: AVE II WE IT."
rilOXE U.
Stock in
Little Bobbie
Mining Co.
l.s a good iitestnieiit be
in use a , few dollars in
vested in this stock may
make you financially In
l liendenl fnp life, .js
nothing givci tn''li largo
returns uh u good min
ing Investment, ami this
In onr.
S. J. KINNEY
1130 West Mountain Road
Albuquerque, - - N. M.
TO
Graduates From Eighth Grade
, in Rural Schools of New
Mexico Show an Increase of
Forty per Cent.
ttPieiAL emnitPONDiNCi to mornins journal
Santa Fe, July 1. Graduates from
the eighth grade In the rural schools
of New Mexico during the past school
year show on increase of 40 per cent
over the total of the previous year,
according to a compilation Just com
pleted toy the department of educa
tion. Reports from all rural schools
how that -a total of 1,062 boys and
girls completed the eighth grade work.
If eighth grade graduates of the in
corporated cities and towns be added
the total of those now ready to enter
New Mexico high schools in Septem
ber is well over 1,500, The entire edu
cational force of the Btate Is now en
gaged in systematic efforts to induce
every one of these boys and girls who
can do so to go On into tbe high school
work.
Recognition of Eighth Grade Work.
Attaching . great importance to
proper recognition of completion of
eighth grade work, and to encourage
the student to go on with his school
course, State Bchool Superintendent
Wagner has substltutear tms year a
handsome lithographed diploma for
the llttlo printed certificate heretofore
given to titudents completing the
eighth , grade auccessfully. The de
partment of education has just com
pleted malliug 1,062 of these diplomas
to the several counties. Each one
'bejjra the 'signature of the state su-
permtemiorit. is s;u":u ny rtv-icouniy
smperir.f'.r.dunt, and is delivered by
tfiatofftctal to the teacher, who signs
tt'anij'dcllvurs it personally to the stu
cent. That the eighth grade graduate)
are pleased with tho diplomas is
shown by, requests reaching the de:
partment from eighth grade graduates
of forrrfer years, asking that their lit
' tie printed certificate be exchanged
:for the more elaborate document.
In discussing today the great In
crease in number of eighth grade
graduates from the rural schools, Su
perintendent Wagner said he regard
it aa (he most convincing evidence
ENCOURAGE BOYS
i
GIRLS TO
100
SCHOOL
TYou Are Sure
c! I8ll!!z
M auger ;
1 1 1 1 7 NORTH FIRST ST.
of the advancement achieved by New
Mexico rural schools and of the Ken
eral gain In educational efficiency
made, in the state during the past few
years. He looks for a still larger per
centage of increase during the coming
school year.
Following is a list of thofe who
graduated from the eighth grade in
:he rural schools of Bernalillo county
this year, exclusive of those in mu
nicipal schools, lrank Stone of Old
Albuquerque being the honor grad
uate: ,
Have Eighth Grade Diploma.
Raymond Helwig, Barton, N. M.
John Johnson, Old Albuquerque, N.
M.
Frank Stone, Old Albuquerque, N
M.
Edilh Morgan, Old Albuquerque, N.
M.
Carmcl N'olasco, Old Albuquerque.
;N. M.
i Vivinno Nolasco, Old Albuquerque,
Mary Shirk, Old Albuquerque, N. M.
Mabel .Summer, Old Albuquerque,
N. M.
Tetra Madrid, Alameda, N. M.
Amelia Mai-tinea, Alameda, N. M.
Walter Dickinson, Albuquerque, N.
M.
Cora Morgan, San Jose; no pnstof
fice, care A. Montoya, superintendent.
KING GEORGE FAMILIAR i
WITH LABOR PROBLEMS
tRt Al CORriKRPOMOIHbl TO MORNINS JO'lrtNALl
London, June 18. William JameB
Thome, social democrat, labor mem
ber of parliament for West Ham, who
in early life worked in a rope yard
and brickfield and educated himself,
was received by King George at
Buckinham palace recently. Thome
had been on a visit to Russia and on
returning to England was tOjked to
pay an official visit to the king.
Describing his visit Thome remark
ed that there was no formality or
convention and that he gave the king
seme homely truths. He discussed
some of the causes of industrial un
rest and told the king plainly ar.d
frankly what was the popular opin
ion of high food prices and the pro
fiteering which is notoriously going
on and said "rows" must be expected
so long as the prices of foodstuffs
remain uncontrolled for the working
people and controlled in the interests
of traders.
'The king, I thought, showed con
siderable knowledge of many matters
affecting the workers generally and
his pointed references" to them show
ed that he understood keenly and ap
preciatively some of the causes of
unrest in the labor world," said Mr.
Thome.
STATE WINS FIRST
SKIRMISH IN CASE
AGAINST LOCAL MEN
f PCOAL CORRMRONDCNCC To morninO JOURNAL1
Santa Fe, July 1. The demurrer of
the state to the answer of O. N. Mar
ron and Francis 13. Wood, attorneys,
of Albuquerque, in the case citing
them to show cause why disbarment
proceedings ugainst thorn should not
be instituted, has been sustained by
the state supremo court, in a deci
sion handed down yesterday. Tho rs
spondents admitted that the sign bear
ing the words "Bttorncys-at-law" re
mained on display in their offices and
also appeared upon their letterheads;
they admitted further that they had
drawn certain deeds and contracts
and had collected fees, but maintained
that this was permissible even though
they are suspended from practice for
one year, such suspension relating
only lo their appearance in district
and supreme courts.
Journal Wants bring results.
of COOLING SATISFACTION with
D POSTUM
A popular home drink that
provides hot-day comfort of the
right sort-
Junctions: Postum. made in
the usual way, dulled with ioo,
" and lenw wii angar, and cUlter
f ft dftth of lifnura or ceua to taste
DE
Soldiers and Sailors Break
Ranks of Marchers, Carry
ing Red Flags With White
Centers, in Boston,
FORCE BAND TO PLAY
STAR-SPANGLED BANNER
Many Persons Are Arrested,
Some of Whom Are Charged
With Making Unpatriotic Ut
terances. IT MORNINO JOURNAL SPECIAL LRASED WIRI1
Boston, Mass., July 1. RiolouB
scenes attended a socialist parade to
day which was announced aa a peace
demonstration. The ranks of the
marchers we,re broken up by self-organized
squads of uniformed soldiers
and sailors, red flags and banners
bearing socialistic mottoes were tram
pled on and literature and furnishings
in the socialistic hcadqunrters in Park
square were thrown into Ihe street
and burned.
Police reserves stopped the rioting"!
after it had been in progress an hour
and a half. Many arrests were made.
The police took into custody some of
the participants In hundreds of fist
fights that were waged on tho Com
mons and in the line of the parade,
whilo agents of the federal depart
ment of Justice, under the direction
of Assistant District Attorney Gold
berg, arrested a number of persons
who were alleged to have made un
patriotic remarks. None of the sol
diers and sailors who figured in the
disturbance was arrested.
Hundred in Parades
The procession consisted of hun
dreds of men and women, many of
whom carried babies. Most of the
marchers carried small red flags with
white centers, emblematic of the
peace demonstration, and there were
large banners bearing inscriptions,
some of which read:
"Russia has a six-hour day. Why
not America?" and "Liberty loan a
first mortgage on labor,"
A large American flag was at the
head of the procession. Half a hun
dred men in the uniform of naval re
servists, nationnl guardsmen, marines
and Canadian "kilties," intercepted
the procession at two points. Ia both
instances a street fight resulted.
Blows were exchanged and flags were
snatched from the hands of the
marchers while women in the line
screamed in fright. The American
flag at the head of the line was seized
by the attacking party and the band,
which had been playing "The Mar
seillaise" with some interruptions,
was forced to play "The Star Spangled
Banner." while cheers were given for
the flag.
Organized at Socialist Meeting.
The peace demonstration was or
ganized at a meeting of socialist
branches, labor unions and workmen's
benefit societies of the metropolitan
district, acting under the name of tho
workmen's council, in imitation of the
council of workmen and soldiers of
Russia. It was announced that the
organization represented 10,000 work
ingmen and that its program would
Include the peace terms of the Rus
sian workmen, no forcible annexations,
no punitive indemnities and free de
velopment of all nations.
Among the speakers who were an
nounced as on the program for the
meeting on the Commons were James
H. Murer, president of the Pennsyl
vania Federation of Labor; J. Edward
Morgan of San Francisco, represent
ing the Mooney defense movement;
James O'Neal, state secretary of the
socialist party, and Joseph Murphy of
Lowell.
BUTTE DISTRICT ALL
BUT CLOSED BY STRIKES
rV MORNIH1 JOURNAL RRi CIAI. LIARRB WIRR1
Butte, Mont., July 1. The strikes
Of electricians and of the Metal Mino
Workers' union, which have all but
closed tho copper and zinc minca of
the Hulto district and have caused
tbe shutdown of the reduction and
doncent rating mills of Ttutte and the
smelters at Anaconda with a loss of
1(10,000 daily in wages, continued to
day without change. Fifteen thousand
men are said to be out of work as a
result of (he strike.
Strimlborg's Works to Bo Published.
Stockholm, Sweden, Juno 18. The
selection and 5rrahgement of tho
manuscripts left .unpublished by the
late August Strindberg has proceed
ed so far that, preparations have now
been nearly completed for the print
ing. The result will he a considerable
addition to the Swedish author's al
ready known works. The manuscripts
found avallablo will compose five
volumes. Tho first volume will con
tal nthree complete dramas and a
number of dramatic fragmonts. The
second volume will contain poems,
short narratives and a number of
sketches little more that) memoran
da which are said to throw an Inti
mate light on Strindberg.
Tho three last volumes will show
Strindberg in a more serious light.
The third is to contain historical and
philosophical works, and the fourth
and fifth will be devoted to the au
thor's excursions into the field of oc
cultism and natural philosophy.
Remits from Journal Want AtU.
Hir V w v ' - fast 1 lp4v4iM
) - . AXif W mm
nRS.;ORACE;HUMlSTON A L FRCOO COCCHl
Mrs. Grace Ilumiston, a woman lawyer, has been declared by the head of the New York police force,
which sometimes calls itself "tho finest," to be a better detective than its whole squad of 400 sleuths. She it
was who insisted workmen should d'ig in the cellar of the bicycle repair shop of Alfredo (,'occhi to seek tho
body of Kuth Cruger, the school girl. who disappeared there several months ago. Detectives had i.islxteri tbe
body could not be buried in thetcellar, hut her workmen found it there.
IS
TO HELP SUPPLY
Sure and Quick Way to
Augment Supply of Meat
for Army, Home and Allies
Is to Produce More Pork,
t BdAL CORRKRRONDRNCfc TO MOAN1NO JOURNAL1
Washington, June .29. The quick
est and surest way of augmenting the
meat supply next to the raising of
poultry is by raising hogs, the United
States department of agriculture
points out. The hog is the most im
pqrtnnt animal to raise ror meat land
money. U requires less labor, less
equipment, less capital, makes great
er gains pei hundred' pounds of con
centrates and reproduces himse'l'
fasler and In greater numbers thai
any, other domestic animal. As a
tcnuimer of by-products the hug has
no iiul. No other animal equals the
lard hog in its fat-storing tendency.
The most satisfactory meat for ship
ping long distances on train, boat, or
wagon, and for long storage after
reaching its destination is mess pork.
There is no animal which produces
more meat and meat products than
the hog
Pork Has Ready Sale.
Pork finds ready sale because pack
ers have discovered many ways of
placing pork on the narket in at
tractive and highly palatable form,
combined with most excellent keep
ing qualities. There is no other meat
from which so many products are
manufactured. Very near DO per aw
of the total value, in dollars and
cents, of the meat and meat product,
slaughtered in the packing houses of
the United States is derived from the
hog. Our country leads by far all
countri"s in tho production as well
as in the consumption of meat and
meat products. Three-fourths of cho
world's international trade in perk
nd pork products originates in the
United States in normal times, a d
the war greatly has increased this
proportion. According (o the esti
mates there was nn increase of 9,580,
000 hogs between I $10, the census
year, and 191 (i inclusive. Tho in
crease at the end of 1915 was 3,14 8,
000 over the proceeding year, while it
is estimated that there was a. "dp
crease at the entj of 1916 of 313,000
hogs compared with 1915.
Demand IiuTeases.
If we expect to continue to provide
meat lo foreign peoples as well as
our own people, every farmer must
put forth the best effort to produce
more hogs. Ims can be kept pro-
HOG
RAISING
MEAT FOR NATION
1 " " ' ""'
TRIMMED WITH BKADS. .
Beads are used for every purpose and most smart gowns and blouses
show a touch of them. This Georgette wuist ia in Copenhagen blue with' a
rose design in burnt Sienna beads;
neck, sleeves und cuffs."
-W-wn-WOPp
fitably upon many farms where they
t ie not fourd today. Farmers who
alrend.y r.iise hogs can produce many
more for there In not much chance
i;f producing moat this year In excess
i f the requirements.
More dairy farmers should raise
hogs for I bey fit in especially well
open dairy farms where skim milk,
buttermilk, or whey is fed Upon the
farm. A man who has skim milk is
In a better position to raise pigs
than a man who has none.
ALL-AMERICAN OPERA
IS PLANJ3F MEETING
T MORNINO JOURNAL RPBCIAL LRABIO W1RI)
' New York,- July 1. A concerted
movement by American .composers
and dramatists and ' leaders of ' na
tional civic and musical organizations,
for the production of American
opera and other natrve music in the
English tongue, .will' be formally
launched here tomorrow.
While the offices of the organiza
tion directing the movement, will be
in New York ,its Incorporators repre
sent all sections of the country. Reg
inald de Koven, the composer, is
chairman of the national committee of
organization, its other members being:
Mrs. David Allen Campbell, Chi
cago; Charles W. Cadrfian, San Fran
cisco: John Alden Carpenter, Chicago;
George V. Chad wick, Hoston; Fred
erick a. Converse, Boston; Arthur
Farwell, New York; Henry Hartley,
Boston: .Mrs. W. A. Hinckle, Peoria,
111.; Percy Muckaye, New York; Doug
bus Malloih, Chicago; Y. J. JIcCov.
San Francisco; Max Ttabinofr, New
York; Joseph Redding, San Fran-1
Cisco; Mrs. Frank A. Seiberling. Ak -
ron, Ohio; Lee Shubert, New York ;
John Philip Sousa; New York- Mrs.
William I). Steele, Sednlia, Mo., nnd I
David Stevens, New York.
All-American Operatic Works.
The announced policy of the organi
zation is to produce throughout the
United Slates operatic works by
American composers and dramatists
only, acted and sung by an all-American
company, with nn all-American
orchestra, chorus and ballet.
"It Is evident," said Mr. Oe Koven
today, "that American music never
will be definitely developed by the
employment of the foreign artist and
the performance ol foreign works;'
Italy, with less than a third the popu
lation of the United States, possesses
sixty-three producing opera houses.
The music of Germany and France
hus been made familiar to the world :
ny its endorsement at home. Russian
opera, similarly encouraged, now is
being sung internationally in increas
ing measure year by year.
"Of all the great music-loving and
music-supporting nations of the earth,
America alone, until now, has made
no material effort for the encourage
ment of her native and natural musi
cal genius.
"We have spent millions to hear for
eign singers and declined to henrour
own.
"The different interests which have
Many rows of fine tucks border the
RUTH CRUQEPt
been working separately to correct
this condition now have been brought
together in one organization. "They
are all Inspired by the same ideal
the one essential hitherto lacking
being co-ordination in one definite
practical plan.
"This union of forces constitutes
the most forward step in the devel
opment of American native music in
the history of the country. The
American composer and dramatist of
a really notable work (ire now as
sured proper presentation, and nn
adequate number of performances.
The American ,singer Is to be given
an opportunity and an audience. The
American people. will be permitted to
enjoy music in their native, tongue
and to contribute to its development.
FALLING WATER
TANK KILLED 15,
LATEST FIGURES!
Approximately Thirteen Oth
ers, Who Were Aboard Lake
Steamer Christopher Colum
bus, Injured, .
! 1 1
' orni jourxal ncm:
1 Milwaukee, Wis., July
! 1 1"11. nine men and
'dead and approximately
LRASSO WIRR,
1. Fifteen
six women,
thirteen in-
lurp, s"me seriously,
com prise the
latest list of casualties from the fall
jing of the big water tank, supported
I by steel framework, at the edge of the
(Milwaukee river, onto tbe steamer
I Christopher Columbus. The tank
crashed through three decks and then
sld into the river yesterday, when tlu?
big excursion steamer was being
swung around by two tugs prior to
l.er return to Chicago.
The local liwreiiii of the federal
Kteumboat inspection service sturted
an investigation this afternoon for
the department of commerce.
.The Christopher Columbus iTroba
bl;Will be taken to Mantowoc within
a '"w days for repairs. The damage
to the Vessel Is estimated at $5,000
and repairs will occupy several
weeks.
Dr. Charles Hubbard Judd and
George C. Fnirweather, officials of
the Chicago' university,, reached Mil
waukee today and identified two stu
dents who lost their lives. Muny of
the injured Were students from the
university on. tin outing:
Different versions were given its to
the cause of the accident,, fc-ut nil
agreed that the primary cause was
the exceptionally strong current
sweeping into the Milwaukee' river
from the Menominee, due to recent
heavy rainsi
BURY TODAY MAN OF
FAMOUS FOREBEARS
tRRVCIAL CORRtRONDRHCC TO MORNINO JOURNALl
Hnnta, Fe, July l.- Tomorrow
mof ning at 7 o'clock, from the ca
thedral, will take place the funeral of
Clemonte .Ortiz, who died U'the ago
of 85 years. Ife was a descendant of
Nicolas Ortiz Nino Ladron de Gue
vara, a' captain under Don Diego do
Vargas, .lie served, as ft. musician in
the federal' army during pa'rt of the
civil war. .
Careful Kodak Finishing
. By Skilled Photographers
YOU WILL LIKE IT f'
Twice Daily Service '.
:, HANNA' & -fa ANNA ,
r : Master Photographers
Remember Satisfaction Guaranteed
rMMm
I Large Crowd. Waits Patiently
! in Downpour of r Rain t for
American Commander; Gen
i eral Is Moved by Reception,
m MORN. NO JOURNAL crical LBACEOWIRKI
i'aris, July 1. One of the most
touching" incidents connected Willi
the arrival of the representatives of
the American army in France oc
curred today when - maimed French
soldiers received Major General
Pershing at one of the institutions. of
the National Federation .for the Aid
of the Wounded in t,hc Chomps
Klysee. A larai crowd assembled, as
Is usual whenever General Pershing
I expected, and waited patiently In a
downpour of rain for the nrrfVal of
Hie America n commander who was
greeted with enthusiastic cries of
"Long live the United States! Long
live General Pershing." '
American Ambasasdor Sharp, Wal
ler Horry, -ii th American Chamber
of Commerce of Paris; Maurice
Barren, president of the League -of
'.'utriols, and Louis Barthou, former
premier, were among those present.
When General Pershing entered the
room one of the' maimed French
heroes limped Curwfird to salute him -in
the name of . his comrades. ; Tpo
wounded private aid:
"Though wounded our souls sliil
vibrate with the ardor of combat.
We salute in the person of the il
lustrious General Pershing, President
Wilson and the noble American peo
ple." -
America Going to Decide.
M. B.irres said the general's . visit
was symbolic as "through him Amer
ica salutes our mutilated, and she Is
going lo deciije the coming victor;,',
won in the. first instance by our
heroes."
General Pershing, who was visibly
moved, arose and exclaimed:
"Long live France."
The wounded soldiers tried to arise
and some waved their crutches in the
air w hile all shouted "Long live I lie
United States."
Thdr acclamations followed Gen
ctal Pershing to the street, where lie
was tiuf center of -'another demon
stration by the crowd which hod
itood through the rain waiting for i
y limpse of the American comman
der. EL PASO SHERIFF WANTS
TO HOLD JONES THERE
IRV MORN, NO JOURNAL RR8CIAL LCAflUO WIRR)
F.t Paso, Tex., July 1. Sheriff Seth
( rndorf announced tonight he would
resist the efforts of the officers of
Dallas county to have Felix R. Jones'
fciken to' Dallas to answer the charge
of miirder In connection with the kill
ing of Ulorence Brown. Jones is
being held in jail here cn indictments
charging him with murder und con
spiracy to commit, murder in eoniuv
tioh with the killing of Thomas Ly iun
of New Mexico.
Journal Wants bring results.
IN theRocky Mountakw,
1 leetaoove sea level, r-i
nowhere near the eone of II
I j anrtossible dancrer Brislniyfj
m from border disturbances, pj
-a This ! the climate for theft1'!
tieaitn leeker and those who Jh
Mm aeiin Pleasure and rest. f
y Ifl'ViJ Epe the heat of the tummer. If:
INI Com to fiver City where tmiKui- fl I
vxtnddant Rtormtarcnot knemn. J)
In tli (WMt, dry sir of the 7
mountain, near forest of Juniper i,J
napine,natlentfmminnnrt v
'i!.;: of th world eome hick t rahuat li.
Ml health and cheerfully taVe new .
lease on life. ThM - n,nu mnA i
exoellent tanatorinra facilities foi A '
I tuberculous patient. ' b
, Tti State Normal Summer i
AjJ School hi available to student dor- J
.1 mJhu.mI t..i i . mm.
accented AnwhaM fc.ii .
ra Wonderful
p000" oad to many point, of hv fiw
Soend von ii,mrf, i l. ii !'
mate of unqualified comfort. '
Write for fall Information.
Chamber ol Commerce S
Sllvor Clly . NiwMulnj l
The New Mexico
!0TTAGE SANATORIUM
i Silver City, New Mexico
AN INSTITUTION which Is
thoroughly equipped, In ev
ery way, for the treatment of
TUBERCULOSIS in all ita forms
Write for full Information to
Wayne MaoVeagh Wilson, Mgr.
Silver eity, New Mexico
WW

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