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Albuquerque morning journal. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1903-1926, July 03, 1917, CITY EDITION, Image 1

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ALBUQUERQUE MORNING JOURNAJL.
CITY
EDITION
CITY
EDITION
THIRTY-EIGHTH TEAR.
AOL. CXLV. So. 3.
PLACES EMBARGO
Oil GUN SALES IN
STRIKE ZONE 10
Unusually Heavy Demand for
Arms 'and Ammunition
' Causes Brig, Gen, Henry A,
Greene to Issue Order,
MILITARY RULE MAKES
HIS ACTION EFFECTIVE
Under Its Workings Dealers
, Can Not Receive Weapons
Without Approval of Army
Officers,
TOY MtRN,NO JOURNAL RRICIAL LIAIfO WIRI,
Douglas, Ariz., July 2. As a result
of unusually heavy demand for small
arms and ammunition, particularly
shotguns and shotgun shells, coupled
with the increase of the labor dis
turbances in Arizona, Brig, Gen. H. A
Greene issued the following order to
day, applicable to the Arizona district
from New Mexico to the California
state line:
"For the present an embargo is
placed on the sale of all kinds of shot
gun and small arms ammunition, in
cluding caliber .22 and larger.
"Until further orders, no applica
tion for, receipt or sales of any small
arms or shotguns and ammunition
therefor, will be approved."
Under the workings of military rule,
no arms or ammunition could be re
reived 7y dealers without permission
of army officers designated to super
vise this detail, nor could any one pur
chase arms or ammunition without a
special permit, issued after carefu! in
vestigation, i ,
FIFTY ACSTItTANS ATTACK
, AMERICAN WORKER AT GLOBE
Globe, Ariz., July 2. The second
act of violence reported in connection
with the strike of copper miners in
the Globe-Miami district occurred late
today when , fifty Austrians attacked
an American mechanic who was com
ing off shift at tho Old Dominion
miner Several American miners in
the crowd pleaded with the Austrlans
not to attack the machinist, but none
interfered. The machinist's face was
slightly cut before he escaped. Earlier
In tho day Richard Mayne, foreman of
the Old Dominion mine, was stoned
by striking miners when he was
going to work.
An Austrian and another American
miner who left the company's prop
erty at the same time were not at
tacked, although the American was
cautioned against returning to work
tomorrow.
Secretary George D. Smith of the
Globe branch of the International
Union Mine, Mill and Smelter Work
ers announced tonight that he has
cautioned all men to refrain from any
sort or violence and said that he was
certain the International members
would act peaceably.
METAL MINE WORKERS OF
' JEROME TO STRIKE AT ONCE
Globe, Ariz., July 2. Telegrams re
eeived at L W. W. headquarters in
Miami late this afternoon assert that
the mtal mine workers In Jerome
will strike immediately In sympathy
with tho branches which' have walked
out in the Globe-Miami district. Thj
messages were from the secretary of
tne Jerome branch of the I. W. W.
organization.
iocai metal mine workers assert
that many other camps throughout
the country will shortly follow with
strike order in their announced effort
to cripple the copper Industry until
their demands are granted.
NO SETTLEMENT TO BE MADE
UNTIL ALL COMPANIES YIELD
Bisbee, Artz., July 2. The Metal
Mine Workers Industrial union this
evening announced through a speaker
at its dally meeting that no settlement
woum be made with the operators in
the I. W. W. membership card. The
companies - now having industrial
trouble on their hands in the various
pajrtn of the country, settled with
meir men. -mis action roiiowed a
similar course taken by the same or
ganization at Butte, it was reported.
No disturbance of any kind marred
the day. The pickets of the I. W. W.
metal mine workers continue to work
on the streets, as the shifts go on and
off at the various mines. The ranks
of the pickets are considerably small
er than at first. Union speakers, at
this evening's meeting, urged the ne
cessity of , many pickets appearing
each day. '
One of the union speakers declare I
that the "best liberty bond Is the lit
tle red card that you carry in your
pocket" The card referred to was
the membership in the I. W. W. The
utterance provoked considerable
cheering. v . ' ,
More men went to work today at
the various shafts in the Warren dis
trict. Though the company's opera
tions are still badly crippled officials
declare that the next few days will
see the worst of the situation over.
It was pointed out by one man that
the Fourth of July celebration being
CHECK TROUBLES
THE WEATHER
FORECAST.
Denver, Colo. July 2. For New
Mexico: Tuesday and Wednesday
partly cloudy and unsettled; not much
change In temperature.
LOCAL REPORT.
A summary of the local weather
conditions for the twenty-four hours
ended at 6 p. m. yesterday follows:
Maximum temperature, 90 degrees;
minimum, 62 degrees; range, 28 de
grees; temperature at 6 p. m., 66;
scuthwest wind; partly cloudy; pre
cipitation, .15 of an inch.
going back to work.
The union this evening urged its
members to stay away from the
Fourth of July celebration and parade
to be held here Wednesday.
Any fears that trouble may arise
during the day were dispelled by this
action.
Churles H. Mover and the Ameri
can Federation of Labor officials who
wired here today that they had not
so close is keeping some men from
sanctioned any strike, were denounced
by the metal workers this evening.
HOLD PASSENGER, TRAIX TO
LOOK FOR STRIKE-BREAKERS
Globe, Ariz., July 2. Two hundred
Industrial Workers of the World held
the regular passenger train in Lower
Miami tonight while a committee of
ten went aboard to search the train
for strike-breakers. More than 300
more I. W. W. members met the train
at the Miami depot prepared to pre
vent the strike-breakers from gettin
off In event there were any aboard
None were found.
CLIKTOY-MOREXCI DISTRICT
QUIET; NO DEPUTIES ON DUTY
Clifton, Ariz., July 2. The strike
situation in the Cllfton-Morenci-Met
calf district was reported to be quiet
tonight and no trouble is anticipated
by Sheriff Slaughter, who has sworn
in eignty deputies at Morenct to
guard the Detroit popper company'
properties. The sheriff's announce
ment today that he would not ask for
troops as long as peace and order was
maintained, had a good effect on the
situation.
Practically every miner and mill
man in this district is now out on
strike, making a total of more than
f.OOO men exclusive of the company
officials of the three big copper com
panies. There was not an ounce of
copper mined today, as far as could
be learned tonight, and no effort has
yet been made to employ strike
breakers. The strikers are asking for
a blanket increase and improved
working conditions. Tho operators
claim the men have been curtailing
production of coppe,r.
Pirate Schooner Captured.
nicxico juy, juiy a. The power
schooner Mariscal, which has been
preying on small vessels in the Gulf
of Mexico, has been captured in the
Tonala, river, according to dispatches
received here. The pirate was pur
sued by the dispatch boat Ligera and
surrendered only after an hour's fight
The Mariscal was taken to Vera
Uruz.
DEFENSE IS BBIEF
E
Calls Only Two Witnesses and
Rests in Thirty Minutes
Will Probably Go to the Jury
Today,
(V MORNINO JOURNAL IPICUL LffAIID W,RI
Cheyenne, Wyo., July 2. It took
the defense in the alleged Interstate
stolen gold conspiracy, which went
on trial here last week, Just thirty
minutes to present Its case today.
Half an hour after the government
has concluded Its case before United
States District Judge Riner, the de
fense rested. Two witnesses were
called by the defendants.
On Instruction of Judge Rlner, John
Uhl of Georgetown, Colo., will go
free, no evidence having been intro
duced against him. Uhl, like the oth
ers in the case, was charged with
conspiracy to defraud the govern
ment. Frank Van Eck testified for the
prosecution that when he was em
ployed as a special agent for a rail
road handling considerable quantities
of ore out of Cripple Creek, Colo., Ora
Chrane and George Heber had of
fered him money to break open cars
of ore and permit them to sort out
high grade specimens. He said he
had seen Heber and Chrane, as well
as Frank Cochrane, Daniel McLeod
and William High carrying sacks
which might have contained ore from
mines at night
, Wife of Defendant Testifies.
Mrs. Benjamin Fuller, wife of one
of the defendants, testified that her
husband, who is- a dealer In second
hand goods at Cripple Creek, had
collected ore from the dumps but
never had stolen any- Benjamin Wan-
amaker, secretary of the miners asso
ciation of Cripple Creek, who previ
ously had testified for the govern-.
ment was questioned regarding assay
machinery.
The defense had asked that Ernest
Goodell, an assayer, be called, but he
had left Cheyenne. '
The case probably will go to the
Jury tomorrow..
IN ALLEGED GOLD
CONSPIRACY GAS
Albuquerque Morning Journal, Tuesday, July
TO
SENATE TO HALT
DEBATE ON FOOD
BILL THIS WEEK
Senator Chamberlain Will Of
fer Motion Today Invoking
Cloture Rule; Sixteen Mem
bers Sign Motion,
PREDICT FAILURE UNTIL
PROHIBITION FIGHT ENDS
Many Say That Two-thirds
Vote Necessary to Enforce
ment of Rule Can Not Be
Obtained Until Then,
(V MORNINO JOURNAL IPfCIAL LtASIO WIRI1
Washington, July 2. Controversy
In the senate over the food control
and Its prohibition feature reached
such an acute stage today that for
mal steps were taken by adminislra
tlon leaders to limit debute and force
a final vote this week by invoking, for
the first time, the senate's new cloture
rule.
Within half an hour many more
than the necessary sixteen senators'
signatures to a cloture motion were
secured. Senator Chamberlain, In
charge of the bill, announced to the
senate later that he would offer the
motion tomorrow and ask for a vote
upon It Thursday. Its adoption would
require a two-thirds vote and there
after would limit each senator's time
upon the bill und all amendments to
one hour.
Rot 1 1 SttlcM Predict Victory.
Many senators say that until the
prohibition issue is settled tho neces
nary two-thirds vote for cloture can
not be secured. Others point out,
however, that the vote on shutting off
debate at least "will show up"' on
record those iot in favor of expedit
ing tho bill as desired by tho presl
dent.
The movement for the use of the
cloture rule came after the senate had
adopted the section by a vote of 42
to 18V extending government control
In addition to food and fuels, to iron
and steel, copper, cotton, wool, hldeB
and skins, lead, aluminum, fertilizers,
farm implements, hemp and other
binding twine materials and their
products.
A skirmish on prohibition occurred
Just before tho senate recessed to
night to meet an hour earlier than
usual tomorrow. The "wets" and
"drys" clashed when Senator Penrose
opposing any attempt at cloture, sug
gested that prohibition's friends had
been delaying action. Senator Jones
of Washington vehemently denied the
charge and asserted that the ojolay
nas oeen caused by prohibitions cp
ponents.
Prohibition Fight Oiieneil Anew.
Senator Sheppard asked unanimous
consent for a vote tomorrow on the
liquor question, but Senator Penrose
objected.
The dispute over prohibition was
opened anew when the agriculture
committee approved art amendment
by Senator Gore proposing that manu
facture of distilled spirits shall be
prohibited and' the president given
power to suspend the making of beer
and wines.
The committee rejected, 8 to 4, the
so-called "administration eomnro-
mise" plan of Senator Chamberlain
limiting prohibition to distilled bev
erages without any action regarding
malt and vinous intoxlcatng liquors.
Leaders of both "wet" and "dry"
factions tonight were predicting vie
tory In the prospective open, clean-
cut fight in the senate over empow
ering the president to deal with light
Beverages. The prohibition fight la
not scheduled to reach the senate
floor until late this week.
xne cloture motion, if presented
tomorrow, will, under the rules, lie
over until Thursday and then be sub
Ject to a vote without debate.
WANT JONES BROUGHT
TO DALLAS FOR TRIAL
1ST MORNINO JOURNAL IRICIAL LIAIro WIRI
Dallas, Tex., July 2, Statements
by El Paso authorities that they in
tend to hold Felix Jones there on the
charge of murdering Thomas Lyons,
millionaire ranchman, today brought
from District Attorney Mike T. Levey
the announcement that he will leave
n a few days for El Paso to see If he
cau arrange to have Jones brought
here for trial on the charge of killing
Florence Brown.
The r thorltles today refused to
discuss e alleged connection of
Jones with the taking of the stenog
rapher's life. Word from El Paso Is
that Jones denies any knowledge of
the killing.
Man Is Cleared of Slacker Charge.
Carnzozo, N. M., July 2. The first
apprehension for failure to register
June 5 in this county was made when
United States Marshal Hudspeth ar
rested Jacobo Sanchez of the San Pa
tricio precinct upon complaint of the
registrar. When given his preliminary
before United States Commissioner
Scott it developed that Sanchez was
a few days over the prescribed age,
whereupon be was released. -
PLAN
COMPEL
FEAR A CHINESE
CIVIL WAR THAT
WOULD DESTROY
REPUBLICANISM
Chang Hsun's Stroke Discour
ages Washington Officials
Who Believed China's Trou
bles Were Ended,
HIS SUCCESS DOUBTFUL,
BELIEF OF DIPLOMATS
Bitterness Against Manchus,
It Is Said at Chinese Lega
tion, Is Stumbling Block for
General.
(T MORNINO JOURNAL IRICIAL LIAIID WIRI)
Washington, July :. Gen. Chang
Hsun's sudden coup d'etat to destroy
republicanism in China and restore
the Manchu dynasty has produced a
discouraging shock among officials
here who believed China's internal
troubles were at an end.
Open civil war is feared between
Chang Hsun's followers and the Maiir
chu supporters on one hand and the
northern republicans and the united
south on the other.
Chinese legation and state depart
ment officials alike expressed greet
surprise at the development. At tho
legation It was suggested that while
Chang might have secured support
among the military governors for a
purely military movement, the wide
spread bitterness against the Manchus
will make final success very doubtful.
Nevertheless, It is realized thnt with
Poking Isolated, President Li largely
Is In Chang's power.
Shu Shi Chang, guardian of Hsuan
Tung, the Manchu boy whose abdica
tion of the throne in 1912 ushered in
the Chinese republic, was reported by
Minister Keinsch to bo supporting
Chang Hsun.
The attitude of Premier Li Chlng
Hsi and the newly created cabinet Is
unknown.
RKPOllT KAYS Til 15 KMPEItOH IS '
IN POShfJStilOS OF FAIaU E
Tien Tsin, July 2. Hsuan Tung,
the young emperor, according to re
ports from Peking today, has taken
possession of the palace occupied by
President LI Yuan-Hung and Is sur
rounded by prominent military lead
ers.
A demand has been made upon
President Li that he should resign in
favor of Hsuan Tung. The president
replied that lie would resign in
favor of the vice president, as he whs
unable to resign in ttfor of the em
peror.
Telegraph and telephono offices aro
closely guarded and telegrams can
not be sent to Peking.
NOUTII AND SOUTH READY
TO GO TO WAR IN CHINA
San Francisco, Calif., July S. Ac
cording to cable advices received her
today by the Chinese nationalist
league, is on the verge of civil war.
with the north ready to fight for the
roturn of the Manchu dynasty and
the southern provinces united for the
republic.
The league is the reorganized
Young China party which aided in
financing the revolt against tho Man
chus six years ago.
WAR TAX BILL WILL BE
REPORTEp TO SENATE
--
COY MORNINO JOURNAL IRICIAL LIAIID WIRI )
Washington, July 2. A final draft
of the war tax bill, reduced from
$1,800,000,000 to $1,670,000,000 and
carrying no provision for additional
bonds, waB completed tonight by the
senate finance committee and will bo
reported to the senate tomorrow.
Next year's war expenses are placed
in new estimates submitted today by
the treasury rinpartment at $2,326,-
000,000, but Secretary McAdoo ad
vised the committee . that additional
bonds were not necessary at this time.
The final committee vote on adopt
ing the revised bill was 12 to 3, Sen
ators LaFollette, Gore and Thomas
uniting In support of Senator LaKol
lette's substitute for raising all war
taxes from Incomes, excess profits,
liquor and tobacco.
CHIHUAHUA HOSTAGES
RELEASED FROM PRISON
I9Y MORNINO JOURNAL IRICIAL LIARIO WIRI,
Juarez, Mex., July 2. The fifteen
foreign and native residents of Chi
huahua City who were held in the
federal penitentiary as hostages for
the payment of a forced loan of 70,-
000 pesos, have been released, pas
sengers arriving from the south to
night saitlj, This number included
three Americans, an Italian, two
Germans and a British subject. De
mands were made upon the corpora
tions which they represented for from
2.S00 to 10,000 pesos each. These
forced loans were all paid.
A report was received here tonight
that the southbound passenger train
which left here Saturday was held
up. by bandits, 80,000 pesos taken
from the train, and the engineer shot
in the leg when he refused to stop his
train. .. .. ,
- r - M. " ' - ,
3, 1917.
RUSSIAN
THRUST
TAKES PRISONER
T
Revolutionary Army Seizes Vil
lage of Koniuchy and Pushes
Beyond Place, Fortified Po
sitions Fall,
ARTILLERY REAWAKENS;
PLAYS IMPORTANT PART
Rain of Steel Projectiles Pour
ed Into German Positions for
Two Days; No Marked Ac
tivity in West,
1ST MORNINO JOURNAL SPECIAL LIAIID WIRI)
Prisoners exceeding 10,000 and the
capture of the village of Koniuchy
and strongly fortified positions south
west of Rrzeznny are the first fruits
of the new offensive movement of the
Russian forces In eastern Gallcla;
north of Koniuchy the Russians have
attacked and fresh battles are in
progress.
The Russian artillery, long inactive
from lack of shells, played an Im
portant part of the defeat of the
Austro-Germans at Konlychy. For
two days a rain of Iron was thrown
Into the German positions and Berlin
says officially that they were turned
Into a crater field. The Russians not
only carried three lines of German
trenches and Koniuchy, which was
strongly fortified, but also advanced
to the Koniuchy stream south of the
village, which is on tho Zlota Llpu
river.
righting Exceedingly Ititter.
Around Brzezany the fighting was
most bitter .and Berlin claims that
sixteen Russian divisions were thrown
forward. The Russians carried the
fortified Teuton positions at several
points in the face of a desperate re
sistance by Austrian, German anil
Turkish troops.
Minister of War Kcrensky person
ally led tho Russian revolutionary
army In Its forward movement and in
a message to Premtor Lwoff mays that
the offensivo "proved to Russia and
the entire world Its fidelity to the
revolution and Its love for liberty an:l
country." The premier has authoriz
ed Minister Kercnsky to give the reg
iments which participated in the
fighting of July 1 red revolutionary
flags and the name "Regiments July
First."
On the western front there has been
little marked activity. Both the Brit
ish and Germans have carried out
raids in the area around Lens and
northward. On the Alsno between
Ccrny and Allies tho French have re
gained a lino of trenches from the
Germans after spirited fighting.
Austrian Attack Checked.
In the Trentlno south of Riva tho
Austrians have attacked Italian posi
tions between Lake Garda and the
Ledro valley. Rome reports that all
the Austrian efforts were checked'
with loss. ' I
President Wilson has promulgated
the regulations to govern exemptions
from service in tho new national army
of the United States. This marks an
other stop In tho preparation for the
mobilization of the new army and will
permit the local and special exemp
tion boards to organize for their Im
portant work.
The Greek destroyer Doxa. mannod
ty a French crew, has been destroyed
In the Mediterranean sea by an ex
plosion. Twenty-nine members of
tho crew. Including all the officers,
were lost.
advance skxis wave of
REJOICING TllKOl'ttll NATION
Petrograd, July 2. The brilliant
Russian advance, the news of which
has sent a wave of rejoicing through
the entire country, was lod by War
Minister Kercnsky in person.
For the last four days the war min
ister has been continuously at tho
front, spending every effort to urge
the troops to advance. Ho finally
rode to the front line trencho and
placing himself at the head of the
troops, gave the order to advance.
The spectacle of the popular war
minister on the firing line accom
plished what oratory had failed to do,
and the Russian line swept forward
into the German trenches.
10,0(10 SOLDIERS TAKEN
PRISONER IJY RUSSIANS
Petrograd, July 2 (British Admiralty
per Wireless Press, via London).
The official announcement today
reads as follows:
."Western (Russian) front: In the
direction of Kovey (Volhynla) in the
region of , Rudkasitovichskaya our
scouts, under command of four offi
cers, after destroying the wire en
tanglements by mines, penetrated the
enemy's trenches, killed some of their
occupants and captured a number of
prisoners. According to the testimony
of prisoners, the Austrians knew of
our attack from two deserters, Senor
Non-commissioned Officer Karsokin
and Private Kolotulnov. An Investi
gation is being made by the authori
ties of the government to which the
soldiers named belong.
"In the direction of Zlochoff, after
two days' artillery preparation, our
troops attacked the Austro-German
0
IN
AND
CAPTURES
Dl
positions in tho Koniuchy-Byshkl
front. After a severe engagement
they captured three lines of trenches
and the fortified village of Koniuchy
and advanced to tho Koniuchy stream
to tho south of the village of the same
name.
as a result of the engagement on
Sunday, 164 officers and 8.400 sol
uieis nave oeen counted so rar as
prisoners. We also took seven guns
and seven machine guns. Prisoners
continue to come In.
"Southwest of Brzezany, after artil
lery preparation, our troops attacked
the strongly fortified rmsltlons nf the
enemy, and after stubborn fighting
occupied them nt places. Germans
and Turks made counter-attacks and
formidable positions changed hands
constantly.
"On Sunday we cantured nn thin
front nine officers and 1,700 Ger
mans, Austrians and Turks. Some of
our detachments sustained severe
losses, especially of officers.
Altogether, on Sunday we funk
prisoner 173 officers and more than
10,000 soldiers. We also rantured
seven guns and seven machine guns."
FRENCH MiSE THEN CUES
THIRD OF MILK IN l.KXGTH
French Front In France. July 2.
The Germans succeeded in occupying
today French front line trenches a
third of a mile in length to the east
of Corny, north of the Chemin des
Dames. This local success, worthless
from a military viewpoint, followed a
terrific pile-driving artillery bom
bardment at the beginning of which
the French abandoned the line, the
trenches of which were flattened out
This forward step leaves the Ger
mans still without their coveted ob
servation posts. Apparently there
was little backbone In tho attack, an
the success was not followed up.
The samo lack of push has char
acterized all the German attacks re
cently along the line stretching from
the eastward of Soissons to Verdun.
Evidently the enemy, after his recent
defeat in the Champagne, feels the
need of local successes in order to en
courage the men, who, according to
prisoners, aro graetly depressed. It is
comparatively easy for them to con
centrate many heavy guns at any
given point and thus drive the French
out of small sectors. Hitherto, how
ever, whenever tho Germans attacked
with their specially selected troops
they did not penetrate to any depth,
all their attempts to do so meeting
with the most energetic resistance and
usually being followed by French
counter-attacks costing the German
occupants of the demolished positions
great losses.
AMERICAN TROOPS WILL
MARCH IN PARIS JULY 4
IRY MORWINO JOURNAL IRICIAL tf AIK Willi
Paris, July 2. It was decided this
afternoon to parade one battalion of
tho United States army In Paris on
July 4. The American troops will ar
rive here on the morning of July 3.
They will be quartered In the Grand
Palais, while the officers will be en
tertained by tho Military club.
Confirmed in Opinion That Sal
vation of Belgium Will Come
Through United States, Says
Baron Moncheur,
V MORNINO JOURNAL IRICIAL LIARIO WIRI
Chicago, July 2. Belgium's war
mission brought the gratitude of a
stricken nation to Chicago today and
in the hands of the city's reception
committee met a welcome that gave
them hearty assurances of the mid
dle west's regard for the country
that stood the brunt of the first at
tack of the German army In 1!4.
It was the first stop of a trip that
will last several weeks and extend to
the Pacific coast-
Baron Moncheur made but one
brief speech during the day. At a
luncheon he responded to tho . wel
come of the reception of the commit
tee by picturing the regard of the
Belgian government for the aid that
had come from the United States.
"I am proud and glad to be chos
en," he said, "to come to this noble
nation to whose people we gladly give
our deep appreciation, gratitude and
admiration. Since I have been in
your country, I have heen confirmed
in the opinion that the salvation of
Belgium will, come through the Unit
ed States, especially now that your
brave army Is fighting shoulder to
shoulder with our men for the tri
umph of liberty."
Tonight they were entertained at a
banquet at which most of the city's
officials. Including Mayor Thompson,
participated.
LYNCHINGS FALLING OFF,
SAYS NEGRO INSTITUTE
COY MORNINO JOURNAL. IRICIAL LIAIID WIRI
Tuskegee, Ala., July 2. There were
eleven less lynchings durlrig the six
months ending June 30 than during
that period last year, according to
records compiled at Tuskegee Insti
tute. They numbered fourteen as
against twenty-five for the same
period last year. Thirteen were ne
groes and one a white man. One was
a negro woman. Robert Maton, prin
cipal of Tuskegee, attributes much of
the negro migration north to the fear
of lynchings.
BELGIAN MISSION
GIVES CHICAGO 1
NATION'S THANKS
rrier or Matt, 70c a month.
single copies, 6a
KILL THEM
Fifteen Men Shot as They Run
From Burning Homes by
East St. Louis Mobs That
Started Fires.
BELIEVE MANY BLACKS '
PERISHED IN FLAMES
Military Rule Is Proclaimed
and 300 White Men Are Ar
rested and Locked Up; Na
tional Guards on Duty.
liiKt St. TjoiiIh, III., July 3.
Fires were burning In five parts
of Fast St. Louis at 1 o'clock
this morning and at least twenty
dead negro bodies and crowded
hospitals testified to the terror
that reigned here last night
white mob after mob swept the
streets seeking negroes whom
P they might slay. At this hour it
was Impossible to make an ac-
curate estimate of the number of
dead. But this was known: Five
negro sections of the city were
fired by mobs, terrorized negroes
fled from their burning homes
only to meot bullets from the
guns of the rioters; four other
negroes were shot by snipers and
two were lynched. One white
man was killed by a negro sniper
and before the burning began
tonight four negroes and one
white man were killed. This In-
eludes the detective sergeant
whose death at the hands of a
negro mob late Sunday night
was the direct cause of the out-
break Monday forenoon and
Monday night.
IRY MORNINO JOURNAL IRICIAL LIAIIO WIRI .
liast St. Louis, III., July 2. 'At
least fifteen negroes were shot and
killed by mobg here tonight as they
fled from their burning homes which
had been set on fire by white mobs.
A number are believed to have per
ished in the burning houses.
Military rule was proclaimed to
night. Three hundred white men
were arrested and locked up at police
headquarters. Negro quarters in va
rious parts of the city are on fire, and
the flames reach the very edge of the
business district. Estimates of the
number of negroes who perished in
the fire ran as high as 100 but there
was nothing authentic on which to
base these estimates. Hundreds of,
whites stood around the edges of the
burning districts and fired at the ne
groes as they fled from their homes.
City Is Weird Sight.
State's Attorney Ehaumloeffel of St.
Clair county drove through) the riot
swept district tonight with Inspector
Walsh of St Louis, Mo. The state's
attorney estimated that the dead ne
groes would number 2S0. All esti
mates, however, ere conjectural.
This city tonight presents a weird
and terrible sight. Vast) clouds of
smoke roll across the sky, flames
make some of the downtown streets
as light as day, and now and then a
yelling mob rushes down a street In
pursuit of a negro or in search of
new excitement. National guardsmen,
loaded In automobile trucks, dash
after the mob, and in a few minutes
the shouting dies down and bewil
dered people walk up and down the
streets wondering where the next
outbreak will occur.
At 9 o'clock the mayor of East St.
Louis called on the St. Louis fire de
partment for assistance in fighting
the flames, which threatened to de
stroy a large part of the city.
' Street Care Stopped.
The mobs in East St Louis were
swelled by hundreds of people who
early in the evening crossed the river
from St. Louis, Mo. This added such
a menace to the situation that at 8: JO
o'clock the bridges were closed to all
vehicles and pedestrian traffic. Street
car traffic in East St. Louis and across
the Eads bridge was stopped at 7
o'clock. This automatically closed
trolley traffic between St. Louis and
many suburban towns on the east
side, including Belleville, and forced
hundreds of residents of these towns
to stay in St. Louis for the night
As soon as street car traffic ended.
crowds crossed the Eads bridge Into
Fast St Louis by the thousands. Au
tomobiles were halted by the national
guard and those that could not show
a good reason for coming were held
on the St. Louis side.
Negro Women Crow Bridge.
The fires. started about I o'clock
this evening and spread rapidly. By
:30 vast clouds of smoke were visible
from the St Louis side of the river
and soon flames visible for miles were '
shooting into the sky.
Hundreds of negro women, most of
them carrying bundles that held their
most precious belongings and leadlnc
jfemall children, walked slowly across
Datf
NOUSES ID
FLEEING

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