OCR Interpretation


Albuquerque morning journal. [volume] (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1903-1926, June 09, 1918, CITY EDITION, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of New Mexico

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84031081/1918-06-09/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

ALB
citV
EDITION
JOURI
CITY
EDITION
UQU'ERQUE MORNING
THIKTV-NINTH VJSAH.
VOL. CLVI11. Xo. 70.
AMERICANS KEEN
FOR ACTION ARE
IRKED BY WEEKS
AT
Eager to Get to 'Business End
of Line New Arrivals Un
easy When Ordered to Train
ing Zones.
AMUSEMENTS HELPFUL IN
KEEPING MEN CONTENTED
Those Who Have Been to Front
Lines Not Required to Drill
as Much as 'Unbaptised'
Ones,
V MORMINO JOURNAL BRBCIAL LBA.SO V,RS
Behind British Uues In France,
June 8. The young soldiers under
orders to embark for the first time
who pictures to himself a future which
will be all fighting days and sees him
self step from troopship to be rushed
to battle as did the first British di
visions sent to the rescue at Mons, is
doomed to disappointment.
As a matter of fact, he will spend
only a small proportion of his time in
the front line, and even while there
will only see actual fighting at more
or less rare Intervals. Life will hold
a good deal of "base" and "billets"
for him even In France.
l'Vjod Is Kxoollent.
The time spent far behind the lines
he will find irksome or pleasant, ac
cording to whether his temperament
Is eager and enterprising or the re
verse. For the great majority, how
ever, billets and base camps are very
pleasant. The food is excellent, work
is comparatively light and amuse
ments are plentiful.
The Associated Press correpondenl
paid a visit the other day to a huge
artillery base camp, situated on the
French coast near some famous bath
ing beaches and within easy reach of
a big city. Within the camp, which
also serves for a large number of en
gineers and some special infantry
units are several theaters, the can
teens of the British expeditionary
force, the lounge rooms and huts o
the Young Men's Christian associa
tion and various "camp Institute"
and athletic, grounds. Hers the 'sol
dier can have a fairly comfortable
and enjoyable vacation.
Impatient for Action.
Most of the men enjoy the varied
opportunities for amusement to the
full. Occasionally one meets a few
men, probably Just over from Eng
land, who are Impatient at every day's
delay in moving forward to the "busi
ness end of the line." The sergeant
major soothes them with wise words:
"Don't worry, boys," ho says:
"there's going to be lots of fighting in
this war, enough for all of you and a
little over to spare."
It is the custom at this base, so far
as artillery officers are concerned, to
distinguish between those who have
not yet been up to the firing line and
those who have had their "baptism."
The former have a fairly complete
program of daily drills and are kept
occupied also with lectures and edu
cational courses.
Must Be In Readiness.
The veterans are permitted ts fore
go these trials to a large extent. They
have little to do but amuse them
selves with- sports, theaters, operas
and the beach, subject only to the
stipulation that they must always be
prepared to move off at a few hours'
notice.
Throughout the army, In the ordi
nary course of things, the Individual
soldier gets a rest period at the base
?very two or .three months. Some'
times a whole unit comes down for a
rest, after an exceptionally arduous
period In the line. Then there are
specially organized sports, In addition
to the standing attractions, to help the
soldier to forget for a time that there
Is a war on. -
Between amusements, the soldier
spends his time hunting up "towneys,"
that Is, men from his own town who
are In other units at the base.
OPERA SINGER WEDS
N. YJ3USINESS MAN
fay MORNINO JOURNAL SPECIAL LBABBO WINS!
New York, June 8. Miss Frieda
Hemnel, colatura coprano of the Met
ropolitan Opera company, and Wil
liam B. Kahn, a business man, were
married here today ;'at St. James
church by the Rev. Dr. J. B. Remin
snyder. The 'wedding Is the result of a ro
mance of several years. Miss Hempel,
German-born, has beepme an Ameri
can citizen. She will sing at the Met
ropolitan the oomlng seasan.
Russia Relies on Allies.
Washington, June 8. Hope for a
complete victory over Germany Is ex
pressed in a communication received
by President vwilson today from the
JVUHOlHl'"""1 ivLiii . ....... . . " . '
merce at Moscow. The Russian peo
ple. It Is declared, rely on the eco
nomic support of the allies for the
reconstruction of the pdwer of Russia.
THE WEATHER
. FORECAST.
Denver, Colo., June 8. For New
Mexico: Sunday unsettled, warmer;
Monday generally fair, warmer east
portion.
Arizona: Sunday and Monday fair;
somewhat warmer Sunday. ... y
LOCAL REPORT, v. , ,
A summary of local weather condi
tions for the twenty-four hours .ended
at 6 p. m. yesterday follows: Maxi
mum temperature, 85 degrees; mini
mum, CO; range, 35; teperature at 6
p. m., 79; southwest wind; . partly
cloudy.
FRENCH
BASES
Eighteen Pages
ECLIPSE OF
FROMS'
OF ASTRONOMERS
A HUGE
Men Versed in Sky Lore
Gather at Baker, Ore,, to
Study and Photograph Old
Sol's Corona and Spectrum.
SCIENTISTS ARE AMPLY
REWARDED, THEY CLAIM
Few Remaining Problems
Which Have Heretofore Not
. Been Clear Are Expected Jto
Be Made Plain Shortly,
1ST MORNING JOUR H I'. BRBCIAL t.KASin WIBB)
Raker, Ore., June 8. Untimely
twlight, fust followed by a deeper
darkness, swept over a strip of the
northwest fifty miles wide today,
when the solar eclipse, predicted by
astronomers, came to pass. The phe
nomenon found noted scientists here
to study and photograph the sun's
corona and spectrum. Definite con
clusions drawn from these observa
tions will be available only after cum-purison-it
results attained and de
tluctions'as to their significance. Tho
observations were declared to be suc
cessful, u slight cloudiness being the
only drawback.
Those devoting their time to study
of the corona were amply rewarded
for the wonderfully colored glowing
and pulsating light nearly equally dif
fused about the sun surface, whose
prominences also were pluinly visible.
Those watching for effects on nature
were also rewarded, for cresceint
shaped shadows on the ground were
seen and in some cases where cloth
was spread mysterious and unexplain
ed shadow bands were observed, al
though some failed altogether of re
sults In this particular detail of study.
Scientifically Successful.
Scientifally the eclipse as observed
by astronomers of the United States
naval observatory was successful. Be
lief was expressed that development
of plates of more than fifty photo
graphs made, will almost if not quite
solve the few remaining problems as
to solar atmosphere und distance
from sunsurface.
While the sky was not entirely clear
light hazy clouds prevailing, these are
not believed to have Berlously hamp
ered observations.
"We secured fino results undoubt
edly," said J. C. Hammond, head of
the naval observatory party. "The
thin clouds hindered little, if any
'"J'"1J"(Contlnuea on Page Two.)
YANKEE FIGHTER
S APPLAUSE
(Auociated Press Corrctpomlrace.)
London, May 11. Tho high esteem
in which England holds the American
soldier and sailor is reflected almost
daily by the tendon press. One paper
devotes a long article to American
qualities as exhibited by Fireman
M , "champion light heavyweight
boxer of the United States navy. The
writer watched him In a contest with
the champion of the British grand
fleet.
"One was forcibly reminded," he
says, "how exceedingly impolite we
are on the surface and how thor
oughly goodnatured. The latter qual
ity was responsible for the applause
which greeted the appearance of the
American applause far louder than
that accorded to our own champion.
"It swelled to a roar as he sprang
up on the stage where the ring was
fixed. It Is not thej custom in the
British navy for even a popular favor
ite to acknowledge the cheers which
greet him. The correct procedure is
for him to dive quickly into his corner
where his seconds Immediately sur
round him and hide him from view.
"Not so the American. He merely
did what he was accustomed to do at
home---paused, a solitary figure In a
well-worn dressing gown, and bowed
not as a hotel manager or a shop
walker bows, but with little shy bows
which were quite delightful to those
of us who knew something of his bat
tling reputation. -
"The American did not win; he
fought a magnificent, clean fight and
was beaten on points. But It was
good to see the real pleasure with
which he congratulated the better
man." '
INGRATITUDE AND
' TREASON RAMPANT
RV MORNINS JOURNAL SRSCIAL LSAStO WIR11
Amsterdam, June 7 (Friday.) The
Vienna correspondent of the Velscr
Zeitung, a radical newspaper of Bre
men, says that In a sensational speech.
Dr. Weiskirchner, burgomaster o(
Vienna, declared:
"High treason and Ingratitude are
rampant and the government has
proved weak and unsteady. In the
present serious time we need a parlia
ment, for even a bad parliamnet Is
better than none. It Is true that par
liament failed to deal with the food
question, but it remlans the only plat
form for free speech and the only
place where the arbitrary acts of the
bureacracy and the numerous military
encroachments can be discussed. The
supreme and the most urgent duty of
the German parties now la to show; a
united front to Slav treachery," 1
SU
flip
SUCCESS
WIN
1
BRITISH
Albuquerque, New
SURVIVORS CAN STILL SMILE
AFTER U-BOAT SINKS SHIP
frviK v- l llW
ai Ail -; cv&j
1 . -; - iA-&vJW r , , v.
I 'b ir m MX 'hiv--;-
These men urc the survivors of the schooner E. II. Cole which was sunk off the New Jersey rouvt by one of the
(J boats. The fact they lost their ship 11 ml hadn't had a meal for mure thiin SB horn's couldn't ki-ep theni from (find
ing liappl'y when they were lanilct 011 good old I'liiieil Stales soil uguiiu From lelt to light they ure: Curl
Curium, Wlllium J I ciicn, Ciiptatn II. (. Newcombe, William Jones ami Sea inn 11 Samulson.
AVIATORS 1ST
BREATHE RIGHT
AS FLUNG TEST
T NORNtNa JOURNAL BRICIAL LBASID WIRS)
Fort Worth, Tex., June 8. Hy a
"rebreathing machine" here, the first
of its kind to be established by the
United States government or any of
Its allies anywhere, aviators flying
under the Stars and Stripes hence
forth will h classified according to
their aointy to thrive in high alti
tudes. The machine Is In a research lab
oratory at Barron aviation field, and
is in charge of Lieut. G. II. Hanson.
F. W. Thomas and James Blair, who
arrived In Fort Worth recently from
Mineola, X. Y. It produces all the
sensations of ascending and descend
ing and has been In use by the Ger
man air service, it is said, for five
years.
Henceforth, no pilot from any of
the local fields will be assigned to
active duty overseas until he has
passed the tests of the contrivance
and been classified according to his
ability to withstand altitude fatigue.
Kxperience has taught that many air
casualties are due to this fatigue. One
man will be so affected that he will
faint. Another will go along with his
flying mechanically and with his mind
so dulled that he cannot plan or exe
cute an attack on an enemy. Still
another will become stupid and his
nerves will not react to the excitement
of battle.
The pilots will be divided Into three
classes. In the first class will be
placed airmen who are never affected
by altitude fatigue and who can
ascend and fight anywhere their
planes will mount.
In the next class will be those
whose mental faculties are dulled by
high altitude..
And In the last, or third, will be
those who faint under the stress,
T
VERY EFFECTIVE
fSV HORNINO JOURNAL SRSCIAL LSABKO WIRS)
Paris, June S. The new type of
German submarine cruisers accom
Plfshes little, according to an official
note commenting on German under
sell, boats. Exact Information relative
to tho operation of two of these noats
which left Germany at tha end of
1H7, cruised as far as tho equator
and were absent for four months,
shows that they accounted for only
29,000 tons of shipping;.
This was equal to only one day's
total loss from submarines In April
of the same year. At this rate Ger
many would require slaty submarine
cruisers' at sea simultaneously to in
flict the same loss as that vi3lt.;d i pc n
shipping by submarines In European
waters In a month. . , f
"But Germany cannot maintain
more than twenty of these boats,"
says the official note, "slnca tha al
lies destroy submarines fjster than
they are built. However, If thoy rink
few ships, the submarines operating
In European waters are ueful be
cause '.heir cargo space enables them
to tiring back to Germany viiluaolu
materials which are totally lucking
there." . , " r . '
NEW TYPETEUTDN
SUB CRUISER NO
Mexico, Sunday, June 9, 1918.
AIRPLANE ACCIDENTS
AT TRAINING CAMPS
Fort Worth, Texas, June S. Horace
Woods of Milwaukee, Wis., Pying ca
det, died Friday night ut tho base
hospital. Camp Bowie, as tho result
of injuries received, when he fell
2,(t00 feet late . Wednesday.
lav MORNINR JOURNAL SRBCIAL LBASBO WIRBI
Phoenix, Ariz., June 8. Late In the
nftenoon there was a joint resolution
In the house of the legislature for a
constitutional amendment to be sub
mitted to the people next November
for the restoration of capital punish
ment in this state. The resolution
was provoked by the fiendish murdor
of a small boy near Mesa on Thurs
day. The amendment will reserve to
the legislative department of the state
the power to restrict the governor's
power of pardons, paroles, commu
tation and reprieves. The resolution
was , placed on the calendar of the
committe of tho whole on Monday.
Almost the whole of the half day
session of the senate was given over
to a farewell to Senator Ernest Hall
of Maricopa, who has enlisted in the
Twenty-third engineers and left the
city.
No business was completed In either
house. Preparations were made to
take up other council of defense bills
early next week in the hope that one
f them may bo found acceptable to a
majority.
The house committee of the whole
recommended tho passage of a bill
for the confiscation of automobiles or
other vehicles taken while being used
to transport intoxicating liquors with
in the state. '
Two IWroyers TAumuipuV
Washington, June 8. -Two Ameri
can destroyers, tho Ramsey and Hope
well, were launched today at tho
yards of the Newport News Shipbuild
ing and Dry Docks company at New
port News, Va., the navy department
announced on May if, the Breeze and
the Gamble were launched simultane
ously at the same yard, making today's
launchlngs the second double launch
ing of destroyers there ..within a
month.
PERSHING HEADED
I.
IN PERSON, CLAIM
1ST MORN, MS JOURNAL SRSCIAL LSABSD WIRS1
" Washington, June 8.-General Per
shing personally directed the" fighting
of American troops at Cantlgny, from
where the Germans were driven with
a loss of 20 prisoners, members of
the senate military committee were
told today at their weekly conference
with war department officials. The
Village was taken by the Americans
May 28 and all German attempts to
recapture It have been in vain.
The Important part American troops
Have, taken In checking ,. the recent
German drive waa told to the senators,
who were informed that tho advance
probably has been, stopped for the
time, being. . i
ARIZONA SilS
ARE AROUSED BY
BRUTAL MURDER
CANT
BRITISH AND HUN
SEAPLANES FIGHT
OFF DUTCH COAST
1ST MORNINO JOURNAL atRBCAL LBABCO W,RB
The Hague, Juno 8. Five British
and seven German seaplanes of the
largest type fought a battle Tuesday
evening off the Dutch coast, accord
ing to a Teischclllng dispatch to the
Handelsblad. One German machine
was observed to fall In flames into
the sea. One British machine was
forced to descend but landed safely.
Another British machine which had
descended to tho surface of the sea
for repairs two hours before the bat
tle, wus set on fire by its five occu
pant, all of whom waded ashore and
gavo themselves up for Internment.
The crew included two Cunadiuns.
Tho British squadron of five sea
planes started Tuesday on a rocon
noltering expedition off the northern
Hutch coast. The met a squadron of
five German airplanes, which they
drove off In three successive en
counters. Germans Get C. S. Material.
Paris, June 8. Millions of dollars
worth of building material imported
from America by Miss Anne Morgan's
committee to rebuild French villages
was engulfed In the last German of
fensive, according to the Paris edition
of the New York Herald. A certain
amount of the material had been hur
riedly removed to the south but the
bulk Is now in the hands of the Ger
mans, os ulso are most of the forty
three villages for which It was in
tended. T
ACE IS
rsr morn, no journal brbcial lbasbo Vmrsi
fioldendale, Wash., June 8. Prof.
W. W. Campbell of Lick observatory
at Mount Hamilton, California, who
Is here to study the phenomena of to
day's solar eclipse, received a cable
gram from France today stating that
his son, Lieut. Douglas Campbell, an
American aviator, was slightly wound
ed. Campbell is the first American
"ace."'
The honor of being known as his
country's first aviation "ace" was
earned spectacularly by Lieut. Doug
lass Campbell on May 31. It was a
20-minute air battle In which his op
ponent 'refused to surrender but ac
cented instead the alternative of be
litft shot down by the American,
Lieutenant Campbell sighted the
German at a height of 4,600 meters.
The German tried to escape when his
ammunition became exhausted, by
fleeing toward his own lines. Camp
hell got on his tall and signalled to
him the opportunity of landing safely
on French s6ll. The German declined.
"I did not like the Idea of shooting
him down when he was not fighting,"
Campbell said later, "but I could not
let him get away." A stream of In
cendiary bullets ended the German's
career,: - ;
Campbell downed his first enemy
air pilot 'on April 15, his second on
May 21. and his last three during the
subsequent ten days. , . ,
FIRS
ME
T
WOUNDED
Eighteen Pages
F
BY THEIR U BOATS
ONU,S.SIIIPP
PLEASES TEUTMu
Press Features the Reports in
Page Headlines and All De
tails Available Are Greedily
Seized Upon,
EVOKES SATISFACTION
AMONG GERMAN PEOPLE
Newspapers Comment Editor
ially and Launch Tirades
Against United States as
Well as President Wilson.
IRV MONNIN4 JOURNAL BPfTIAL LCAGBO WIRB)
Amsterdam, June S (liy tho Associ
ated Press 1. News of the German
U-boats operations on the American
coast receives page headlines in the
lutrst German newspapers reaching
here and all details available are
greedily seined upon. The press, more
over, takes the occasion once more to
launch its tirades ugulnst the United
States and the president of tho United
"States and to endeavor to find some
I offset and comfort for the steadily as
jsemliliiig American hosts In France,
j which, despite the abuse by the Ger-
man papers cf Premier t'lemenceail
for the inspiration for I1 ranee ho
finds in the coming Americans, is evi
dently viewed Willi unything but
equanimity In Germany.
The Cologne Gazette concludes a
violent diatribe against America:
"It is therefore only right ami
fuir tJuit we, too, nuike use of
mil' war melius und show tho
friends of Immunity in their home
land vtluit wui' looks like ami
what it melius. Our U-lxiuts first
visited the American coasts for
legitimate iiccful commerce.
The North Americans may now
feel the fist of (bo wur lord.
"They need not bo surprised.
He who sows the wind reaps (lin
whirlwind, even when he sits on
the other side of the great lier
rliu? pond, whercj he Is under the
delusion that he is nfe f""" t'w
storm."
The Cologne Volks Zeittmg talks
aboufthose who ure iirnHefutlng u
Mtarvutlon wur against our wives und
ehildini ImAliig revealed to them off
their own eousts tho wrloiisness of
war, when the new strutegy of our
I -boat war, which technieiilly Is lie
coming Increasingly porfivtod. Is ulso
directed against the other shore of the
Atlantic ocean. Tills, In view of the
character of our American opM)iient
evokes on nil sides the liveliest satis
faction amongst the Geriiuiu peoples."
ANOTHER GERMAN
lav uahMINO JOJRNAL BRBCIAL LBABBD WIRBI
Paris, June 8. In an article In the
Matin, dealing with the recent ap
pointment of the Paris committee,
Frederick Br.unet, a socialist deputy,
says:
"By another drive made without re
gard to sacrifices, the Germans, If
thev did not enter Purls, could ap
proach near enough to hold tho capi
tal under fire of long range guns, not,
as now, for an intermittent bombard
ment ,but for permanent fire.
"Such conditions would render In
dustrial life impossible and the gov
ernment's will to resist must not be
influenced by the fear of sacrificing
the lives of non-combatants or by fear
of the consequences which a cessation
of the output of the munition factories
surrounding the capital would entail."
M. Brunet highly approves the for
mation of the committee.
The committee In question, whose
duty It is to defend the Paris area,
will not only study plans to meet tho
threat of Invasion, which Is regarded
as improbable, but will deal with the
problems caused by night air raids
and the long range bombardment,
says a Havas agency review of the
committee's work which summarizes
the newspaper comment. The com
mittee also will take into consideration
the question of the morale of the pop
ultion with the confident assumption
that while the enemy can strike at,
he cannot break down, the resolution
or courage of the people.
ATTEMPT TO POISON
WATER FRUSTRATED
V MORNINO JOURNAL BRBCIAL LBABBO WIRBI
Globe, Ariz., June 8. What is be
lieved to have been a dastardly at
tompt to poison the city water at Hay
den, Ariz., was frustrated ThurBduy
night by Deputy Ed Hamilton. He
'walked over to the tank and ques
tioned the man as to why he was loit
ering around the tank In the early
tiours of the morning. The ' man
reached for his hip and Hamilton cov
ered him with his gun. On searching
the man, Hamilton found a quart bot
tle two-thirds full of some dark liquid.
The prisoner was taken to the Jail at
Wlnkieman and locked up for the
night. When the deputy went to the
Jail in the morning to' feed his prison
er, he found the Juil lock sawed In
two and the prisoner gone. He has not
yet been apprehended. The bottle and
contents have been forwarded to the
state chemist at Phoenix for analysis.
n
0FFENSIVEM1GHT
ENDANGER PARIS
Daily hj Currier or Mall. 70c a Mouth
Single Copies, 60
S
.PUIOIOF
O a UOlJInm.. ..
HLLIlD
Germans Now Standing Vir
tually on the Defensive as
Americans and French Make
Gains at Chateau Thierry.
ACTIVITY SHOWN ALL
ALONG FIGHTING LINE-
In View of This an Early Re
Newal of the Hun Offensive
Is Not Unexpected; Woever
Sector Claims Attention.
1ST MORNINO JOURNAL BRBCIAL LBABBO WIRBI
In the battle field of the Marne,
where a wees ago tha Germans were
hurling their masses or troops against
the western side of the wedge they
had driven into the allied lines in the
battle that began on May 26. the
Teutons are now standing virtually on
the defensive in the Chateau Thierry
sector.
American and French troops are
participating In a reaction on the
extromo tip of the salient and are
making progress In this Important
region. The British are engaged on
the other side of the wedge between
the Marne and Rhelms.
While the operations take the na
ture of local attacks, thoy have had
their effect In driving the Germans
back from the points they reached on
the crest of the wave that carried
them far on the road to Paris. The
attacks, which began just to the
northwest of Chateau Thierry, are
spreading northward along the line
and everywhere the allies report
ground recovered from the enemy. -Rush
Is SUll Going On. :'
The rush of the American marine
and the French on Thursday after''
noon has not continued to gain ground
as fast as it did at the inception of
tho movement, but it is still going on.
In the meantime they have withstood
two violent attacks by the Germans
and have repulsed the enemy In de
cisive fashion.
Reports from the whole battle line
In France are to the effect that there
has been renewed activity on the part
of the German artillery In several
sectors of the front. Notable among
the regions under bombardment is
the lino before Noyon and Montdidler.
It is along this line that a heavy
enemy offensive has been expected by
military experts since the momentum
of the Oerman advance from the
Aisne died away. When the Germans
pushed west from St. Quentin late In
March and early in April, the line
from Noyon to Montdidler was almost
equal In Importance to that In front
of Amiens. The French forces were"
rushed to this front and fought sav-'
apoly to stop the Oerman advance and
retake ground which was of strategic
and tactical Importance, J
Activity In Wocvre Sector. - r
At the same ti-me the Woevre seco
tor, Just to the southeast ofVerdun,
Is claiming attention. Largo move
ments of enemy troops In the direc
tion of St. Mihiel have been reported
by aerial observers and there are In
dications that the positions of the
Americans along this part of the front
may be In the storm center of a ter
rific attack soon.
The advantages to be gained by the
Germans if they succeed In breaking
this line are manifold. Eighteen miles
west of St. Mihiel Is the town of Bar
Le Due, and still further westward
Is Vltry, which would be but a step
ping stone to a dash to Chalons Sur
Marne. It the line at St. Mihiel could
be broken or driven back very far the
whole Verdun sector would be In peril
and might have to be abandoned.
In the Flanders sector, which has
been quiet since the beginning of tha
attack along the Alsne, the Germans
on Wednesday sought to Improve
their positions by capturing the hos
pice at Locre. This point would give
them a starting point for an attack
on the villuge of Locre, which Is con
sidered one of the keys to the allied
positions along the hills behind tha
line southwest of Yprea. The French
forces In this sector on Friday, how
ever, attacked the enemy and drove
him back to his former positions and
the allied line has been restored.
There have been no, engagements
of a notable character on the Italian
front, but In Macedonia the allies,
particularly the Greeks, have been
continuing their aggressive operations.
JOSEPHINE MARCH ,
WEDS MAJOR SWING
ST MORNINO JOURNAL BRBCIAL IIASIB WIMl
Washington, June 8. The marriage
of Miss Josephine March, daughter of -Gen.
Peyton C. March, acting chief of
staff of the United States army, to
MuJ. Joseph M. Swing of Newark, N.
J., field artillery, U.S. A took place In
St. Margaret's church here today.
Tho ceremony was performed by tha
Kev. Herbert Scott Smith.
Owing to the recent death of the
bride's brother and because of war
conditions, the wedding company was
confined to the members of the two
families. ., , , "
SWITCHING CHARGES
WiLL BE; INCREASED
1ST MORNINO JOURNAL BRBCIAL LBASIB WIRBI '
Washington, June 8.--Local switch
ing charges are to be Increased June
25, under the same rules applicable
to other shipping, the railroad d
ministration announced today.
This will result In., doubling the
charges on many commodities, such
as sand and gravel, moving under
commodity . rates and originating
within switching districts. No car- .
load shipment will be accepted for
even local switching movement at lest
than $15 a car.
TEUTON PRES
ORE
RELAX 1G
UNOE
ARMIES
1
1
1"

xml | txt