OCR Interpretation


Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1860-1864, April 21, 1863, Image 2

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84031490/1863-04-21/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

€l)kago tribune.
TUESDAY, APRIL 21,1863.
aPTtinmnßß TIIBJROYS IN TUB
I'IELD S
Chicago lias thousands of troops in the
field, whose claim to our admiration and
support, rests on many a bloody and des
perate fight against the enemies of the
Union and the Constitution. 'We know,
from testimony, the value ol which no
Copperhead w ill deny, that it is the cry
and earnest wish of these troops to be sus
tained by their friends at home. Their
■words are borne to our cars on every breeze
that comes* from the South. “ Stand by
up” say they, u and we will fight your
•‘battles. Show our enemies no more mer
•* cy in Chicago, than we show them here,
»* and the war will soon be brought to an
«end. Be true to us who have volun
•‘teered to risk all for you, and, we will do
“the rest I” This is the voice of Demo*
crats and Republicans, who are under
aims—of men and officers, regardless of
their birth-place, politics, or estate.
hlen of Chicago! you will do well to
heed that cry. Nay, how monstrously
ungrateful not to heed it! How, if you,
by the verdict of to-day, declare your
sympathy with treason, can you ask these
hravc men to fight on to put treason down?
How if you knowingly and wilfully throw
your votes wrong, shall they, in the face of
danger, be expected to aim their mus
kets aright? "With what heart will your
sons and brothers in the field, who will
not, because it is treasonable, admit, the
Chicago Times into their camps, go on with
their arduous work, if it shall be told that
the people of this city, on the election of
Sherman, have endorsed all the treasons
of which the Times is guilty? "Will they
fight and die, while we parley that we may
make money or get office? Will they
continue to offer up their lives for their
country, while the majority offers up the
country to political hatred and strife ?
Will they stand firm if we beg? Will
they keep up their courage while
ire cower? Will their patriotism resist
the persuasions of o«r poltroonery? Wc
Tnsli that the regiments and batteries that
Chicago has sent to the war—the men who
went out from among us, followed by the
plaudits of the multitude, and the fervent
prayers of all the just —could hear and an
swer these questions. The thunder of their
indignant voices would make Copperhead
ism. tremble in its marrow bones. It is be
cause these soldiers are away—because
they cannot be heard at the polls—that
Coppcrheadism dares what it has essayed.
It is for those whose patriotism is not cor-
rupted by opportunity of profit or tbe
chance of gratifying hate—those whose ad
miration for the bravery and high honor of
our troops did not subside as soon as their
banners fluttered out of sight and their mar
tial music cased to fill the air—to stand
by the country’s defenders to-day, and see
to it that obedience to their wishes is the
law of Chicago when the polls close to
night Imagine an endorsement of the
man who refuses to do a thing or say one
Void for the defence of the holy cause, or
for the encouragement of those who hear
it onward amid the horrors of the hospital
and the battle-field; imagine the record as
it will be set forth in the Timw y should
Sherman succeed; and imagine the shame
ypd mortification with which it would he
lead wherever on the enemy’s soil, our
country’s flag is unfurled. What disap
pointment fills the heart, and what pal
gy arrests the arm of each man to
whom the announcement comes I
“Chicago untrue I” will be their cry.
“Chicago, the advocate of Jeff Davis!
“Chicago, ready to surrender! Chicago
“ willing to give us up to perish by the cue
“ my in front, or by the malevolence of par
“ tisans in the rear ? How can we fight ?
“ Why should we figbt ?”
The war must go on 1 To recede is as
impossible as to stay the sun in its course.
Let us, then, send our brave men words of
cheer that rfmll make each man a con
queror! Let us tell them that their hero
ism is remembered, and that their spirit of
sdf-sacrificc that offered all for the coun
try’s sake, is their highest title to our re
gard. Let us tell them that the cause
for which they went forth, holy in the be
ginning, is thrice holy now by tbe sacrifices
that it has cost; and that come what may
come, Chicago will not desert it. These
are the words for which their ears are lis
tening. Shall the ready wires bear them
that inspiring message to-night ?
ENGLISH NECTBALITV.
The people of this country ought to be
thoroughly posted as to the kind of neu
trality which England-has maintained be-
tween the Federal Government and the
rebels during the present war. It has con
sisted in giving as much countenance and
support to the latter as it possibly could
give within the bounds of public decency,
and in throwing as many obstructions as
ingenuity—whetted by the keenest edges
of aristocratic hate —could invent, in the
tray of the former.
Tins is not exactly the thing for a neutral
to do, and comes with a very had grace
from England, because she has always—
during late years at least—professed so
much friendship lor us, and has even gone
out of her way on several occasions to laud
our institutions and wish God speed to the
Republic. Perhaps we ought not to be
surprised at it, nor ever at any time to set
more than a common value cither upon
# her love or her hate: for what she says she
docs not mean, and what she means is a
riddle until it is put into action; and she
reconciles her falsehood with truth by the
logic of the Jesuits, and her hypocrisy with
fair'dcaling hy the canons of diplomacy.
’Tie a pity that wc cannot separate the
English people from their Government,
and that the crimes of the one should be
visited upon the other, and involve both in
the meshcsofacommonrctribution. For
Ihc people of England have their hearts
with ns in our trouble, and have done all
they could by public meetings and other
wise to express sympathy on our behalf,
and to strengthen and encourage the Ad-
ministration. It is this very fret that has
scared the British Government from its
original project of interference in onr af
fairs, and compelled it to adopt a secret in
stead of an open "warfare against us. Any
other course, indeed, "would have over
thrown the Ministry; for although the
great mass of the people have no votes,
they have a terrific outside infiuencc which,
no Government —in modem times—has
ever pretended to despise.
Even as the case now stands, it would 1
not he surprising if the duplicity of the
English Ministers in respect to American
affairs should bring about a crisis, the end
of which will be their rather sudden and
premature exit from office. The people
in that country are naturally dull
and sluggish, and it tabes a long
while to wake them up to a lull
consciousness of a pnblic wrong done in
their name, through the criminality ol their
Ministers. It is very probable that they do
not understand at present the true object
and meaning of the Alabama and gunboat
building, nor how it is likely to affect the
friendly relations between the two coun- i
tries. Here, owing to the better education ,
of the people, and the facilities afforded by !
our newspapers and telegraphs, we arc
thoroughly up to every foreign move
cveiy trick and dodge that is made on the
European chess hoard.
We arc not ignorant, therefore, that the
whole getting-up ot the Confederate loan
was a scheme of the British Government,
to help the Booth and damage the North, |
and we are well aware also how the trick |
was accomplished. It was ueccssaiy, first
of all, to impose upon the capitalists, and
rhpnt them into a belief that the war would
soon be over, the South get its recognition
abroad, and that the cotton hales would be
forthcoming at the proper time. This could
never have been done without the aid of
the British Government; for the rebel
Slates were notoriously and immensely in
debt already, and could neither V a f the in-
Iciest nor the principal of it. To borrow
more millions, therefore, on the credit of a
bankrupt Confederacy, to enable it to carry
on a hopeless war against ils legitimate
Government, was too monstrous a proposi
tion to be entertained for a moment by
ravenous Jews and moneylenders,without
gome collateral security which held out a
prospect of final ifayment of claims.
It was well known that the rebels had
already borrowed nearly two hundred and
nineteen millions of dollars, and that no
more than between seventeen and eighteen
millions had from first to last been raised in
the shape of taxes to meet the repayment
—a sum not much more than enough to
clear off a single year’s interest of the
money borrowed.
Add to this that the interest is rapidly ac
cumulating to an appalling extent, and that
the rebels have no more funds to bleed from,
and we find them altogether in a had way,
and not likely suppliants to get without
help what they wanted at the gates of the
Gold Kings. *
. The British Government and aristocracy
resolved, however, that they should have
it Hence the insulting speeches made by
Lord Russell, Lord Palmerston, and other
Ministers in the House against the Federal
Government, and their manifest sympathy
with the rebels. This was a part of the
plan which they had devised to bring the
Confederates into favor with the capitalists,
and make them listen with attentive
cars to their proposals. They let it be un
derstood—in a quiet diplomatic way—that
they took the rebels under their wing to a
certain extent; and believed they would
soon be an independent people. This, of
course, had great weight with the money
’ lenders, and was meant to have. But
this was not enough; and pending the pos
sibility that it might not have the desired
effect, they committed themselves by an
unheard of act, and one more likely to
help the South with the money-men than
anything else they could have done—by
publishing, namely, a secret letter written
by Lord Lyons to Lord Russell, iu which,
under the sanctions of privacy, his lordship
gives it as his opinion that—to make
short of a long yam—the Korth must go
down, and the South must go up I
This settled the business; the rebels got
their loan, and the British Government
maxfitained its neutrality inviolate—by vio
lating every principle of public and private
honesty, and of international law.
ABOUT TO RETIRE.
If no other job is accomplished to-day,
the demonstration that Trill he made to Mr-
Sherman that the people of this city do not
■want him as their representative in any
capacity, will be, in so far as it is effective,
a good job. He is possessed by an itch for
office that nothing can allay; and it is to
be supposed, should lie be again elected
Mayor, and not immediately thereafter
nominated for President, that he would be
over on our side as he was once before,
and that he would, as he once did, only
profess Republicanism to’ betray. It was
supposed, last November when he failed
in his canvass for Congress, that he was
politically dead and done for; and had not
Copperhead malignity as many lives as a
cat, the supposition would have
been correct. This defeat—and
defeat to-day is inevitable—will be the
last that we shall hear of air. Sherman as
a great man. The people will, when night
comes, have “ hove in a few remarks” that
will reach even his deaf ears; and the
electors of Cook county will be troubled
with bini no more. lie has run the round
of parlies, and has exhausted the list of
places in Lis vain endeavor to be a*candi
datc at every election; and it is about time
that he had run out. Who that knows his
recent political history, and Ins present af
filiations, will not lend him a helping hand
to that retirement which becomes his age
and ability so well.
the school question.
No voter who has at heart the interests
of education in Chicago vgll fail to remem
ber, in the vote that he casts to-day, the in
famy of the attempt lately made by the
Sherman faction, to seize upon the public
schools of the city and make them subsid
iary to their schemes of partisanship. That
the iniquity was defeated by tbe firmness
and fairness of Alderman Shimp, does not
remove the stigmalxom the men who plot
ted the scheme, worked it through the
Legislature and tried to put it into execu
tion. They arc again seeking opportunity
for mischief by acquisition of power—pow
er in the Mayoralty—power in the Board
of Aldermen, and hence, power - over the
schools. We are unable to fathom the
meaning of all their plans. "We arc
at a loss to know what zeal of partisanship,
or what insanity of theological hate, impels
them to disturb the sources at which oar
children end their children must drink
knowledge in; but it is certain that some
sufficient motive animates them, and that
they arc again at work. Who does not
1 hope that the schools, so many honorable,
and we trust, enduring monuments of the
love of education that Chicago has evinced,
may be preserved from their contaminating
touch ? Who will not aid in the work of
beating these enemies off? Look to the
Aldermen, and when you vote remember
the schools!
Xcvr Jersey.
The loyal people of New Jersey had a grand
Convention at Trenton on Thursday last un
der the auspices of the Loyal Leagues- A
distinguishing feature of the meeting was the
presence of a largo number of prominent cit
izens, who have not participated actively in
public movements, but who, in the present
exigency exhibit no less solicitude for the Na
tional welfare than those who have been more
conspicuous in patriotic efforts. Many influ
ential Democrats were also in attendance.
The President of the Convention, Hon. Thos.
C. Herring, was formerly President of the
Slate Senate, and has always been recognized
in his party as a Democrat of exalted charac.
tcr and influence. The spirit of the Conven
tion was hopeful and earnest, the most “ rad
ical” sentiments as to the prosecution of the
war and the necessity of suppressing home
traitors commanding the heartiest approba
tion. Steps were taken tor the formation of
a Slate League, with a council representing
cvejy county, by which the State will be thor
oughly and efficiently organized upon the
simple basis of au unconditional support cf
every measure adopted by the Administration;
and on that platform no donbt is entertained
that the next election will be carried by the
friends of liberty and the national unity.
April Election*.
ILLINOIS.
Ogle County.—ln every town In Ogle
county, where there was a contest, the Union
ticket was successful.
LaSalle County.—The Ottawa Free Trader
(Copperhead) says the new Board of Supervi
sors in LaSalle county, will stand 22 Republi
cans to 13 Copperheads. This county gave a
Copperhead majority last fall.
• Sanitary Condition of Hooker's Army.
—A recent report of the sanitary condition
of Hooker’s army makes the ratio of sickness
less than 6S to the 1,000 men—or less than
seven per cent.* The entire number sick is
about 10,000. This is a most excellent and
satisfactory exhibit, and as it comes from the
Medical Director, may be regarded as accu
rate. From this exhibit, it must be pretty
evident that tbc Army of the’ Potomac is in
xndst excelleriPflghting trim—probably better
tb«n ever before.
Soreowtul Accident.—Two young girls
named Angelina Portlippi and Josephine
Thompson, in the employ of Eliot C. Cowdin
& Co., importers ot French fancy goods in
New York, fell from the fifth story to the cel
lar of C. & Co.’s store, on Thursday last
Miss Portlippi tjas instantly killed, and Miss
Thompson died In an hour.
No Country foe Copperheads.—At the
recent Stale election In Michigan, that in the
towns of Watertown, Dement, Wisner, Wells
and Kingston, all in the county of Tuscola,
not a single Copperhead vote was polled—ev
ery one for the Union. In the town of Wells
the only man that was a Democrat last year
came out for the Union, and was elected Su
pervisor.
|3T The Union members of the Ohio Leg.
islaturo, at the close of the session, adopted
a most excellent and eloquent address to the
Ohio soldiers la the fteld.
BOOK‘NOTICES,
TUT! NEW AMERICAN CYCLOPAEDIA, a Popu
lar Dictionary of General Knowledge;‘Edited by t
George Ripley and Charles A, Dana: Sixteen
Vole. New York, D. Appleton & Company.
Thelast volume of the New American Cycle
’ piedla has justbeen issued from thcprcss,andis
already ensconced amongst Its noble compeers
on the shelves of a hundred thousand libra
ries throughout the United States. The enter
prising publishers who projected, and have
now completed tlds magnificent scheme of
knowledge and learning, arc worthy of very
high praise, and an ample remuneration; and
we heartily hope and believe they will get
both, although it was a bold venture to make,
at the best, and It required a good deal of
fiubscqent faith in the intelligence of the peo
ple to justify its periodlcalissuca during the
progress of the war.
The event has shown, however, that the pub.
listers were quite right in their calculations
of support, and the fact is In the highest de
gree creditable, both] to themselves and the
people.
We do not by any means desire to traduce
the literary character and authenticity of for
eign Cyclopaedias—especially those of Great
Britain, which arc confessedly of a very high
order of merit—when we say that an Ameri
can book of this sort was much needed by
scholars, as well as the great reading public,
and that the present performance supplies a
vast fond of information upon things purely
American, and pertaining to this continent,
which could not previously he met with in a
collected and concise form. The Editors, who
have done their share of the work with admi
table skill and judgment, have taken care
not only that this hiatus lu the literature of
previous Cyclopedias should ho well and.
choicely filled, but that no department com-'
ing legitimately within the range of their hori
zon, should be neglected. Deuce, it is not
too much to say, that America has, in this In
stance, produced the completes! and best Cy
clopaedia extant.
AH the talent in the country has been con
scripted, as it were, to build up this great na
tional work; and we ought to be proud of it;
the more so, because it is genuine and be
longs to the soil. We have been, hitherto,
in all our intellectual and imaginative crea
tions, far too reminiscent and imitative—rely
ing too much upon European precedents,
forms and materials, for architecture and orna
mentation; but this successful attempt to
compel America to speak lor herself, through
her own oracles, Is very cheering and hope
ful, and cannot fail to come to good, in all
ways.
We do not know how many thousands of
distinct topics arc discussed In this book, but
they have swelled it out into sixteen stately
volumes, and of some 750 pages each. Each
article was written also by the most compe
tent man that could be obtained, on the sub
ject to be treated of; and thus, In all the de
partments ofllteralnre and learning, jurispru
dence, science and art, commerce, manufac
tures, and agriculture, we have here a great
body of reliable facts and informations, con
tributed by the most able men In the country.
It is a Hbrary.in itself, and no one engaged
in intellectual pursuit©, or desirous of bring
ing himself up to the high water mark of the
culture of his time can afford to do without
it. The last volume contains a supplement
which includes the historical records of the
war down to last March, and supplies a large
number of new and omitted titles, including
biographies of the most eminent loyal Gen
erals, and the chief notorious leaders of the
rebellion.
Dicktnsok vs. Seymoub.—it will he recol
lected that tome few days since, Gov. Sey
mour, of New York, issued a message threat
ening to veto the bill to giro tbe soldiers of
that State an opportunity to vote at future
elections, which is now before the Legislature
of that Stale for passage. The grounds of the
Governor’s anticipated veto was the nucunsti
tutionality of the law. Under these circum
stances, the Committee who reported the bill
deemed it proper to take the opinion of Hon.
Daniel S. Dickinson, Attorney General of the
State. Sir. Dickinson, in the reply, says he
finds nothing in the State Constitution to
forbid the passage or impede tbe working *f
the bill in question, nor does ho find anyne’
ecssity for an amendment to the Constitution
to reach the desired end. Our opinion is
that Mr. Dickinson is full os good a constitu
tional lawyer as Gov. Seymour.
Massachusetts.—ln the Legislature of
Massachusetts last week, an abstract of the
valuation of the State, as assessed ilay Ist,
ISG2, was presented. From this document we
learn that the total valuation of the State was
as follows:
Value of personal estate.
Ileal estate
The county of Suffolk possesses $118,057,005
of the personal esmte, and $171,107,8G0 of the
real estate—a total of $254,053,895, or very
nearly one-third of the entire amount. While
Suffolk county Is the leading one in wealth,
Middlesex has much the largest population,
the total number of polls 48,571 to 87,003 in
Suffolk. Worcester county stands next to Mid
dlesex, with 39,321; Essex, 35,544; Norfolk,
24,173; 8ri5t01,21,235; Plymouth, 15,747,& c.
Good 'Reports.— The Cincinnati Times says
that the effective force of the sth Ohio in
fantry has been increased by the return of
prisoners, sick and stragglers, until It now
numbers 500 men, Us strength having been as
’ low at one time ns 100. The Commercial hears
. from other veteran regiments the same sort of
good news. Many of them muster more men
now than they did a year ago. And the regi
ments raised last summer have also been
rapidly strengthened within the past two or
three months, the men becoming used to
camp life, healthy and In good spirits. Regi
ments that last winter had but 300 or 400 men
fit for servi c, have now twice that number.
These are facts in the highest degree impor
tant and gratifying.
Englishman, disgusted, writes
to the London Tunes to say that
the Queen’s equipages, as displayed
in the recent royal processions, are dis
graccfultothe British nation. Theliverlcsaud
harness were old, the horses unmatched, and
the whole turn-out unfit for a moderately fas
tidious Woman of the Bedchamber to go on a
shopping excursion with. The Master of the
Horse is the individual lashed, ami thd indig.
nant Englishman thinks that If he would do
hie duty decently, as well as draw his salary
regularly, the Queen might travel respectably,
If not elegantly.
Tim Great Ram Dc^dekbeug. —This im
mense vessel, now in course of construction
at the ship yard of Mr. Webb, In New York,
has assumed shape, and her wooden hull is
almost finished. The decks are under way,
and the ram, which protrudes from the bow
of the craft, is completed. Tho length of
this vessel appears to be greater than that of
any other Iron-clad afloat. In a few weeks
the work of plating will commence, and be
fore fall her sides will be partially covered
with iron.
A Sensation- at Columbus Ohio.—A sen
sation was created in Colafilbas, Ohio, on the
15th,by the discovery .that several clothing mer
chants had been In the practice of famishing
citizens’ clothing to soldiers in Camp Chase,
to pass the guard and desert. The proprie
tors of four large establishments were arrest
ed, their stores dosed and guards placed over
them. The Butternuts arc in great travail of
spirits on account of this dection.
A jodgment for $1,600 against Judah
Peter Benjamin, the rebel Secretary of Slate,
was rendered in the Rochester (N. T.) Circuit
Court, last week. The suit was forfunds col
lected by Benjamin before the rebellion, on
claims entrusted to him as a legcl agent, and
never paid over. It is stated that the rebel
Secretary of War has considerable property
in New Orleans, and the judgment has been
sent there for collection.
frg’T* Mrs. Dame has just been tried and ac
quitted in Toronto, C. W., for attempting to
shoot another woman, the paramour of her
fugitive husband, an account of which we
published a few week's since. The papers in
Toronto regard the verdict as one of the sym
pathetic kind, and not exactly in accordance
with law.
ggT The various reported speculations of
A.T. Stewart, the New York merchant prince,
In cotton goods, butter, &c., arc authorita
tively contradicted in the New York Ledger.
Mr. Stewart not only has not speculated as
stated, but be is heartily opposed to all such
operations.
Mutiny on Gen. Fleet’s Flag Ship.—
There was a mutiny on Gen. Ellet’s flag boat,
Autocrat, on the Mississippi, afew days since.
After several hours’ confinement and fasting,
the mutineers sent a committee of three from
their company to intercede with Gen. Ellet
for their release: but the General sent them
word that they should remain in irons until
they were court martialcd, and if death were
awarded, they should be shot. He also added
that, sooner than allow a mutiny to go un
punished aboard of one of his vessels, he
would blow her up with every soul aboard,
not counting bis own life anything In the
effort to maintain that perfect discipline,
without which, an army, or any portion of it,
was utterly useless to the wise end to the
. country.
WASHINGTON CORRESPONDENCE.
Tho Conficrlptluu Still—Tlio Iron Cl&d
ifccounolKsancc—AVlial 1m Tliouglit
Of It.
[Correspondence of the Chicago Tribanc.]
■Washington, April 15,1563.
Tm: CONSCRIPTION BILL.
The Conscription bill and its enforcement is
now the subject of consideration in the Cabi
net, and the chief topic of conversation every
where. The appointments of Marshals are to
be made with great care. Men of influence
and character are to be appointed, wherever
such material can be found. Some of the
most prominent and talented men in Illinois
have signified their willingness to accept the
appointment for their Congressional Districts.
But if there should be no necessity, and no at
tempt to enforce the law. it has already ac
complished wonders for the Union cause. It
hns convinced Europe, aud therehels, that the
loyal States arc determined to. put down re
bellion; and it has carried consternation into
the secret dens of the Copperheads. It haa
been a St. Patrick to the snakes—tobacco on
the tongues of the vipers—a regular extermi
nator —and silencer of treason in the North,
as the late elections and the tone of certain
papers conclusively prove. You no longer
hear ions to the organization of negro
regiments, or to the enlistment of negroes.
Copperheads are perfectly a oegjo
Bhonld ficht. If it will save one of their nmn
be? from g the draft. It has suddenly dawned
upon their visions that negroes make good
soldiers, and that Copperheads arc lav
abidina citizens, and will not resist thedrafL
It can no longer be doubted that a Copper
head is a cowardly as well as au odious and
disgusting specimen of the viper race.
THE IKON-CLAp eeconxoissaxce.
• The President and the Cabinet, it Is' under
stood, regard the late iron clad recoimoissance
in Charleston harbor, not as a disaster, bat as
satisfactory. It was tbe object ol the move
ment to test tbe power of the iron-clads to
stand the tire of the forts, to ascertain the
character of the rebel gnus, and the nature of
the obstructions In the channel. This was ac
complished successfully. It is now known
that certain boats can safely pass tbe forts
and, without ranch doubt, get within shelling
distance of Charleston. The land forces can
now attack the city on a given day, with some
degree of certainty that Uic gunboats will be
able to co-operate to advantage. Before the
recoimoissance, there was no such certainty.
It was not known but our most Invulnerable
Monitors would be shot through and through
bv the guns in Forts Moultrie and Sumter.
The exaggerated reports of terrible torpedoes
and Infernal submerged machines in the har
bor, were, and arc still to a certain extent, a
source of serious apprehension and danger.
So far, however, as the gunboats proceeded,
these danger? have been shown to be not of a
very formidable charac’er, and it may be
safely inferred that the remaining unexplored
distance to the harbor is not a very dangerous I
road to travel, on account of submerged pow
der in any shape, however difficult other ob
structionsmay render the passage. I. think
there is no cause lor writing down the Char
leston rcconnoissance a serious attack upon
tbe forts, or a disaster in any sense. It is
true, we lost the Keokuk, and other boats
were more or less injured. But on the part ot
many it was a matter of grave doubt whether
the Keokuk would stand the test, and not one
of theiron clads bad ever been subjected to any
thing like such a terrible ordeal. The result is
that nearly all of the Monitors came off with
no very serious injury. It is true they were
somewhat bruised and battered, but these In
juries serve to point out to the engineers and
builders, what could be learned in no other
wav, the weak points and imperfections of the
boats and their arrangements, and to enable
them to apply the proper remedies. The im
pression ought not to go out to the country
that the gunboats are a failure, and that
Charleston cannot be taken. There Is no
sufficient ground for such a conclusion, and
no reason whatever for putting on a long face
on account of what has been done, or failed to
be done. Tim gunboats ate not a Micro, and
Charleston willhe taken and destroyed when
the attempt is made by the Union forces.
The apprehensions of the rebels rare well
founded in this respect. They do not claim a
victory in the late engagement between their
forts and the iron-clads, aud are looking for a
speedy and serious attack upon Charleston;
I aud they by no means speak conlidently of
! their clianccs of success. G.
OUR WISCOSSES LETTER.
Tire Recent Election—Disadvantage*
under which llic Loyal Candidates
Labored—The Result Encouraging
to Lnlon IGen—Adjutant Ctcneral
Thomas and tho new Negro Policy—
Items
(From Our Own Correspondent.)
Madison, Wis., April IS, ISG3.
Tlio result of our recent election is now
pretty well known, though returns have come
in very slowly. It now appears probable that
Judge Dixon will hare a majority against
him on the home vote of about 4,000. It may
be less, but that is not likely. The soldiers
will give Dixon about 8,000 majority, or about
11 vc-sixths or six-sevenths of all the vote,
though if all the regiments had understood
the issues involved and the character of the
two candidates as well as the 80th, in camp
here—where Cothrcn only received one
twelfth of the votes—the result would have
been similarly in all. Two regiments, one
Geiman and the other Irish, and two or three
artillery companies, misled by past party af
finities and led by Democratic organs to be
lieve that Cothrcn was just as good a Union
man, and as fit for Judge as his competitor,
voted for the regular Democratic candidate,
so boldly avowed since the election to he a
Copperhead and a disciple of Fernando Wood
and Connecticut Seymour. The soldiers vo
ted much more generally and in a much more
one-sided way than last fall, showing that
they rejoiced in an opportunity to exercise
the rights of citizens, and to put themselves
on record against the Copperheads. The j
Democrats fume with rage at the result, but I
have no remedy.
The home vote has doncmuchtbstrcngthcn
wcat-hackcd and timid Unionists. A candi
date never ran for oillcc under more unfavor
able auspices than Judge Dixon. Ho was
simply an independent candidate, prematurely
brought out, in a manner that many objected
to, by a few lawyers, and afterwards endorsed
by the Union members of the Legislature, but
not nominated by any parly, and so holding
no one to his support by party fealty. Then
be was warmly endorsed by E. G. Ryan, who
is popularly regarded as the incarnation of
Copperhead Democracy, in a Democratic Con
vention, where he barely foiled of getting the
nomination, though the Convention manifest
ed a plainly disloyal spirit. And farther, his
decision against the power of the President to
suspend the writ of Aobcas corpus and declare
martial law in loyal States, was most unpalat
able to Union men, and gave plausible excuse
for wide misrepresentation of his position as
a loyal man, and the opposition or very cold
support of several Republican papers. Be
sides all this, the Farm Mortgagers were
leagued against him in a body, and so changed
the votes of men from their natural affinities
as to lose votes for Dixon to the extent of SCO
in Rock, the same in Dodge, and hundreds in
other farm moitgage counties. Notwithstand
ing these disadvantages, he has gained between
two and three thousand on the Union vote of
last Poll, and demonstrated that with a good
ticket and an active canvass, the Copperhead
Ditnocraaj cou It beaten out of fight on tha home
vote, in the State election next Fall.
The farm mortgagees, by their course in
going bodily for such a man as Cothrcn, hive
alienated a large amount of sympathy here
tofore felt for them, and committed political
suicide.
.$315,311,513
513,0(19,113
$355,950,530
The fanners arc having superb weather to
cel In their Spring Crops, and are diligently
improving it. From all that I can learn, Ido
not think the "Winter has proved favorable to
the small amount of Winter wheat sown In
this State,
There is a large amount of building, both
for business purposes and lor residences,
under way, or projected here this season.
Money seems plenty, and almost every one
prosperous.
Major Stansbury. United States Military
Superintendent of Wisconsin, who died here
yesterday .was a rare specimen of olllclal in
tegrity. He has been most conscientious in
the discharge of all bis duties here, and one
or two of his last acts were characteristic. He
directed .the chronometer given him years
ago by the Government, his drawing tools,
and everyhing of that nature, to be returned
to the Government. He had a son who Is a
Brigade Quartermaster of the regular service
in Roscerans' army. When it was proposed
to send for him, his father, who was aware
that he had but a few hours to live, declined
telegraphing for Win, saying that “he could
do no good’ here, and his time and services
were due to his country.” Philos.
A Disgusted Coppcrlioad.
Austin Brooks, editor of the Quincy Herald ,
has withdrawn from the editorial management
of that concern, for reasons which will be
found below;
TO THE HEADERS OP THE QUINCY HERALD.
For the present, the undersigned withdraws
from the editorial management of the Herald.
He Is unable, fromseveral causes, to be present
in the oflice and superintend its management,
to write the editorials, to make the selections
that appear iu the paper, and a* he doc* not
choose to be called vpen almost daily to retract ,
qualify and explain, he proposes to withdraw
until such time as he can devote his exclusive
attention to the paper. The Herald will be
conducted by our associate, Gen. Singleton
and his assistants, until we can make our ar
rangements to bestow onr exclusive attention
to it. In the mean time I shall retain my in
terest in the establishment, and in other
spheres than that of one of its editors, do all
in my power to promote the usefulness and
success of the paper. Austin Brooks.
Buivns House. —We learn that CoL H. Wal
ters returns to Chicago this morning, to re
sume his former position in the Tremont
House, having been disappointed in obtaining
satisfactory arrangements In relation to the
control of the Burtis House, which it bad
been announced he was to assume. This la'
much to be regretted. Under the popular
management or Col. Walters, a hearty Union
man, the Bnrtis House would have regained
—if not. indeed, exceeded—its former popu
larity. Tbeßoms has in betterdays been the
pride of Davenport, therefore we the more
rccret that the well known skill and taste of
Col. Walters cannot be exercised In our city,
to which we believe he is attached, rather
than la Chicago. The Tremont, however,
will be a largo gainer by our loss. —Davenport
Gazette.
Dr, Burtis, wc learn, maintains possession.
of the Bnrtls. We hear he is becoming more
rabid and Copperhcadish, every day. He re
cently expressed to some gucsta a wish that
“Abe Lincoln and bis whole d—d Abolition
Cabinet could be conscripted into the army,
and every ecamp of them bo shot.”
FKOMBEJTOKE VICaSBUKG.
Adjutant General TUomas-Tiic Poli
cy ol'tlie Administration —BcTidPrw-
oucpN-Sanliary-Xho Expedition to
.tlie Simlloncr.
[Correspondence of the Chicago Trihnne.]
Transport Fleet, )
Ofp Milliken's Bend, I*a.« r
AUKIVAL OF GES. THOMAS.
The steamer Rocket, a little rickety Btcrn
wheel boat, arrived down yesterday morning,
having on board Gen. Thomas, Adjutant Gen
crab making his tonr of inspection throngh
the Southwest. Gen. Thomas was received
by Gen. Grantand stafi; aboard tbo Rochet
bat kept bis state room dnrlngthe day, owin
to indisposition, conscqnent to the eUm.deo
this nnhealthfnl part of the countrj . Joa
are probably aware of the natnre of his visit,
lie is authorized to proclaim the policy of the
Administration on the contraband question,
and to investigate in a general way the busi
ness conduct of the array at large. •
TUB POLICY ENUNCIATED BY OCX, THOMAS.
It will be gratifying to the friends of the
Government to learn that the last policy it
has seen proper to adopt with regard to the
negro in the lines of onr advancing armies, is;
meeting with the hearty approbation ot all
the loyal officers to whom it has been an
uonneedy and that no difficulty, whatever, will
he found in placing efficient and undoubtedly
patriotic officers in command of the new reg
iments. Applications are made dally, in ad*
vancc, for positions, and a most encouraging
spirit and enthusiasm prevails. Thetime had
come long since for-the formation of negro
regiments, ant?their remains little doubt of
their success.
REBEL PRISONERS.
Col. Norton, Provost • Marshal General
to General Grant, received live rebel
prisoners this morning, sent in from
Richmond, La., a town on the Shreveport
and Texas Railroad, and situated twelve miles
in a direct line back from Milllken’s Bend.
The prisoners include Lieut. Col. R. 8. Tay
lor of tbo 3d Arkansas, and J. M, Leitch, an
ex-member of Congress from North Carolina,
and were taken by some troops under Gen.
Osterhaus, in a skirmish, a few days ago, the
particulars of which I did not learn. The
rebel officer wore a home-made uniform of
Sey cloth, embroidered at the cuffs and col
r with gold lace, and set off with the regula
tion Btaffbnttons of the United States, stolen,
no doubt, from the uniform of some United
Stales officer, either captured or killed by the
enemy. He was placed under guard on the
Minnehaha, but had the freedom of the cabin,
where he went through the usual vulgar swag
ger peculiar to the rebel officers, especially
those belonging to the pistol and howie-knite
Slate of Arkansas.
SANITARY.
After several days of uncomfortably hot
•weather, the clouds lowered yesterday until
sundown, when a most refreshing rain set in,
accompanied by vapordiispclimg thunder and
lightning. To-day the atmosphere is refresh
ing, but it is laden with dampness, and the
skies 6t ill betoken rain.
There is nothing worthy of particular note
at Young’s Poiutrescept that it grows daily
more unendurable on account of the accumu
lation of filth. The river continues to recede,
but its lull is almost imperceptible; in
deed, the only certain means of judging
is by the gradual disappearance of water in
the doughs and bayous back a little ways from
the shore. The water in these has already as
sumed that green, repulsive slimincss pecu
liar to all stagnant water, and during the in
tense heat of the more intensely hot days the
deadly malaria exhaled from them can be
sensibly detected on the breeze. There is no
doubt at all of the deleterious effect of inhal
ing such’an atmosphere, but it must be en
dured for a time, and we must make up our
minds to looie apcrcentago of our troops for
a lime, either by sickness or altogether by
death produced by the unavoidable sickliness
of the locality. On the whole there is a great
improvement in the condition of the troops,
even within two weeks, and everything wears
a more cheerful aspect than was wont to meet
the eye in this army.
A DESERTER.
A deserter from the besieged city brings the
usual story of the tremendous strength of the
rebel fortifications, suliering among the rebel
troops, but their expressed determination to
bold their ground nt all hazards. He states
that the rebel commanders hadalread learned
of the
EXPEDITION TO THE SUNFLOWER,
by Tray of Greenville. This, it will be re
membered consisted of Gen. Steel’s division,
■which left Young’s Point about, ten or twelve
days ago, and which is now probably engaging
the rebel forces known to bo thickly encamped
between the Sunflower and Yazoo Rivers.
Heavy firing was heard in the direction of the
Yazoo, off from this point yesterday forenoon,
which favors* the opinion that Steel’s forces
arc already operating in that direction. It
was the intention to clean all that country
out, bclzc all the forage and subsistence to be
found, and make a good job, oria other words,
not to leave a thing undone which might form
the basis for future annoyance to our army in
that section. This “is aconsnmmation most
devoutely to be wished” for the swamps aud
bayons thereabouts have hitherto afforded the
most convenient and safe lodgment for cut
throat bands of guerillas whose operations
wc have had abundant reasons to dread and
guard egainst. - Bod.
Prof. Labonlayc on America.
[Paris Correspondence of the N. T. World.
M. Laboulayo. the distinguished professor
of the College de France, whose knowledge
of America is perhaps greater than that of any
man in Europe, concluded bis lecture on
Monday as follows: “America is the future
of civilization; America is the future of lib
erty, "When her territory shall become as
populous as that of France, 200,000,000 of free
men will occupy it, with a system of govern
ment which will, with irresistible force, draw
all the world to follow the example. It is for
Ibis that I am so interested in American pro
gress; it is lor this I wish to direct your at
tention toward It—you, young men, particu
larly. for it is to you that tho world looks for
its advancement.” This was received with
enthusiastic plaudits, the speaker having evi
dently possessed himself of the hearts of his
audience. M. Laboulayo remarked, in the
course of his lecture, that it may be remem
bered that twenty or thirty years ago the most
intense sympathy existed between Americans
and Frenchmen; all seemed inspired with the
noble friendship of Lafayette for Washington.
Ho asked, “Why is it that this friendship has
cooled V Why is it that the name of Ameri
can Is not so dear to us as it was in those
days? It is duo to slavery; we had always
hoped that something would bo done to put
an end to an institution which was regarded
by the founders of the Constitution as fraught
with peril to the country; but instead of this,
the partisans of slavery, having obtained tho
ascendant, have continually been eugiged in
efforts to perpetuate It and extend its limits,
so that wo have ceased to feel the same inter
est in Americans,”
PERSONAL.
A. T. Stewart, the prince of New York
merchants, has authorized the master of brig
Gen. Bauficldto load a full cargo of provis
ions, entirely at his expense, for the benefit of
the poor of Ireland.
A Suffolk correspondent of the Hartford
Pras % gives the following version of the un
fortunate affair at that place, which resulted
In the death of Col. Kimball, at the bands of
Gen. Corcoran:
41 In my relation of the Corcoran and Kim
ball affair I committed the error ol saying
that Lieutenant-Colonel Kimball was on
picket duty at the time of his death. I have
learned since that he was at Gen. Gutty’s
headquarters at the time of the unfortunate
occurrence; that ho halted (of course with no
authority) Gen. Corcoran, who was riding
past, and that he nut only used abusive lan
guage, but drew svnd brandished his sword,
threatening the General, If ho attempted .to
pass. The General, whose business was ur
gent, and seeing no alternative, drew his re
volver and shot Kimball dead Such, I be
lieve, to be a tmo version of the affair.”
—Lieut- "W. L. "Wheaton, of Providence,
B. L, son of Dr. Wheaton, and an aid to Gen.
Palmer, went to the month of Pamlico river,
in a steamer, and then taking a small boat,
passed the rebel batteries, delivered dis
patches to Gen. Foster, and then returned to
the steamer uninjured. Such an act of per
sonal bravery is worthy of record.
—Gen. Wadsworth called on the veteran
Scott, as chairman of the committee of ar
rangements for the loyal league meeting,
held in New York, on Monday evening, to
request him to preside. The veteran replied
that be bad thought he should not again pre
sent himself before a popularaudiencc, but In
the present condition of public afTiirs he
would consent cheerfully to “ help the boys
take one battery more,”
—Zaccheus Beatty, Esq., editor ami pro
prietor of the Knoxville ifrpw&hVan,- was
elected Mayor of that city on Tuesday of last
week.
James B. Hull, of Decatur, in ibis State,
was arrested in Baltimore on tbc 14th, charged
with disloyalty; but he was finally released
on taking the oath of allegiance.
—lt is well known that the Due dc Pen
thler, son of the Prince de Jolnviile, is a
student in our Naval Academy, at Newport,
R. I. The wife of the Prince and mother of
the Due, was Donna Francisca, sister of the
Emperor of Brazil. Rev, J. C. Fletcher, in a
recent lecture at Newport, R. L, stated that
in case ol the death of the two Brazilian
Princesses, the Emperor’s daughter, and ol
the children of Donna Jamearia, the elder
sister of Don Pedro 11., the Orleans member
of our Navel Academy would become the
Emperor of Brazil. Mr. Fletcher, however,-
suggested a shorter way to a share in the Im
perial throne, viz: by the young Duke marry
ing his cousin, the fair Donna Isabella, who is
the immediate heir of the gifted and intelligent
monarch of Brazil. The Duke Is a very tall,
unformed lad of 17 or 18, assumes no airs,
and is simply recorded in the books of tbe
Academy as Pierre d’Orleans. His compan
ion, or guardian, is Capt, Fauvcllc, late ol the
French navy. We should not be surprised
in the turn of fortune’s wheel the student of
the XJ. S. Naval Academy became Emperor
consort in Brazil. Stranger things hare hap
pened. grandfather. Louis Philllpc, was
un exile in our country. Prince Talleyrand
for a time found a homo in Newburyport ana
New York. Louis Napoleon three
months qf banishment in the United Btatea.
Louis PLillipe reached the French throne,
Talleyrand became the facile govemor ot
monorchs; and Louis Napoleon is the Pros-
in the hight'of his power sways
monarchs and raises storms generally. It re
mains to he seen whether he can also potently
say
« Untie the spell,” .
And promise you calm aeas.aoiplciotißgalaß."
Orleans family should some day occupy a
place more conspicuous than that of student
in the new world.
©tnrral Kolias.
'"PRIMMING RIBBONS, plain and
_l_ quilled.
Trimming Velvets,
BRAS AND BDOIE TRimUNGS AND
OBNAHESI3,
Corsets, Hosiery, G-loves,
SUN UMBRELLAS, &e.,
Large lots, newly received, and greatly reduced la
price. Close buyer* please call.
CRAVES & mn?iE, 78 Labe Street.
HERR.
For Fir«t Assistant Engineer of Fire
Department.
According to the wishes of so many of my friends
and fellow citizens, and because no nomination for the
Fire Department hns been made at tne Bepabllc-ia
Union Convention, whose di-legates would certainly
have supported me. I hereby solicit the rotes of my
fellow citizens for the above named office. at the com
ing city election. I have always supported Republican
principles, and nothing but an experience of many
years as a fireman, could determine me to bring my
name as a candidate for the office of First Assistant
Engineer of the Fire Department before the pubUc,
and on the Republican r nlon Ticket. . ,
I hope to be supported In my claim by all my Ameri
can leliow citizens. •
apS's-clCw-St AUGUSTUS HERR. -
ATATRTMONIAL.—A lady of
Ifx pleasing personal appearance, and possessed of
all requisite female accomplishments, wonld like to
correspond wlthagentlcmaa (between fifty and sixty.)
with a view to marriage. Apxbsoxof wealth pb*-
pzbz&o Please address. with confidence, Mrs.GRACH
CASTLE. Post Office Box 712. Chicago. Hliaola.
opis-cssc-sita ;
Durham and deyon
BULLS.—There are the Summit. Cook County,
several thorough bred , w w _
DUKHAItt AND DEVON BULI9,
with pcdlgri.es recorded.tu the Herd Book*, and appli
cation caLbemade to the subscriber. cate of lion. John
Wentworth. Chicago, orto hln>elfat the premises.
apitc&y -Ct vast 2tw ____
J£YERT DAT LAYING
BLACK SPANISH HENS,
Those feeling an interest In this class of fowls can
address the sußscrlber. care of Hon. John Wentworth,
at Chicago, or call «m him a: Summit. Cook
aplT-CLSI-2t fom 2tw . H. HAY.
HONEY.
HIGH PRICE OP SUGAR.
In consequence of the high price of Sagar. tnaay
families are using Roney, which can he procured with
out expense alter tne purchase of the Urst Hire of
Ikes, besides the large quantity of surplus honey made
by Bees ycarlv. they sind ont two and often three os
tia swarms, ffnerclsno way in which lire dollars can
be so economically expended ns In purchasing a Hire
oMccs, to be delivered at any depot In Chicago, Bees
season can be safely sent to any portion of the
Tubed bfates. Apply at the Summit Farm. Cook
County, or address, care or Uou. John Wentworth.
Chicago, the subFcriber. H. HAT.
apl ocfiSu 2t raM-2tw
ORTHWESTERN CHINESE
Sugar Manufacturing Company.
Tlila Company chartered by tbe last General Assem
bly of tbe Suuo of Illinois, with ample and liberal
pow-rs. bn* onf r.cd books for tbe subscription of stock
at tVelr cilice in tbe city of Cairo. Illinois.
Tbe manufacture of sugar from Sorglmm or tho Cal
liege Sngar Cane, and the yield onmmenFe.lt not fabu
lou* - proilt from tbe article even at ordinary market
rates, arc facts which now admit of the fullest demon
stration. As Southern Illinois. In point ot climate and
soil Is admlrablv adapted for the growth of the- cane.
o nd as the cultivation of tbe cane already forms a
great feature In the agricultural parsultsof the people,
the Ctnets of the location of thcfactory will be readily
C °lt C ls < the’pnrpoEO of the Company to erect andhare In
operation a large factory before theclossof the pres
ent season: and with a view to aid In that particular
subscriptions of stock Is solicited on tbe following
terms: Shares One Hundred Dollars each • twenty-five
dollars at tbe time of subscription, and the balance In
Quarterly pavments. A receipt will be given for each
Installment, and whoa tbe fall sum Is paid a Ccrtlllcate
of stock bearing the signature cf the President and
Secretary of tbe Company, will be ifsncd. ....
Tbesuccessof this enterprise, when once started. Is
beyond a question. The President of the Company has
had much experience lu European countries. lalUo In
tbe erection of factories and the manufacture of sugar,
and le abundantly satisfied that no field ol operation
be has ever seen promises belter than this. So fully
satisfied Is be of success, that for one he will oppose
the tale ol a single share ol stock at any price, however
high, alter enough has been taken to erect and put In
operation the first factory.
OFFICE OF THE COMPANY,
Commercial avc., near the Post Office, Cairo, Illinois,
CAPT. D. W*. IIIKSCII.
QpU-c458-8t
TO DEALERS IN
statiosebt.
Ecrdcd proposals for tarnishing t’e State of lowa
with Stationery, as per the following Schedule. will bo
•received at tho office of the secretary of State, a: Dos
Moines, in eald State, until the 21st nay of July, ISG3.
atncneors»ldday. on the said cloy seen proposals
as shall have been received tip to said hoar, will he
opened, and the contract or contracts awarded to tho
lowest responsible bidder or bidders; the parties con
tracting on the part of the State, reserving the right to
let the contract in part* to dlflerent bidders. If advis
able Proposals must be accompanied by samples ol
the articles to be famished, which said article are to
be delivered at the office ol the Secretary of State, at
t: e Capital, on or before tho 12Ui day of October next,
without claim* for height, boxes, or anything extra,
over amount bid: Rrnmmx
1200 reams book paper—2lx33 Inches,
SO reams legal cap.
150 reams commercial note.
l! 5 reams flat cap.
125 reams letter paper.
10 reams packet post.
10 reams folio post.
60 reams enveloping paper.
€0 reams pamphlet covers.
I*s U. envelopes. No. 10—9 inch.
5 at. envelopes. 10 Inch.
•,t doz. inkstands, common.
15 doz. cold pens with silver cases.
14 doz. letter pads.
2 doz. erasing knives.
12 doz. Cushing's Manual, *
14 doz. maps ol lowa
3 doz. quart bottles writing fluid.
2 doz. bottles common Ink.
2 doz. bottles mucilage.
2 doz. mucUase bottles with brushes.
1 doz. spools red tnpe, \i inch.
2 doz. bolts silk ribbon.. 1 .-Inch.
20 dez. rubber erasers.
8 gros* rubber bands, assorted sizes.
S gross blotting boards.
30 press steel pens.
4 gross pen holders.
30 boxes candles.
ICO boxes paper wafers or seals.
25 boxes eyelets, assorted sizes.
0 eyelet machines.
■ft pounds flax twine. . „ .
.T. W. CATTEI.L, Auditor cf State.
Pcs Moines. April B.iSf3. apltc3t99witew
'THE LAST CHANCE BEFORE
JL TUB DBiFT.
19th Reg. Illinois Vol. Infantry.
I bave been authorized to recruit an entire new
Company for tuts Regiment. The noncommissioned
officers of the Company are to be selected from tho re
cruits when a foil complement has been mattered in.
thus giving all a chance for promotion. This is a good
opportunity to cater atoncc into an old and splendidly
drilled regiment, ono that has a good reputation and
stands first with the Commanding General (General
W. S. Bosecrans.)
The term of service of the Regiment expires in Ilf
teen months.
Tlic Same Bounty, Advance Fay,
Regular Pay,
And allowances will be allowed to this Company as to
the three years troops,
The Company will rendezvous. until filled, at Chi
•ago. and will move as scon as filled to Murfreesboro
tojoln Use Reclment. For further particulars apply to
LIEUT. V. BRADFORD BELL. P. O Box 512, Chicago,
Or at Tent la Court House Square,
Or at 19 Cook’s Block. Rock Island, ULlcols. of Lieut.
AT.YA n MANSUR. TJth Illinois. ap9 c«B-2w
lake street, 202
CHICAGO. 111.
CLOAKS,
CLOAKS.
navtogtaken the Store IC3 Lake street, permanent
ly. the undersigned d&lree to Inform the Ladl&a ot
Chicago that ho has now oa exhibition and will bo
revet ring weekly from Eew York, oneof the richest as
sortments of Spring Cloaks that has ever been seen In
this city I flatter myself that from my long experience
in the badness In. New Tort, I will merit a share of
your patronage. IfollcU & can before making yoap
Mirations. DASIKL CARR. 102 Lake street.
5.51.—A fan assortment of Children*# Cloaks.
rums-K&t-io „
j^OTICE.
BOOTS AND SHOES,
AT WHOLESALE.
Having added a WHOLESALE DEPARTMENT to
ourßetailEuslaesJ. we arc prepared to show a well
selected stock for city and country trade, to which
the attention of wholesale purchasers U Invited, as
r.arlDß them that prices shall be AS LOW* IP NOT
LOWER, than can be found elsewhere.
IN THE RETAIL DEPARTMENT,
May be found a SPLENDID ASSOKTJfEKT of the
latest rtylce of goods, and we take this medium of re
turning our thank* for the firmer very liberal patron-
age, and would respectfully solicit a continuance of
tbc same.
ROBERT BAMBER,
133 Lake Street*
ftpl-bSOG- SOt
WESSON.
HEW AND COMPLETE STOCK OF
BOOTS & SHOES,
Careftilly selected for the
WESTEBN XUIDE.
ISTo. 12 Gortlandt streat,
(Opposite tbe Western Hotel.)
fe3-*2»3m YORK.
'J'O RENT—New and second-hand
PIANOS.
A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF
PIANOS AND MELODEONS,
at wholesale andictaD. Orders from a distance prompt
ly attended to JULIUS BAUER*CO.,
mliH-KKC-Sa 99 South Clark street.
UL. CARDS, containing Pat
• rtotlc Bong*, adapted lor use In tap council
room, neatly primed in colors, are for sale at tula
office. Price. SO cent* per dozen. Address
»PU TWSUNfi CQMPANX. CUcagQ.
gimnaenunta.
v* eVICKEB’S THEATRB.
IVI llndL-on street. Between Btete and Deerbom.
Diiri opSmil t Q-Bto.fr: penecmnneeecenmeneeei.
merits air known to all America
and CrUl»h Europe.and -»h#aO ablltUea are use.iQ»led
to tli* waits of the drama. It which they appear
J W WALL AC K .lu.. the able Tragedian and popa*
laf'actorTwd EX’DaVmIWIT ejtcemtd by tee
nrtM and public »f the moil critical cities ai aB a~to.
whc»e rerltxsbns thrown the nio»t brilliant opon
all tbeflne*t pla'acttbe Esallih *npwj.e Tn »e
talented arM»tixvl ! l arrear this evening a« ■! ACDETn
AND MACDUFF, anrported by a catt which gnaran
t4ca the re rdf rink of the great Tragedy In a maaner
M VSSURPASSEO IS 'CUE COUNTRY.
TUESDAY EVENING. April 21st, will be probated
Shakspcare’a Tragedy Of
MACBETH.
.J. W. WALLACE. JR
~..E. 3. IytVERP&RT
MACBETH.
MACDUFF.
To conclude with a
Graxd Daxcs Mua Jxsne Hisnr.
r3*”Dmlrg the week Shakspcare's groat work of
HAMLET, and Lord Byron’s Tragedy of WERNSB.
will be preaented with nnequaled costs.
HALL.
The Model' Troupe of fire World.
DUPREZ & GREEN’S
New Orleans Minstrels,
Baricsqae Opera Troupe and Brass Band, of Eighteen.
Ethiopian Arttts, litroduclng
com. FOOTS AND COIi. SSIU,
The two ptrallest. mo.-t perfectlv formed, best edu
cated, and lightest people ever before trie public.
POSITIVELY FOUR MIGHTS ONLY!
Friday, Saturday, Monday and Tuesday Even
ings, April 251h, 27th. A 28th,
Admitted to he the oldest.most complete, carefully
selected, and most extensive band In existence.
Con. Foote Is twenty two years old, twenty-eight
inches high, and weighs but twenty three pounds.
t3F~ Doors open at 7 o'clock Concert to commence
at a fleamr before 8. Admission i> cents.
ap2C-cTS7-7t C. IX. DUFRKZ. Manager.
A RLXNGTON, LEON AND
Xl DONNIKEK’S MINSTRELS. Opera House.
Randolph street, between the Mutteeon and Sreiman
Uonrvs MONDAY EVENING. April 20ih. and every
evening during the week. First week of tho Great
Eastern Band, who will appear in their new uniforms,
with now Instrument?. &c., presented to them express
ly for this eceazemest by Arlington, Loon as Doanl
kcr’s Mlnsttclsf N. B.—There will be no Gift Concert
during their engagement. Third week and imruenso
sutce*»of Leoir&New Operetta ••Love In a Basket
First week of tho great Flutist. Mr. Drach. First
week of the baautlfuT song, “ Who will care for.Mother
now.”sung by Edwin Kelly: ArUcston rnnutng for
Office: Nuobs. the Poet apl3-c7£t-lw-U
npHE FOURTH ANNIYERSA-
X ETOFTUE
St George’s Benevolent Association,
Win be celebrated
On Ito 33d Inst., with. a Ball and
Sociable,
TO BE HELD AT
BiETST-A-lSr HC-ALL.
The cumber of tickets is limited, «o If you wish to
participate In one of tlicinostple&sautatTalrs of tbs
tcascD buy your tickets carle. Tickets can be bad at
the following places: On too Sontn Side atA.ll.
lilackall's.-iyClaikstfeet; Joseph Uatler's. Clark
Ft • James Grln.shaw.C;ark Diar Ifitb Thomas E.
Po'olsoa. 120 Clark st: Thomas E. Cook. IQ ‘Wells st.
North bide—Joseph Sobey’s Drop Store. 65 Marie st.
■West Side, at Richard Slater's. 135 Randolph st.; John
lloore Maxwell’s, between Jefferson and t/nloa sta.
Tbo Sapper will he served up by the wcllk-.oxn ca
terer. Mr. John Wright. W Sooth Clark st., who also
has ticket? for sale. ..
. comuittke or Rzcettion.—Aid. W. Baragwanath,
ComißlPSlotjcrTVin, M. Wayman.Y. C. W.Bayley.
t3T Music by tbe Light Guard Band. _
apl9-c7i9 5t 3 JOHN LOLLINs.Sec,
fills ttllaiutui!.
gTEIKEK & GO.
CLOAKS!
plain, beaded aid eioilt
ESIBBOIBEBSD.
Circulars and Sacques,
New anil Splendid Styles
NOW READY AT
STRYKER & CO.’S,
No. 141 Lake street,
ALSO—JUST RECEIVED,
SOTTED, U!I), and FHE LUIBS WOOL
SHAWLS,
Tn Seasonable Colors.
DRESS GOODS
SUN UMBRELLAS,
Parasols and Son Shades,
A Urge stcck now la store.
Bonnet, Trimming and Belt Eibbons.
JOUVETS & ALEXANDERS KIDS.
A large assortment of
HOOF SKIRT S,
Prints and Domestic Goods,
EMBROIDERIES,HOSIERY & GLOVES,
Jnst opened, and will be *old at prices eslotv as can
cisawUeie bo found.
STRYEER & CO.,
11l LAKE STREET.
mytS-riTfl-ly
J ' H. REED & CO.,
’ IMPOSTERS AND JOBBERS OF
DRUGS & CHEMICALS,
146 I.AEFi ST., CHICAGO.
Also, deal largely In
PAINTS, OILS, WINDOW GLASS,
GLASS W A-liE,
Burning Oils, Kerosene,
SOAP-MAKER’S STOSK,
Mannfactnrers’ Goods, &c., &c,,
"Which -we offer at prices favorable to Western Mer
chants and Manufacturers,
J. H. REKD. I*l Pearl street,». Y.
mMS-biawm E.A.HURLUUT. Chicago.
JJATS, CAPS, &c*
25 Lake Street.
¥EBER, WILLIAMS & FITCH
new offer for
EARLY SPRING TRADE,
by the package or dozen,
5.0 00 CASES.
Hats, Caps, Straw Goods,
UMBRELLAS. PARASOLS,
Palm Leaf Goods, Shaker Hoods, &o,
comrrWrff toll lines of an new style*. making the
LARGEST and BEST ASSORTED STOCfc to ba found
West of the sea board, most of which wasrmrehaaed
before the late advance In priced, and wUTbo sold a*
cheap sa can bebaoght of the best noose* la the Atlan
tic cities. feaSaMO-toi
pLOTH AND PIECE GOODS
\J HOUSE.
GHAS. BEMDSLES & BROS.,
56 T iake Street,
Have now in {tore and are In dally receipt Of tiQ
Largest and Only Exclusive Stock o:
CLOTHS, CASSMERES,
VESTBVGS,
SATDiETTS,
TWEEDS,
. COOTBY JEMS,
ixws,
IffABSAILLES,
COTTOKADEB, CHECKS, BRILLS,
And all otlior Piece Goode, for MEN’S WEAR. ever
exhibited In this market.
McrchauW visiting tbe city arc invited to call and
examine our selections ana prices before purchasing
elsewhere. A lull, complete and extensive assortment
cf Tailors* and Clothiers’ Trimmings always on n&niL
as also CLAY’S St SCOTT'S EasMoa Plate* and Be
ports. fa3-aS67-gm
Made and pat up.
ALSO.
Bags made and articles of every Had sewed for parties
wtahiogtofaialahthelrown goods. Canalesraswed
at our STEAM Sewing Machine rooms.
GILBERT HUBBARD & CO ,
Ship Cbaadicrs and Sail Makers.
apIDcHS-Gt . M 7 South Water, corner Well* street.
TJOWARD INSURANCE CO.,
XX NEW YORK.
Chartered 1825. Capital, $250,000,
With a large surplus.
ap7-cICS-lm T. T. PHILLIPS. Agent. M Lake street.
IVT ALT. MALT. MALT.—Sn
JjJ perlor Barley Malt for sale. Addre** J. £.
SANDS, COhauUaa Brewery, Chicago. mb*H>a6-na
faction Sales.
/COLBERT & SAMPSON,
46 and 43 Dearborn Btroot
Superior Household Furniture,
BRUSSELS CABFETS, PIANOS) Ac,
AT AUCTION.
On Monday. April 07th. at sv o'clock, we shall
sell at the fonr.story residence,
508 Wabasli Avenue,
For Q family going East, the entire effects of nald
houie. i ticslstliz i f a line ard large a-tortment of
superior Parlor. Chamber and Diningroom Kurnltar*
Brussel* nnd other Carpet». Cor tl- c and SloveF
China Crockery and Kitchen Utensils Ac.*
Al-o. oteKosewooaP.'vel Plano. read-; in Parts. The
above grorta arc all In good order, and w*>rthy the at
tention <-f liou-ekcepcrg. ap2i cilT-Tt
(GILBERT & SAMPSON,
4J4 43 Dearborn street.
The entire Furniture, Carpel*, Plano,
&e, t of* the Poster Stonge, at Auction.
We shall sell on Monday, May Uth. commencing a:
9/* o clock A. 31. and continue until nil Is sold, the en
tire furniture of theFo?tcr lloose.fon the comer of
North Clark and Klczle sU,' consisting of all the par
lor, alalng-roou. and bed room furniture. Qae curled
hair mattra>;cs, bed* and betiding. carpet*. mlrro*a.
rosewood ri’tco forte. Ac.. Ac. particulars will be
given cne week before the sale. Sale podttvc and
without reserve Each article will be sold .operate,
and cot ail together. GILBERT A SAMPaoN,
ap2t c?i‘i id Auctioneers.
VJ, 46 A IS DEAEBOnS STREET.
NEW AND SECOND HAND
Furniture, Carpets, Bugs, &0., &c.,
A.T JATJCTIOIC.
On TUESDAY. April 21st. at o’clock, we aha!!
sell at our Salerooms. 46 & 4i Dearborn street, elegant
Parlor felts. In rcsewoo I and walnut; Oak. Ho*a-
lanui vui«b. tki icKHuv i a..u -A«;.ub; '/a&. twic*
wood. Walnut and Mahogany Chamber Sew. Mamie
Top Tables. Mahogany Cralr.,lk>c»lne Chairs.elegant
ly carved; Ha'ble Top, Walnut and *>atc fide Boards,
with mirror backs; work Table-*. Card d->. Creeping
Bureaus,Washstands. Office Tah rs Hook Cases.Sot
Maunr-se», Mirrors, splendid Velvet Rugs, Carptls.
line Steel Plate Engravings. Spring Beds. Cooking
Stoves, 4c ; together with a general variety of Houie
hold Goorls. GILBERT * SaMPSON.
apl9-;713-4t A’iCtidneora.
/COLBERT & SAMPSOtf,
VJ « 4 43 DEARBORN STREET
Household Furniture, Carpets, &c,,
jAT AUCTION.
At the House 111 Wabash arenas, oa WEDNESDAY
April ati.d, at 9<-- o’cl'.ck, we shall sell the cutrofeml
lure of the above house, coaslatiag of a geceral assort
ment tor parlor, chamber and dining-room. brus*eU
andlncratacarpets,cooklneasdother stove*, croek
erv and glassware, talrrop*. beds and bedding, hair and
other niattrasset.kllchcn fnrr.ltarp. &r„ 4c.
ap9-cafJ-ld GILBERT & SA3IPSON. AuCfW.
GILBERT & SAMPSON,
VJ General Auctioneers, 44 £IS Dsartnrn-sS.
superior household furniture.
French China* Carpets, &c., &c.
AX AUCTION,
At the four story marble front residence, IS Wabash
avenue.
On THURSDAY. April 23d. at 10 o'clock, we will
fell all the Bedroom. Slttlngroom, Diningroom and
Kitchen Furniture Ac., consf&tlnc la part of Brunei*.
Irgraln and three ply carpets. Minors. Beds and Bed
ding. Hair and oth»T Matmssei. Chair*. Tables,
Stands. Mahogany. French and foliage Bedsteads.
Mahogany Marble-Top Bureau.-. Dining Tables aid
Chairs. Tcto a-Tcte. Easy and Rocking Chain,
Crockery. Glassware. £c.
■«.miuihii» splendid French China Dinner Sc : , with
heavy GMd Band. GILBERT A SAMPSON,
apil ersyit Anetioucgrg^
Sttuuig fllaclftncs.
*#■
Merit alone makes a SEWING MACHDiR ralnabi.'
The people are perceiving that glowing rspreeseat
ttois ore not merit.
That it is economy ard wisdom to purchase only
SEWING MACHINE of known practical utility.
There are ICB.OCC Machine® In use in this country and
Surope.
This Machine is PROFITABLE and AVAILABLE A
LIFETIME.
2t is equal to TSN Beacfihrcssoß.
AN ANNUAL DIVIDEND of 103 to COO POT eoat. (CO
tts eoit) may bo obtained la ose-by It* possessor.
This is the only SEWING MACHINE lathe world
making the LOCK STITCH with the ROTATING
HOOK, and Usirg the GLASS FOOT.
GEORGE B. CBITTEXDEX,
General Agent for Illinois, Wisconsin, lowa. Northers
Indiana, Minnesota and Kansas
106 Lake street. Chicago.
£3T"Circulars ncyba had on application orbypoit
tahH-nSW-ly
i24icilsAfi ei
The Florence Sewing Machine
MATTES FOITR DIFFERENT STITCHES,
Tlie Leek, Knot, Doable Lock & Doable Knot,
With as moch ease and facility m ordinary'machlnas
make orra stitch. and with as little or leas machinery.
libaetiOEETEßsnjtErEaDiionoy. which enabled
the operator, b* simply inrnlngtlie thumbscrew. to
bare the work ran to the right or left, to stat any
fart of scam, or £uten the ends. of scams, without
arsing the fabric.
It runs UGim.T, sews RiriDLr.miu !a almost xoisa
ties. , ... , .
11 decs the keattest or rnrrsT work with equal &>
cllitT. wilhoct change of tension or raaclilntry,
CliaDcincthe length of the stitch, and trom one and
H)f stitch to another, can, readily be done while the da
chine is In motion. „ ... . . ..
It turns any width of hem; foils, Nads, braids, gath
ers lacks quilts and gathers and tewaon a raffle at the
same tin: o- It will not oil the dress of the operator.
A hemmer, all necessary tools, and ~B ARXXIM*3
SELT-SHiVER. 1 * which guiiss co work Usel£ are fur
nished with each machine.
AGENTS "WANTED.—For terms, samples of aewlag
and circulars. address
tJXDSENCE SEWING MACHINE CO
Post OfficeEotSXJ.ChlcasoJM.
Salesroom. 124 Lake street. sel-tfWHy
RINGER & CO’S LETTER A
Family Sewing Machine,
With ail new improvements (Hemmer. Braider. Cindet,
Feller.Tucker, cerder. Gatherer. Ac_ Ac.. 4c.,' la the
cheapest, and beat, and mo«t beautiful of all machines
for Family sewing and llcht roanafictartag purposes.
The Branch Odices are well supplied with silk twist,
thread, needle*, oil. &c . of iho very best quality.
g»nfl lor a PAitrULKT and a coot of “SINOEU &
CC-, G
Chicago Office, 50 Clark Street.
Agents wonted In Illinois and lowa.
BhlSb3CS4w
1863 ~ I SPKIJfS TRADE
CLOTH HOUSE.
HELD, BENEDICT & 00.
Ol&SG Lake Street, Chicago,
WHOLESALE DEALERS IN
Cloths,
Cassimeres,
Vestings,
And all the various styles of WOOLRN, COTTON and
LINEN piece goods for
MEN’S WEAR,
Adapted to the wants of the We<t, We shall. as here
tefore for the vast fourteen yean, keen the largest
and best assorted stock ol tHb class of goods to ha
found to this market. An examination ta scLcited.
AGENTS FOB.
Scott's, Clay's and Glcacross’
Reports of Fashions.
fc*s-eIC9-2m
FiLAX SEED
From selected seed, and screened for
SOWING PUBPOSES.
X Limited Quantity
FOR SALE IN SHIPPIN& ORDER,
-ii-
Chicago Lead and Oil Works.
E. TV. BIATCHFOBD,
mtgr-bTOt-lmDidpAlmwT
JOHN GRAY,
u dealeeej
WOODEN WARE, BROOMS,
Pails, Brushes, Mats, Twines, Cord
age, Tubs, Chums, Cradles,
‘Wagons, Clmirs, Sosketa, Scc»
Nos, 15 Fulton and 202 Front Streets,
Ifew Torki
Ja2S-ria3-tm .
CPRING STYLES
OF
HATS AND CAPS,
Just Received.
RETAIL AND WHOLESALE.
j, a. sanxH * co.,
. 113 LAKE STREET.
fWS ap.termaster’3 drafts
U forono iwarttoia. IKinsStby
J. A. EbUS * CO.,
Northwest comer of Clark sad Lake Btroeta.
spie-cs&i-ua •
CEuriiun Soles,
WM. A. BUTTERS & CO.,
T T AUCTIONEERS.
Have removed to the elegant and spacious State®
Ported Block,
Corner of Dearborn and Washington-tti,
apiAcaH-m b *
T?T WM. A. BUTTERS & Co_
-U AUCTIONEERS.
Superior Household Furniture.
PIANO FORTE, Etc,
AT AUCTION,
On Wednesday, April 22, at 10 o’clock A.
At Dwelling House 339 Illinois street, between Wo*-
cots and Ca«i.
WewiU ten the entire furniture of a ftmllyreUa
gilshlnf housekeeping. consisting of rich Parlor
rawing Room. Chamber. Dining Room and SJtchea
Furniture. Cooking and Chamber Stove*. Cn-ckerr
China and Glau Ware, rich Mantel Onuramu Otf
Paintings, Engravings, Silver Plated Ware, Table Cut
lery. etc. *
Also, a rich and brilliant toned Plano Forte, nude
by OLktering, of Boston. In rosewood ease.
WM. A BUTTERS 4 CO., Auctioneers.
ap15c567-St
OF BOOTS AST) SHOES
AX AUCTION.
On WEDNESDAY. April 3£d. at 9M o’clock A, K., at
Our new Mlesrcoma. ICS 4 105 Dearborn street. Port
land Block, corner of Washington street.
apl»c7KMt WM. .V. BUTTERS A CO^Auetra.
J£LEGANT FURNITURE,
Velvet and Brussalls Carpets,
Mirrors, Silver Plated Ware,
Piano Porte, Ac., Ac.,
AT Arcxios.
On THURSDAY. April ti'.. ar o - o’c’ock A. it at
our new salesrooms. Ktid: las D'ufbori street Port
land Block, comer of Wa.-hlr.gt.n -r-c»t *
ap!9-c;4I-3t W.M. A. UUI a'co.. Anct*ra.
J}RY GOODS, CLOTIIIXG ANT>
STRAW GOODS,
AT AUCTION.
On FRIDAY. Aprll24tb. a;u , o'clock a, M.. at our
salesrcomaln Portland Block, corner or Dearborn and
Washington streets
apUA-CilSflt W3L ABUTTEIh; & <JO.. Anct’ra.
HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE,
PIANO FORTE, &C.,
AT AUCTION.
On TUESDAY. Apr!! Sth. at 9M o’clock A. If., at
Dwelling House SSH Usb.vh avenue
nplO-cti3lCt WM. A. BU FTERS & CO.. AoCfra.
QATALOGUE SALE OF
RICH AND ELEGANT
Soston 3Sadc Furniture,
Velvet andPnrasrili Carpets. Splendid Mirrors and
Curfoir.3. J.anicacd fiicg.mt During and Tea Sets,
gLvcr Piateil Ware, Piano Forto.«6c„4c.,
AT AUCTION.
On WEDNESDAY. April 29th. at 9V o’clock, at tbo
residence of Sjlvutsr Marsh, £s<t. No. 494 Wabatit
avenne.
FttUpartlculars and catalogues in a few days.
ap!9c744Ut W.M. A. BUTTEBa A CO.. AuCfra.
aENTEEL HOUSEHOLD
FURNITURE
AT AtCTIOX.
On TuUKSDAV. April 30th. at 9.4 o’clock, at Dwell
ing House No. 212 Indiana street, between Wolcott and
Cass street*. Wil. A. BUTTERS A CO..
ap!9 c"43-i2t Auctioneers.
TTOUSEHOLD FURNITURE,
XX RICH CAUPETS. PIANO FORTE. AC..
AX AUCTION.
On FRID AT. May Ist. at 94 o'clock, at the residence!
Of Gco.W. Gage.ti>q.,No.4l» Wabash avenue.
Particulars lu due season.
spl9-CT4<>Ut WM. A.PUTTERS A CO.. Anct'rg.
rjiXTEEL HOUSEHOLD FUR-
U NTTFRE.
BBISSEUS CARPETS, AC.,
AT AUCTION.
On MONDAYS April 2«th. at 9.4 o’clock, at dwelling
house >’o. Ftiotui av.,between Jackson and Vaa
DarenstrctV itiL A. BUTTERS A CO.
Auctioneers.
H ALEXANDER, AUCTION
• ard COM MISSION MERCHANT. IC9 Dearborn
street. Genteel Fornltare, China, Glass, Kitchen and
Hall Stoves, Ac.,
AT AUCTION.
On WEDNESDAY. April ‘,*M at o’clock A. M.. at
Vo 3W Wabash avenue, the well kept household good*
of a family leatlre tbecll- consisting of rosewood
parlor chairs acosofh. m&rbln top tvbles. Bruasells
and Itgraln carpets.elegant French pUto mantle mir
ror, center aril card tables, whatnot. Etagerc book
case, superior mahogany bedstead and chali j. marble
top bureaus and waehrtandi. feather bods and flno
curled hair mattrtffcsv ball stoveand drum, cook stoyo
with water back. lire French china and
mantle deck, mahogany hat tree, extension dining ta
blc.choir9.locnue.de. apl«-c"fiJ3t
gY E. & TV. MORGAN
Government Sale
COJiDEMED AM) CAPTURED
HOBSBS
BROOD MARES,
On Thursday, April 23d,
AT 3IO2C.LVS ST. LOUIS STOCK JUET,
Corner of Fifth and Cair Streets.
AT 10 O'CLOCK, Will BE SOLD,
AN IMMENSE NUMBER OF
Condemned and Captured
HOUSES,
BEOOD MAKES, many with foal.
The Sale "will bo continued from day
today, until the whole are disposed of*
Terms—TEZASUBT NOTES,
By order of Edmond Wnerpcl, Captain and A. Q. V.
aplS-oCfrtf
■RT RANKIN’ & LTEBENSTEIN,
-LI ACCTIOSEEE3.
Groceries, Horse, Wagon and Harness,
AT AUCTION.
On THURSDAY MORNING. AprllKJ, at 9K o'cDC ,
we will sell on the premises.
22 TTcst Sladlfos street,
Tbc stock cf Groceries. Store Fixture*, Seale*. Mea
sure* and Crockery. Also, one Bay Horse, Grocery
Wacoa and Harness. Forparttcnlars.seebllls.
RANKIN & LCEUENSTKIN.
ap!3 c74S-ct
CLOTHING assd dry goods
\J ATAUCrrox-By S. Nicraasox. 2W Lifeeslreet,
•orner of franklin, on Mom* vr. April a*th, Wkz>!fs»>
X»aT. April Slil, FkidxT. April ilth. at 9S o'clock A. H.
■will be told cloths, ca»slrnerw. satinet*. brown and
bleached shcetlne. SpaoL«n Usen. thread. A general
stock of dry goods. Yankee notions, famishing gooda.
At prirarc sale of Oil and Carpettnc.
aplT-cGU-Tt 8. NlCKEßSON.Auctioneer
RUCTION SALE OP
BOOTS AND SHOES,
AT WHOLESALE, ’
!T
Gore, Willson & Co.
CA LAKE STREET,
Every Tuesday and Thursday,
AT 10 A. iL. PROMPT,
And at private sale throughout the week. Wo soar*
antce onr stock to bo
LARGER, BETTER SELECTED,
AND
OFFERED AT LOWER PRICES
Than by any other House.
Onr stock being consigned to us by
SU3ITACX IEEBS,
To whom we make advances,
GIVES US
UIfUSUAL EAOItmES
For carrying a LARGE and WELL stock,
which we otferto the hig'.esthidiia.
or at private sale, on
MANUFATUBEBS’ account.
GOBE, WILLSON & CO,,
ftCSaSW-Sm S* Lake street. Chicago.
■REALESTATE AT AUCTION
All GILBERT A SAMPSON. Auctioneers.
tS Lata street, Chicago JIL. via sire m
t*mloa to Ul9 sole of Beal Estate,la an* n&rt of tbs
cl;v. parties mklus op molr plana to aellßTaactloa
vlfi do welt to call oa toe ankoertbere.
fr« aGUJIBBT 4k SAIfPSOEr.
WOOL TWINE. —I am manu-
T T fectariap, and caa Oil orders tor this goods,
Tn any quantities* •
NATHANIEL WHITB.
gs south Water street.
mblO-o9BS-2ia
three thousand five
I HUNDRED DOLLARS to lead On
Cook County Beal Estate,
At ten per cent. Apply to J. A. CBAIN, Ho. 9 Talc
mph Bniwins, corner of lake and dark streets.
ap!6-csij>-*t
OUGAR.
b bl*. TThlto coflTee Sncar.
75 bbls. Powdered and Cra»tod.
For sale low- by NEWELL SNOW Hi nrrnf
apIXS7-gw *
KAfl BAGS COFFEE.—Rio, Mar
t) V V/ acalko sad Costa Rea. fair to prims. arztr*
i=s «ni for pirKur a manor.
HLF. chests teas.—a
OUv fall assortment o :oew crop Greens sea
Blacks, embracing »11 grades of Tocng Hyson, Hyson
Skin. Gunpowder. Imperial, Tvaakay. Oolong. 6o»
KTl,toe
nsonliwiurdzwc.
'T'IMBER.—The Peshtigo Com-
I naoy la prepared to tarnish Bias ofDlmenaloa
Timber for Undscs. Elevators and Doildioga of ovary
description, at abort notice. .
spUc399ln THOiIAS B. BSEBE, President,
AND
AND
E. * W. MORGAN,
Government Anctioneem.
Auctioneer*.

xml | txt