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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1860-1864, May 01, 1863, Image 1

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CHICAGO TKIBUXE.
DAILY. TRI-WEEKLY AMD WEEKLY
Office IVo. 51 Clark Street.
term* or the cm ca go tiubuxe:
Dally, delivered In city, per year SIO.OO
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Dor risk.
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fee made at oke time.
tS r- There will be no deviation from tho fore
going scale of rates.
Address M CHICAGO TRIBUNE,” Chicago, HL
Cliicago tribune.
FRIDAY, 3IAY 1, 1803.
THE NEWS.
The rebels on the Tennessee River have
been the victims of a cruel instance of
misplaced confidence. With tho little
pleasantry that has become characteristic
of the chivalry, they choose a location for
a masked attack, and proceed to astonish
what they deemed an unarmed transport
Steamer, by a volley of round shot and
musketry. Quicker than the echo, comes
back the response winch tells them of
their mistake in waking up one of Com
mander Ellet’s Marine Brigade craft, al
ways ready for such an emergency.. Tho
rebels were tho ruefully astonished party,
for their covert was riddled in an Instant.
What was more, the boat swung to the
bank, landed a cavalry force, and then be
gan a race in which the rebels showed
speed and bottom. They strewed the road
as they ran, with impedimenta cast off in
their flight. Altogether it was a disastrous
affair for the rebels, who will, next time,
study in advance the manifests of all
steamers they attack, lest the party assail
ed manifest something too much for the
the assailants.
Tlie Sanitary report of our "Western ar
mies shows an improved and highly favor
able condition, as compared with the past,
and a present very creditable state of affairs.
Some of our wisdom in such matters has
been rciy dearly bought
The war in Missouri will, from present
appearances, soon become extinct in ou r
dispatches, Marmaduke has retired in
haste from his misadventure at Capo Girar
deau, and the Butternut gentry that were
to rise simultaneously all over the Btato
have Ih ought better ol it, and will remain
in their holes.
Elsewhere we give an unofficial report
from the Bth Illinois cavalry, now with
Gen. Hooker. It shows how they passed
Iho winter, and the way they keep ac
counts with the rebels. They produce a
highly creditable balance sheet.
Our dispatches from Murfreesboro are
interesting. The rebels have certainly ad
vanced theirwhole line. A collision must
soon ensue from present appearances.
It is confirmed by last night’s dispatches,
that Gen. Hooker’s amiy has crossed the
Rappahannock River, at Port Royal, ef
feeling the transit by pontoons. The
grand movement against Richmond has
begun. The army is in splendid fighting
condition. Their General is an earnest
and thorough soldier, with a single eye to
the triumph of onr arms, and no obliqnity
of vision from Copperhead associations.
He intends to hurt the rebels. He has no
desire to save them, or their pet iniquity.
He is honest, earnest, will obey orders and
strike lolling blows. The people will fol
low him with prayers that he may succeed.
If he fails it will not be because his heart
is not in the work.
Fifty Surgeons are wanted for Illinois reg
iments in the field. We trust tho profes
sion will respond liberally, and patriotical
ly to the calk We feel tempted to add the
wish that no loafing, vagabond members ot
this noblest and most humane of crafts
would apply. If there be a place in the
world where sham surgery is gross inhu
humanity, it is where a dunderhead, unfit
to be a cow doctor, is put in charge of a
regiment of men, with no appeal from his
miserable practices and malpractices.
There arc too many of these wretches now
iu ihe army, where their presence is an in
sult and an injustice to the worthier of
their honored profession. We understand
very well that theic is no pecuniaiy in
ducement held out to onr medical men to
leave even a moderately profitable practice
for the pittance of the army surgeon, but
with a full consciousness of the important
duties that fall to them in the care of our
troops, wc appeal to their patriotism, and
urge that all personal considerations be
laid aside. The fifty surgeons called for,
should be forthcoming from Illinois in
three days time.
Tin: NATIONAL FAST.
Yesterday was generally observed by our
citizens in a manner to render it marked
and remarkable among similar past occas
ions. Business was almost entirely sus
pended. The streets wore a quiet and al
most Sunday aspect. Our churches were
very largely attended, and our church au
diences were in most instances edified by
discourses fittingly characterizing the day,
and the era in our national affairs which it
marks. Very few pulpits failed
to refer to the great lesson of the day, the
national sin which has broughtour sorrows
upon us. The time for gentleness and
reticence with reference to our national
cancer has passed, now that life Is endan
gered, and an operation of excision can
alone save the patient’sdifo.
The lalx>rs of our reporters yesterday
occupy a large share of this issue, in repro
ducing in detail more or less complete, the
Fast Day discourses of our city Pastors,
and the other occasions of the day, more,
general in their character. Their tone and
Sentiment is excellent, and some of them
arc striking specimens of earnestness and
eloquence. We publish them as a memorial
of the President's Fast, as a token of the
manner in which the people responded to
the proclamation, and the faithfulness of
our religious teachers in strengthening the
purpose of the nation to the high and
noble sacrifices devolved upon this age
and time. _
THE FIRST OF HIT.
Madam, wc sympathize with you. Sir,
you bare our best wishes for your safe and
Epcody transition througb the present
clouds that lower upon your house. You
will live in an express wagon to-day, and
verily a dray shall be your abiding place.
The Lares and Penates of your well order
ed home shall be overtaken with a sad
jumbling. Incongruous associations shall
befall your household goods, and extremes
will meet on the common level that be
longs to the avocation of common carri
ers. The parlor arm chair shall hold in
its embrace the washluh, the kitchen stove
and the clagere shall journey side by side,
kitchen crockciy and parlor vases, the so£i
and the wash bench, the lounge and the re
frigerator shall become severally partners
in the grand cotillion so fatal to varnish
and trying to fragility, for this is the first
of May.
The expressmen are in demand. The
draymen will feel their position, and the
mourners will go about the streets, for the
homes of the dty are broken up, the grand
flitting season has befallen the tenant
world. The Tbibcjje will find many dis
tressed city patrons ibig morning, and be
snubbed of its friends, for how is one to
sit down to read a newspaper, whose
chairs are piteously subverted on top op
the household stuff, journeying slowly to a
BCW location. Oar carriers will require
fredi toots and new pencils. The City
Directory is ns a last year’s almanac. The
tuteter and tte grocer have new neigh
bors, and a quest for old ones. It i.?v.
first of May. ““e
To live in one’s “own hired house” hath
apostolic precedent, and the share of man
kind who do not so live, in a dty like our
own, is comparatively small The chang
es of a year like the present are something
remarkable and noteworthy. There will
VOLUME XV.
be more removals in Chicago to-day than
in any previous like season before. The
enhancement of all rales ot living has not
forgotten the item of house rent, and to
this is snperadded an influx of population
that has given a brisk demand for houses
at the advanced rentals. Houses that
rented last year for five hundred dollars,
may be quoted firm at six hundred. There
has been a full flight of all the smaller
rents proportionately upward. The only
steadiness is observable in the higher
priced residences, which, to follow the
market phrase, are quiet at SBOO to SI2OO,
with little change within the pastfewyears
The demand is for homes of medium
and moderate rent. It is a demand, we
are sorry to believe, is poorly met among
us. It should be, in tho broadest sense,
satisfactory to all our citizens that the very
prosperity of our city is the cause of high
rents and is not tho cure of landlords, little
careful to secure the comfort of tenants.
But the actual result of neglect and un
concern for tho comfort of tenants is not,
for that reason, any the more tolerable.
A standing advertisement might be kept
the year round in our city papers, to the
advantage of tenants and the city:
, "ITT'ANTED—From throe hundred to fire hnn
» * dred well planned, desirable tenements. In
wood or brick, to accommodate fimlllCß of moder
ate means. Rent from *250 to S4CO. Forallsucb.
prompt paying, grateful tenants can be secured at
once.
Precisely this need stands broadly adver
tised in every part of the city to-day. The
hundreds of pleasant homes are stilj
“wanted” hy dwellers,who pay exorbi
tant rates for nnpleasant ones, and wait
for a good time coming. The tokens, in
deed, are that the present year will make
large accessions to the list of desirable ten
ements. The present rate of rents should
indicate to capitalists a tempting class of
investments. Buildings must needs go up
with rapidity to keep pace with the influx
of population. Our citizens will have all
the better homes when a competition for
first-class tenants is well hegtm. Just now
it is quite the other way. The better time
for tic tenants is not yet
THE COAVEATIOX
Farther Action of the Committee.
A meeting of tho Committees on the Canal
Convention was held last evening at the
rooms of the Mercantile Association; Hon.
Grant Goodrich in the chair.
Dr. Hahn stated that no action had as yet
been taken by tho Common Council with ref
erence to an appropriation for the Conven
tion, but he btlieved tho old Council were fli
rorable to such appropriation I
Wm. Bross submitted, and tho Secretary
read, a letter from Messrs. Prince & Baker of
Boston, containing a proposition for furnish
ing a mammoth tent for the use of the Con
vention, at a cost of SOOO.
The Secretary stated that lie had received
communications from nearly nil the railroads
running into Chicago, and they had thus far
all agreed to carry delegates to the Conven
tion at half fare.
Dr. Hahn suggested the propriety ‘of pro.
caring, for the use ot the Convention, the
large building located on Canal street, North
of Madison, formerly used by the American
Transportation Company.
C. G. Wicker was opposed to using the
aforesaid building, on account.of its close
proximity to the River, which would probably
be in a flltby condition in Jane.
Col. R. M. Hough was opposed to using the
building alluded to, and thought that if the
Common Council refused to make au appro
priation for a suitable building, the people of
Chicago had sufficient liberality and interest
lu the matter to raise the necessary amount
of money by private subscription.
Mr. Bross moved that the business commit
tee be authorized to contract for the tent
which Messrs. Priucc & Baker offered to fur
nish at S6OO. The motion was carried by a
unanimous vote.
Hon. I. N. Arnold inquired whether any
special efforts bad been made to secure dele
gations from lowa and Missouri. He hoped
all proper measures would be adopted to in
jure a large and an influential representation
fiomeacbof those States. Mr. Arnold also
stated that he had just received a letter from
Cleveland, saying that a full delegation might
be expected from that city.
On motion, the meeting adjourned to next
Thursday evening.
Tlio Suffering* of the Loyal People of
East Tennessee.
CoL Hawkins, of Knoxville, East Tennes
see, who has been in the military service of
the Government over twenty months, arrived
in this city on Wednesday, and in compliance
with the invitation of friends,has consented to
delivcranaddressatßryan Hall this evening,on
the sufferings and trials of the Union people
In East Tennessee, In which he will take occa
sion to pay hii respects to the rebel tyrants of
the South, and their copperhead allies at the
North.
CoL Hawkins la a native of Tennessee, and
as earnest a Union man as breathes. He is an
eloquent speaker. Wo have heard of him, In
Ohio and Indiana recently, and have read his
speeches In the papers of those States. He is
a regular Parson Brownlow in hi* stylo of or
atory, and is indeed a personal friend and co
adjutor of the Parson.
There will be no charge for admission, but
a collection will he taken up at the close of
the address, for the benefit of the Sanitary
Commission. The ladies are invited to at
tend.
OntrageonH Falsehoods.
[From the Richmond Examiner, 14th.]
Among the prisoners brought up by the
flag of truce boat, on Last Monday, were
some from the West, who have been confined
at Camp Douglas, at Chicago. The very
sight of the poor fellows is enough to strike
pity to the heart. Wc wish the Government
could hear their talcs of suffering and dis
tress, and wo hope that they will take some
step to lay their grievance before the authori
ties here.
Camp Douglas is worse than the Hole of
Calcutta, Not satisfied with putting our men
to death by suffering and torture, tuc Yankee
demons have taken to poisoning them I The
little things such as pics and cakes, that our
poor prisoners would hny out of their few re
maining cents, had killed a number of our
men, and on an Investigation being ordered
and the food being analyzed, poison was plain
ly detected, and its presence admitted by the
Vsmkte surgeons I The authorities tried to
exculpate themselves by laying it to an old
Irish woman who was permitted to peddle
cakes among the prisoners.
The death of onr men at Camp Douglas has
been appalling. One of onr prisoners esti
mates that In the short space of three months
there were over seven hundred and fifty
deaths. This was caused by a combination o*f
causes —the low, wet and marshy situation of
the camp, being half in water; the filth and
vermin of the place, and the long and deso
late confinement of our men. In fact, some
of the prisoners who came np by the last flag
of truce, had languished there for nearly two
years, and there dejected, sorrow-stricken and
emaciated faces boro testimony of more than
all they told of their suffering.
The suffering to which our bravo men have
been subjected by the demons Is enough to
melt the heart to tears. Even in the cold
winter, when our prisoners were taken there
from the West—m mid winter—thev were
thrown into prison, with nothing more than
a pallet of wet straw as a bed. and without a
particle of clothing to protect them from the
cold and piercing masts—and one who knows
anything of Western life knows bow fearfully
they sweep over the prairies. In all the cold
our men lay exposed to the storm, cold and
shivering and benumbed. A cold snow storm
came, and the result was that twenty
live or thirty of our men actually froze, to
death. Wc have this on reliable authority,
and the stoiy is substantially confirmed, in
cveryparticnlar, by an account which we pub
lished some time since from the Chicago
Tima.
On their way from tho West, our prisoners
were still objects of persecution and maligni
ty of the Yankees, and were made to travel
two live-long days without a morsel ofrfood!
They left at Camp Douglas about two thou
sand prisoners, who were to bo exchanged,
and were leaving in bodies of four and five
hundred. It was hoped by our men that they
would soon be out of the clutches ol the
demons who haveforded it over them with a
tyranny and cruelty worse than that of tho
dark ages.
—The above falsehoods, misrepresenta
tions nnd glanders concerning tho treatment
received by the rebel prisoners at Camp Doug
las, we find In the Richmond Examiner. A
part of the material for those atrocious lies
were furnished by the secession organ in this
city, and it seems that it is quoted as the au
thority for the statement, that twenty rebel
prisoners froze to death! The truth of the
whole matter is, that tho prisoners reached
the camp sickly, ragged, emaciated, lousy and
filthy. They were well fed, nowlyclad,cleanscd,
comfortably wanned and bedded, combed
doctored, and as many of their worthless
lives saved as was in the power of benevolent
men. The secesb of the city who never gave
a dime to the loyal cause, administered to
their wants freely and profusely. H a large
number died, it was because they came here
with small pox, measles, chronic diarrhcea,
typhoid fever and other diseases among them.
They were about the hardest, scaliest, dirtiest
specimens of white men that ever visited
this city. They had been half starred for
months before they were captured, and had
wallowed in their filth and vermin at Arkansas
Post Many of our clean, decent and respect
able soldiers who were obliged to guard them,
caught infectious diseases from the miserable
herd, and lost their lives thereby. To cap
the climax of lies, the Richmond paper
charges that an attempt was made to poiwn
the prisoners by an old Irish woman. A. likely
story, that the Irish would do such a thing!
The rebels have no belter friends north of
Mason and Dixon than the Irish. It is black
ingratitude to charge them with any cruelty
to the prisoners.
FROM THE TENNESSEE Rim
HOW THE REBELS WARED UP
THE WRONG PASSENGER.
TEEIE ATTACK AND WHAT
CAME OF IT.
Operations of Gen. Ellet.
[Special Dispatch to tho Chicago Tribune.]
Cairo, April 30, 1363.
Gen. Ellet, accompanied by Col. Ellct, ar
rived hero to day on the ram Homer, from
Fort Henry, where the Marine Brigade now
lies, Frointhem Ileam the particulars of an
encounter they had last Saturday with several
hundred Texan Rangers, commanded byMaj.
White, at a point two miles below the month
of Duck River. A similar rebel forco was
stationed at Green Cotton Bar, twelve miles
below, under command of Gen. Woodward.
Each party had two pieces of artillery—ten
pound Parrott guns, and twelve-pound how
itzers. The rebels mistook the boats carrying
the brigade for transports, returning from
carrying reinforcements to Gen. Dodge, and
anticipated an easy victory.
Gen. Woodward intended to pick up any
boat that should escape Major White. The
river is very narrow at the point of attack,
and the boats had to nm within two rods of
the shore. Tho rebels concealed themselves
till the Autocrat, the flag-ship, was nearly op
posite, when they opened with every gun
they had. Unexpectedly to them, tho fire
was vigorously returned with cannon and
sharpshooters. The Autocrat was struck
nine times with solid shot, while her pilot
house, texas and side were peppered with
musket balls. Tho Diana, Col. EUct’s boat,
which came next, received six shots and mus
ket balls. The Adams was struck twice.
The rebels, as soon as they discovered they
had caught a Tartar, fled in great disorder.
Gen. Ellet landed cavalry two miles below,
and started in pursuit, but tho rebels outran
him, throwing off hats, caps, coats, blankets,
and everything else that would impede their
progress. So far as is known, tho rebels lost
ten killed and twenty wounded. The Federal
loss is two killed and four wounded. One or
two horses were killed on board the boats.
Gen. Woodward left his post lor safer quarters
pretty soon after the engagement had com
menced.
Cairo, April 20 —Gen. Ellet has destroyed
every grist, saw-mill, and every distillery on
the Upper Tennessee, besides half a million
feet of lumber. The towns of Hamburg and
Eastport are entirely destroyed.
IKE WAR \H MISSOURI.
General Failure of Rebel Plans.
[Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.!
Sr. Lons, April 30,1563.
Gen. Van Dover has crossed Whitewater
River in pursuit of Marmaduke’s forces.
On Tuesday a race took place between four
companies of the Sd lowa Cavalry, under
Lieut. Col. Caldwell, and the rebel rear guard
for a bridge over the Big Whitewater, twelve
miles south of Jackson. The rebels had
several miles the start, and succeeded In par
tially destroying the bridge before Caldwell’s
arrival. In returning Caldwell found that
a rebel force had gained his rear, and was be
tween himself and Van Dever.
The lowans cat their way through with sa
bres, with the loss of one killed and four
wounded.
Capt. Spencer, of Co. E, with sixteen of his
men, are missing, and are supposed to have
been taken prisoners. The rebels are burning
bridges and doing everything they can to im
pede pursuit.
Gen. McNeil has joined Gen. Van Dever in
the race alter the rebels.
A general suspension of business, and ser
vice in nearly all the churches, has marked
the observance of to-day.
Advices from the interior represent the fail
ure of the anticipated guerilla outbreak, de
pending on the advance of rebels into the
State.
TO THE MEDICAL PROFESSION,
Fifty Army Surgeons Wanted,
[Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.]
Springfield, HI., April 30,1862.
Fifty Assistant Surgeons arc wanted imme
diately for permanent service with Illinois
regiments in the held.
To avoid delay, application far examination
may bo made directly to Dr. Henry Wing,
Secretary of the Board of State, Medical Ex
aminer, at Chicago.
Those who have already passed au examina
tion by said board, and liavenot received com
missions, will report in person to mo at
Springiield, for orders.
Allen C. Fcllbb, Adjt. Gen.
THE CLERICAL IMBROGLIO.
The Conn lu Session In Chicago.
The Ecclesiastical Court adjourned at Jol
iet, at 6 o’clock on Wednesday, to meet at
Trinity Church at o’clock last evening,
but for some reasons none of the prosecution
were present, nor was the church opened.
The defence, one of the Assessors, and the
ever-present reporters, after waiting an hour,
(meanwhile hunting half over the city to sum
mon the Court together) gave up the chase.
The Court will convene in Trinity Church
Tower, at 9 o’clock this morning. We are
unable to state the motives by which the Court
were actuated In this change of base,” un
less it bo to frustrate the well laid plans of the
reporters, who had their arrangements so com
plete at Joliet. What can bo made public, re
specting their session here, remains to be seen.
The prosecution have concluded their inves
tigation, except that of cross-examinlug the
witnesses Introduced by the defence. Mrs.
Everett’s testimony is not concluded, but her
physician, Dr. Cook, protests that owing to
her illness, sbecannot attendthe Court; henco
their first labor this morning will bo the pre
parations of questions to bo propounded to
her at the house of a friend where she remains
to-day, lor this purpose, Mr. and Mrs. Ever
ett will retumhomc this evening, If hcrhoalth
will permit, •
FROM HOOKER'S ARMY.
THE TROOPS ACROSS
THE RAPPAHAN
NOCK.
Further From the Movement-
Fighting Begun.
From the Eighth Illinois Cavalry,
Tlicir Condition-Stale of Their
Accounts with the Rebels.
Pnu,Al>ELPinA, April SO.—Agent Cnreau,
who has just returned from the army of the
Potomac, brings the following report of the
proceedings in that direction.
The pontoons are said to have been laid on
Tuesday night andWednesdaymorning across
the river at Port Royal.
Yesterday morning at daylight the troops
began to cross, and by ten o’clock ourfou r
corps iTarmec are sold to have crossed in safe-
ty. Cannonading and severe firing have been
heard on this side of the River. The Sutlers
have been ordered away from Acquia Creek.
New Yoke, April 30.—The TibrW says that
yesterday the army under Gen. Hooker pros
ecuted vith energy the movementthusbegun.
Troops were crossing throughout the day,
near Port Royal, twelve or fourteen miles be
low Fredericksburg. Pork Royal will be re
collected ns the scene of tho recent raid
across the Rappahannock in pontoons by two
Federal regiments, who took the place by
surprise on a foggy morning, capturing a
large number of horses and a quantity of
stores.
We arc in possession of other and highly
important private information respecting the
movement progressing, the publication of
which we defer for obvious reasons. Such
publication might derange tbe plans of the
General in command and jeopardize tho suc
cess of the advance. The sequel of it, if what
is now hoped, will startle tho entire country.
A special to the WorW from Washington
says: Gen. Hooker scut a woman to the city
to-day, for imprisonment, charged with being
a spy in his army.
[Special Correspondence of the Chicago Tribune.]
In Camp near Warrknton, Va., I
April 25.1803. j
Since the battle of Fredericksburg, onr
deeds of action have not been recorded so os
to be observed by the public. Hence some
may begin to think that we have become in
active. The probable reason is, because the
cavalry is now (for the first time) regularly
organized. So, whatever is done by any one
portion of it, is reported as done by the cav
alry division or brigade, &c.
The Sth Illinois cavalry has the honor of
being the Ist regiment of tho Ist brigade of
the Ist division of the Ist corps of the Ist
.army of cavalry. During the winter wo were
on picket most of the time, near King George’s
C. H. We were there from Christmas up to
February 17th. While there, we captured
about thirty rebs, and twenty horses, and
about fifty deserters. But, by the way, since
Gen. Hooker has taken command, desertions
have ceased, so far as we know, at least.
From February ISth until April 13th, we
were in camp near Hope Landing, and did
picket duty about half of the time,near Dum
fries. This wasjcallcd a very dangerous place
to do such duty. Here wo lost the first and
only men that wo ever lost on picket. The
boys are very much grieved about it, because
it looks as though there was no use of sending
a patrol of men twelve miles through the
woods, and strange paths, unsupported, in an
enemy’s country. But we have the satisfac
tion of knowing that tho rebels have not got
any start of ns, even in this locality. We cap
tured rebels, at different times, as follows:
The Eighth IttiTWi* Cavalry In account iciih the
Jteoeh Hhce the battle of Fredericksburg.
While ncarKlng George’s C. H.
March 10
March 90
March 81
April 14
April 17
April 21
April 35
Total
Zotseein Same Period.
Kill'd. Cap. Horse.
March 15.
March 81.
Total
Balance in our favor.
We have also wounded many, besides killed
many horses, but the exact nombe can only be
guessed at, so we hare not mentioned it. We
arc now near Warrenton, Va. The object of
our being here, or what tho main army is now
doing, are both things that wc have no right
to slate.
[Correspondence of the New York Times.]
Belle Plain, Va., April 23.
I sent you by telegraph, yesterday, tho main
particulars of CoL Morrow’s late expedition
to Port Conway and Port Royal. lam able
to add something more of interest, showing
tbc affair to have been conducted with great
celerity underthc clrcumstauces, It being per
formed during the great storm, with the roads
in a terrible state, ans the streams much
swollen.
me forces consisted of two regiments, the
241h Michigan, Colonel Morrow, and the 14th
Brooklyn, Col. Fowler —the entire force be
ing under command of the former officer.
One section ot battery B, 4th U. 3. artillery,
n£der Lieut. Stewart. The force left camp
at 2p. of Wednesday, the 22d, and march
ed to Port Conway, distant eighteen miles, by
10 n. m. Tb?J bivouacked behind the vilbeo,
and, by direction, built no fires, and kept very
quiet. The approach of our forces was con
ducted so secretly that onr own cavalry pick
ets in Port Conway were not awaro of the
presence of our men until they marched into
the town on Thursday morning.
Col. Morrow rested his men until a. m.
of the 23d, when he began to construct his
pontoons, which had been brought down in
wagons, to the number of eighteen. The
pontoons used were of a new pattern. They
are composed of a light framework, put to
gether at the moment of use, and then set on
a large piece of canvass, which is wrapped
and looped and tightened around it, by means
of loopholes and ropes. One of these pon
toons will weigh, when ready for Launching,
bnl six hundred pounds, while one of the old
wooden stylo of boats weighs not less than
two tons.
Our men put these boats together out ot
sight of the enemy, and then carried them
down to the river and launched them. Owin'’’
to the unlamiliarity of the men with the
method of putting them together, this work
was not accomplished until about 6 a.m.
Sergeant French of the engineer corps, super
intended the construction. A heavy rain
which prevailed also retarded operations. Bat
a few moments after six, they were all ready
to start across the stream. .
The river here is about six hundred yards
wide, and Is a deep, placid and beauUTol
CHICAGO, FRIDAY, MAY 1, 1863
stream. Owing to the rain, a mi?t or fog ex
isted, which partially scrcened'lhe opposite
shore, rt ndering objects indistinct, and it was
generally supposed that a force of rebels was
there, concealed in their rifle.pits, and that
onr men would have a worm timg.in crossing.
Shortly after C o’clock, Col. Morrow select
ed 800 men from the two regiments, being
less than half his force, and launching twelve
ot the pontoons, started for the opposite
shore. Every man certainly expected to bo
greeted by a shower of bullets Aom the ene
my, who was supposed to occupy the rifie pits
on the lon of the slope, which runs from the
town to the river’s edge. But not a shot was
fired, and our men landed without the slight
est resistance. So quiet and sudden was the
entree of our troops, that the enemy, who oc
cupied the town with cavalry, had barelv time
to reach their horses, and they left one end of
the village as our forces entered the other.
Our boats landed at the upper end of the
town, and the troops immediately deployed
through it. The rebels found their horses not a
moment too soon, and left at high speed down
the Bowling Green road, abandoning their
wagon train and a number of horses, which
fell into our hands. Several prisoners wore
also taken, among whom was a wagon-mas
ter, who bemoaned his lute with deep curses
at his cowardly comrades, who left him and
his train to capture. The wagons were all
destroyed by axes, os it was raminir so hard
that it was impossible to burn anything. The
town was searched, and a valuable rebel mall
captured, which, I may add, ha 4 given Gen.
Hooker Information of grea'. iumortonce, as
the letters were nearly all for thearrfly,*
Alter an occupancy of the towy^fornearly
three hours, Cof. Morrow receifed informa
lion that a heavy force of the enehiy, Infintry
and artillery, were approaching ;by the Bow-
IhigGrccn road, and having accjocnpliahcd all
that was :po?bible, he re embarked Ids men.
and crossed back to this side without loss.
The force that thus appeared was known to
be encamped back of Port Royal, some four
or five miles, and the prisoner slated that it
was part of Jackson’s command, who wore
bttweer.lhat pr.int and Bowling Green.
Our artillery was favorably planted on the
side of the river,though there was no occasion
ibritsuse. j
The weather was so exceedingly bad that
little could be done after crossing the river.
But reiy few white people were feeen, it being
early in the clay, and the weather being go
stormy that Col. Morrow is of the opinion
that he came and went without the knowl
edge of many of the citizens. Negroes were
numerous and communicative, giving infor
mation freely, and expressing ;greai joy at
seeing our men.
We append to this the following paragraph
from a Washington letter in the Commercial
Advertiser, dated the 27th;
“ Gen. Hooker is not idle. Ddringthelong
storm just ended, he made a/*m< of crossing
at Kelly’s Ford, up the river, and another at
Port Royal, down the river. Now whetherhe
will advance at one of these points, or else
where, no one knows. The General is under
stood to keep his own counsels, ' and when he
is ready to start, hard fighting may bo expect
ed, unless the trily rebels retreat to North Anna
and I'amnnkey Jfivers, which hthcaghtto he their
line of diffused'
FROM ROSESBANS’ kW.
FURTHER FROM THE REBEL
ADVANCE.
The Situation Below Murfrees
boro.
[Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.)
McnrncESEor.o, Teun., April SO, 1803.
All is quiet on onr front to-night. The
weather is beautiful.
A number of deserters have come in, and
their reports confirm tho nows already tele
graphed you of tho rebel advance.
Gen. Lidell and Brig. Gen. Polk’s brigades
are at Bell Buckle, and a large portion if not
all of Hardee’s corps is in the vicinity of Bell
Bunkle and Wartrace. Breckinridge seems
now to he in command of a corps and there
is a probability of his being at Winchester
with a quarter part of his force. Tho enemy’s
troops at Bell Buckle are reported to have
received orders,onSunday last, ta prepare two
days’ rations and getready to marchlastnight.
However, if a contraband whoerl consulted
may be relied upon, they had eaten up a part
of their rations, and had not marched. Their
object was to make a reconnaissance toward
Murfreesboro, but it seems they thought bet
ter of it.
Bragg and Johnson came np to Sbelbyvillc
on a visit, gave certain orders with regard to
the construction of fortifications, recommit
cred onr front line of pickets, projected cer
tain divisions in case onr forces should attack,
issued some orders dated headquarters at
Sbclbyvillc, apparently out of mere bravado,
and then returned to Tullalioma.
I hear, although I cannot traco tho matter
to any definite source, that the army of Bragg
and Johnston has been reinforced from2o,ooo
to 25,OOOmcnfrom Virginia. I have conversed
with different persons to-day,, all of whom
stated that these forces had been seen passing
in cars, and that tho whole rolling stock in
Virginia and East Tennessee,, as well as tho
Richmond and Atlanta Railroad, had been em
ployed in bringing them down.
A deserter brings a report that the enemy
has advanced in strong force to McCowana
ville, Northwest of Shelbyrille. Nothing has
developed to excite any uneasiness. Gen.
Reynolds returned from his expedition to-day.
He captured about 200 prisoners, some stock,
&c., and brongbt in a considerable number of
refugees and fugitive slaves.
This statement must bo token with many
grains ef allowance. All reports concur In
: p resenting the rebels to be on short allow
ance. Those at Shclbyvillo have as much
meat as they want, and not much else. The
most favored get only one-fonrth pound of
porkperday.
Murfreesboro, April SO.—The near ap
proach of the rebel force has afforded oppor
tunities to deserters to come into our lines.
Seventeen came in to-day. They confirm
the report of the rebel advance to a point
north of Dnck River. Some say Polk’s troops
have moved eight miles north of Shelbyville,
on the road to Murfreesboro, and that Hardee
is at Wartracc. Bragg is at Bell Buckle.
They say it Is Breckinridge who is at Man
chester, and speak of him as commanding a
force.
la Sa S a
ro s.o
5 w —a* —-i
n “»
• » ®S’ 2 3
; c. C*
33 20
8 4
6 4
.1 11 14
•6 4 8
14 SO
Rumors of reinforcements are confirmed,
hut the statements generally look like exag
geration.
Deserters say the rebel commanders talk
boldly and loudly of their intention to drive
Roeecrans out ot Tennessee. Their men get
a quarter ration of bacon, but plenty of meat
Murfreesboro, April 30.—Yesterday a
small force of rebel cavalry appeared on the
Manchester pike. Our videttes gave the
alarm, saying tho enemy was advancing iu
force. Gen. Ncgley, with commendable
promptness, moved out a short distance, hut
tho alarm proved false. Gen. Negley met
several citizens, residents near the outposts,
moving in. It is thought generally that the
rebel demonstration yesterday was made for
the purpose of forcing Rosecrans to concen
trate his lines, thus leaving Van Dom and
Wheeler at liberty to act on his flanks with
their cavalry, and also to enable them, with a
force north of Dock river, to deteat any at
tempts made similar to tho one on McMinn
ville.
.1 2
.8 70
.7 63
present all efforts of the rebel cavalry on
onr flanks are futile.
FROM THE SOUTH.
News from Rebel Sources.
[Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune].
Murfreesboro, Term., April 25,1663.
The Chattanooga Hebei , of the 2oth, says one
Yankee transport lies sunk to the hurricane
roof, eight miles below Vicksburg. One gun
boat and a transport ran past the Vicksburg
batteries on the night of the 23d. Two trans
ports were disabled and one sunk.
The fleet was at Grand Gulf on the 22d
inst.
Gen. Taylor is retreating down the Opelou
sas to Alexandria.
A special dispatch to the Appeal, published
at Grenada, from Panola, says: The
have been reinforced, and ore advancing
south.
The rebel Gen. Chalmers advanced to Her
nando, but fell back before the Federate to
Fanote.
The rebels don't like the tax hill, hut sub
mit.
The Huntsville Advocate says of the late
fight at Bear Creek, that the rebels worsted
the Federate, 'lt was precisely the other way.
FROM WASHINGTON.
Sanitary Report of Westers
Armies.
[SpcclalDispatch to the Chicago Tribune.!
WasmxoTOK, April 30.
Col. Wild, of the 55th Massachusetts, has*
been commissioned a Brigadier, and author
ized to raise a Wild African brigade, to con.
sist of four regiments ol blacks, enlisted in
North Carolina.
The visitors from tho Sanitary Commission
to the Western armies report them presenting
a percentage of sick only a little larger than
in the army of the Potomac.
The Commissary Department is making ex
cellent provision forgiving soldiers a variety of
vegetables and fresh meats in lien of regular
rations. Hospital transports on the Mississ
ippi are more comfortable and aervicablc
formerly. Tho report of bad management of
medical matters in Sherman’s armyatthe
lime of the former attack on Vicksburg, were
unfounded, and the number of dead at that
time exaggerated.
FnOM SOUTH BASXERX Tilt.
eiTVIA.
Rebel Batteries ontboNonscmond.
Fortbess Moxboe, April 2S.—The propel
ler Commerce arrived this morning from Suf
folk, which she left at four o’clock, a, m.,
having run by the rebel batteries on the Xan
semond, three in number, under their heavy
fire. The boat was riddled by sharp-shooters,
who lined the banks of the Xansemond for
three miles, and kept up a continuous fire
upon the boat while she passed that dis
tance.
The steamboat Swan left Suffolk at tho
game time, and came down the Nunsemond in
company with the Commerce, but afterpass
ing below the range of the rebel guns, got
aground. Tugs were immediately sent to
her relief. The Swan received four solid shot
through her light wood-work, but is not dis
abled.
It is understood that the rebel force has
disappeared from the front of Williamsburg.
No casualties arc reported from Suffolk or
the Nonsemond since the 34th.
LITER FROM EUROPE.
The Polish Revolution—Our For
eign Relations.
Halifax, April 30.—Tho Enropa, from Liv
erpool 18th and Queenstown 19th, arrived this
morning, with three days later news.
A large amount of United States Treasury
Notes, in denominations of s’s, 10’s and 20’s
had been issued at Sheffield. *
The Daily jWs says there is an impression
that the Confederate Government cotton
warrants are in circulation in England, but it
is announced that such of these documents os
were created previous to tho Confederate loan
have been reduced through the medium of
that operation.
Poland.—The Paris I\tys says the dis
patches of England, France and Austria were
presented to tho court of Russia on tho 17th.
A Vienna dispatch says: The question
threatens to assume greater complications
Great excitement Is prevailing in Moscowand
Sweden regarding Poland. The courts of
Italy and Poland had conveyed to St. Peters
burg their adhesion to the notes of tho three
Powers.
The Revolutionary Committee has divided
Poland into twenty-three districts. Each
furnish 400 men and pay taxes.
The movements of the insurgents had be
come more active since tho publication of tho
amnesty. Numerous engagements are re
ported, and an attack on Kalisch was daily ex
pected.
London.—Funds are advancing and a re
duction of bank rates expected.
LATEST.
London, April 19.—Sweden is actively en
gaged In reorganizing her navy and complet
ing her inorulime defences.
The Great Eastern was eafelyfloated off the
grid-iron last night.
The following paragraph appears in the
Monitcur of yesterday, and it has attracted
considerable attention:
The growing hostility of the United States
towards England is exerting uneasiness in
London. Tuc last dispatches from the Wash
ington Government have a character of in
creasing irritation.
FROM THE ARMY OF THE
POTOMAC.
Xlic Cavalry Expedition of Gen Stone-
man.
Headq'rs Cavalry Corps, Army op tot I
Potomac, Warrenton Junction, April 25,1563. f
It was proposed during the past winter to
collect the cavalry force of the army of the
Potomac from the different divisions to which
they were detailed, and concentrate them un
der one leader. Gen. Hooker, with the Na
poleonic knowledge of men, which ho has
shown in the selection of his subordinates,
nominated Gen. Stonemanfor the position, an
officer who, from natural aptitude and long
experience In the Western Territories, is ac
knowledged to possess no superior in the
the army, Tho design was speedily carried
out. Pleasanton, Averill, Gregg, Buford, with
their forces, were ranged nnder'his command,
corps Generals, who had aired their dignity
with long trains of body-guards, were reduced
to stump-tailed potentates of twenty; divi
sion Generals were remorselessly curtailed to
six; and Brigadiers, poorfellows, were vouch
safed but three to act as orderlies and run
their errands.
A review by tho President was held early
during the present month, of this splendid
body of men, and on the 13th inst. a large
portion of them started, with two batteries
of artillery, under Major Robertson, upon a
secret expedition, beaming with hope, and
proud ot the magnificent organization to
which they were attached. To the regulars,
Gen. Stoncman urged that they should prove
tho superior discipline they claimed over vol
unteers. To the latter, he conceded the un
surpassed efficiency which several of them
had attained, and hoped much from their em
ulation. The press has properly long been
silent upon this undertaking, but a Philadel
phia paper having impatiently divulged cer
tain of Its movements, reticence is no longer
necessary Its definite object was known
to very few, and this was
subject to the modification of circumstances,
and of [information received. No wagons
were used, beyond a few ambulances. Pack
mules carried the supplies, and mud was no
obstacle. On Thursday Gen. Stoneman ar
rived at Beverly Ford, accompanied by Aver
ill’s Division; Gregg lay behind him; Bu
ford, with the regulars, and Rush’s Lancers
was lower down, at Rappahannock Bridge,
while CoL Davis, with a brigade, was ordered
on Tuesday evening to cross at Freeman’s
Ford the following morning at daylight,
drive the enemy from their rifle-pits, move
down and do the same from Beverly Ford,
thus clearing the way for Averill, Gregg, and
the Commanding General. Bufbrd was ready,
at a riven time, to effect his own crossing.
Col. Davis commenced his march at 11 p. in.,
but darkness and a furious rain retard
ed his object until 0 a. m. on
Wednesday. Passing Freeman’s Ford
without interruption, he proceeded on
to Hazel River, captured eight men at Milford
Mills Ford, and then, to reach Beverly Ford,
made a flank movement of two and a half
miles, with two squadrons from tho Sth New
York and Sd Indiana under Major Pope, cov
ering his right flank. The latter squadron
being subsequently directed to move on the
ford and capture the enemy in their rifle pits,
found they had escaped, and were then pushed
as skirmishers into tho woods in tho rear.
The Rappahannock swelling rapidly, an order
came from Gen. Stoneman to recross. Within
an hour after doing so the river became
unfordablc. By the miscarriage of an orderly,
the skirmishing squadron of the 3d Indiana
retired too late, and lost a Lieutenant, with 19
men, as prisoners. During a lull of the subse
quent series of storms, CoL Davis moved his
brigade to Liberty, thence to Waterloo, and
scouted the country to Hazel River, Little
Washington, Orleans, Salem, killing 4 of the
enemy, wounding 5, capturingfii, wuh an offi
cer and 80 horses, and losing himself but one
Lieutenant, slightly wounded. Previous to
his march on Tuesday, he had detached two
squadrons of the Sth Illinois, under Capt
Farnsworth, to Warrenton and White Sulphur
Sjirtoge. They drove a company of the 4’h
"Virginia from tho former place, killing,
wounding and capturing 11. ‘The Ist Rhode
Island rendered gallant and effective service
with the other regiments, under Col. Davis,
and the conduct oftho whole brigadereceived
high commendation. Any crossing of the
Rappahannock has since been nttcriy out of
the question.
Jfiven the small creeks throughout the neigh
borhood have been at times too swollen Tor
passage, and communication could only be
kept open by swimming. After waiting at
various points for an abatement of the waters,
we arrived here, by way of Warrcnton, on the
22d inst.. for supplies, which, through the
timely disposition of the General and his
Quartermaster and Commissary, Lieut. Cols.
Sawtellc and Austin, met ns at the moment of
arrival. Snch punctuality has been hitherto
almostunhcard cf but constant practice has
rendered every department of the army now
comparatively perfect in its details.
Arrest of Traitors in Southern
Illinois.
South Pass, HI., April BG.—There is a lit
tle excitement hero among the K. G. G.’a.
Two hundred soldiers are at Jonesboro, and
have arrested about twenty of the most prom
inent clOzens—Col. Ashley, all the doctors in
the place, and ‘Willard, we expect them
here to-morrow.
OCR CAIRO LETTER.
Tic 1 Cape Girardeau Affair.
[Special Correapondcuce of the Chicago Tribune,]
Como. April 23,1863.
Heretofore wo have been pre-eminently a
a peaceful people, and so little had we studied
the art of war that- outside of a limited few
we knew nothing about It, It is hardly to be
wondered at therefore* that in tho beginning
of this struggle innumerable mistakes should
have been made, and that the whole machine
ry of offense and defense should have worked
imperfectly. We have- failed in several in
stances to achieve results- greatly to be de
sired simply because oar commanders have
failed to co-operate and work harmoniously
together. These difficulties, however, are
last being overcome by the‘light of experi
ence and disasters, and reverses in the future
must be less frequent. The recent affair at
Cape Girardeau happily illustrates this truth.
As soon as Gen. X. B. Buford, commanding
this district, learned tliat, the enemy were ap
proaching Capo Girardeau, ho ordered his
small command under Lieut. CoL Xowhold,
of the 14th lowa, ■which was then at
Jonesboro, to march to the river
opposite and co-operate with Gem HcXeiL
On Sunday night at. ten o’clock die received a
telegram from Gen. McXeit Aaboth,"
asking for reinforcements. As the linos were
not working to Columbus, Gen. Buford in
stantly sent the dispatches by boat, with an
aid-de-camp, to Columbus, and before dav
light had sent for transports to convey the re
inforcements, volunteering to command the
expedition. He also held his small reserves
here in readiness for any emergency. In a
very short time the transports returned with
the troops on board, and reached the Cope in
time to have rendered the service which hap
pily was not needed. - r
Gen. Bnford has recently displayed an en
ergy and tact worthy of himself and his un
tarnished reputation. He has completely
scotched the sympathizers here by arresting
thirty of them, and fortv deserters or more
have been picked up within the last few days
He still retains his force in Union county un
til it be relieved by Gen. Burnside.
An unwonted order reigns in Cairo, The
negroes arc employed and provided for, and
throughout the streets proper sanitary regu
lations are enforced, a much needed order to
that effect having been issued on the 22d inst.
FROM MEXICO.
New York, April 29.
By a passenger arrived at this port yester
day from Vera' Cruz, in the bark Henry Trow
bridge, we learn the following:
On tbe 31st of March, about 11 a. m., a
force of about 700 guerillas attacked tho main
camp of the railroad company, where there
were about ">OO men emploved, taking the
men by surprise and killing abouttwelve men
and wounding twenty. After tho balance of
the men made their escape by ruunin*’’ to
ward the military camp atTijcria, and biding
in the woods, the guerillas took all the mule£
thirty-five or forty in number, and loaded
them with the stores of the camp, beds,
blankets, etc., and demanded of Mr.
the General Superintendent of the
keys of the safe; he accordingly handed them
over, when they took all the cosh, about
$3,000. *
After taking tho camp and nearly destroy
ing till except the buildings, the calef of the
guerillas told Mr. Hogan that the Mexican
Government had resolved to stop the progress
of the roads, and that all men auerthat notice
would be killed if found working thereon, at
the same time advising Mr. Hogan not to al
low himself or any of his meu to be found
there again.
During the night they routed and plundered
all the camps along the road toward Tijena.
Among the wounded is Mr. David Kelly, the
timekeeper, shot through the left arm.
Tho road has progressed about four miles
and a halffrom Tijena, which distance Mr.
Hogan hastened over on foot (having no horse
left,) to notify tbe military forces at that
place, and he soon had a force of about 300
soldiers on guard. Expecting the guerillas
to return, the Frenchmen were very anxious
to fire, and one of them, undercover of night,
thinking he saw the guerilla, fired. Here
another scene of horror occurred, the few
laboring men wbo had stayed in camp, ran
out to learn the cause of the firing, when the
soldiers, taking them for the enemy, fired
among them, killing and wounding between
ten and fifteen of them. This threw them
into a state of consternation, and the men
hurried down tbe road to Vera Cruz,
The Company had promised the men to
keep a guard on the place, and were making
preparations to resume work on the Monday
following, (April 0.)
The plunder taken by the guerillas amount
ed to about $12,000.
Tbe following arc some of the names of the
men killed: Charles Flagg, Richard Wilson,
Thomas Brady, Patrick Ward, John Cunning
ham, Jobu McDonald.
The French are making very slow progress.
About the middle of March they attacked a
small fort on the outskirts of Puebla, and suc
ceeded in capturing it after sustaining the
loss of 700 men.
Foreign IHarlret*.
By Telegraph.] [Per Steamer EruorA.
Liverpool.— Flour very dull,
with a downward tendency. Wheat dull, and par
tiallyeasier. Corn heavy andSd lower.
Provisions— Beef flat and lower, mostly In lower
qualities. Pork steady.
London, April 18.— Breadstupts Dull and
steady.
Illinois Central 41ft43 discount; 4G3tf<ft4T# for
Erie. Consols closed Friday at Bul
lion increased in the Bank of England £205,000.
LATEST.
Lwzrpool. April 16, p. m.— Cottox— Buoyant,
and holders demand an advance.
Bbeaustuits—Dull and easier.
Provision?— Heavy.
London, April 16.—Consols formorev92 V'3S2 r i;
Erie 4GQ.47; Illinois Central 44#(243»tf discount/
Jflenj 2Utocrtiscmtnts.
LOST.—A {girl (German)
fonr years of ace, dressed la a brown-colored
calico drc**. with dark red woolen winter hoadLhaa
lost herself from 291 West Polk street, this afternoon.
HENRY C. CABSBL, 291 West Polk street.
N. D.—Her name U Bwirrax Casssl. myi-disait
QJmKY BAGS.
100 Bales Single Gunnies,
Just arriving, will bo sold from depot at low rates.
UNDERWOOD & CO.,
rayl-d3SS-Etnel IST South Water street.
"OEMOVAL.—We have removed
JLV to the large store.
lO RIVER STREET,
(near Chicago Tobacco Works), where, with Increased
stock and facilities, we shall be plowed to serve oar
patrons and ALL who want good articles, !a the Gro
cery Una. at lowest market pi lees.
myl CSS7 etset LADD. WILLIAMS & YOUNG.
A/fASONIC.—There will be a spe
-ITX ciol convocation o! Washington Chapter No. 43.
R. A. M„ this (FRIDAY) evening at o'clock, for
Work. [royl-d269-ltj 6. K, UNDERHILL. See.
p O-PARTNERSHIP.—The nn-
V_> dcrelpced have this day formed a co-partnership
for the troc(action of a general Commission business,
under the Ann name of m)WE & ROBBINS. OUlce, its
Sonth Water street, Chicago, LL
CMcajro.Maylat.l36l SAMUEL HOWS,
myi-dra-da B. V. ROBBINS,
OD-PARTNERSHIP NOTICE.
I have this day taken Into partn "fillip mvbrother.
W3I. W. 81LTON8TALL.
Tie business will be conducted. hereafter, under tho
name of F. G. SALTONSTALL * CO.
Chicago. May : s t. !So3. F. G. SALTONSTALL.
rnyl-dSTT-lw
FG. SALTONSTALL & CO.,
• COMMISSION
STOCK AND BON’D BROESBS,
21 South Clark street.
Stocks purchased In New York by Telegraph. Inr
ca?b or on time, and speculative orders executed
promptly at New York Rates. d*e, Ac
myl-d2n- iw F. G. SALTONSTALL & CO,
■pROM AND AFTER THIS
I. date. Mr. ROSCOS R. FRORACK Is almltteda
psrtne.'lnonr firm. VAN WAOENEN & CO.
Chicago. May Ist. ISO. myl-dJ73-lw
\TAS WA6ENEN & CO..
” GE’.TiliiL
COMMISSION EERCniXTS,
ISB Soath Water street. Chicago.
Ca?h advances made on consignment-* to Buffalo.
Oswego and New York, with privilege of sale at either
place. myi-drrs-im
"Tt IS S O LTJTION. —TIie partner-
JLf ship heretofore existing between the undersigned
Is tbit day disseised by mutual consent.
Chicago. April 2W.ISC3. A. W. WHITAKER,
tuyl d!X>lt A. ARTHUR BANKS.
"VTOTICE.—On and after the first
1' dy of May, I shall take CARTES DE VISITS
PICTURES
FOB $2.00 PER DOZEN,
Ard Ambrctjpra for 25 cents. J. D, DENNIS,
isyi-Hgifrlt C 3 West Randolph street.
piG IRON.
THE PHOT MOB PIG IKOS,
A superior Foundry Iron. For sale by ALBERT E.
vrvT.Y. 240 South Water street. myl-d277-15t
J^EMOY-Ali
Julian Kune & Co.,
GENEEAI COM2HSSIOH MEHCHAHTS,
Have removed to 120 SOUTH WATER STREET, where
they will continue to transact a general commbwlon
business as heretofore. JDUAX KL’SB.
Chicago. Hay Ist, ISO. B. K. BEXSOX.
Refer by permission to Hon. J.T. Scataraoo, Banker.
Chicago; Messrs.A J. Galloway A Co.. Land Agents,
do; Peter Dscgy, Esq.. Sec. L C.R.U.. do.; A. T. Hall.
Esq..Trcaa.C.B.A<£u.R.. do myidJjQim
jyjOSQTJITO NETTING,
10,000 Pieces
Of above for sale la tfte following colors:
PINK, BLUE,
VBTLOW. • GBEEIf,
black, white,
By Washburn, Welch & Carr,
myl-d36*-Im e*«rrankUa street, Boston.
NUMBER 2(59.
2ft®
TO PROVISION DEALERS.
We bays about S.OfO pieces of
heavy Boren sides
And 5,000 pieces
Heavy Dry Salted Shonldcn*.
01 rcgalar port tonaoent.
Afloat In canal boat, wbicb woold be goM. if smiled
for to-day. at Inside f jure**, to jjvqm atorinr
UNDBHWOUD &"C0
myl-dSSC-lt I&7 Sooth Water street.
OARATOGA EMPIRE SPRING
kj TVATEIf DEPOY r
REMOVED TO
I*o SOUTH WATER STREET.
clllci^o.ll.y lit. ISO. myl-d-ST-lm
T>T JOHN H. OSGOOD-A SON,
Office. U7 Congress street. Boston,
Large sale of Military Overcoats oa-scconnt of
the Government, by order of the U; s, Qoar.
tamaster at Boston.
Will be gold by Pcbllc Auction, in lots tn-eolt mir.
to the highest bidder.
On THTRSDAT, May 14th, 1863,
At 10 O’clock A- M.,
23,201 Infantry Great Coats,
(assorted aUea.) viz:
17.7C1 Black Tricot. Doeskin, Bearer; and Satinet,
l.coo Grey Satinet, '
6.0C0 Dark Bine Pilot, and Satinet.
All In perfect order, veil packed In caEr?.und ready
lor sLlpißC'jV. Tbe can be examined on tbc duv
prcTlons to tbe sale. Terms cash.
wm. W. McKIM. Captain and A. O V
Assistant Qnartenn Aster’S Office, I *
Bowoo. April gT.iaa. » myl-'d»7-td
Y ONE HAVING A
Lot to Lease,
ON WABASH AVENUE,
Or East of State Street,
"Will address «C,” Tribune Office.
{mlil-da3-lt!atpl
■pXCISE TAX LAWS,
JLLi In Press:
TVillbe published In a few days.
XETE EXCISE T-AX LAW,
WITH ALL THE AMENDMENTS.
Together with the Instruction*. Blank Forms Decl*-
loim and Regulation* ot the Comml'sloacr, lacludiac
those most rccentanC not before published. renting to
Proprietary Ailiclesoad to the At.*e.-ameat of the In
come Tax in Mat-.
A most complete. accurate, and reliable work, with
fhll marginal notes and references, anti a minute Ana
lyticnl Index. Valuable to Assessors. Collector*
Manufacturers. Lawyers, and to every Taj-payo. - •
also. Important to every Library.
Compiled by Ciiabixs F. Estes. Esq., lato Deputy
Commissioner of Internal Revenue.
1 vol. octavo; about :nopages. Cloth. Price?LjO.
Order* respectfully solicited.
FITCiI, EsTEK * CO.. Publishers.
myl-tiyAlOt No. SPa-k Place. New York.
GROCERIES
G. C. €GOK & CO.,
WHOLESALE
<3-B;OOEB/S,
16 & 18
STATE STREET.
BURLEY & TYRRELL,
48 Lake Street, 43
CHICAGO,
Jobbers of
WALL PAPERS!
RORRERS,
AND
WINDOW SHADES.
gTEAM TO LIVERPOOL.
NO SEA SICKNESS.
’ITTF STE V’TTSmP
GREAT EASTERN,
53.5C0 tons burthen.
TTIU leave Liverpool on her first trip durian the pres
ent month, or early In May, and will continue to rnn
regularly dnriac the season. Early notice will be
given of dates of departure?.
BATES 07 PASSAGE.
First Cabin....405 to|l3slSecond Cabin #7C
Third Cabin 50 \ Steerage SC
First and second cabin excursion tickets to Llvnr
poolandback at a fare-and a half. Prepaid pa«age
certificates Issued.
Payable la gold or Its eqnlralent In treawuy notes.
Each passenger allowed twenty cubic feet ot lugsate.
An experienced surgeon onboard. Berths should o»
secured Immediately. For farther particular* apply tc
JA3IKS wAßßACK. n Latest,,Chicago.
lIOWLAM) & ASPIXWALL. Agacta.
ORO. G. POPE, late
POPE & SLOCUM,
122 - - Clark Street, - - 122
Wholesale and Retail dealer in Port brands
CARBON OIL AN» BEXZOLE,
LA3IJPS, &c.
Sole Agent for BldvcQ's Coal OH Axle f»reaao.
op22cSßl-tww-Faatnct 132 CLARK STREET.
JJEEKING’S PatcntGHAMPION
FIRE PROOF SAFES.
SEEKING’S CHAMPION
BURGLAR PROOF SAFES.
WITH
HERRING AND FLOYD’S
PATENT CBISTiUZSS IB OS.
<9 STATE ST, Chicago.
er^c^s-n
'T'RiiiES,—The finest Ornamental
JL Shade Trees ever offrred—Silver leaf Maple SIU
rer leaf Poplar. Lombard? Poplar. Balm of GLowL
Rose of Bharen. Gulden wriov. \rhor
Ylta>—all Knr«ry-cro«n Trees, from 7to IT feet la
height—at Mr. R. Fosa lota on MadUoa street tTi
Woctse«tonjnlon Park. I will be there froniatUl
BP.M. Any ordere left at the Clarendon Hoos« Jji
Randolph street, win receive careful attention ’’
apTS-dm-steodoct T. F. BALD WTK
KAA DOZEN HOES, and full as
V V of Agricultural Implements far
sale by WM. BLAIR «t CO„ Wholesale Hardware
House, 176 Lake street.
KAA DOZEN SHOVELS AND
SPADES, and complete stock of Forks.
Rakes. Ac, for sale at thoWholes'ile Hardware House.
ITG Lake street. WM, BLAIR * CO.
9 k A DOZEN SCYTHES, Blood’s,
Jmi t/ V Wadsworth’s, and other first class brands.
Scythe Snaths. Scythe Stones. Ac., far sale at the
Wholesale Hardware House 176 Lake srree t
l> JI. lILAU. » tU.
OAA DOZEN SHEEP SHEARS,
Aj\J\J extra nuatity. Wool Twine. Sheep Bells,
AC.. for Yale by VM. BLAIR ± CO.. 176 take street^
7KAA BOXES TIN PLATE,
| t/UU and all kinds of-nnaers stock for sale
at the Metal Warehouse. CQ
f»AAA KEGS WHEELING
uUI/V KAILS for sale at Factory Prices, add-
OAAA DDLS. SHEET IRON,
£\J\J\J Common, Charcoal, Juniata and Gal
vanized Iron. Ibr sale at the Hardware and Metal
Warehouse. 176 Lake street. VM. BLAIR A CO.
THJILDERS HARDWARE, the
X* most complete assortment ever brocgtAjo this
maket. lor sale at the Wholesale Hardware Ho&e 178
Lake street. WM. BLAIKACO
rjARHIAGE BOLTS AND
SCREWS, the largest slock In the West, lor sale
rx e rSv at Wholesale Hardware Hotwe,
178 Lake street WM. BLAIR. A CO.
900 GROSS PRESSED TIN
■“*, A-TE3. au d full wortmentof Jsppan
nedandPresfedTiaWaroof oQkla(b.for sale la the
Hardware and Metal Warehouse. ITS Laka street
*p3« dl&oet-Xir*t WM,BLAItt*CQ»
jJSnD 2llU)crtt3tmtnt«
THE BUGLE CALL,'
By Geo. F. Root,
JUST ISSUES.
Deigned espMiilly for fnloE le gats la Q«
Sorth, oar iftnj in tlie Soalh, tad
Loyal people ererywhere.
CO.NTENTS :
THE BATTLE.
jygWBALLAD OF LOUD SOTELL.
•BATTLE-CRY OB BBEEDOJL
BOYS ARE THEY.-
n. JIFF
CLEAR THE WAT
COME RoCSE I P, *BRAVE BOYS.
ENGLISH NEUTR vtttv
FINE OLD UNION GEVFLTTWV
GOD BLESS OUR NATIVE land* W
HEAVENS
GOD SATE THE NATION;
SAVE THE PRESIDENT.
GOD SPEED THE RIGHT.
GONE TO THE WAR.
•GRAFTED INTO THH AIOtT.
•HAIL-COLUMBIA.
no : FOR THE GCK-ROATJ^HOI
JEFFERSON D , S3E.
•KINGDOM COMING.
LORD' LOVELL MARCHED' OUT OP NEVf^
ORLEANS.
MEN THAT DARE.
MY NATIVE COUNTRY. THTt'
THE nEAIt CWES. ‘
OLR SOLDIZKS 3TA.N3 UPO3 THE
cl£Ll>.
°- THE FLAG .WOBSB me;’
PATRIOTIC ANTHEM.
PICKING LINT.
STAND BY THE PRESIDENT
•STAND UP FOR UNCLE SAM.
THE LX.TTLE-CALL.
TBK BiTGLE CAtL.
THE HARP OF THB UNION BA SD
•THERHS t \ GOOD TIME COATNOJ
THE SHIP OF UNION.
THE SKEDADDLE RANGERS.
*THE STAR SI ANGLED BANNER.
THE UNION LEAGUE. .
THRICE HAIL. HAPPT DAT
TOLL THE BELL.
UNCLE SALTS FMUNftr.
UNITE.
WHAT-I Thl MAOTtsf TmS
WHERE HOME IS.
Tie pieces marked irtih a Star (*) are f rt_-
IkUrd la sieet for.n, with prelate and at- -
tompaulments for Pliao Porte.
Sample copies mailed Creotoanvpartof the coun
try on receipt of 2o cents.-
ROOT &■ CADY,
ar^da^tnet
y» CLARK STREET. Chicago.
-'J'UTTLE, HIBBARD & CO,
IMPORTERS OP
HARDWARE AND TUf PLATE,
SHEET IRON, COPPER,
Wire, USTaHs,
GLASS AITD FARMING TOOLS,
Ever offered In this market.
W» iss also ausuTACtunsM or ua
BEST AXES
IN AMERICA.
Our goods were purchased before the recent *d
▼ar.ee. Nt . wei-f-.a'lse them a* low as they caa ha
purchased East. and many article without
transportation.
XUTTIdE, EUIBAIID Sc CO.,
myCC-lstp • C Lake afreet, Chicago,
LIRE AND BURGLAR PROOF
ctcrrotter ini;-«nd the only Fire tW fSorSIS
which liaa bars of hardened steel between the heavr
past to arrive, but will have within a week or teadaya.
The Largest and Best Assortment
Ever wen in the Northwest, comprising everything hi
Fire Proof, Burglar Proof, and
Ere and Burglar Proof Combined.
Also. Small Safes. ft>r silver ware article* of
Jewelry,&c. Ac. No boslners man should investona
.dollar in Safe*, until he w*** onr stock
A a far as tre r.asi is rroia rnt* *» esc. SO lar 4TO
Safes abend of every other make tn this market,
F. W. PH.ITT,
street.
»p2C-tfSM*net
TTOWE’S IMPROVED STAND-.
J-JL AED
SCALES.
The above Scale has been adopted by th«
U. S. GOVERNMENT,
ra ras
New York Custom House.-
AND OTHER POINTS.
We offer for «Uo all hind*. embracing U W Cattl*.
SiSST““ a IU,LnOAI> Sca - M - i complitoSi
SCALE,
IN GENERAL USE IN THE ARiIT,
Our pocccm la the Introduction of the above Sctfea'
to the Northwest having more than e<i milled onraa-*
tlcipatlosß. we shall continue the sale ashentofora—
any report to the contrary (drcaUted by rivals) S’
lug entirely unfounded. ' w
Our Hay, Cattle and Railroad. Scale*
Require No Pit,
A very great advantage In a fiat country.
Price* as l«wa« any Scale that has merit. All Seals
sold at a low list price. ,
Attempts having teen made In many eascs.to under* -
sell to oar customers, we are determined to meet sat*
unialr competition In every Instance. Apply to
Tamiervoort, Dicker-won *fc Co.,
Agents for Howe's Scales,
TUT PLATE AND METAL WAREHOUSE,
199 & 201 Randolph street.
Chicago
apS-clirMwnet
AITCTIOX.—We boucht.
A at the Great Panic Auction- Sales In jrew vfcrw
within the pant few days, and aro now recelvlmr and.
have in stock, over “**.««*»»,
500 Arcnos lots of
French, English and German, Spring
and Summer Dress Goods,
Many of then bought. and win be sold S) per cent bo.
low the Importing cost. Th»«e goods are all ofthlc
seasons Importances, comprising many ol the Tifnif
novelties in
PARIS DRESS GOODS.
° TO “° PACKAOES OP TUB
DOMESTIC GOODS
of every description, bought at panic prices antf
which we arose Ring ¥ * “"*■
20 and 30 per cent, below prices of a
few days ago.
fa the time to buy, as prices are again ad ran chEX
rapidly la l«ew Tort.
W. it. ROSS & co„
„ 16, * Q d IMLake Street.Chicago.
Chicago. A prillfi ISO. fe3o.a377.«nwie*
METAL WAREHOUSE.
TIN PLATE,
Sheet Iron,
TISSEKS’ stock,
VAitDERTOORT, DIfKERSO.V&CO.,.
199 & 201 Randolph street
mli2U-b3S2 lyx-way net
H™ g toSU«..«w
jobbzss nr
cLOTsiira-,
AND
Gents’ Furnishing G-oods,
34 &36 LAKE STREET,
Corner Walnah avenue, Chicago, »** T
itaaufc cturera and Jobbers at
95 Devonshire St Boston, Waw.
WebaTetheUrseetandbestancrted stock (3reot
Ircm our mann&eicrr) to’oe found west of Kaw York,
to which we larite the attention ol Western mer
chants. Haring bought ottr goods early last Paß, ww
are enabled to seU at a large per centavo tea* than thw
r&me good# can now be mhl-LaSS-aat
QHAS. L. NOBLE,
■WjtIOLBSAIB DBXLEB W
l.a.:m:;ps, :
Carbon, and Kerosene Oil,
IH tick gXBEEX.
WIT-vaOJTICS

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