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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1860-1864, November 28, 1863, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84031490/1863-11-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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ggccial Koticcs.
X>k% C. Iff. WoodUnll,
CAA'CSB AND OOSBTrWPTIOjr POTBICIAK,
Has located at Chicago, HUnolf, No.
street. He kllU and extract* Cancer? tour
to tvcmr.foor Lour without ni'trumea-s or pim.
AlKi lif.it all kind, of Clirgnlc T J -
Coro* Always guaranteed. Post Odlcc Bax cow.
Hair Dye! Hair Dye!!
BACHELOR'S celebrated HAIR DTE IB TZTE BE£T
*nftkk wobia> The onlv Haemlebs. Tun* and Belt-
SS Pycknotru. Tk 1 s splendid Ha\r Dye la Perfect
-Sumner* Bed, Rnsty or Grey Heir blatantly, to a
«LO?f>v
or staining the Hair Soft
and Beautiful: imparts fresh vitality, frequently res
toring Hr pristine color, andrcctlCen the 111 effects of
Bad liver. The Genuine is signed Wiujaji A. Bxca-
TT/in,'n:i others arc mere Imitations, and should be
uroldodl. SoldbyallDruggists, Ac. Factory,Bl Bap»
clay i-t.vct. Xcw York. JyS-gasi-ly.
Trasses,
Sbtmlilrr Braces, Abdominal Supporters, Elastic
«3tocl Jngn, Ac* at 1. B. BSELES7S Truss Estab
lishment,
126 CLARK STREET,
wole proprietor and xnanufscUircr of tho Hard Rubber
Trnffe.pr.ficr Riggs and Goodyears PateuU.Thls Truss
<7TBEi> Ruptures and frees the cord from all pressure,
will nevurrust, break, chafe, gall or blister, can be
made stiff or Umber, used in bathing, always clean and
good a? new. Persons wishing this Truss can be accu
rately fitted, by sending size In inches around the body
in Hue of rupture. de2-x6C6-lw T. FAS.
UolJoway’s PRle,
fTAWord to mother*. Cholera Infantum, Diarrhea.
About one third of the weekly interments registered
by the Hoard of Health may be classed under the head
or Infant mortality, the major!tr of which arc swept
off fc.t flic disease of the bowel*. We here coafldenijy
.asset; that any case of Cholera Infantum or Diarrhea
as It is termed In the after stage of life, however vio
lent in its nature,orwhatevcrlts origin,can bo radi
cally eared by-the use of Holloway's Pills. The sea
son v.'hvn this class of disorders becomes prevalent Is
approaching, “forewarned Is forearmed,"says the pro
-rorh, nnd mothers should take heed in time. For In
fant*. tho Pills should bo crushed and dissolved In wa
ter yv.xeteoned with sugar. noSi-781-lw.
JL Pliysiological view of Btsu>
Viage.
Containing ncarlr SOC pages, and 130 lino Plates and
Engravings of Uic Anatomy of the Cereal Organs In a
of licalUi aoA Dlwmd, viUi o Treatise on Sell*
Abmr, its deplorable comw-qncnce* upon the Mind
and Body, with the Author's Plan of Treatment—the
only rational and encccssfnl node of core, os shown
by the report of the caerstrentod. A truthful advis
er to the married, and those contemplating marriage
•who entertain doubts of their physical condition.
-Rent .free of postage to any Address, on receipt of 13
ccntr> in stamp* or postal currency, ny address Inc Dr.
LACROIX. No. SI Maiden Lane, Albany, Jf. T.
ocll^^SS-Sm.
JDrfi. W Sc J. Hunter A Ten*
Baden
Trent nil Chronic Diseases, such as Colds, Coughs,
Consumption. Asthma, the Lungs, Heart, Stomach,
Kldm-ye, Dlsdcr and the Dowels, Dyspensl*, Diarrhea,
I>vh- turry, Gout, Rheumatism, Paralysis, Hip Disease,
while Swellings, and all complolots of w*mca and
children; Sore Lyes and Ears, Cataract Discharges,
liosrjtig and Dossing Sounds. Also .
CANCERS, OLD SORES OR ULCERS. TUMORS,
MENS, PILES AND FlS’i’DLKs.
WUI-mit cutting with the knife. A 1 letters must con
tain ten cent* for a speedy answer. Dra. VT.V J
HCKTrR A VON BADEN. Box 6CRS. Hour from 9
A. M. ioBP. M. Ofilec9l Randolph street, corner of
Dearborn, Chicago lUlnoa. fe3^g647«ly.
Trutlis that Defy Competition*
Ecr*’ the following facts in relation to CUI6T & SO*
■RO'bKXCELSIOBIiAIBDYEand then say U it has
any equal to the world:
It neither boras thcskln nor balrj it colors every
Lair alike; its blacks nod browns are Nature’* dupli
cate* ; it is applied in a Tew minutes; It leaves a gloss
upon the hair; It is more permanent than other dyes;
it contains no corrosive Ingredient*; and lastly, its In*
Tentor challenge* a trial between this dye and any
other in existence whether of native or foreign ori
gin.
Manufactured by J. CEISTADOBO, 6 As tor House,
New Turk, gold everywhere, and applied by nil Hair
Dressers, Price SIXO, sLsoand fSdWper box,accord
jpg to mkc. nols-Ss9*im,
Piles! Piles!!
X>r. WUflcld’s Vegetable PUl>
Are warranted a certain euro for FISTULA, BLIND
AND BLEEDING PILES.
We would caution all who arc victims to this dla*
trcft.iig complaint to ovoid-tliensc of external appll*
catic:<* us they result only in aggravating the disease.
Dr. WITFXEXD’S remedy removes the cause of the
diflCL.'T, and effects & permament cure.
THIS IS NO QUACK MEDICINE.
Those Pills have been triedforthe last seven years,
And in no instance have they tailed to care.
Price SO cents per box. Bent by mail to any address.
J. VODNti.Solc Proprietor, _
481 Broadway, S. T.
Tor ..lie by BLISS & SHARP, 141 Lake street, Cul*
cago, lit. oc&-m516-am.
TV: «lcr Core and Horaocpathbic
Medical Infirmary*
232 I*2 STATE STREET*
Dr. H. G. TOWNSEND,recently from Boslod.Mbm.,
Proprietor.
The burincss arrangements ol this establishment
Comprehend:
Ist. General Practlcc-for which Dr. Townsend has
a competent AwoclalePhyulclau.
Sd. office advice with verbal or written directions
So r Lome treatment.
Sd. Department for Female Diseases, also for special
ease.- of Nervous Debility of Males and Females. Fo*
males, visiting the city and wishing Medical Advice
can be provided with nice rooms and the best of nurs
ing on very reasonable terms. Dr. Townsend has his
rooms; so arranged that patients visiting his office nev*
or see any one bnt the Dr. himself. Letters addressed
to Dr; TOWNSEND. 282)£ State street. Chicago. 111.,
will be promptly answered. Consultation free. Office
hour? trout 9A. M. to li F. M. nol-piJO-im-U.
ggjfjorcsafr Rouses.
1863. Fall Trade. 1863.
BAWSOX & BABTLETT,
Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in
BOOTS AXD SHOES
30 Lake street, Chicago, 01.
Wt nre now offering to the trade one of the largest
and ULiiT SELECTED etocka ever brought to this
market.
Baring defr-rmlned to make our BUSINESS CASH
ONLi, we will agree to eell our goods
As Low as con Be Bonglit
Tn tills or ony other market. Eastern bills freely do*
plicated. We make a SPECIALTY of EXTRA SIZED
S*, a large assortment of which we now have on
BAWSON A BARTLETT*
scll-mCIC-Sm
JgCOTT, KEEN & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
FINE CLOTHING,
Officer’s Uniforms,
CLOTHS, CASSCTERES, VESTINGS,
FURNISHING GOODS.
TronkijTcarcllzisi Bags and Valises,
136 LAKE STREET.
OQ.-P3S&SCI
CIAY, HANENKA2IP & ED
KX WARDS,
[Successors to Edward J. Gay A Co-]
ST. LOUIS, no.,
OFFER FOB BALE
'BOO hhds. fair and choice N.O.Bugar.
250 hhds. fair and Choice Porto Bico
Sugar.
.750 hhls. Plantation Molasses.
1000 bags Prime Bio Coffee.
fer. Louts. Mo- Nov. 19,19C3. noll-pSU-lm
Banking anfr Exdjangc.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
OF CHICAGO.
2Q LASALLE STREET.
CAPITAL PAID IN, - - 9250,000.
E. B. BBAIfiTED, Cashier.
E. Amry, President. ■ aoS-pSCS-ly-is
Bank of America.—Puttie
Notice is hereby given, that nil Bills or Circulate
IngNou-sofiUc
“ BANK OF AMERICA,«
HeMoforc incorporated end doing business In the city
of Chicago, under the general banking laws of the State
of Fliums, most be presented for payment to the Audi
tor of Ihiblic Accounts of said State, at his office. In
the cliv of Springfield. within three years from the
date hereof, or the Ihnos deposited for the redemption
Offnld note* will be given up to said bank.
Dated this 20th day of May, A. D. 1861.
GEOfeGE SMITH, President.
E. W. WnXARD. Cashier. Jy26-g2B-tqieY-3t
U. g. 5-20’s
Cn hand and Ordered for
Subscribers at all times.
Favorable arrangements made with Rankers and
•Other* ordering bonds.
J. YOUNG SCAMMON,
SUBSCRIPTION AGENT.
nctf-rscs-ioi -
Sot tfjc
JJECRUITS FOR
OLD REGLnE^TS.
Tcieran Tolnutecrs, $lO2 Bounty
and Premium.
All other Bccralts, $302 Bounty
and Premium.
All nblc-bortied men, between the ages of Eighteen
and lort r-Flvc Years, who hare heretofore been en
listed «nd hare served for not less than nine months
who .-lisUre-lnUst for Regiments In the field, will be
deemed VETERAN VOLUNTEERS, and as sttch will
be 4 roiled to receive one month’s pay In advance apd
a bounty and prcmlom of fifth
To iih other Recruits for Old Regiments, not ‘Vete
ran*, out niomhV nov lu advance and a bounty and
-premium of f*fi wfifbe paid.
Eueli recruit will be allowed to SELECT THE REGI
MEN J which be prefers to join, and will be mustered
Into the Regiment of his choice.
All who with to join any of Uio gallant Regiments
Stow In the field, end to receive the munificent boun
ties ottered by the Government, can have the privi
lege by calling at the 11 eadQuartera of
Crpl. WM. JAMES, Provost Marshal of the Ist Dis
trict, at Chicago.
Capt. AidoSTl. COOK, Provost Marshal of the 2d
DlurJct, at Marcnro.
(.'apt. JOHN.V. EUSTACE, Provost Marshal of the
3d lb.- ;rict,at Dixon.
Ciipi. JAAIES WOODRUFF, Provost Marshal oftho
4th iMhirlct at Quincy.
Cent. JAMES M. ALLAN, Provost Msrabii of the
sth District ot Peoria.
Cam. ABEL LONG WURTH, Provost Marshal of the
sth DMrtct, at Jolirt,
Cnpt, tv. SITBIAK, Provost Marshal of the 7th Dls
lrU;i, ut Danville.
o. i-i.L.K. WESTLAKE, Provost Marshal of the 9th
DMrict. »t Mt. Sterling.
Cam. WILLIAM M. FRY, Provost Marshal ofthe
JOih DiHririjat Jacksonville.
. Lapt. 110RT1MER O.KEAN, Provost Marshal of
lh. lUh lfiMrirt.aiOltiey.
Whlnari;.? l^^^ 1 ' 0^1 - Pro '’ Mt “"“■•J or U,c
Prol '“ t orthc
MEN OF ILLINOIS*
*Y< n are again summoned to rally around the dear old
ring. \ our eiwDiaueoua and glorious patriotism Tim
Blthcno more than cpnalled every call of your conn,
try. impcrlahahle lustre has crowned the una of the
invincible legions of your brethren already |o the
fieM. No other Slate has so proud a record. Xhe
Twdllon Is reeling and staggering beneath the tremeo.
tioo' blow* of the brave and stalwart sons of the Re
public, A few blows more and Treason dies. The end
Isncur. Your country again calls. She asks you to
dose- on the thinned ranks of the battle-scarred he
ron, who, on a hundred glorious fields have made the
DMii4 oftilUnolßan" a terror to the foe and the watch
word of victory. She greets yon with a liberality wor
thy alike of her gratitude for your past achievements,
and her faith in your ability to win yet more enduring
renown. HUnofhaub! to the field again! by hundred*
and thousands and assist In the anal effort that shall
bring the Infernal Dragon of Secession to the dost for
ever. So, living or dying, shall ti»i« Commonwealth and
the Republic ole* you, and your names and memo
ries be Immortal! JAMES OAKES.
■ft . „ Lieut. Col. 4th U. S. Cavalry,
t>cls-03»-Sin- A. A. Pro. Mar. Gen. EL
&c.
gAD DL ERT~HAR D WA R E,
SLEIG-H BELLS,
HORSE BLANKETS,
SADDLES,
CARRIAGE TIUMINQS,
tEATUSH,
HOYT’S LEATHER BELTIMG.
COEEICT, WOOIX3Y & CO.,
ISTo.' 52 Lake Street.
fnol-p2sfi-lm)
JLJAYDEX, KAY & CO.,
45 and. 47 Lake Street,
Manufaclurcrs of and.Dealers iu
SADDLERY HARDWARE
Spring Aales, Hobs, Spolccs, Felloes.
Out Pace Bostics and Seats, Rnnin.
died- Clotli) Patent licolher,
CAEEIAG-E TRIMMINGS,
Horse Collar*, Elaukets, WWps, Lashes,
-ATP—
Earnegg Leather.
OBTHiATBR & CO.,
Manufacturers of and Dealers in
SADDLES,
HORSE COLLARS,
TVXifps. Homo Blankets, Plow Hor
. UCAS) &C., &C.,
44 LAKE STREET, UP-STAIRS.
ScO-UisCl»l3w
firms (Contracts.
T>EEF SUPPLIES.
JL> OmozC&isr CoxwissanTOFSwßsisTZNCs,)
2SB North Main street. >■
Sr. Lons, Wo- November 10, ISIS.)
tep.kvm PROPOSALS will be received at this office
until j2 o'clock it., Monday, November SO, ISG3, for
furnishing
FRESH BEEF
To the troops in the field, and at porta and camps In
the Department of the Tennessee (Cairo and Paducah
excepted.) and at posts or camps in the Department
of the Missouri, dtuated on the Mississippi River,
south of Bird’s Point: it being understood that should
the troops leave the above Departments, bnt continue
to draw supplies therefrom, the contractor shall con
tinue to tarnish them with fresh beef if required.
The contract to commence January 1, IS*, and to be
Is force fof four months.
Theßecftobeofgood and wholesome quality, with
(qual proportions or fore and hind quarters, (necks,
baanks* and kidney tallow to be excluded). The necks
of the cattle slaughtered for beef nodcr the contract,
shall be cut off at the fourth vertebral Joint, and the
breast trimmed down. The shanks of the foor qnar*
lert shall been! off from three to foor Inches above
the knee Joint, and of the bind quarters irom six to
eight inches above the gambrel or sock Joint.
The beet' to be delivered at snch tixncsln such places,
and in snch quantities, as may be directed by the Cider
Commissaries of the Departments, the Commissary of
nn army or command in the field, or at post or camps,
or bv other competent anthorlty.
Tue United States reserves the right to slaughter for
the use of the troops such cattle ns may be seized or
captured as contraband of war.
T.ic bids will state the price per net pound nt which
the beef will be furnished, the United States furnish
ing water transportation from SU Louis and points
rootli thereof, to the main Subsistence Depots In the
Department, on navigable streams, and railroad trans
portation on roads conducted by the Government
when practicable.
Also, the price per net pound, the contractor ftxr*
nialiing all transportation.
ProjKisals from contractors who have previously
failed to comply with their bids, or fill their contract,
from disloyal persons, those interested tn more than
one bid, or when bidder is not present to respond to
ids bid, will not be considered.
Neither contractor* or their agents will be allowed
to tngngc In any speculations in the enemy’s country,
nor sell occfto private parties without due authority.
All bids must be accompanied by a guarantee of the
form annexed. The responsibility of the guarantors
(unless known to the undersigned) must be shown by
the official certificate ofthc Clerkofthe nearest Dls*
trlrt Court, or of the United States District Attorney.
The uamesof Anna must be stated In fall, with the
precise oddres* of each member of the firm.
Each bid must have a printed copy of this advertise*
ment posted at Its head, and be in the following form:
1, —.hereby propose to deliver the subsist*
cnee Department ofthe United States such fresh beef
ol the quality described in the advertisement above
ported, as I may from time to time be required to fUr*
nlth, on dne and timely notification, at—cents per
pound net weight, the Government furnishing water
and railroad transportation, as indicated in the above
advertisement, when practicable, or I will fUmish the
same assuming all tzunsjiortatlon at cents per
pound, net weight. .
I enclose herewith my affidavit that I am not inter
ested, directly or indirectly, in aav bid offered, except
the one to which I have subscribed my name.
good and sufficient security, will be
required.
FORM OF GUARANTEE.
. We, ofthe county of , and State of ,
do hereby guarantee that——ls able to fulfill the
contract in accordance with the terms of his proposi
tion, and that should his propositi on be accepted, be
win at once enter into a contract In accordance there*
with.
Should the contract be awarded him, arc are pre
pared to become hie securities.
(Signed) —.
Tblh guarantee most be appended to each bid;
Thengbt tordect ollblds is reserved. 4
Bids must be fa duplicate. To be endorsed “Pro
posals for BecL" and addressed to Colonel T. J.
Hrim-s, A. D. C- and Chief Commissary of Subsis
tence, St. Louis, Mo.
Those not corresponding with the above conditions,
will be rejected. T. J. HAINES,
Colonel, A. D. C- and Chief Commissary.
r.015-rICM2t
"PROPOSALS FOR ARiir
X TRANSPORTATION.
Optics of tits Dxpot Quxbtesjubtzs, ?
Four LxavzKWOBTB. Kansas, Oct. 28,2863. J
SEALED PROPOSALS will be received at this office
nml! 22 o’clock AL on the 10th day of December, last,
for the transportation of military supplies daring the
year* 1861 and 1865, on the following rentes:
Hours No. L—From Forts Leavenworth, Laramie,
and BUey. and other depots tuat may be established
during tsewbove years, on tho west bonk of the Mis
souri river, north ofFort Leavenworth and sonth of
latitude 42 deg. north, to any posts or stations that are
or may be established in the Territories of Nebraska,
Dakotoh,ldaho,and Utah south of l&UUdcs. north,
and cast of longitude U4 deg. west, and In the Terri
tory orColorado.north of 40 deg. north. Bidders to
etiuc the rate per 100 pounds for 100 miles, at which
they will transport men stores In each of the months
from Apnl to September, Inclusive, of the years ISM
ardibGS.
Hour* Ko.2.—From Forts Leavenworth and Riley,
In the State 01 Kansas, and the town of Kansas, In the
State ofMissonri, to any posts or station that are or
may be established to the State of Kansas, or In the
Territory 01 Colorado, sonth of latitude 40 deg. north,
drawinr supplies from Fort Leavenworth, and to Fort
Dnlt.n, N.M:, or other depot that may be designated
In that Territory, to Fort Garland, and to any other
point or points on the mate. Bidders to state the
rde per luO pounds for 100 miles at which they will
Ui.u-pon said stores In each of the months from April
to St picm her. inclusive. of the years 1881 and 1865.
liouxr No. S,—From Fort Union, or such other de
pot eg may be established In the Territory of New
Mexico, to any posts or stations that arc or may be es
tablished in that Territory, and to such posts or Sta
tions as tnav be designated In the Territory of Arizona
ai'd State of Texas west of longitude 105 deg. west.
Didders to state the rate periOO pounds for 100 miles
at which they will transport said stores In each ot the
months from June to November, inclusive, or the
years 1864 and 1803. ....
-The weight to be transported each year will not ex
ceed ID.COWX3O pounds on Route No. 1, 15,090,000
Sounds on Routt No. 2, and 5,000,009 pounds on Conte
c*. 3.
No additional per eentage will be paid for the trans
portation of bacon, hard bread, pine lumber, shingles,
or any other stores.
Bidders mast give their names in fall, as well as
tin it place of residence; and each proposal must be
accompanied by a bond in .the sam of ten thousand
dollars, signed by two or more responsible persons,
guaranteeing that in case a contract is awarded for the
route mentioned In the proposal to thenarcles propos
ing, the contract will be accepted ana entered into,
nnc good and sufficient security furnished by saldpar
ties, in accordance with the forms of this advertise
ment.
The amount ofbonds required will be as follows:
On Route No. L - SIOO,OOO
M 2. - - - 200,000
“ 8 .... - 00,000
Satisfactory evidence of the loyalty and solvency of
each bidder and person offered as security trill be re-
QUlrcd. .
Proposals must be endorsed "Proposals for Army
Transportation on Routes Nos. 1,2, or 3." as the esse
may be, and none will be entertained unless they folly
comply with all the requirements of this advertise
ment.
Parties to whom awards are made must be prepared
to execute contracts at once, and to give the required
bonds for the faithful pcrformscc of the same.
Contracts will be made subject to the approval of
the Quartermaster General, but the right is reserved
to reject any or ail bids that may be offered.
Contractors must be In readiness for service by tho
£frt day of April, 18GU and they will be required to
have aplscc of business or .agencies st or lathe vicln*
itv of Farts Leavenworth and Union, and other de
pots that may be established, at they may be
ommonicated with readily and promptly.
L. C. EASTON,
nul-p23&-SBMs Major and Quartermaster.
ORDNANCE OFFICE,
TTas DEPABTifEST, I
WASnoroTOK, Nor. 20,180. J
SEALED PROPOSALS Bill be received at this office
until 4 o’clock P. M.tm the 16th of December next, for
3fC,CU) iDiuntrv Accoutrements, calibre 48, to be deliv
ered Id the following quantities, at the undersigned
arsenals, viz:
30,CC0 sets at the New York Arsenal, Governor's
Ll&nd.
20,C00 sets at the Frankfort Ai*enal,Brideaburg, Ps,
20,000 sets si the Alleghany Arsenal, Pittsburg, Pa.
2n,C00 sets at the St.-Louis Arsenal, St* Louis, ilo.
IC,CCO sets at the United States Arsenal, Watertown,
Sla-s,
These accoutrements arc to be made In strict con
formity with the regulation pattern, which can be seen
at sny of the above named places; and they are to be
subject to inspection at the arsenal where delivered,
be!ore being received by the Government; none to be
accepted orjwldfor but such as arc approved on In-
Witecnoc;’ The belts to bo of grained leather, and all
the snock to be ofthe best oak tanned. The shoulder
belt to be included In the act.
Deliveries most be made In lots of not less than 1,000
sets per week ftor all contracts of lOfiOO sets or under;
end not less than sets a week on all contracts for
overiftCOOscte: the first delivery to be made within
fifteen days from the date of contract. Failure to do*
liver ntn specified time will subject the contractor to
a forfeiture ortbc amount tota delivered at that time.
Thi-tvcccmtrrment* moat bo boxed in tho usual style—
the boxcv to be charged at cost, to bo determined by
the inspector.
Bidders -will state explicitly the arsenal or arsenals
w hero they propose to deliver, and the number of sets
tbey propose to deliver at each place, If for more than
one, -
No bldswffl'be considered from parties other than
regular manufacturers of the article and such as are
known to the Department to be fully competent to cz
t-enre In thrir own shops the work proposed for. .
Eachparty obtaining a contract will be required to
rntor Into bond, with approved surety, for its faithful
execution; ■ K ■ -
Tlic Department reserves’ the right to reject any or
eh bids H not deemed satisfactory. _ ,
Proposals will be addressed to “ Brigadcr General
George D. Ramsay, Chief of Ordnance, Washington,
3*. and will be endorsed “Proposal* for Infantry
Accoutrementa." GKO.D. RAMSAY,
Brig. General, Chief of Ordnance,
aoSC-ran-lSt-raftAAM
A LBUMSIV ALBUMS 11 l
m me tso stock of new, rich and. beautifhl styles
row on exhibition. Having them made expressly to
my order, I am tctalUng tlwm lower than any bouse In
the cRv, while 1 offer them at wholesale at tbe some
run*uW«nboosts Don’t bnvuntil youseemy
rtocL P.0.80x4G30. B.B.ArPJ*EßY,Ehotogranhic
block Depot, 184 South Clark street. su2-k6-6m
(OLAIRVOTANCE —The wonder
\_v fnj clairvoyant and Doctrcsa, Madame CAN*'
SISTER. has Just arrived In CUlcago.and Ufccn rooms
m Its South dark Street, where she may be consulted
dally In all the affairs of llfc. She resMCtttaUytf rites
the aitlicted to call on her. She has a Si* dsttmti which
win draw the poison from any wound*
and aatisihetion given to all. ,aols-r612-3w
pres
-Lj
small *!«<■ tor lady or medium forccots, beautifully
engraved Huntinccaacß,full Jeweled, sent free on re-
STptorns. Acsii«
mentionUl>cnilirnn»-.sand for crcular. ABRAM
DALE ft CO., ai*wn)*cw*y» **cw York:
no2-pKK-la*P* rW -
asailroabs.
1663. . tqs 1803.
P3NITSYLVAHIA CENTEAI E. E.
825 ItEllo» Double Track.
In c rdcr to keep pace with the 'demands of the trav
clirip public, the inauagcic cf this popular route have
added many Improvements during the pear 13C2, and
■with itßcoDnretioDß.lt trill be found In all respects a
TIE FT CLASS ROUTE Vo dll the Eastern cities. The
track is stoic ballasted, and entirely free from dust.
THREE DAILY TRAINS FROM
PITTSBITEGH TO PHILADELPHIA,
(With close connections from ‘Western Cities,)
All connecting direct to yew York, THROUGH PHI*
LADELFHIA, und close connections at Harrisburg,
BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON.
From Pittsburgh to New York, one train runs daily,
<4% miles.) via Allentown, without change of cars, ar
riving Id advance of all other routes.
SEVEN DAILY TRAINS FROM
PHILADELPHIA TO NEW YOEK.
Tickets for sale to Boston by boat or roll. Boat
tickets good on any of the sound lines. Fare to all
m ir is ai* low as any route.
fcjccplpeCtTßonrdght trains to Philadelphia, New
York anollcltiniorc. _ . A
Baggngc checked through and transferred free.
FREIGHTS.
• By tfcie Rente freights of all descriptions can be for
warded to end from MUladelphla, New York, Boston,
or Baltimore., to and from am - point on the Railroads
of Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, lowa
pr V.lstonri, nr jah-hoad dtt.ect.
The Pconcylvacit Central Railroad also connects at
Pittsburgh with Steamers, by which Goods can be for.
worded to any pert* on the Ohio; Jlushlojmm, Ken
tucky, Tenncrfcc, - Cumberland, Illinois, MisauKlppL
171600011111, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas sad Bed River,
ondat Cleveland, Sandusky- end Chicago, with steam
ers to all p< rts ca the Northwestern Lakes.
Merchant* nod Shippers entrusting the transporta
tion of their Freight to this Company, can rely with
confidence on Its j-niHHlr transit,
THE RATES OF FREIGHT to and from any port
In the West by the Pennsylvania Central Railroad are
AT TXIfXS Afi FATOUABLE AS AXS dttASGXD BT
OTCEE RULBOAD CONPASIKS.
g*y lie particular and mork'packsgcs “via Pjonr,
For Freight Contracts or Shipping Directions, send
to or eddresa either of the following Agents of the
Company s _
D. A. STEWART.FreIgbt Agent, Pittsburgh.
CLARK E & CO- Transfer Agents. Pittsburgh.
H. tV. BROWN « CO., Cincinnati, Ohio.
• R. C. WELDRUM & CO- Madison, Indiana.
J.E. MOORE, Loolsrllle.Ktv
W. w. AIKMAN A CO., Evansville, Ind.
P- F. SA£S, St. Louis, Mo.
CLARKE 4 CO-Chicago, DU
13. MCCOLM,Portsmouth, Ohio.
McNEELY & MONTGOMERY, Marsvinc, Ky.
W. B. & E. L. LANGLEY, Gallipolis. Ohio.
H. B. PIERCE 4 Co-Kr.ncsTHle, Ohio.
11. 11. HUDSON, Rlnlcy, Ohio.
ILU.MELDBUM, Gei-ncral Travelling Agent for
the South and West.
LIVE STOCK.
Drovers and farmers wilt find this the most advanta
geous route for Lire Stoct. Capacious yards are
watered and supplied with every convenience hare
been opened on this line and 1 ts connections, and every
attention Is paid to their wants. From Harrisburg,
where will bo found every convenience for feeding ana
renting, a choice is offered of the PHILADELPHIA,
NEW YORK and BALTIMORE MARKETS. This will
also be found the shortest, quickest, and most direct
route for Stock to New Tork—Cvia Allentown)—or
with fewer chance* than any other.
ENOCH LEWIS, Ocn’l Snpt- Altoona, Pa.
L. L.HODPT. GenT Ticket Agent, Philadelphia.
II.U.HOUSTON,Gcn-FrcightAgcnt^hilndelpbla.
Jal-y74My .
ATLMTIC AND GREAT
Zl "WESTERN RAILWAY.
1863. NEW BROAD GUAGE 1801.
PASSENGER, FREIGHT, MAIL,
EXPRESS i.VD TELECKAPH EOUXE.
Connecting at Salamanca, N. T., with the Eric Rail*
way* forma a contlnnons Six Feet Track from New
York to Akron or Cleveland.
OVASTD AFTEB MOXDAY, yOV. IClh, ISG3,
Through Passenger and Freight Trains will be run
regularly between
Cleveland and New York.
KEW AM) BtIFOBTANT PASSE.V-
Mill BOITE,
Pare as low as hy any other Eouts.
BAGGAGE CHECKED THROUGH.
Passengers by this line have choice of Five different
routes between New York and Boston.
THROUGH TICKETS
Can be obtained at any of the offices of the Erie Rail*
way. and alt ticket offices of connecting lines West
ana Southwest; also.at the Central Ticket Office, un
der the Weddell House, Cleveland, Ohio.
Ist for XlAtts via the Atlantic and Great
'Western and Erie Railways.
Passenger Trains stop at Meadvllle thirty minutes,
giving pafasengers ample tlmotodiao at the “McHenry
House, the best Railway Hotel in the country.
New and Expeditions Freight Line,
ALL RAIL.
No transhipment of Freight between New York and
Akion or Cleveland. Merchants in the West and
Southwest will find U to their advantage to order their
goods to be forwarded via the Erie and Atlantic and
Great Western Railways, thus saving trouble and ex*
pease* Bates of freight as low as by any other all rail
route. . ...
Especial attention will be given to the speedy trans
portation of Freight of all kmds.Eost or west. The
engines, care and other equipments of this Company
are entirely new, and of the most improved modern
The only direct route to the wonderful OIL BE*
GIONS OF PENNSYLVANIA-via Meadviilc or Corry.
From Leavitt shnrgh the Mahoning Branch rasa to
Youngstown and the Cool Mines
This Road is being extended, and will soon be in
complete running order to Gallon, Urbana,Daytonand
Cincinnati, without break of gunge.
J. FARNSWORTH, GeneraTFreight Agent.
T. B* GOODHUE, General Ticket Agent.
- 1L F. SWEETSEE. Gen. SupL
Meadvllle, Pjl. Nov. 17, 1963. nolS-rTO-Sm
Express Hines.
1863.
Western Transportation Company
AND
WESTERN EXPRESS
THE WESTERN TRANSPORTATION COMPANY
have made arrangements to run their Lake Steam
Propellers on alternate days with those of the
NEW YORK CENTRAL
aan>
MICHIGAN CENTRAL RAILROADS,
—ALSO
TIIE WESTERN EXPRESS,
Ttnnntnp over the New York Central Railroad to Buf-
Ihlo, and connecting with the varlons Railroads ran
nine West, and the different lines ©/Propellers on the
Upper and Lower
For bills of lading and contracts vis canal or rail
road, apply to the following agents: __ _ :
HUGH ALLEN, No. 1 Coentles Slip, New York.
KVEBETT CLAFF, No. 1 Cocmles Slip, New York.
AUG. COLSEN, No. 1 Coentles Slip, New York,
b. G. CHASE, 113 Pier, Albany, N.Y. _
p. O. CHASE, 191 iriver street, Troy, N. T.
J. L. HURD * CO- Hurd's Dock, Detroit, Mich.
E. A. BOCK, Green Bay, Wls. _
J. J. TALLMADGE, M. and P. D. C. B. R. Dock,
Milwaukee- Wla.
WESTE& TRANSPORTATION CO- Buffalo.
CONSIGNEES.
JNO. BEAM & CO- Eric. Ps.
BOND A MORRIS, Cleveland. Ohio.
BORKINB A GRIFFITH, Toledo, Ohio.
W. F. DILL. Sandusky, Ohio.
A. P. DUTTON, Racing, Wls.
KENOSHA PIER CO-Kenosha, Wla.
W. B. WRIGHT A CO, Wankeegan, DL
J. F. KIRKLAND, Sheboygan, Wls.
Jf, W. TUTTLE,
GENERAL WESTERN AGENT,
seS-mSX-Sm r No.2Statc street, Chicago.
"\f W FREIGHT~EXPRESS
X> LINE.
PLATTSMOUTH, GLENWOOD,
COUNCIL BLUFFS & EDDTTILLE.
The undersigned have cslabltshe a Team Line from
and to the above points, and will carry Height via
BCBLDTCTOX ASD MISSOURI RITES,
AND
Cliirago, Burlington and Quincy Railroads,
At the belowglvenratfaperlOOpounds, until Nor. Ist,
l£6S * Ist class. 2d do. Sddo. 4tb‘do,
and Omuh&~.
Alter Nov. Ist, and until further notice— <
Chlcaeo to Council ■ ■ ‘
Bln&andOmaha— CUB S2JJS SLSS. $2.75
Merchants and shippers entrusting the transportation
of their freight to the undersigned, can rely upon Its
according to Eastern classi
fication. .
Be particular and mark packages via
•* BURLINGTON AND EDDrVILLE.”
For ftxrtner Information apply to G. F. HENDRIE A
CO- Connell Bluffs; TOOTLE & HANNA, Platts
nicrath; £. S. BOSBTSHELL, Olenwood; FISH &
WIGHTMAN, EddyrlUe. „ „ r
*• C. F. HENDRIE & CO.
Council Bluffs, Oct. 9,1863.
For further information apply to the General Freight
Office, Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Co.,
Chicago. 0c26-0250-3m
★ ★
DE. SWEET’S
Infallible Liniment,
THE
CHEAT EXTERNAL BEHEDT,
FOR RHEUMATISM, GOUT. NEURALGIA. LUM
BACO. STIFF NECK AND JOINTS, SPRAINS,
BRUISES, CUTS AND WOUNDS. PILES,
HEADACHE, AND ALL RHEUMATIC,
SSD KEKVODS. DISORDERS. 1
For all of which It Is a speedy and certain remedy
and never falls. This Liniment is prepared from the
recipe of Dr. Stephen Sweet, oi Conuectlcnt, the.
famous bone setter, end has been used In his practice
for more than twenty years with the most astonishing
ro ASAN ALLEVIATOR OF PAIN, it Is unrivalled by
any preparation betore the public, of which the most
skeptical may be convinced by a single trial.
Tills Liniment will cure rapidly and radically. Rheu
matic Disorders of every kind, and In thousands of
cases where It has been used it bas never been known
to fall,
FOB NEURALGIA, it will afford immediate relief
In every case, however distressing.
It will relieve the worst coses of HEADACHE in
three minutes, and Is warranted to do It.
TOOTHACHE also will it cure Instantly.
FOR NERVOUS DEBILITY AND GENERAL LAS
SITUDE, arising from Imprudence or excess, this Lin
iment is a most liappy and unfailing remedy. Acting
directly upon the nervous tissues. It strenghtbeos and
revivifies the system, and restores it to elasticity ana
vtcor,
FOB PILES.—As an external remedy, we claim that
U is the bust known, and wo challenge the world to
produce an equal. Every victim of this distressing
complaint should give It a trial, for it will not fail to
afford immediate relief, and In a majority of cases
will effect a RADICAL CUTC.
QDEN ST AND SORE THE OAT arc sometimes ex
trcmcly malisnem and dangerous, but timely applica
tion or this Liniment will never fall to cure.
STRAINS are sometime very obstinate, and enlarge
ment of the joints is liable to occur If neglected. The
worst case xn»y be conquered by this Liniment in two
cr three dave.
BRUISES. CUTS, WOUNDS, SORES,' ULCERS,
BURNS AND SCALDS, yield readily to tho wonder
ml healing properties of Du. Swnrr’s Isvallidlx
LijaiiEKT, whoo used according to directions. Also,
tTRLLRLAINfi. FROSTED FEET, AND INSECT 1
BITES AND STDi OS.
Every Mops© Owner
Should have this remedy at hand, for its timely use at
the nrst appearance of Lameness will effectually pre
vent those formidable diseases, Vo which all horses are
liable, and which render so many otherwise valuable
; horses nearly worthless.. ...
Over four hundred volantary testimonials to the
wonderful curative properties of this Liniment hare
been received within the last two years, and many of
them from yersoos In the highest ranks of lift.
CAUTION. * .
To avoid imposition, observe the Signature and
Likeness of Dr. Stephen Sweet on every label, 'and
- also** Stephen Sweet’s Infallible Liniment” blown In
the glass of cacti bottle, without which none, are gen
uine. ■ •
RICHARDSON ft CO,
, Sole Proprictora, Norwich, Ct. .
For sale by LORD ft SMITH, General Western
Agents, 2S Lake street, Chicago, and by dealers
everywhere. fe26*«ss-eow-ly
Extract Surfjn.
; V v .:-
HELMBOLD'9
HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S
HIGHLY CONCENTRATED
HIGHLY CONCENTRATED
HIGHLY CONCENTRATED
HIGHLY CONCENTRATED
HIGHLY CONCENTRATED
COMPOUND
COMPOUND
COMPOUND
COMPOUND
COMPOUND
FLUID EXTRACT BUOHU,
FLUID EXTRACT BUOHU,
FLUID EXTRACT BUOHU,
FLUID EXTRACT BUOHU,
FLUID EXTRACT BUOHU,
A POSITIVE
A POSITIVE
A POSITIVE
A POSITIVE
A POSITIVE
AND
SPECIFIC REMEDY
SPECIFIC REMEDY
SPECIFIC REMEDY
SPECIFIC REMEDY
SPECIFIC REMEDY
Non-Retention ■ or’ -Incontinence of Urine,
Irritation, Inflammation or- Ulceration of
the Bladder and' Kidneys, Diseases of
the Prostrate Gland, Stone in the
Bladder, Calculous Gravel or
Brick Bust Deposit,
AND
All Diseases or Affections of tbe Bladder and
Sidneys, and Dropsical Swellings exist*
Lug ta Ken, Women or Children.
HELMBOLD’S EXTRACT BUCKO.
HELMBOLD’S EXTEACT BUCKS
HELMBOLD’S EXTEACT BUCKS
HELMBOLD’S EXTEACT BUOHU,
HELMBOLD’S EXTEACT BUOHU,
For Weakness arising from Habits ol Dissi
pation, attended with the following symptoms:
Indisposition to Exertion, Loss of Memory,
Difficulty of Breathing, Weak Nerves,
Trembling, Horror of Disease, Dimness
of Vision, Wakefulness, Pain in the
Back, Universal Lassitude of
the Muscular System, Hot
Bands, Flushing of
the Body. Dry
neaeofSkin,
ERUPTIONS OK THE FACE,
PALLID COUNTENANCE.;
Those symptoms. If allowed to go on, which this
-Medicine Invariably removes, soon follows Fa
tuity, Epileptic Fits, In one of which the
patient may expire. Who can-say that
they arc not frequently followed by
those “direful diseases,” “IN
SANITY and CONSUME
HON.” Many are aware
of the cause of their
suffering.'
The
Records
- • of tbe In
sane Asylum?
and* the Mclan- -
- - choly Deaths by Con
sumption, bear ample
witness to the troth or the
assertion; The constitution once
affected with Organic Weakness, re
quires thcold of Medicine to Strengthen
and Invleorato the System, which IIELSf-
BOLD’S EXTRACT BUCHU INVARIABLY DOES.
Hdmbold’s Extract Buchn -
Is Fftfc, pleasant In Us taste and’odor, and more
Strengthening than any of the preparations of
IRON OH B.VKK,
For those suffering
From Broken Down and Delicate Constitutions,
From whatever cause either in
male oil female,
WILL give you
A GOOD APPETITE,
WILL GIVE YOU
STKOING,IOEALTinfi'ItERVES,
WILL GIVE YOU
BUSK. AM) EJiEBGCTIC FEELINGS,
ASD WILL ENABLE YOU TO
SLEEP "W ELL.
A TRIAL WILL CONVINCE THE MOST
SKEPTICAL.
HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S
UELHBOIE’S
HELIOBOLD^
HELMBOID’S
IIELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S
HELMBOLD’S
HIGHLY CONCENTRATED
Compound Fluid Extract Sarsaparilla
FOR ■
purifying
the blood, re
moving all chro
nic constitutional dis
eases arising from an impure
state of tbe blood, and the only reli- .
able and effectual known remedy for the _
cure of Scrofula, Scald Bead, Salt Rheum, Pains
and Swellings of the Bones, Ulcerations of
the Throat and Legs, Blotches,
Pimples on tbe face. Tetter,
Erysipelas, and all
scaly Eruptions
of the
Skin,
And Beautifying tbe Complexion,
NOT A FEW
of the worse disorders that affect mankind arise from
the corruption that accumulates in tho blood. Of all
the discoveries that have been made to, puree It put.
none c«n equal In effect BEIACBOLD'S COMPOUND
EXTRACT OF SARSAPARILLA. It cleanses and
renovates the blood, instils tbe vigor of health into the
“system, and purges out the humors which moke dis
ease. It stimulates the healthy tractions of the body,
and expels the disorders that grow and rankle In the
blood. Such a remedy, that could be relied on, has
long been sought for, and now, for the first time, tho
E nolle have one on which they esq depend. Our space
ere does not admit certificates to show its effects, for'
the trial of a single bottle will show, to the sick that ft
has virtues surpassing anything they have over used.
Two tablcopoonsfUl of the Extract of Sarsaparilla
added to a pint of water, if> equal to tho Lisbon Diet
Drink, and one bottle Is folly equal to a bottle of the
. Syrup of Sarsaparilla, or the Decoction, as usually
“tmese extracts have been admitted
TO USE IN THE UNITED STATES ARMY, ami are
also in verv general use In all thc«TATE HOSPITALS
and PUBLIC SANITARY INSTITUTIONS through
out tbe land, as welt as In private practice, and are
considered as Invaluable remedies.
See Medical Properties of Sudan.
FEOM DISPENSATORY OF THE
UNITED STATES.
See Prof. DE WEES’ valuable works on the Practice
of Physic.
Bee remarks made by the late celebrated Dr.
PHYSIC, Philadelphia. .
' See remarks made by Dr. EPHRAIM MoDOWELL,
a celebrated Physician, and Member of the Royal Col
lege of Surgeons, Ireland, and published In the trans
actions of tbe King and Queen’s Journal.
.Sec Medlco-Chlrnrglcal Review,published by BEN
JAMIN TRAVEKS,FeIIow of Royal College of Sur
geons. •
See most of the late Standard Works of Medicine.
PRICES.
Extract Buchu 81.00 per bottle, or ax for $5.00.
<( Sarsaparilla SI.OO per Eottle } or Six for $5.00,
Delivered to any address, securely packed.
Address letters for Information to
HELUBOLD’B
MEDICAL DEPOT.
MEDICAL DEPOT,
MEDICAL DEPOT,
MEDICAL DEPOT,
MEDICAL DEPOT,
104 SOUTH TENTH STREET,
104 SOUTH TENTH STREET,
104 SOUTH TENTH STREET,
104 SOUTH TENTH STREET,
104 SOUTH TENTH STREET,
(BELOW
(BELOW
PHILADELPHIA.
PHILADELPHIA.
BEWARE OF COUNTERFEITS AND
UNPRINCIPLED DEALERS.
WUO ENDEAVOR TO
Dispose Of “their own” and “other” articles on the
reputation attained by
HELMROLD’S PREPARATIONS,
HELMBOID’S PREPARATIONS,
BELMBOLD’S PREPARATIONS,
HELMBOLD’S PREPARATIONS.
HELMBOLD’S
GENUINE EXTRAS! BUCHU,
EKLMBOLD’S
GENUINE EXTRACT SARSAPARILLA,
HELUBOLD’S
GENUINE DtEEOVED EOSE-WASH.
Sold by LORD Sc SOTim, 23 Lake>St^
and all Bmsgtsti.
ASK FOB BELBBOLD’S.
ASK FOB liELJIBOLB’S.
Cat out the advertisement and send for it, and
■ QoU _ d avoid imposition or exposure.
(Smutnisstcm f^lercljants
Q.RIFFIN BROS.,
COjmiSSIOX MERCHANTS,
No. 5 Pomeroy Building.
Edo a* r. GEtrrJif. augustcs QBtrrrx.
ocll-o2OMy
A BIEL AKIN & CO.,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
h'o. IS6 Booth Water street. Liberal mode on
Floor. Grain and provisions, to be sold here or by
WM. A. BUOWS i CO-Kew Tors.
A. AKCf. J. D> U v BIaBVT
A LBERT MORSE & CO.,
XA. PRODUCE
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
No. 15 South "Water street, (Aiken's Bonding,)
CHICAGO, ILL. „ , ,
ap-Busiaess confined strictly to Commission.^
aor-taas-iy
pENISTOK & CO.,
COMMISSION MEUCHANTS,
LIVERPOOL
Rife annexe:—Messrs .Page, Richardson & Co JJoston
Middleton <t Co„ New York.
Snow & Burgess, do. -
Joboeton & Bayley, do. , .
Cash advances made on consignments pi Provisions,
Flour, etc., to the above house ny
HENBY MILWARD & CO.,
dclfrylM
ALLOW AT & CO., Packers,
VJ Provision Dealers and General
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Office ISO South Water street, Board of Trade Building,
CHICAGO.
We have a large stock of Smoked Hams and Shoul
ders, both sugar and plain caring, canvassed and ua
canvassed, which we offer at low market rates. Or
ders respectfully solicited from the city and country.
We buy and self for others every description of Pro
duce and Provisions. Wo pay the highest market
price for Cracklings. GALLOWAY A CO.
anls-kSOO-£m
Insoluble (Ecmeut.
USEFUL AND VALUABLE
' DISCOVERY!
HILTON’S ’
INSOLUBLE CEMENT!
i ( Is of more general practical
utility than any invention now
before the public. It has been
thoroughly tested daring the last
two years by practical men, and
pronounced by all to bo
Superior to Any
Adhesive Preparation known.
OnxiiT Disco vsbt.
Applicable to the
Useful Arts.
A hew thing.
Hilton’s Insoluble Cement
Is a new thing, and the result ol
fears of study: Ua combination Is
on Scibstifio Pbimcxplxs, and
under no cl rcamstancesor change
of temperature will It become
corrupt' or emit any offensive
smell. ■
Its Comblnatiofi.
IOOT and SHOE
Boot and Shoe Man
ufacturers.
Manufacturers, using Machines,
will find it the best article known
for.Cementlsg the Channels, os it
works without delay, Is not affeo
tedby any change oftemperoturc.
JEWELERS
Will find it sufficiently adhesive
for tbclr use, as has been proved*
Jewelers.
It Is especially adapted
to Leather,
And wo claim as an especial
merit, that it sticks Patches aud
iLlnlngs to Bools and Shots suffi
ciently strong without stitching..
Families.
IT IS THE ONLY
U(IUU> CB3IENT
Extant that Is a sure, thing for
mending
It Is a Liquid.
FURNITURE,
CROCKERY,
TOYS, _
BONE.
IVORY,
And articles of Household Ose.
REME3HBER.
Hilton’s Insoluble Cement
Is in a liquid form, and as easily
applied as paste.
Remember.
■Hilton’s Insoluble Cement
) la insoluble in water or OIL
•Hilton's Insoluble Cement
Adheres oily substances.
Supplied m Family or Maunfkc
.turerd Packages, from 2 ounces
to 100 pounds.
HILTON BHOS. & CO.,
Peopbietobs,
* PROVIDENCE. R. I.
SMITH, Wholesale Druggists, 3)
o, HU General Western Agents, to
ybe addressed. JelO-gS2-lywF«i
Bold by LORD ft i
Lake street, Chlcagc
whom nil orders maj
ffttsrrilancaug.
QHICAGO LEAD AXD
OIL WORKS.
E. W. BLATCHFORD, PROPRIETOR,
Cor. Clinton and Fallon Sts.,
MANUFACTURE
Lead Pipe, Sheet Lead, Bar Lead,
LINSEED OIL AND OIL CAKE.
(Collier White Lend and Oil CO.
Chicago Agency for < fit. Louis Shot Tower Co.
-5 cW.ft B. Douglas’ Mannlaei’g Co.
Particular attention Is Invited to my
BOILED LINSEED OIL,
Of which a stock is kept constantly on hand. OIL
CAKE, ground and onground, packed in barrels for
shipment, and sold In quantities to salt.
TERMS CASH.
For prices address E. W. BLATCHFORD,
pol2-p733-Sm Chicago, HI.
GAS STOVE
JLlj WORKS.
CAS THE CHEAPEST FUEL.
Gas Heating and Cooking Stoves.
CHEAPER THAN COAL OR WOOD.
SEND FOB DESCBIPTrVE CATALOGUE.
A Liberal Discount to the trade.
If. D. BLAKE, manufacturer,
474 Broadway, N. X. |
nolß-r!52-10t I '
rjio THE PATROH6 OF
WILSON t UIDEKWOoJs
' COMMISSION j !
PUEOHASHTG AGEROY,
No. 8, Board of Trade Building, (op stairs) Chicago.
Orders for purchases amounting to less than 115, from
places within reach ofa Dally Express, can be paid
ronox dexivehy BY EXPUEBS; others should bo re
mitted for direct. Parties forwarding more Hinds than
required for payment of their orders will beceitk
rxczss wim nrrußxixa invoice of pcbuiases, us
onr commission for services Is small, and as the recep
tion daily of numerous orders requires largo expendi
ture, our friends will readily see tho Justnew and ne
cessity of ibis course. We pcbojiasb “ anything on
earth, bnt belt. “nothing^under the Heaven*.”
noSC-rS24-3t WILSON ft UNDERWOOD,
STEINWAY’S PIANOS.
On MONDAY, Dec. Cth, we will open U the com
modious hoUdlng now being completed at
“. 201 South Clark Street,
A superb stock of Pianos, amongst whlck will be
iounu.the finest assortment ot Steiuway’s magnificent
Instruments ever brought together outside of their
New York warerooms. ,
In announcing ourselves as sole agents of Messrs.
Stclnwry* Sons for the city of Chicago ant vicinity,
wedeem-ltenUrcly-unnccessajT to say anything la
praise of their instruments, celebrated as they now
ore wherever the piano itsclfis known. • t
For ourselves, we can only refer to our uany yeara
of business experience In Cincinnati, and rctacst from
plaoo buyers such a share of their patronaio hero as
our business reputation elsewhere and the txcellcnce
of the Instruments we keep may merit. - > >
- SMITH ft 15X0N,
Agents for Stelnwav ft Sons, 201 South CUrk street,
Chicago, and 3Tw. Fourth street, Cincinnati. '
nolß-ltS-aw - , 1 -
piPORTANT TO TAX PAYERS.
City Coiaectob’s Office; 1 )
Comrr Honas. Boon No; H. ;
Chicago,
Tax payers arc again notified that I am required by
the new City Charier to collect a penalty of kvxpxb
cest. open all taxes upon real estate not ptld before
tho first day of January next. The time Isso short,
and the pressure upon my office a week bcnce will bo
so great, that all prudent persons will avoid the neces
sity of standing days in n Uoe, and the risk of being
crowded out, and incurring the above penalty, by cali-
Ini: at my office UDfEDiATELY; and making bavmont.
lam also required to collect by LEVY AND SALE,
alt PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES NOf PAID
BY DECEMBER Kin, NEXT.
F. MEHBING. City Collector.
N. B.—Nothing but LEGAL TENDER wIL be re
ceived in payment of taxes and assessment..
’ noES-rtlß-lm • ' ' • ■
gPECIAL NOTICE
THE PROPRIETORS OF THE
GIRARD . HOUSE,
PHILADELPHIA,
Respectfully call 1 tho attention of Business men and
the Travelling Community to the superior accommo
dation and comfort offered la their establishment.
6e£C-n197-Sm-2tcwls EANAGA,FOWLER
TVRASS STENCH ALPHABETS.
M. J. METCALF jj SOS,
43K SALEM STREET. B(J5lON. MASS.,
Tbo only manufacturers la tho United Slates or Brass
Alphabets and Flsttrcs,- to any great extent or In any
variety. Sold at wholesale, at the lowest oabu
prices. AlfO, the BEST OF INDELIBLE STENCIL
INK. tzbt cheap. Stencil Dies and all kinds of
Stencil Slock. Inpulrics or orders promptly attended
to. . oct-nat-Cm
T> OTAL HAVANA LOTTERY.
JLV . In Drawing of November 13,-
No. Si;S3 drew *100,000; No. 17.551. drew *50,000; No.
ISJtSdrew *30,000; No. . 4,743 drew *IOjjOOTno. OJ2K
drew *s,ooo—being the five capital prizes. SO per cent,
premium paid lor prizes- information fornkhed.
The highest rates paid for Doubloons and all kinds of
Gold and surer. TAYLOR fir CO- Bankers,
n024-rS&Mw-Is No. 16 Trail street, N. Y.
J>LOSSBURGH AND ORMSBT
C O A Xj ,
KELLOGG & GRAY,
For sale by
polt-68C8-Srr 1 • Cor. Market apd Washington sts.
TRON FROM RUSH STREET
ABRIDGE TOR BALE.—Thcßoard of Public Woiks
will receive scaled proposals until Tnc9dJiy.Dec.lst,
aiU A. M.,.for the Iroa obtained from Knah street
bridge- - The Iron is now at the Bridewell dock. The
Iron offered for sale is all of the cast Iron and the flat
wrought Iron. The round Iron is not offered. Sepa
rate, bids will be.received for the cast ironand the
UTorgbt iron. By order oftbe Board.
no2&rSs7-6t A. V. TIKKHAM, Secretary,
QODFISH.
100 Boxes Grand Bank Codflah !
For Mle low to the trade by . GEO. H. PAGE,
nol~-ri*s-iw cod-Tt? tii aa. - 16 jii-y er street.
TV'EW YORK STATE APPLES,
X' tSAO PER BBL.—We are this day recclring some
of the most selected bew York Apples, and setting at
the above figure. Also Michigan Apples, from fair to :
ez.ra, at from per ibl. CMlat M State
street. £no26-rSTWI] H. P. STANLEY,
®osstetter's Sitters.
J-JOSTETTER’S STOMACH
BITTERS.
CONCLUBIVK PROOFS
OF THE EFFICACY OF
EOSTETTEB'S STORAGE SETTEES
HEAR THE 'WITNESSES.
. Worthless and pernicious articles are* so often bol
stered up In the advertising columns, of the press by
fabricated letters, that the proprietors of HOSTET
TEWS BITTERS rarely give quotations from their
business correspondence, lest the GENUINE OPIN
IONS of those who use and appreciate a GENUINE
ARTICLE should be confounded by the unthinking
with the FULSOME 1 RIGMAROLE put Into the
months of MEN OF. STRAW by unscrupulous empi
rics and charlatans, whose doable object Is to SELL
both their trash and the PUBLIC.
Believing, however, that FACTS IMPORTANT TO
THE HEALTH AND COMFORT OP THE PUBLIC,
and which can be VERIFIED AT ANY MOMENT by
addressing tbe parties who vouch for them, ought not
to be hid under a bushel, the undersigned fpubUsh be*
low a few communications of recent date, to which
they Invite the attention of the people, and I at the
same time ESPECIALLY BEQUEST all readers who
may feel Interested in the subject to ADDRESS THE
correctness of the particulars. ’
It may be thought, perhaps,' that a preparation like
HOSTETTER’S STOMACH BITTERS, which hd3
long been a STANDARD' TONIC throughout the
WESTERN HEMISPHERE, ahdls rapidly becoming a
staple of trade at the antipodes, speaks. for itself in
stronger tones than private eologlnm can speak of It.
Thills true; but tbe phases of disease are almost In
numerable, and every day new Instances of tbe suc
cess of the Bitters, cither as a PREVENTIVE -or a
CUBE, come?to the knowledge of the proprietors
through the mails. Some of these are of immense in
terest to thousands placed In precisely the some cir
cumstances as the parties who have been PROTECT
ED or RELIEVED, and therefore it seems almost an
act of duty to put them on record. 1 -
For example, seven-eighths oft he multitudes who go
to sea suffer more or less from SEASICKNESS- They
dread this terrible affliction more than the fury of tho
elements, and It must bo an unspeakable satiafiiction
to them to learn that It can be averted by the; use of
HOSTETTER’S BITTERS. It Is only within the lost
twelve months that this GREAT FACT IN MEDICA
TION has been established, and hence it Is not uni
versally known. Those who hare tested this newly
developed property of the preparation, and escaped
sea. sickness by Us aid, are naturally anxlona to
spread the glad tidings among all who “go down to
the sea In ships and do business on the great waters."
Tbe witness on this point whose testimony Is append
ed, not only gives his own experience, but corrob
orates It with emphatic evidence from other sources.
If there be any who are skeptical on the subject, they,
ore hereby referred directly to him and to the gentle
man who shared with him the beneficial effects of the
antidote. ,
The immense Increase In the sale of HOSTETTER’S
BITTERS, both at homo and abroad, during tho past
year, proves that tho world, while it obeys the Scrip
tural Injunction to “ to try all things,” only “HOLD
FAST to that .which Is GOOD.” Spurious prepara
tions, like poisonous fungi, are continually springing
up, bnt their character Is soon discovered, and they
are “flung like worthless weeds away.” On tho
other band, s great antidote, that performs all It pro
. mires, and even more than Its proprietors claimed for
it on Us Introduction, is “not for a day, bat forall
time.” ...
Every dose administered of a useless or delctcreous
nostrum, helps to disabuse tbe public mind of tbe Im
pressions it may have received from the flourish of
trumpets with which the deceptions article was an
nounced ; while, on the contrary, every bottle sold of
a really valuable medicine secures the permanent
custom of the purchaser, and makes him an ADVER-.
TISEROF ITS MERITS among his friends. It U
thos that’.HOSTETTEB’S BITTERS, have obtained
their unparalleled popularity. The Press, indeed, has
made the GREAT STOMACHIC widely known, but it
is the uniformly successful results of PERSONAL
EXPERIMENT that have rendered It a HOUSEHOLD
MEDICINE throughout the length and breadth of
the laud, and the main reliance of the TRAVELER,
tho VOYAGER, tbe MINER aud tho PIONEER.
During the Summer months a pure, wholesome
Tonic, In which arc also incorporated the properties ot
an antl-blUoua and mild nsperlent agent, is essen
tially needed. Such a preparation la HOSTETLER'S
STOMACH BITTERS, tbe screst preventive and cure ,
of dyspepsia, biliousness, constipation and nervous
debility ever placed within the reach of the commu
nity.
Against the depressing and sickening tendency of
heat and miasma It is a potent safeguard, and upon
persons of feeble constitution and uncertain health.
Its renovating effects arc most extraordinary.
St. Nicholas Hotel, New Tobx, March 3, ifls.
Dn, Hostjctikb—Dear Sir; Being ofa billons tem
perament, and baring suffered much from sea sick
ness heretofore, I determined, when leaving Mew Or
leans for New York,-in June last, to try your cele
brated Stomach Bitters.' Having made the trip In the
propeller Trade Wind without the least . Incon
venience, owing to their preventive efficacy, I pro-'
cured, on the £hh of July, a box of your Bitters, for
the use of myself and a “few friends, on our contem
plated voyage to Europe In the Great Eastern. After
getting to sea I opened tbe box, and, together with
about ten of my fellow passengers, partook of the
Bitten. On the second day some ortho ladies on
board fell sick, bat by taking half a wine glassful
three times a day, they soon recovered. Dr. Golds
borow, tho ship’s physician, and Capt. Baton, tho
Commander, together with a large portion of tbe
passengers, subsequently experimented with the Bit
ters, and uniformly with entire success. They will
certify to the fact that daring the whole trip not one
person on board was sea sick after the second-day.
Dr. G. having appropriated tbe last remaining bottle,
as an Infallible specific, I bad none of the article on
my return voyage, and suffered more than I can de
scribe In consequence, t bate orders for two boxes
from two of my late fellow passengers, now In Llver>
pool, and shall send them out by the next steamer..
You ought to have a depot tn Liverpool. Advising
aU persons venturing for tho Ant time (or indeed at*
any time) to sea; to obtain, if possible, a supply of
your Bitten before leaving port, and thereby SECURE
themselves against sea sickness,
I am respectfully, your obedient servant,
JOHN A.MUELLOR.
Beooxlyn, N. y„ May 22 d, 190.
.Messrs. Hostztbb ft Stain: .
Gentlemenl have used yonr Bitters daring tho
last six weeks, and felt It dne to you and to the public,
to express my hearty approval of their effect upon me.
1 never wrote a “ puff” for any one, and I abhor every
thing that savors of quackery. Bnt your Bitters are
entirely removed from tho level oftbcmerexosTßtnia
of tbe day, being patent alike to all, and exactly wbat
they profess to be. They arc not advertised to cure
everything, bat they are recommended to assist nature
In the alleviation and ultimate healing of many of the
most common Infirmities of the body, and this they
will accomplish. I had been unwell for two months,
ss Is usual with me during the Spring. * I was bilious,
and suffering from Indigestion and a general disease of
the mucous membrane; and though compelled to keep
at work. In tho discharge of my professional duties,
wmvery weak, of a yellow, complexion, no appetite,'
and mneb of tho time confined to my bed. When I had
been taking yonr Bitters a week,.my vigor retained,;
the sallow complexion was all gone, I relished my food,
and now I enjoy the ■ the mental application
which 60 recently were BO very. Irksome and Garden
some to me. When I used yonr Bitters IvxLTacbange
everyday. These are facts. AU inferences, must bo :
made by each Individual for himself.
Yours, respectfully,' , . W.B.LEE,
pastor of Greene avenue Presbyterian Church.
Pbospect Cottage, Gsobqbtown.D. C., April 2.1563.
Messrs.HostbttebftSmith: ■>.’,• ■ ,
Gentlemen:—lt gives me pleasure to add my tes
timonial to those of others, In’favor of yonr excellent
preparation. Several years of residence on the beaks
ofa Southern river, and of close application to literary
work, had so thoroughly exhausted my nervous sys
tem, and undermined my health, that! had become a
maettb to dyspepsla, and Nervous Headache recur-*
ring at short Intervals, and defying all known remedies
In the Materia Medina. I had come to the conclusion
that nothing bnt a total changed, residence andpur
suits would restore my-hcalth; when a friend re com
mended Hostetler’s Bitters. I procured a bottle aa an
experiment. It required but one bottle to convince
me that I bad found at last the moor coxsntAxzow
of bxksdieb. The relief It affordedmobasbeen com
plete. It Is now some years since 1 first tried Hostet
ler’s Bitters, and it Is but Just to ‘say that Ihavu found
tho preparation-all that, it olaixs to be. .It is a
Statdaep Fajult Cokdiaz. with ns; and even as a
.snaruLAETwe Uko it better than anything else; but
wo use It in aU nervous, bffiious and dyspeptic eases,
’from fever down to toothache. If what I have now
said will lead any dyspepsia or nervous invalid to a
sure remedy, 1 shall have done acme good. .
I remain, gentlemen, respectfully yours, .
- E- D. B. N. SOUTH WORTH.
Navy DEPABxatxjn*, BuEßAir of Yabds AED Doass,)
December 30th, 18S2. j
Messrs. Hobtzttsb & Smith, Pittsburg, Pa.; > !
Gentlemen:—About four years deco my attention
was called to your CelebntedStomocbßUters, Ibelng
at the time a perfect inartyr to Dyspepsia, in all of Its
terrific forms; Indeed, I had not known for six years
an uninterrupted night’s sleep. I commenced tho use
of yonr Bitten, taking them according to yonrdlrec-
Uoos, except that tbe dose was reduced ono-haif, and
found myself much, very much benefited by tbe first
bottle; the second relieved me entirely; but I have
ever since taken a dose In the morning, immediately
on rising, finding 1c to act as s Tonic and Appetizer of
the most agreeable character. : There Is a pccnll-
arlty In the effect of your Bitters on me, which it may
he well to state; if from any cause 1 shall bo suffering
ao accntely with the Headache, a dose of your Blttcra
Biinna me In pittexN 'Xnras. , In conclnslon, I
say, with all sincerity and truth, I would not [be re
turned to the state of health In which yoor Bitters
found me, and from which they have unquestionably
BELOVED me, 70S ALL THE NONET IS THE WOULD.
I am, with great respect, yoor oh f t serv't,'
JOHN W.BBONAUQH. Chief Clerk.
New convalescent Cam*,)
Near Alexandria, Y«., May 34th, lS6i ■ f
Messrs. Hosierse & Surra: . ..
Dear Sirs r—TVUI you do me the fhvor to forward
by express onc-halfdorenHofitotter’s Stomach Bitters,
with bill, for which I win rcmltyouonrecelptof same,
as lam unable to procure your medicine here; and If
I bad a quantity it could be sold readily, as It Is known
to bo the best preparation In use for diseases having
tbelr origin with a diseased stomach.' I hare used and
sold hundreds of preparations, but-your Bitters are .
superior to anything of the kind I am cognizant with.
Indeed, no soldier should be. without It, should he bo
ever so robust and bealihy ; for It is not only, a Bejto
native, but a Preventive for almost all diseases a
soldier Is subject to. I have been afflicted with Chronic
Indigestion, and no medicine has atpoeded me the
shop toubs bas ; and 1 trust you will lose no tfrjo
In sending me the Bitters ordered, •
Yoarv, very respectfully, '
. SAMUEL BYEBS, Hospital Steward.
UOSTETTKK & SOUTH,
Proprietors, Pittsburgh, Pa.
Key York Office. No. C 8 Broadway.
4e19-gs*s-to-ltew
dljicaiga tribune.
SATUBDAY, KQTEJIBDK 2S, 1863.
TEANKSSIVme IN Kidd.
GENERAL OBSERVANCE
OF THE DAY.
Suspension of Business—Attend
ance at the Churches—Elo
quent, Christian and
Patriotic Sermons.
The respect, paid to the day both in Its religions
and festive character, was almost universal. In
the morning very few persons were to ho seen in
the streets, except those whose dress, appearance,
and general demeanor showed that they had set.
their Ciccs towards some place of public worship,
there to join in the expression of solemn praise
and joy befitting the occasion. . The places ofbasl
mess were generally closed, and the air of bustle,•
business and activity, which characterises to an.
extraordinary degree the secular day in Chicago,
waa no where visible.
. The attendance on the church was fnIL The
discourses that were delivered, could they be col
lected' Into one volume' and published, would,
probably embody as much truth, loyalty, sincerity
and eloquence, as can be found anywhere else
within the same compass.-•; ' -
The usual festivities of the day followed close
upon the heels of,the religious exercises. Family
reunions took place aU over the city; in nearly ;
every house the unctuous turkey smoked upon tho;
board, to whose savourinesa the rich and fruity'
pudding formed an appropriate and by no means
■unheeded appendix.. , , . K
In the'evening, the places of nmnsement were
crowded to overflowing, and'the day seemed to
complete itself in that spirit of cheerfulness and
joy which flows naturally from, the depths of a
heart replete with Christian thankfulness.
. St* James’ Ciiurcli* •
Ear. B. -B. CLAILKSOy, P. S. I
An unusually large congregation for a week-day
service assembled in St. James 1 ChnrchJ nearly
filling the largo edifice.- The Thanksgiving 1 Hymn,
written by tho Bev. Dr. Slnhlenbcy, was distrib
uted through the Church, and during tho • service,
was song with great spirit by the audience. The'
-Homing Prayer, including theepedal Collects, set
forth by tbe Bishop of the Diocese, was read by the
Rev. Mr. Van Dyne-thoßector’s assistant. The
ante Communion service was read hy tho Bov. Dr.
Dyer, of New York.
' ’ After (he service, the Sector, the Ecr. Dr, Clark*
son, ascended the pulpit, and instead of a formal
sermon, delivered a simple- address to the congre
gation of about a half noorV length, chiefly on
subjects of parochial Interest and bearing. : -
He sold that it might be expected on such a day,
consecrated as it were, to free speech and to tho
widest pulpit liberty that he wooid address them
them on some topic connected with tho condition
of the country, and the glory of oar arms, and the
eagles of victory, and tho dissolution of rebellion.
Bat all these things you read about .sufficiently la
the daily papers, and on all these subjects yon very
well know my own ever-undisguised and deep
rooted sentiments. Besides yon have in that mag
nificent hymn which yon have been singing axuoro
stirring and eloquent sermon on these topics than
I could possibly preach. Motiving could oe added
to that noble inspiration. There is everything
there that can kindle patriotic fire and awaken «a
tlonal pride in every loyal heart. Mo poor words
of mine are fit to be heard in connexion with that
Inspiriting anthem, so worthy of the theme-eo
true to the right—and so like in every thought aud
lino their revered and honored author.
Tho - difficult thing about a Thanksgiving Ad
dress, is where to begin and how to end, la oar
enumeration of tho countless and manifold bless- ;
Inga for which we ought to be thankful. Dr. Clark
son then dwelt at some length on this thought
as the only starting place ot all real rejoicing,
and all gratitude. Be alluded to two speeches 01
St. Poors “in everything give thanks” and “giving
thanks always, in all things,” and showed-what
they meant, and what they do not mean. And
from this standpoint he proved how redeemed and
forgiven men ought to be able to thank God for
every allotment, and for every event tn life, for
everything in fact which God bad given ns in our
persons, In our Cuuillcs, in the nation, and In the
Church.
Dr. Cloikson then passed on from more general
topics to speak particularly of parochial ones,—
the bleescd and loving relationship os Pastor and
people, and the numerous causes for righteous
gratitude—that increasing prosperity and fuller
numbers mark the record every year—that no dis
coid or.division ever dims the sunshine of their
mutual attachment; that so much had been done,
through the blessing of God to remove the paro
chial obligations—for what the parishioners hod
dene so readily, and handsomely done, for the com
fort arid happiness of their Pastor—which has been
very much—both Pastor and people should find
cause for Thanksgiving. He alluded to the con
tinued health and prosperity of his people, taa con
tinually increasing interest manifested by his con
gregation in spiritual matters—that ho had been'
spared to see dear children on whose infant brows
ho had marked tho sacred cross, grow np to matur
ity u> cheer and reword him by tueir sweet affection
to himself and by their better loyalty to the
Church, , ,
■ If each one of us were to sit down and try to
reckon up the causes for private and individual
gratitude to Almighty God for the blessings- that
are merely personal—limited by the little lines that
circumscribe.ourselves—ho should' fully employ
the whole day In the blessed work. Then If we
gassed out or the narrow bounds of self, and took
i the family, and afterwards when-on into, the
sphere of the parish, and then to the nation.: wo
should have more than enough to occupy ourselves
for many days to come.
BnPfirst, os the foundation or all true Thanks
giving—because the foundation of all mercies and
the sum of all blessings—we should all remember
that the main thingfor on immortal man’s'grati
tude Is that which is summed up in that fine saying
of the Liturgy, “for tho means of Grace ana the
hope of glory.” * - ' •
What is your own bodily health,the throbbings of
vigorous lile, and tho bounding of youthful bloodr
W uat are the sacred joys of home, and the glccfhl
plays of your rosy-ehcetcd children t What is all
your exlcndingbuaincss, and your year’s commer
cial success ? what is It to yon that yon lire in a
city which is the world's wonder, and that defies
la jtsglant-like strides at once the precedents of
history,' and the fancies of conjecture ? What is
it to you that yon are the members ofa united and
beloved parish, and that you have tho privileges
of worship in a stately and beautiful temple f
What Is it to yon that the nation is vindicating her
outraged laws, and recovering her spoiled terri
. Tory, and punishing her rebellious children f What
arc all these things to you, O fellow men, if yon
have not below and beneath them all, as a resting
place for all real thanksgiving, “ the confidence of
a certain faith—the consciousness of gins forgiven
through the blood of Christ, aud the assurance of
God’s favor through tho life-suretyship and sacrl
. fice of Jesus Christ, your Lord and Savior?
lam thankful said the Pastor, that not all tho
men ore so rich hero as to think more of money
thyw of any other good, and that not aU the women
are so devoted to mshion as to care little for pray
er. lam thankful now and then, as to day,tohear
a full and hearty hymn of praise from Ups which
'should never he closed when . God’s Anthems are
sung. lam thankful that I can see, year by year,a
crowing fueling of just parochial pride, and an in.
ctcasing willingness andheartiness in all that apper
tains to parochial Interest and work. lam thank
ful that the gloomy clouds' of financial difficulty,
which on account of the greatness of our undertak
ings, for awhile overshadowed ns, have been so
completely scattered, and that such a glowing and
glonous future Is opening out before ns, with an
ever brightening radiance. ;
■ Dr. Clarkson then went on to speak of the call
which he had lately received, and was then consid
ering, to take charge of Grace Church, Brooklyn
Heights. 1 . -
• He said, it seems to me, to be due both to you
and myscifi my beloved parishioners,- since I am
speaking to you mainly of parochial matters, ■ to
day, that I should say some thing to you. on the sub
ject which so much occupies now my thoughts aud
my anxieties,and which I know is a matter of deep
andgrave concern to yourselves. •
I do not know that I should have thought it well
to have said anything here on the subject, until I •
bad ftiUy,-niider Goa’s, blessed guidance, made up
my own mind, on the question of'duty thus seri
ously presented to me. But since the matter has
been made public, it Is perhaps best that 1 should
state to you frankly just now It stands.
- Unsought by me, uudcsired,aiso, on accountof
the conflicts of duty and the pressure of anxieties
it would necessarily involve—and In fiico of the as
surance of the improbability of my acceptance, 1
have received, conveyed in terms as creditable to
yon as they were complimentary to myself, an In
vitation to the rectorship of a parish in an Eastern
city, which; from its' commanding position, its
beautiful record, the widely known character of its
people, and its inherent capability, ! consider as
second to none In tbe Am erf cop church.
• If X looked only on what tho world calls, In
speaking of these things, “attractions and induce- ’
ments.. tbe country even,' coaid famish nothing
more desirable. But there ore deeper questions or
dnty which underlie these outside things. In’ that
relationalonoby the Holyßplrit*aaiu,lmuatde-'
cide this grave matter. ; . • .
I do not propose now, or at any time ta discuss
with you the solemn Issues involved.* It is not a
matter that I desire, or am able to talk about with
you. I know your feelings well. -AIM have now
to say is, that 1 believe I possess -your confidence
in such a degree, as to be sure that you will feel,
however I decide, that r- have done that which I
conscientiously before God believe to be right in
itself, and not unjust in the slightest degree to this
people, who have lavished upon me, tnese mony.
years, the priceless wealth of their warmest, affec
tions. - -
Mr. Clarkson, la conclusion alluded to the collec
tion about to be taken up for needy and ill-paid,
clergy, whom he heartily commended to the judg
ment, generosity and sympathy of bis generous
parish, and besseefaed them to make it os largo or
huger than if It were a gift of love ,to himself.
“And when yon go homo to your well-filled tables,
and joyous firesides,** continued Dr. “Mayyou
cany with yon the consciousness—to consecrate
your own Thanksgiving festival—that you have
done something—yea, done much here to-day—to
alleviate the sufferings and supply the wonts of
some of that “noble army of living martyrs”—
the true-hearted, the patient, the Cuthfuh^beun
faltering, the “ world unworthy ” band of western
Missionaries, who, through storms and adversities
. are holding np the banner of the cross in these vast
frontier empires.
After the address tbe collection was taken np,
during which Dr. Clarkson said, that ii; when the
plates were all handed in, the amount seemed to
be generous and sufficient, they would conclude the
services by singing “Praise God from whom all
blessings fiow,’Y IT not, be would pronounce the
Benediction and let tbe audience retire “ nnhonor
cd and unsung.” On inspection of tbe plates—the
tune‘having been deemed satisfactory— tbe whole
congregation joined beartllyTn “the Old Hundred
Doxology” and were dismissed. The collection
amounted to S3OO.
Trinity Church.
BEr. c. n. craooNS, n. pasxob.
Test— Psalms £0; verse 7: “Some trust In
lots and some in horses; bat we will remember the
the name of the Lord oar God.”
' Another Thanksgiving Day greets as with the
light of this beacteoas morning I It is oar Ameri-.
canTentecost, when»great nation.hows, at.the
bidding of its rulers, before the throne of God to
offernp its gratitude for abundance and plenty;
for the teeming frnlts of the.earth: for poososal
and social blessings: for His many mercies In the
midst of its groat trial; for the tokens of His love
in the past, and for all the light that gilds the hori
zon of the future. ■ _,, ,
And truly is there abundant cause of thankful
ness to every devout heart, even whileacknowledg
ing the chastening hand of God in our* national ar
’ faction, and bowing in submission tty Him who
guides the destinies as well of nations, as of indi
viduals.' Vln the midst of a civil war of unequal
ed magnitude and severity," His hand has been
opened anew every morning, “filling our hearts
with food and gladness." • Never have our orch
ards hung down their branches more heavily laden
with fruit; never have our gardens poured into
our laps greater plenty; and our harvest fields on
hill and m valley have been so thick with golden
grain that, in the beauteous 1 mguage of David,
they have seemed “to laugh and sing."
More wondrous etiU, notwithstanding the ab
sorption of the wealth and strength of the na
tion in war, God's hand has been steadily
multiplying those resources. New territory has
been added to its domains, vast enough for u king
dom of the old world. New mines or wealth have
been opened to labor; new fields brought under
the culture of the huthindman; while, notwith
standing the fearful waste Of life in the field, the
eanrp and the hospital, we ate told, on the highest
authority, that “ the population of the country has
steadily increased, nna that the land rejoices la
augmented strength and vigor," Surely 1 may re
peat with emphasis tbo words, “No human coun
sel hath devised, r.or hath any mortal bond worked !
out tteic great tbines; they are tho gracious gifts
of the roost High God, who, while dealing justly
wi'b ns in anger for onr sins, has nevertheless re
membered merer/’ “Somo trust in chariots and
soino in horses, oat wc will rememter the name of
the Lord oor God I" Such must he tho feeling of
every Christian heart on this day in review’of the
mercies and blessings of tho past year. Lot others
trace them to human might and human skill, to hu
man counsel and hnman energy—'* we will remem
ber tbo name of the Lord our God"—we wul bend
reverently and adoringly before His mercy-seat,
and say, V Not unto us, O, Lord, not unto us, but
un‘ o ’inv name be tbo glory, foe Thy wring ® £Tcy
and Thy*truth's sake I” ’ .
This then is my theme for tho day-MS ground
Of a Chiittian'a h*p€/or th 4 future of hU coun
try— nr God—his remembrance of God’s
goodness in the past, his acknowledgement of
(jC£’b hand in tho present, his confidence that God
haaa trttk ief this nation to do, for which He may
be preparing It in tHe forniCo »vT trial*.
We have oecn accustomed to look uyfio this
country os having a glorious work assigned to it
In that great drama where nations are the actors,
and where God unfolds his plana in the stately ana
slow and sublime inarch of events. Nor has it
heen an unreasonable view. If the history of this
land is marked by any one feature more strongly
than all others, U Is by the evidences of the inter
posing Providence of God.
The discovery of this continent was the first in
the train of events disclosing the working of the
Divine hand. Whence came such a conception in
to the mind of an humble Genoese? And what
was tbo spring of that undaunted perseverance,
.which ro»e higher at every fresh repulse and bore
him on to als sublime goal ? 1 >
They who have no filth in God may see in all
this nothing but tho working of a solitary human
energy. But the Christian can see the prompting
and guiding and strengthening of Him who rales in
the hearts of men os In tho armies of Heaven. Nor
has the time of the discovery of this continent less
marked by Providence; a Ume when the world was
just entering upon a new era. when the human
mlndwaa awaking from the sleep or ages, when
great and imperishable seeds of civil ana religions
freedom were just beginning to germinate and both
-■ And If in we can trace the hand of
. God; bow much morolu the - character of tho. men
, raised up to lay tho foundation of this great nation.
Where has the world ever seen a ach a body of moa,
so wise, so pore, bo patriotic as
they who watched as nursing Cithers at tbo birth
of onr liberty—tho heroes and atfifoemen of the Re
volntion I
And the central figure tn the group I—who can
study his character and life, and not exclaim, the
jnanbf Providence l.the man raised up and fitted
.for his work by power above and beyond him, the
Gcd-dirccted and supported. And he was the
foremost in acknowledging this. In all tbe long
night of the Revolution, when reverses fell upon
; hie troops, and he was compelled to witness tnelr
sufferings from the lack of clothing and food, and
when false friends conspired to destroy him, this
was his sheet anchor—a serene and unshaken trust.
In Providence. In speaking of the progress of war,
he said, “ the hand of Providence has been so con
spicuous in all this that he must be worse than on
infidel that lacks frith, and more wicked that has
not gratitude enough to acknowledge his obliga
tions.” And again:—“wo have abundant reason
to thank Providence for its many favorable inter
positions In onr behalf. It has at times been my
only dependence, for all other resources seemed to
havo failed us.”
How do we seed In tills crisis his calm, serene
wisdom, bis prudence and conduction, his spot
less Integrity, his love of country, his trust in God.
And not more conspicuous la the hand of God in
the men than in the work they were guided and
strengthened to do; the Constitution which they
were permitted to frame—this Union of sovereign
States in one nationality. The world has seen no
thing like if. Greece, with her discordant States,
exhibited nd such model. Republican Borne made
no approach to it. It was left for this land to ex
hibit to the world this wondrous nationality. A
union of States, many of whom are vaster than
kingdoms in Europe: 8 totes self-governed and in
dependent, each developing, unrestrained, its own
resources, and yet blended into one country; aU
bearing bat one name, all sharing in a common
gloiy. Unity amidst diversity; a unity like that
of the planets in the solar system, each revolving
in its own orbit and yet aU obeying a central, con
trolling power—all uniting to declare the glory of
God. \vondrous confederacy I the world bias seen
nothing like it; and, if destroyed, will never look
upon its like again.
what then are the duties which a great crisis
like this demands of us as Christiana, as a Christ
ian nation professing to fear and reverence God ? '
1. First to acknowledge His hand in the nation's
trial; to recognize the sadwarnow raging as God's
jugment. His chastening. His stern and fiery disci
pline of our country. To fail short of tins is to
ignore our fiiith in God, to deny the first principles
ofourlhith, torqject the plainest teachings ot the
Word of God. And, herein lies one of our dangers.
We dwell upon second causes and human instru
mentalities, upon the wickedness and folly of man;
wc forget that the wrath of man'la overruled of
God to accomplish His purposes and that men ore
unconsciously the' instruments of His Will. Let
others who hovenothithin God see In our coun
try’s trial, nought but the working of man's hand;
let the Christian remember the name of bis God,
remember that war is one of God's great ministers
of wrath—Cunlnc, pestilence and the sword—that
Is Bis ploughshare which strikes deep, yet to pre
pare tho sou, we trust, for a richer and nobler har
vest.
2, Then when we have bowed submissively
before Bis Throne and acknowledged His chas
tening hand, let us hasten to bring forth fruits
mcetior repentance. *
- There are flagrant sins everywhere abounding,
for which we do well to-day to humble ourselves m.
sackcloth and ashes. - Everywhere is there beheld
the hot reckless pursuit of wealth, the eager baste
to be rich by rapid steps and ventures of doubtful
morality; everywhere- do we hear of the criminal
extravagance of fast living, the enormous sums ex
panded Tn costly jewels and magnificent attire—a
million of dollars wasted upon a single boll, while
our soldiers In camp and hospital were in need of
almost necessary food. Intemperance again abounds
In the ranks of our young men, cutting down the
flower of onryouth; licentiousness scarcely hides
its hideous head in onr streets and alloys; the
Sa! bath day la profaned and polluted by perverttn ;
it lio a day of sensual indulgence; wnile every
day's journal tells us of fearful frauds whose evil
incuenee fails moat heavily upon the defenders of
theircoontry.-
Let us bnmblo ourselves for these things, no
covering and hiding our guilt, bat confessing it be
fore God, and imploring mercy at His hands.
- Bicbtcouenees alone is the salvation of a nation;
•in ia the rain of any neople.
cne more ground of hope remain to be noticed.
God is educating the nation to do & great and
solemn work of charity on a scale never before
equaled, a work rendered necessary by the calami
ties incident to a gigantic war. money flows free-,
ly for the sick and suffering, for the wounded, for
the prisoners, and captives, for the houseless and
homeless in regions desolated by the war*. Hun
dreds rive themselves personally to this work; and
on the Battle-field, ere the echo of the cannon has
died away, they are found, staunching the last eb
bing life-blood, supporting the dying bead, sooth
ing the last hour by holy words of hope and prom
ise, breathing a prayer Into the ear growing anil in
death, and pointing the dying to tho Lamb of God.
And m hospitals and tents, and camp and field
they are found, ministers of mercy, unwearied in
their Ueavcn-bleesed work oflove.
This la the work of the Christian Commission,
and for this work our offerings are to be appropri
ated this day. May they be worthy of the work, a
free-will offering from cheerful givers.
Clark Street M, E. Church,
B£T. MB. C. IT. FOWLED, PASTOB.
The services in the Clark street M. E. Church
were of an interesting character. The new pastor,
Bev. Mr. Fowler, preached a very eloquent and
practical sermon. Hia text was;.
Text.— lsaiah v, 4— u What coold have been done
more to my' vineyard thatl have not done in It.”
Mr, Fowler proposed far the prayerftri, patient
consideration of his-hearers, a troth that is true at
an times, under all circumstances, and in the life
of eveiy people and every Individual, that Ood has
done lor us all he could do. Nothing could have
been done for hia vineyard that he Has not done.
This he did at much length. We have only room
to note a few of his striking thonghta.
Human history, taken inlts grand epochs, sum
med up in resolutions and convictions Just when
wc would least expect them, finds Us explanations
only on a system of higher law, which measures
things by their surface inline, but not by their moral
value. For that man has studied history hut poor
ly who has not seen that human schemes and cal
culariona aro prostrated when they seem moat cer
tain of success. So mithftil is this law, that wo have
all come to think that corruption is always thd insur
ance of dissolution. And this fcetanruesthehigher
bidden cause. For if the purpose fa not a moral
one there could bemo connection here. When the
the Kingdom of the Bourbons trembled, France
was most prolific of genius. She bad statesmen
atdphilosopheis, poets and scholars,' orators , and
warriors; and outside of her moral life there were
no signs of the terrible judgments that buried, the
nationally in the grave of Louis XVT. Thus ail
things which exists or happen iff God’s domain
have ihclr moral or theological purpose, and they
move on or stop according as they nest subserve
truth or virtue. This brings as to. the real ques
tion 1 ■lf God reigns why is it that right mores on
so slowly? If God is pledged to the right, and has
indeed aB forces at his control, why is 1c that the
.wrong so olien and so long triumphs ? • * * The
other day 1 heard a newsboy, at tho public bid
ding, crying the sole of treason, while by him gal.
loped on his crutches, the remnant, of a man in
blue, whoso comeliness and usefulness were mould
ering on the .field of Gettysburg, and I half held
my breath, waiting for the God of the patriot and
the Guardian of liberty to speak in His wrath.
Bnt the earth did not open,.and the lightning
slumbered on; and I hastened away wondering u
mercy too long continued was not akin to crime..
When I ece these patient heroes wearing the uni
form of my country, and the scars and crutches of
my country’s foes, I am reconciled to God’s Gov
ernment o«y by his promised penalties: “I am
glad there is a Judgment and' a hell I” The poor
bondman—the slave—direst of ail words—chat
battlc-cry and no language spells: If every letter
were as vast as the ocean, and blazed all over with,
the awakenad wrath of eternal vengeance, it would
even not then be half spelled out tans—the slave. A
man without - .! hope, without a right, without a rep
resentative, without a country,andwithont a soul;
baring bis back to'the unwilling beak of our
csglc, and clanking his chains on oar festal days,
simply because his ancestors happened to bo under
when our Government was launched, may well
ssk in bis hereditary anguish and loneliness,
■Where are the signs of Jehovah’s action ? Why
- does bo not bear the wall of his helpless children ?
■ For . tho past hundred years. In ' our
. haste for . wealth and power, wa- called these
o iatraci questions,.: ana have silenced every
man who has dared to ask - them,' with
the cry of AMUionUt. But to-day they are being
concreted, and we are. compelled to feel them.
Dumb lips from the sound are mumbling them even
, in tho mart, and the hollow voices of the dead are
muttering them in our ears, . even in our narrow
chambers; and wc must answer them. God is
giving ns the other end of the cat-o’-niuc-taila; and
. as wo go leaping abonc the stake of our destiny,
we too, in our turn, are wondcringif God is asleepl
And we are learning that he Is neither dead nor
asleep. May 1 not safely coil it a proof leaf ques
tion, worthy of oar thought today, as to how God
has done all for his vineyard that. He could do?
And I postulate as a truth of the utmost import
ance, that all divine action is under limitations.
What 1 mean is this: There ore lines along which
Ho must act, if He acts at aIL, If he would throw
you toward the sun. Ho cannot do it by throwing
you tho other way. He cannot make a man' a trai
tor snd> loyal Christian at the same time. He must
utterly annihilate the traitor of him before be can
make him a loyal Christian; and 1 think he must
destroy the last symptom of secession sympathy,
before he can make any kind of a Christian of him
in this latitude. You understand what I mean by
limitations to divine action.
[The preacher discussed these limitations and
lines of action at much length; and. with sound,
practical sense; hat we have not the room to fol
low him. We give hla estimate of President Lin
coln:]
Above all, and far Is front, stands the man of
Destiny—the honest rail hoy of Illinois—who shall
stand ont forever as the representative man of this
straggle, to whom 90 centuries hence the world will
lookbsacatas we now gaz% at old Pericles. 1
know that many say he la a good maiybut only sec
ond rate. But. I aab,wlxat constitute a great maaf
Is It not the ability to do what is required in great
emergency ? Take the three great men of the last
hundred years—Washington, Wellington and Na
poleon- They were great, measured only In their
individual life-work. Interchange them and they
wocld sink into eminent men—not great. To
quell a mob and act aa dictator over a people who
have saddled themselves and are asking for a rider,
is one thing. To load the armies of a great peo
ple against a hereditory foe. Is another thing.
But to take the Government of a free
people by a minority vote, be flung
imo the midst of traitors where concealed
and open is piety: to face a wide-spread
<ird web-equipped &nd well-appointed rebellion—
the mofct restful and formidable ever known—and
without men aid munitions; to retain friends,
conciliat'd rivals, and subdue enemies, is altogether
adiflurrjnt thing. If wc lastly praise the sailorwho
brings his ship through the storm, what shall we
say cf h m who, fuig into thebo.l.ag sea, amid
the broken tin ben of a shattered wreck, con-
E'mctsa ship that the tempest cannot barm? If
the doing of the greatest and most difficult work
In history Is evidence of greatness, Abraham Lin
coln stands puxlcss among ttc world’s lieroce.
New the qr.tttlon comes, who gave ns Mr. Lin.
coin ? Not our own sagacity, for wA neither knew
the mac nor foreknew the times. It was that
wise Father from the begin
ning, and works out human history by bringing
forward the man for the times, which U always the
Scat mao. My own conviction Is. that God baa
cn patiently waiting for Mr. Lincoln'to mature
bclorehe allowed our .national Btrepjlc. so long
going silently on, to culminate. Ho waned twenty-
Sve centuries for Moses; and forty centuries toe
Christ. He waited twelve cectunes lor Martin
Letter, and two centuries for John Wwlay;
and Ho has waited ever’since 3620 for Abraham
Lincoln. Is It not enough for us that ws livo U
this the fulness of time? A year ago to-day oquo*
but an cld-line Abolitionistfinance the prom*
he .of etnnnclrtiUoD, But fiH&y, even with.ta«
bulk of bur right voters ta tho field, WQ full HJfc
tca*r7 majorities fir a real emancipation and for
arming the negroes, and that, too. when* vigorous
prosecution of the war means tho draft and thft
trenches. This growth Is our true success, and.
makes our nltinaie ard permanent triumph only
gacsUon of.time. The last month baa
t carer demonstration of the power of .the people
to govern thenwcivwthan an our past years put to
gether. It has exhibited to the world the subttm*
spectacle of a great people sn comprehending tho
hazard of a crisis, and so wedded to tho great Ides
of liberty that weighed it, an party prejudices and
party leaders, and party Issues arc bnt os dun and
ashes. The lories or taxation, the fctlguea of the
campaign, the privations of the camp,.tbc suffer
ings oftfce hospital, and the dangers of the field of
carnage are undertaken with Joy, simply because
the Republic Is In danger. The great Idea of self
government Is no longer an experiment, bat a fact;
uo longer a theory, hue a grand, sublime truth.
First Presbyterian Cbarch,
- Text—“ Fair weather Cometh out of the North.**
Job, xxxvii. 22.
“Out oftheSouth comcth the whirlwind," says
the same voice. And as the ardors of the Souther*
heats cause the UmpesU which are disponed by
Northern winds, bo do Southern natures give rise
to tbo gusts of revolution which are dispelled by
the bracing Influences of the Northern, will and
principle. The whirlwind which has swept ovor
tho central portion of onr Republic, had raged tor
longer than we could have anticipated. We have
begun to believe there is a Trado-wind behind It.
But SB during the yearpaut it has gradually become
weaker, ana as great fields of blue studded with
stars have broken here and there into flight, we
have been encouraged. A nation now gathered he
fore Gcd in thanksgiving beholds tho suspicious
signs, and confident In that law by whichpnnclpls
triumphs over passion, thanks God that “fair
weather cometh out of the North." -
With these encouragements wo may reflect upon
the peculiar relations which wc, upon these prai
ries, sustain to that Union in whoso pcrmtnonce
wcluveucw reason to hope. Tho principal theme
around which the speaker then gathered the
thoughts of his congregation was, “tho Northwest
and the Union.” He began bv stating that it was
conceded by all.that were the union divided br the
Ohio and tho Potomac, it might also bo divided by
the Hudson, the Mississippi, the Rocky Moon tains,
or by any convenient line. Yield the principle on
which the South woo'd establish their independ
dtucc, and a’l the ligature* of the Union snap at
tholuetant. Wcmayant'cpa'canew Dutch Re
public cm the. Mohawk, a Puritan Republic in Now
England, a Prairie Republic in tho Northwest. W«
must therefore think of our relations to the Eastern
as well as to the Southern States. In contemplating
a possible dissolution of the Union. In snowing
how the interests of tho Northwest lay In tho pres
ervation of the Union, tho preacher spoke first
of the peculiar qualities of our iota, civilization*
Every section of a large country has Us local typo.
Oaib is derived partly from our wide horizons* and
the great facilities afforded to enterprise; bat more
from the character of our citizens. We have rep
resentatives from all portions of our own country
and from most of the European States, Hence,
though we have no history as yet; though we may
not hive all that is most.excellent In older sections
of tho land, we have that blending of qualities
1 which is to make our typo of civilization, the rep
resentative American type. Here ta to bo the great
theatre of American ideas, and it Is our Interest to
preserve that Union upon which so splendid a fu
rore depends. When the artist Kosiiter would re
present America, he dtiy placed hi;* Ideal on a prai
rie Eoll, and represented ter with a sickle In her
hand and ears of wheat In her apron. When we
looked upon the picture it was as when wc read a
chapter In prophecy. May our children see In it a
proi hecy Implied!
A second point made was, that as a community,
the Northwest la not yet sufficiently consolidated
for a distinct governmental organization. We
have sot the flxca educational anti religions Insti
tutions which are necessary at the centre of every
stable fcim of society. Wewant more musculari
ty in ell onr social system. At present our strength
- comes mainly from older communities. We should
lose much oflc If a foreign boundary should be flung
between our Eastern citizens ana the graves or
their kindred. “Leave New England out in the
cold," and many of her sons, contented now be
cause she is in the Union, would return to die on
her lap. Meanwhile, we would suffer from the
preponderance of that foreign element, which, at
present valuable, might be Injurious without the
balance of American temper and American blood.
The commercial argument was then presented,
and It was readily shown bow the interests of the
Northwest would he injured by a liub of custom
houees between it and tho ocean. The
business man understands tais The Board of
Trade is shrewdly patriotic. The grain ware-'
bouses may well hang out the flag of tho Union.
The present prosperity of tho Northwest, while
the Mississippi Is practically closed, is no argu
ment to the contrary. That prosperity might not
last on a return of peace. It could not In a divided
country.
1 lie fourth point was that the Union has already
coat the Northwest too much, that we should be
willing to forego its advantages. The sacrifices
made lor the war in the camp and the field, as well
as in the office of the tax collector, were then
pic ted, that itmight he seen what value would be
placed upon wfcathad occasioned so much sacrifice.
The last argument adduced was that in the pres
ervation of the Union we have our only hope of
developing the American Idea of freedom. This la
of special interest tons, If this Isto be the central
field for the maturing of the characteristic typo oC
American civilization. That Idea la universal lib
erty. Hitherto to maintain the Union has been to
tolerate slavery. Now fo maintain the Union Is ta
make freemen of all. Revolt has given os our
port unity and we must embrace ir. It matters not
whether the shackle be removed by the gauntlet of
war, or by the ungloved brand of humanity. Tho
Issue Is the same. It maybe that were the inde
pendence of the South conceded, slavery would
end by governmental necessity, but then would
there be no hope for the development oftbe true
' American idea of freedom, which is neither un
bridled democracy nor exclusive aristocracy, bnt
republicanism between the extremes. Hero is mt
Incentive ;stronger than almost any other—the
Union for the soke of the best form of freedom.
Tbe model republic of tbo future Is tojgrdw out of
the ashes of the present fires—grand and vastt
lifting itself before the nations with no* bronzed
figure of Liberty on the Summit—needing no sym
bol of what is already expressed In every line and.
ancle. *
The preacher then proceeded rapidly to refer ta
some of the minor occasions of gratitude coming
from tbe same general source. First, our unexam
pled financial prosperity: second, thehardihood of
cbcractcr developed by exposure in war: third,
the benevolence which has been arouted among os
*by the exigences of tbo war. and by tho appeal*,
of our philanthropic and religions institutions. A
fitting tribute was paid to the Northwestern Fahv.
and 1c was stated that tbe congregation to which,
the speaker ministered had raised for its own pur
poses alone, nearly $40,000 during the year.
The last occasion mentioned was that In thl*
critical period the Northwest has given the country
its President. This thought was advanced with*
: out partisan reference or bias. Whether the policy
of the Administration was good or bad, it la a CicC
that under this Administration the death blow Is
given to slavery, audit is an boner that God’s In
strument in this great step of progress is from our
soil ; that thensme which, next to that of Washing
ton, will be long know i as associated with the
critical periods of our national life is
■Xjxcolk, of Springfield, DHnols.
With gome other reference to the more strictly
religions occasions of thanksgiving, the. speaker
closed.. • k ■:
A collection was taken up for the Sanitary Com
mission. The President’s. Hymn was song before
the sermon. .
New England (Congregational) Churclu
bet. sTAun n. Nicnozxs, pastob,
Tbxt—'“My shoes shall he iron and brass; aml
as thy days so shall thy strength be.’!—Dent.*
sxxili, 25. i
The Hebrews bod just been wondering up and
down the desert forty years,-and bad doubtless
found that good shoes were & prime necessity.
Unshod, their feet were eboatom and maimed,
and their march arrested. SqMoseacooldpromlse
them nothing more grateful than shoes of Iron and
brass. Wc also know* from recent events, the im
portance of shoes—in the army. . Gen, McClellan
refused to follow up Gen. Lee* after Anrietam, for
want of shoes, be said.: Shoelessness cost os
another year of war there. Bebeb, in raids, al
ways make for shoe-atoreaffrat, as If they could do
■ anything but go barefoot. Shoes, then, Co travel
ing nations like Israel, or to warring nations like
ours, seem to mean endurance, ability, independ
ence in movement. The text means, then—capa
city to meet and'to complete one’s dot{ea.>
It represents our own history during'the past
vear. we have had hard and rough-roads to trar
v cl, hard tasks to finish, but wo have been kept
ecuai to our labors. In war, politics, diplomacy*
we have gone forward in sound sandals. For thfa
-wc have to give thanks this day. Bnt more par
ticularly—theso la tho Proclamation which opened
' the new year grandly. Its effect was electric.
It cleared the air like a thunder-storm.
It divided the true friends and the real
fees of the Government. It established a policy
nearly uniform In the army. It is a success, font
has been followed by great victories, been approved
by the people at the ballot box, given us many
thousands of black recruits, lifted fear from tub
liberty lovers- of the border States, shaken the
prejudices of the whites .against blacks, and
shackled the bands of foreign Interventionists. 1C
has also reinstated God’s justice as the supreme
authority of, the land, brought back moral princi
ples and the Higher law. It has consecrated oar
cause ond made It the cause of universal humanity.
From the day when our President thus in the name
of the nation knelt down beside the slave, and
like the good Samarium to the poor neighbor who
fell among thieves, poured into tho wounds of hie
master’s wishes tho oil of freedom and gave him
the wine of liberty, there passed upon our cause &
consecration holler than the anointing of priest
or of bishop. . . . ’ • .
■ It purged the nation’s conscience. Its effects are
not yet done. fbr.like the gulf-stream which sweeps
across the whole broad Atlantic and heats the wat
ers of Great Britain and of Norway, 8,000 miles
away, so will the sentiments of this Proclamation
sweep across ages of coming rime and warm the
hearts and the Homes of men yet 3,000 years away.
It also places tho nation squarely Upon its min
principle—Universal Liberty.
Next wc give thanks that our shoes have been as
iron and brass to tread the paths of victory. We
bare bad to win by sheer pluck, and wo have won
—Vicksburg, Gettysburg, Port Hudson,' Chatta
nooga and Knoxville arc our trophies. -Nest, anti
slavery is advancing among the people. - Border
States even are catching tho inspiration. The
old slavery wheel-horses at the North - are the
main hold backs now, but the late elections half
convened many of thorn; and anti-slavery rolls
cn in spite of their resistance. Mr. Wendell Phil
lips may live to be President yet. The avalanche
of libeny shall soon fill the whole land with tho
white snows of purity and peace.
Our dreadful discipline is also making of ns a
true nation—one In traditions, memories defeats*
struggles, victories, German and Irish being for
gotten in American. The war la melting and forg
ing ns - into solid coherence. Illinois lia dear
er to Massachusetts since tho sons of both sleep
the last sleep of heroes together at Gettysburg.
We have been a Union, we shall be a unit. And
our praying may be necessary to enable us to meet
the labors and changes of the future. The ordeal
of a nation Is always severe, and we have it yet to
undergo. 1 Finally, wo give thanks for our escape
from foreign intervention. England and France
have been ready, bnt could not gel in. God kept
his hand, on the lion’s month—as for his servant
Daniel. Wo were enabled to keep them’ off. Bo
has cur strength been equal to our stormy day—let
us be thankful. ’
The audience was good,%nd the services assisted
in by Rev. G. 8. F. Ravage and Kev; Air. Kendrick,
pastor of the North Baptist Church.
St, John’s .CNnrcli.
BSV. DU. U. If. Bisnop, PASTOB.
At St. John's Church there was a large congrega
tion. The services were conducted by the Rev. Dr.
Trimblc, and the Hector, Reverend Dr-
Blshop.. The choir did their part admirably wed.
A handsome collection was made for the poor. Th&
sermon was by the Rector, founded on the SWh,
.Psalm,Htband 15th vems. The preecherbriefly
'called attention to our common daily mercies a«
affording abundant causes for thanksgiving, i e
then went on to epeak of our netlennl etnje.
gratitude to tho Great Ruler of nations. u&
spoke most earnestly of the of ana
.alulng the moat vigorous po Icy 01. the gov
‘eminent, and of seconding the most
thorough and extended
nutting down cf treason and rebellion. Hw utter
ances were very patriotic, and denounced.ln the
most scathing terms th© inlhmoas theory of sece*-
s!on. Do sam that it was one cause of thankagtv
ftg that the masses of the people still continue *o
on Fourth ihje,l

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