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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1860-1864, December 14, 1863, Image 1

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CHICAGO TRIBUTE.
WILY TRI-WEEKLY AND WEEKLY.
Office, No. 61 Clark Street.
TEEMS OP THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE,
D&fly, delivered Jn city, per rear slo*oo
Daffy, delivered iu cltv, per week 20
Daily, to mail enbacribeia, per rear o*oo
Doflv lo mail eutacribcn, per 6 months... s*oo
Tri-Weekly, per rear £.OO
Weekly, tmOe«il**cr*ber* (6 mo's $1.03). 2.00
** < copies 7,00
* ID copies 15 qq
** SO copies, and Ito £e£ter-np*‘of
dub **— 30.00
fST - Money In Blistered Letters may be twnt at
our risk.
|y The remittance for clubs must, in all cases,
lie made at on time. s
Add«M “ CHICAGO gRtPIIN-E,” CUago. BL
<£l)icnga ITribnac,
MONDAY, DECEMBER 14,1803
TOC NEWS.
The bad weather cuts off our usually co
pious eastern dispatches, and leaves us
without any late news from that direc
tion.
Our Springfield dispatches contain the
joyful news of the smashing up of the
Gridiron, and sustaining of the proroga
tion of the Legislature by the Governor.
■Asad casualty occurred in Charleston
harbor in the unking of the iron dad *W6e
hawken, during a severe storm. Four en
gineers and twenty-six of the crew were
drowned.
The Army of the Potomac is quiescent
The air is still rife with rumors of a change
of commanders. An effort is being made
to reorganize the army, enlarge it, and
■place it upon a proper war footing.
A Knoxville dispatch states that our loss
•during the investment of that dty by
Longetreet was only one thousand, while
that of the rebels was five thousand.
.. HaUeck*s annual report, embracing a
■summary of military operations since his
last annual report, is given elsewhere.
The rebel Congress bids fair to have a
stormy session. The conservative North
Carolinians are bound to pftss a scheme
of reconstruction. They had better lake
the one offered them by the President
FATE OP TfiE GBXDIBON.
It is not often we write an obituary with
feelings of joy, hut we conless to a large
degree of unalloyed satisfaction in chron
icling the last of the infamous Gridiron,
and that the highest authority in the State
lira put an eternal quietus upon the swin
dle, which a pack of petty dema
gogues sought to fasten upon the
city of Chicago, and which involved in its
issue a train of evils to the State at huge,
as longas the tail of a comet. The people
of Chicago will breathe easier now that
they arc not at the mercy of this handful
of men who had planned and sought to
canyto'stSfcess agiganticmonopoly which
threw into their hands the control ofevety
highway and scaled the mouths of those
who would . protest against the enor
mity. The people of the State at large
will rejoice that in the crushing of this
swindle, they are spared still greater evils—
■evils of a State and National character
which must have followed. The majesty
mnd purify of the law have been most sig
nally vindicated. It was a Democratic
measure, urgejl before Democratic Judges,
but the Democratic lawyers who urged it
have found that the ermine cannot be taint
ed. The Supreme Court laid aside its po
litical sympathies, rose above all party
feelings, and dissected the question placed
■before them upon its naked legal merits,
and have given their answer.
By that answer the action of the Gov
ernor is sustained. By that answer the
Stale is saved an infamous apportionment;
the wheels ot the National Government
will not be blocked with tie stones these
unscrupulous demagogues sought to throw
in front of them; the Legislature cannothe
brought together again; the courts cannot
be set at defiance; tbe prerogatives of
Ibe Governor which be has never
sought to demise except to ad
vance the interests of the Union
cause, are intact, and a ruinous per diem
reaching from the dispersement to there,
assembling is spared the State Treasury; a
long catalogue of evils has been wiped out,
of which the bartering of the city into the
hands of Little Fuller and 'Wabash C.
Gondy was but one.
But the gridiron is melted down and in
its overheating has roasted its owners to a
crisp. We have no spare pity for
them or their pockets, President,
directors, stockholders, bondholders, or
hangers on. If they can save themselves
from the sadden collapse with whole legs,
they will be lucky. We understand a
search is to be instituted by the curiosity
hunters among the remnants of the Gridiron
forwhat is left of Little M.'Wabash Fuller,
and Wabash C. Goudy. If there is any
thing left of them, and if the wind is not
knocked dean out of their bodies, will they
infonn us of the quotations of their stock,
hoy soon the rails are going down, and
how many streets they are going to occu
py ? Will they inform us of the status of
the Gridiron, and who is to get the con
tract for laying down the solder? Win
they tell ns somewhat in detail as to the
condition of their health? Our columns
are open to them, even though they come
In the coarsest sackcloth and greyest of
ashes. Speak out, gentlemen. How are
you, Gridirons?
tsf The Jeff Davis organ in this city con
tinues its abuse and villilication of Mr.
Sweet, Superintendent of the Illinois &
Mississippi Telegraph Company, for furnish
ing the Tribune with a portion of the Prcsi
dent’s Message, as he was in duty bound to
do. Kow why docs It not turn round and
pour out its filth ou Mr. Cobb, because his
company offered the same facility? The
cites arc exactly paralld. Each company
was legally bound as a common carrier to do
this.- Why then is Mr. Sweet singled out as
the object of attack? Let Mr. Cobb have his
share. His line is guilty of the some offence.
FROM CAIRO.
Cxiuo, Dec. 12.—Late accounts from below
represent Mannadukc endeavoring to unite
his force with Price, who was said to be
crossing the Rod River into Texas. Price’s
forces, which are much reduced, would num
ber less than five thousand. A large Federal
force is pursuing them. The rebels arc much
disheartened.
The steamer Platte Valley passed with thir
ty-nine bales of cotton for St Louis.
The Provost Marshals of this Dls
•trict arrested two deserters from tl» 109 th
Illinois, near Dongola, yesterday, when the
deserters attached their captors, and killed
one outright, and beat the other till he was
. insensible. The deserters escaped.
FROM NEW ORLEANS.
New Tons, Dec. 12.
The steamer Columbia, from New Orleans,
Dec. sth, Las arrived.
Advices from Texas say the health of the
troops is excellent, and they are ready and
-eager to push into the interior.
Matamorae advices state that Gorlinas had
turned over the Government toJcsndeLa
•Serna, the old constitutionally elected Gov
ernor.
General Banks and staff had arrived in
New Orleans.
FROM CHARLESTON.
New Tobk, December 12.—8y tbc arrival of
the Fulton from Port Royal, we learn of the
loss of the Monitor Wcchawkcn, which sunk
ui anchor inside of Charleston Bar, on Bun
<iby last. Four engineers and twenty-six of
the crew were drowned. A furious gale pre
vailed at the time. The other vessels sus
tained no damage.
The Situation before Charleston is tm
changed.
The WcchwkDu lies iu five fathoms of
TTotor butlserpectedtohemi.ed. Her loss
is said to have resulted from uegleet aud mis
.management.
THE LAST OF THE GRIDIRON.
[Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.]
SnuKonru), EL, Dee/ia, ihcs.
The People on relation ofEeyee vs. The
Auditor, and the same on relation of Harless
vs. Iho Secretary of State—a peremptory
mandamus in the above cases Is refused,
Judge Walker andßrccsc holding that the
proclamation of the Governor, acgnifsaodln
by the General Assembly, terminated the
session on the 10th daylof June.
VOLUME xvn.
THE WMAWffI SIM IN
CHARLESTON EiSBOR
TIRTT LIVES LOST.
important from Spring
field —The Last of
the Gridiron.
From the Army of thcPo
tomac-Bcorganization
of the Army.
TDE SIEGE OF KNOXVILLE-.
UNION LOSS ONLY 1,000
LOSS 5,000.
Gen. HaUeck’s Annual
Eeport—Summary
of Military Ope
rations.
THE REBEL, CONGRESS-A
CONSERVATIVE POLICY
TO BE URGED.
FROM WASHINGTON.
Dec. 12.—Gen. Garfield will
probably be Chairman of the House Military
Committee.
Private advices received hero to-day from
Richmond say the present session of the
Cmiederatc Congress will be a slonny one.
The question of reconstruction will be fear
lessly presented to the Southern people by
the conservative members from North Caro-
Pna. A great many members who were
elected on the Last Ditch platform, are said
to be secretly in levor of the policy advocated
l y the North Carolina conservatives. Joint
resolutions will soon he introduced, taking
strong grounds in favor of reconstruction.
FROM THE ARMY OF THE PO
TCMAC.
Washington, Dec. 12.—Accounts received
last night say that all reports to the cdect
that General Meade has been superseded are
unfounded up to a late hour last night
General Meade, day before yesterday, for
warded Jxis report of the recent movements
south o£ the Rapidan, to the War Depart-'
ment. It is confidently believed it will he
satisfactory to the Cabinet His late retro
grade movement is fully indorsed by almost
every officer of the army.
New Yoke, Dec. 12,—A Washington
special to the New York Timet says;
“ The Army of the Potomac will be imme
diately reorganized and made larger and bet
ter than it has been at any former period.
Its chief command will probably he tendered
to either Hooker or Thomas. It is believed
that Thomas would prefer remaining where
he is. Hooker’s reputation, since the bottle
of Lookout Mountain, stands higher than
ever. He is considered here by some as the
next commander of the Army of the Poto
mac. The present corps commanders, with
one exception, will be relieved.”
ANNUAL REPORT OF GENERA
HALLECK.
Washington. Dec. 12,—The report of the
General-in-Chief is a very lengthy document,
comprising mainly a grand summary of the
military operations since his last annual re
port. Referring to the Department of the
Potomac, General Halleck says Burnside's
proposed change of base "was not approved
by him. Burnside, therefore, consented to
cross his army by the fords of the Upper
Rappahannock, and then move down to seize
the heights of Fredericksburg, while a small
force was to be sent north of the river, to
cnablp Honpt to re-open the railroad. This
plan was assented to, hut not approved.
Bumsldc, instead of crossing the Rappahan
nock by the fords, as be was expected to do,
marched his whole army down the north
bank of that river. Lee’s army, in the mean
time, moved down to the south bank of the
river, which was at this time fordable a few
miles above the town; and General Sumner
asked permission to cross and occupy the
heights, bnt it was refused, and no attempt
was made to effect a passage till December
11th, by which time Lee’s army had been
concentrated. It Is alleged that the defeat,
which we suffered soon after, resulted from
the neglect to forward the pontoon train
from Washington; whereas the pontoons at
the time were at Berlin, in the Army of the
Potomac. The delay was therefore unavoid
able, and on investigation of matters, Bum
side pronounced St co.
Speaking of affairs in Grant’s department,
the General-in-Chief says; It has been al
leged that Grant positively disobeyed the in
structions of his superiors. It is hardly
necessary to remark that Grant never diso
beyed an order; moreover, he has never
complained that the Government did not fur
nish him all the means and assistance in its
power to facilitate the execution of any plans
he saw lit to adopt.
The General suggests that, as the rebel ar
my lives upon the country through which it
passes, the federal army do the same, as it
•facilitates rapidity of movement Our com
manders in the rebel States hardly ever find
supplies, and in theborder States it is difficult
to distinguish between real friends and ene
mies.
In regard to antlers, he says the entire abo
lition of the system would rid the army of
the incumbrance of sutlers* wagons on the
march and the nuisance of sutlers* stalls and
booths in camp,' “and it would improve the
discipline and efficiency of our troops in many
ways, and particularly by removing from the
camps the prolific evils of drunkenness. It
is not difficult for sutlers to act the part of
spies, informers, smugglers and contraband
traders.
The General thinks the court-martial a too
cumbrous proceeding for the battle-field, and
suggests some more speedy punishment.
He suggests the Inspector GcneraTs De
partment be merged into the Adjutant Gen
eral’s Department. He recommends several
reformations in relation to the. organization
of regiments, brigades and corps.
He claims that the cartel for the exchange
of prisoners has been violated in relation to
colored soldiers.
FROM SPRINGFIELD.
[Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.]
Sx’Bzxcnrtn, Dec. 12, 38C3.
Mr. Freeman, Supreme Court reporter, re
ceived to-day the following, which is an offi
cial report of the decision of Judges Walker
and Brcese In the case of the prorogation of
the Legislature:
~N o. - 1 5r' Tlj ? :r e °P le <?■ »W u». Keyes fr.
the Auditor of Stale. No. 19.—The people
errdvs. Harless vs, the Secretary of State. A
peremptory mandamus in the above cases is
refused, Judges Walker and Brtese holding
that the proclamation of Gov, Tates, acqn£
csccd in by the General Assembly, terminated
the session on the 10th day of June.
Gov. Tates is sustained In thu decision,
and the question is settled ihat there will be
no session of the Copperhead-Legislature
this winter, **
A. J. Ease, of Bochcstcr/ was to-day
brought before U. S. Commissioner
Adams, charged with aiding Isaac Allen and
others to desert from the army, and .was
bound over in the sum of SI,OOO for his ap
pearancc at the next term of the U. S. Dis
trict Court.
Tuenty-eight soldiers, a part of the nnm
fer the balance having been in the
fium Camp Button*' *, Bt L °“ l8
During two days, Thursday and Friday, 118
recruits presented themselves at the head
quarters of Lieut Hubbs, in this city, and
■were mastered into the service.
The son of John Vopcl, of Lincoln, HL,
was run over by the down train on the Chi
cago and St Louis railroad yesterday, and
instantly killed.
Eighty loads of wood were battled into the
city to-day for the soldiers 1 families, and
large contributions of provisions were re
ceived from the business men.
The stock of the First National Bank in
this city has all been subscribed. Frank W.
Tracy, of Beardstown, has been appointed
teller by the directors.
Richard O’Connor has been appointed Sur
geon of the 118 th regiment, vice Gardner, re
signed.
FROM ST. LOUIS.
[Special Dispatch to the Chicago Tribune.
St. Louis, Dec. 12,1903.
The latest returns of the State election cut
down the Conservative majority to 981. The
election will bo contested on the ground that
the soldicru’ votes were improperly thrown
out. One of Gamble’s pet Colonels, Judge
McFenun, who arrested Radicals quite freely,
is defeated for Circuit Judge by ISO majority.
A letter to the State Adjutant General re
ports Marmadnkc, Quantrel, Shelby and
other Missouri gamblers at Washington, Ark.,
and says Shelby is preparing another raid
into Missouri via the Indian Territory.
The Common Connell has resolved to cel
ebrate the centennial anniversary of the
founding of St Louis by a public demonstra
tion.
There arc movements of troops down the
river from this point
The 9th lowa cavalry, which arrived yea*
terdsy, remains at Camp Gamble for the
present
An effort is being made to have the sen*
ten cc revoked in several eases of exiles here
tofore banished South.
The proposed sale of the Pacific Railroad
still hangs fire in the Legislature, and the
controversy has become bitter and personal.
The majority against the sale is supposed to
be small, but no agreement seems possible
on any plan to complete the road to Kansas
City. A proposition has been made to raise
the money in St Louis, if the Legislature
Trill release the State lien on the last sixty
miles.
The Pirate Chesapeake,
Pobtuakd, Dec. 12.—The steamer Chesa
pcake left Shelburne at 12 o’clock last night,
after shipping men and coaling.
Weather Bound.
Bad weather having interrupted the work
ing of the Eastern wires, we are unable to
get any more reports to-night.
The Statue or Freedom.
[Correspondence of the N. T. Tribune.!
Wabhixotox, Dec. 2, 1563.
The colossal statue of “Freedom,” in
bronze, by Clark Hills, modelled by Craw
fox d, is to-day set upon the great tholus sur
mounting the dome*of the capitol.
During more than two years of our strug
gle, while the national* cause seemed weak,
she has patiently waited and watched below;
now that victory crowns our advances,
and the conspirators are being hedged in and
vanquished cveiy where, and the bond ate be
ing treed, she comes forward the cynosure of
thousands 'of eyes, her face turned rebuk
ingly toward Virginia, and the hand out
stretched as if in guaranty of National Unity
and Personal Freedom.
Perhaps the -whole history of that admira
ble wort of art is not generally known. As
I see, from my window,the crowd gathered at
the Capitol, andms the grand salute in chorus
from all pie forts around the city reaches my
cars, it occurs to me to repeat a'cfOuplc of in
cidcnts for the Tribune.
When the bronze castings were being com
pleted, at the foundry of Mr. Mills, near
filadensbtug, his foreman, who had super
intended the work from the beginning, and
who was receiving $8 per day, struck and
demanded $lO, assuring Mr. iL that the ad
van ceinuet be granted to him, as nobody In
America, except himself could complete the
work. Mr. 31. felt that the demand was cx
horbitant, and appealed in his dilemma to
the slaves who were assisting in the moldin'*;
“I can do that well,” said one of them, a*n
intelligent and ingenious servant, who had
been intimately engaged in the various pro
cesses. The striker was anffthc
negro, assisted occasionally by the finer skill
of his master, took the striker’s place as su
perintendent, and the work went on. The
black master-builder lifted tbeponderous un
couth masses, and bolted them together,
joint to joint, piece bypicce, till they blend
ed into the majestic l4 Freedom,’* who ta-day
lifts her head in the blue clouds above Wash
ington. invoking a benediction on the im
periled Republic I
Was there a prophecy in that moment when
the slave became the artist, and with rare
poetic justice, reconstructed the beautiful
symbol of freedom for America ?
Another fact: The original model of Craw
ford -was crowned with the old “Liberty
Cap”—loved by our grandfathers for Us aig
niflcance, but fallen into disrepute and dis
use under the pro-slavery debauchery of the
last twenty years. When Mr. Jefferson Da
vis, then Secretary of War under Fierce, saw
tbe model, he said at once, “ This will never
do. We Americans have patronized this ab
surd 4 Liberty Cap * too long already. It was
the detestable head-gear adopted by the freed
slaves of Rome. Let ns put it out of our
sigl*!” And with characteristic bad taate,
and a fondness for American institutions for
whichhe has not recently been conspicuous,
he ordered that tbe classic helmet be doffed and
thntthegoddcssbc crowned, after tbe manner
of our North American TndtAns, with a fantas
tic headdress of feathers I So the Liberty Cap
of Crawford was knocked oli;and the barbar
ous device of Jeff Davis mounted in Its place,
consisting of a limpsy eagle skin, with a
row of stiff quills, rampant, running down
the back, from beak to tall. It Is related
that when the amended "head was finished,
and on exhibition in the Rotunda,an Irishman
inspecting it, said to his comrade, “Murther,
Mite, what quarc bird Is this, wid his tall on
the top of his head V* As it stands to-day,
though Mr. 31111 a gave all his talent for its
construction, and interpreted carefhlly and
faithfully the orders which ho received, tho
head-dress is an utter nondescript; and oar
capital is to wear a sign of- barbarism for its
very crown, because Jefi: Davis, worshiping
Slavery, despised the significant and grand
old “Cap of Liberty.”
A spirited debate has been carried on in the
papers with reference to the ponderous
shield on .Tridch the Goddess leans—a half
border, with which the artists have taken
the liberty to encompass it, giving it some
what the appearance of bearing fifteen
stripes, instead of the old thirteen. The
critics charge that this was deliberately de
signed to represent the fifteen Slave States,
Instead of the thirteen original members
This is too bold an outrage for probability;
besides, the slight altcrauon of the shield
does not justify the criticism. All frivolous
changes in heraldry, •and all fanciful orna
mentation, arc. obnoxious to every artistic
mind, not less on the ground of ambiguity
than of irregularity; I do not see that this is
open to any other objection. There are
really but thirteen separate stripes. Besides,
all will believe that Crawford, though a Vir
ginian, had too much patriotism to conceive,
and Mills, though educated in South Caroli
na, too much honor to execute such a wanton
and wicked mutilation of onrNational Shield.
The Postmaster-General’s Report.
The Postmaster-General reports that dur
ing the last fiscal year the financial condition
ofhis Department has been one of unusual
prosperity. The revenue has nearly equaled
the expenditures, the latter amounting to
and theformer to $11,163,789 -
59. There is good reason to believe that the
department will be self-sustaining in a brief
period of time.
The whole number of Post Offices existing
on the 80th of June, 1863, was 29,
Eight hundred and thirty offices have been
established, and CSB have been discontin
ued.
The number of special agents on June,
1863, was 10, vflth an aggregate salary of $26,-
500: and SB7 route agents at au aggregate
outlay of $289,800; also 45 local agents at
$27,024. Baggage masters in charge of ex
press malls bad received $7,440.
The total cost of Trans-Atlantic mail steam
ship service was $342,18180. This price
covered IS3 round trips to various European
ports.
The Postmaster-General regrets to state
that no progress has been made in negotia
tions for a new postal convention with Prus
sia, embracing the States comprising the
German-Austrian Postal Union, on account
of some obstacle presented by Austria in re
gard to territorial transit charges.
« 1118 recommendation of March
Sd, 1802, to the postal committees in Con
gress, that all private ships departing from
the United States for foreign ports should be
required, as a condition or clearance, to con
vey malls on such terms as may be allowed
by Congress.
■During the year the increased length of
routes has been 6,585 miles, but the annual
cost of man transportation has decreased
$118,258, or abont 2 per cent.
The value of stamps issued to Postmasters
during the vear is $9,683,882; stamped letter
envelopes, $634,621, and stamped newspaper
wrappers, $20,545. The total value of these
cold to the public was $9,624,529 62,
an excess over the previous year of $2,714.°
897 78.
The Postmaster-General renews his last
year’s recommendation to Congress to au
thorize him to adjust and allow the claim of
postmasters; who have sustained losses of
stamps and stamped envelopes by reason of
the occupation and robbery of their offices
by bodies of armed men.
These claims thus far presented amount to
about SO,OOO. He calls attention, also, to the
ftet that these postmasters have suffered
greatly in the loss of private property.
He requests additional legislation in res*
peel to post office thefts, and recommends
that the stealing of letters and stamps be
made a penal offense.
THE DEAD LETTER OFFICE.
There has been a continued increase of let
ters containing money and other valuables.
The number of dead letters covering deeds,
bills of exchange, drafts, and other valuable
papers, received, registered, and returned for
delivery to the writers, was 8,322, withan ag
gregate nominal value of $1,534,277.81; of
these 7,559 were delivered to the owners.
Letters registered and mailed, containing
money, numbered 18,2X9; of these, 15,048,
containing $63,627.72, were finally delivered.
Sixteen thousand seven hnndred and sixty
three letters of less value were received, near
ly ten thousand of which contained daguer
reotypes, and 8,273 were restored to their
writers or owners.
The Postmaster General recommends that
a postal money order system be established,
to facilitate the transmission of small sums
through the malls, which he is confident
wonla prove not only a great convenience to
soldiers and citizens, bat also almost entirely
obviate the loss of this class of remittances.
In regard to letters addressed to points in
the rebellions States, the Postmaster General
says: By reason of the coo tinned suspension
of regular postal communication with sec
tions ofthe country under Insurectionary con
trol, a considerable number of letters,amount
ing in the aggregate to 31,314, found their way
by various channels, to the Dead Letter Office.
Of this number 3,818 were foreign, and were
returned to the countries where they origi
nated. Those originating in the loyal States
were turned over to the military authorities,
and, after examination, most of them scot
by flag of truce to their destination.
The Postmaster General has instructed
postmasters to forward to the Dead Letter
Office, except in special cases, all letters re
maining unclaimed one month after being
advertised, instead of two months, as for
merly.
In conclusion, he asks the consideration of
Congress of the revised code of laws sub
mitted by him at the last session, which is
mainly a digest of existing postal laws.
CAPTURE OF THE CHESAPEAKE.
The Vessel Taken by Rebel
Passengers.
THE OrriCEBS ATTACKED AT MIDMCUT.
[From the New York Times, Dec. 10.]
The following telegraphic dispatch was re
ceived by Mr. Cromwell this morning;
Pobtiakd, Wednesday, Dec. 9.
H. B. Cromwell & Co.:
Steamer Chesapeake was captured twenty
miles N.N.E.~oif Cape Cod at 1.30 a. m. on
Monday morning by rebels who left New
York as passengers. Second Engineer killed
and thrown overboard. Chief Engineer and
Male wounded. .
Capt Willetts and crew were landed at St
Johns this morning.
.Th° Chesapeake carried a crew consisting
of Captain, two mates, two engineers, two
coal passers, four men before tbe.mast, cook
nndsteward. Tbe capture was made daring
the hour of midnight, and but. one watch
was on deck and but two men In the engine
room.
The captain had retired, and thus, while
they were quietly sleeping, was this outrage'
committed. The second engineer, Hr. Grin
Shaffer, undoubtedly haa charge of the
engine, and in all probability met his falc
through his bravery. He has been a
time in the employ of this line, an dims always
won the respect and esteem of his employers.
He was a young man, and leaves a wife and
children. The chief engineer, James Johnson,
and chief mate, Chas. Johnson, both of this
city, were wounded.
Seven passengers obtained their tickets at
the office, and among them was one who
stated to the clerk that be was an old sea
captain, and preferred this mode of reaching
Portland oh account of its being the pleas
antest and cheapest. Before she started some
fifteen persons were counted on her deck,
and as it is usual in this line for persons to
sail without having purchased their tickets,
nothing was thought of this circumstance.
She left full of freight, consisting of cotton,
rags, provisions and general merchandise.
She only carried about thirty tons of coal,
which is enough to last her for the round
trip, and had not more than three days 1 coal
at the time of her capture, so that the rebels
cannot get very fir with her. Sho carried
two guns, C-pounders, one brass the other
Iron, several revolvers, and some other fire
arms.
It !s not known whether there was any
powder on board, but it is supposed there
was not much. Her sails was small and can
not be depended upon. There was no war
risk, and the value of the vessel Is over $60,-
000. It is not known whether the cargo was
insured. The Captain is expected to arrive
here to-day, and then the full particulars will
be. obtained. ’
Tbe steam propeller Chesapeake was own
ed by B. B. Cromwell, of this city, and was
a splendid vessel in every respect. She was
built In 1353 by J. A. ‘W’estervelt—was 400
tons burden, and 11 feet draft of water, built
of oak, schooner rigged, and had a direct
acting engine of2oo-horse power; one cylin
der of 40 inches and 42-lnch piston. Her or
dinary speed was from 10 to 11 knots, but
she could be driven at the rate of 1-4 miles
Eer hour. She has always been a propeller
oat on this route, and was the vessel which
chased Captain Rcddj of the Tacony, at tho
time of his famous foray in Portland harbor,
June 27, and succeeded in capturing his ves
sel, the schooner Archer.
JTtmiUER PABTICULAB3.
[From the N. T. World, Dec. 10.]
Reported,
Our. reporter called at the office of the
Cromwell Lino on Wednesday, and asked
permission to copy the list of the Chesa
peake’s passengers. Marshal Murray was
present, exercising his usual energy and dis
cretion in silling the facts that have been re
vealed In relation to the rebel pirates. He
thinks the plan to seize and confiscate the
Chesapeake originated in Canada, and that
the pirates were armed and equipped In that
province. A glance at the passenger list
might throw some light upon the question,
bnt the privilege has not been accorded to
the press nor the United States authorities.
Wc are not aware that direct application was
made by the latter to make desired investi
gation.
The crew of the Chesapeake consisted of
about twenty men. There were but few pas
sengers beside the rebel pirates. The supply
of provisions on board was not large.
As the vessel was taken possession of at
o’clock on Monday morning, ft is proba- ;
ble the captain was asleep, as the most dan
gerous part of the voyage was passed—that
between Long Island and Martha’s Vineyard
Sounds.
The second engineer, killed, was Orin
Schaffer of this city. He leaves a wife and
children. The chief engineer, James John
son, and chief mate, Charles Johnson, both
of this city, were wounded.
The following is a list of the officers of the
Chesapeake:
Captain, J.Willets; First Officer, Chas. John
son ; Second Officer, Daniel Hendon; Third Offi
cer, John Anderson :• Chief Engineer, Jas. John
son; Second Engineer, Orin Shaffer (killed);
Third Engineer, A. Scrubby; Steward, Patrick
Kelley; Stewardess, Jennießorgoin.
The Chesapeake had a cargo of sugar, rags,
cotton, and a large number of small pack
ages.
There are several hundreds of discharged
blockade runners at large in this city, Phila
delphia and Boston. Many of them are coal
heavers and common sailors. Among them,
however, are men of education and dare
devil enterprise, who are on excellent terms
with the Copperheads, and fully prepared to
seize a steamer or set fire to a navy yard. A
huge number of these men have violated the
blockade with impunity, and when captured
they have boldly claimed their discharge
upon taking the oath that they were foreign
ers. Many of them, as soon as they were
discharged, would return to the haunts of
secession and reship in other blockade ves
sels ; indeed, some of them have been caught
half a dozen times, always claiming’ to be
neutral, when they really were aggressive
aliens.
The Captain of the Ella and Anna has been
paroled by the Marshal in Boston, and is now
the much-admired pet of a clique of snobs
and secessionists of that city. He puts up at
a first-class hotel is honored with calls, and
wined and dined to the great disgust of the
patriotic people of Boston.
The streets of New York are thronged with
menirtioonghttpbe iuFortLalayette. Some
of them have been caught over and over again
running the blockade/out they have thus far
escaped just punishment, under the plea that
they were the subjects of a foreign power.
They have their private consultations, their
grips and pass-words, and they watch for op
portunities to render aid and comfort to the
rebels. They need watching. Our detect
ives should be upon their track. They may*
seize other vessels and murder unoffending
citizens to accomplish their purposes. Only
yesterday, James O’Neil, aprisonersentNorth
from the blockading squadron, was sent to
Fort Lafayette for attempting to blow up a
Union gunboat and all on board by throwing
a keg of powder into the furnace of the ves
sel Such is the character of the desperate
men who are let loose in our city, and wo
have little doubt that the men who seized
the Chesapeake were formerly blockade run
ners.
. A considerable stock of sheep, horses
and cows are being imported Into the United
States, from Canada, for the use of the mili
ary market.
fsg- The Internal revenue tax paid by citi
zens of Massachusetts, daring the year end-,
ing September i; 1863, amounts to $8,490,407.
CHICAGO, MONDAY, DECEMBER 14,1863.
THE VERY LATEST,
From Washington-
Doubtful Rumor
of Proposals,
of Peace.
LATEST FROM ODR RICHMOND
PRISONERS.
No More Provisions to be
Received for Them.
FROM WASHINGTON.
Washington, Dec. 13.— The Chronicle to
day publishes a rumor which it is not able to
verify, hut believes it to bo true and not Im
probable, to the effect that Alex. H. Stephens
and five others had come down to Fortress
Monroe on a flag of truce with proposals of
peace. That they asked to bo received in
their official capacity as Commissioners of the
Southern Confederacy, but their request was
refused.
Inquiry was made this morning in a quar
ter where such a fact If it existed would
probably be known, but nothing obtained
confirmatory ofthe rnmny.
If our Commissioner or any person acting
by authority of the rebel government made
a visit to Fort Monroe, it was on the ex
change of prisoners, which for certain rea
sons is more probable than the rumor re
ferred to.
Wasuikotos, Dec. 13.—The followlnir is a
spechl to the ihrf.- The National League,
now m session here, has taken strong radical
ground in Jlleconrl matters. A committee
waited on the President yesterday and re
quested him to remove all obnoxious men
•irom office in that State.
. Hew Tore, Dec. IS.—The 2Zlro?dVWash
ington’s dispatch mentions the rumor that a
rebel Commissioner was en route to Washing
ton to propose terms of peace. °
Efforts are making to add the regiments of
the volontccr army to the regular army.
All Indiana soldiers in hospitals around
Washington are to be’ removed to Indianap
olis. *
The Herald V Fortress Monroe letter of the
Uth states that Gen. Butler had addressed a
note to the rebel Commissioner, accompany
ing a package of vaccine matter for the relief
ot union prisoners afflicted with small pox
on Belle Isle, and that he received a courte
ous response from Mr. Quid.
[From Oar Regular Correspondent.]
Washington, Dec. 10,1863.
THEFACTION3 OF TUB DEMOORAOT.
Ab the session progresses, the differences
between the democratic factions become
more marked. S. S. Cox claims to lead the
war, and Fernando Wood the peace democra
cy. It will appear strange that Cox should
put forth such a claim, but the fact is, the
late electlqns.in Ohio brought him to a real
ising sense of the position of a man in these
days who; exhibits anything like apposi
tion to give aid and comfort to the enemies
of the country. Cox now claims that he and
two-thirds of, the democracy of Ohio voted
for Vallandigbatn through sympathy only,
not became they agreed with him In princi
ple.* Coxprofesses to be willing to vote the
supplies, and that all he desires la to hold the
Union men to a strict accountability for the
conduct of the war, the measures to.brirg
hack the seceded States, «fec. The Wood fa<£
tion profess to be the only Simon Pure Dem
ocrats; say that the other faction has de
serted the principles of the party, *fcc.
They oppose the war, per se, and continue to
hope for the day to come when It will be
fully proved to the nation that it is a failure,
and tout the attempt to coerce a State or
States by force of arms, Is not only unconsti
tutional, hut will prove abortive.
THE ILLINOIS AND MICHIOAN CANAL ENLARGE-
The Illinois and Michtoan Canal Enlarge
ment, I I cam irom Its friends, bos a larger
number of and more Influential supporters in
this Congress than the former. Several of
the men elected from the Eastern States fa
vor it, and it is expected it will receive a
more calm and dignified attention than dar
ing the last session. A lew narrow minded
men still continue to inveigh against it. And
for narrow mindedness I think on any ques
tion, your Pennsylvania politician is not to
be excelled. It appears «s if they never could
get out of the old grooves in which they
have been running for years.
THE NEXT COPPEEPEAT) MOVE.
The next move of the Copperheads is to be
a general assault upon the New England
States and capitalists. They place theif last
hopes of distracting and paralyzing the coun
try upon this. They will set forth the fact
that the capitalists arc the persons particular
ly benefited by the war; that they hold all
the bonds of the Government, especially the
capitalists of New England and New York
city; that they arc saddling, for their exclu
sive benefit, an Immense debt upon the labor
ing mosses and small proprietors. They claim
that in a year from now this debt, including
unadjusted claims, will amount to over three
thousand millions of dollars. Their every
effort will accordingly be made to create a
contest between the capital and the labor of
the country. This they expect will operate
in two ways. It will frighten capital on the
one hand by the terrors of repudiation by
the masses, and thus engage them
on their side in their effort to atop the war;
whilcibwill arraythc labor and small capi
talists of the country also in their ranks.
They say that the war can now only be stop
ped by a collapse of the finances of the coun
try ; and that this can only be brought about
by bringing the capitalists • who hold our
funds to the conviction that what they have
invested w*ill be perilled If theydouot stop
the Investment of any more funds for its
prosecution. - This, I am assured, is
the hope of the copperheads just
now. They have given up all
idea of stopping the war except by finan
cial disturbances and purtnrbations, and to
bring these about they will strain every nerve.
In this they are only playing the same role
over again—opposition to the Administration,
to the war, and especially to the abolition of
slavery.
TUB LOUISIANA MEMBEB9.
These bogus representatives will doubtless
be stricken from the roll It was a barefaced
fraud, the return of these men, and all such
attempts to reorganize seceded States should
be promptly suppressed, as they arc fraught
with danger to the future peace and wellore
of the country.
SHALL POX.
This disease still prevails to an alarming
extent A representative of a leading Now
York hired a house here, from
which the former occnpaut had been removed
to the hospital with small pox, some months
since. Strange to say, the new occupant and
lady were seized with the disease, happily In
a mild form, and are now suffering therefrom.
GOOD APPOINTMENT.
Capt. J. *V7. Rutherford, well known as
having been Chief Clerk in the State Quarter
master's Department, at Springfield, HJL,
has received the appointment of Chief Quar
termaster at Alexandria, in place of Capt.
Fergnsson, arrested and imprisoned for
frauds on the Government. This is an excel
lent appointment, and peculiarly fitting, as
Capt. Rutherford has been engaged for some
weeks in ferreting out' these outrageous
frauds at Alexandria.
SENATOR SUMNEB FULLY ENDORSES THE'
I have Just had on interesting conversation
with Senator Simmer on the subject of the
President’s message. He permits me to say
that he la fully and perfectly satisfied with it,
in fact, endorses it to the fullest extent.
There may be difference about the details of
the admission of the States; but he says
these will drop out of sight and nothing re
main but the great principle of the ir
revocability of .. the proclamation. Thus
we will have from the South, if
not indemnify for the past, at least securi
ty for the future. Senator Sumner is pre
pared fully to co-operate with the President
in bis proposed plan, and I am thus happy to
be the first to make this announcement from
his own lips. It is a great point gained in
the coming Presidential contest.
ELECTION OF CHAPLAIN TO tub HOUSE.
The House to-day elected a Chaplain, and
then adjourned till Monday. Tho choice fell
upon Rev. W. H. Channlng, of the Unitarian
Chnrch In this city. It is an excellent choice.
Mr. Charming has tho reputation of being
ope of the most talented clergymen in the
country, and no more devoted nnti-slaverv
man can be fonnd. Zeto. ‘
FROM CAIRO AND BELOW.
Caibo, Dec. IS.—Late accounts fro in' be
low represent Warmadnko endeavoring to
unite bis forces with Price, who was said to
be crossing. Red River in Texas. Price’s
3 O’CLOCK, A. 51.
MENT.
A share of public patronage respectfully solicited.
deH-BSIMy ALDRIDGE & MERRIMAN.
jjj'EW MUSI C s Vb~R E .
Between Clark and Pearborn streets. E. A-BEN*
son, publisher and dealer In Sheet Music end all
kinds of
MUSICAL lysTninrFvrti,
-Sole agent for Haines & Bro’s celebrated Plano
Fortes, Cubans & Needham’sHeloueona : alio Brass
Band Instrnmcnls of alt kinds. JlasJc arranged for
Brass Bands in fine style. Pianos toned and ah kinds
of^ s ll?y£sL lcßtraniema repaired a: short notice.
ddS-sSg-gw E. A. BEN SON.
P|LOTHES WRINGER NOTICE.
V-/ W.M HORTON will remain at the old stand.
Lake street, and famish the splendid Colly
I *?£• wWch ar . e k i» own t0 be BEST In nsc by
all that have examined or used them. Wholesale and
ratal!, and no charge for territory In five Statea-Ken
yissonrl.lowa. Minnesota and Illinois.
P. 0. Box 2109. [det>sS7Mt] W. M. HOItTON.
MESSAGE.
Hb. smith & CO.,
• GENEKAL
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
16 Dearborn Street.
[delt.aS'EMUa]
n.a. SMITH.
Dissolution. —The co-partner
phfn heretofore existing under the Arm name of
hukTON & UIDELL, Is this dav dissolved by mutual
consent. Either party will adjust any claims against
aaw unji. w. m. Hor.ro.vT
’ A. P.IDELL. •
*I?TE AND EAK. Dr. TTnder
most obstinate diseases of those delicate oreana. con.
tlnncs bis practice at 2yo.pi Randolph street. Dr
mi.. tlexoted twenty-eight years of Ms professions
*£i totb , e treatment of diseases of the Eye and Ear
dn . rtn £ D . ,D . e .? f w,lJcu Jj e ha 3 practised In Chicago.
.Artificial Eyes and Ear-Drums Inserted ®
dcs-s9l-slnet
TJEADQUARTERSFOR GENTS
JLX AND BOTS LINEN COLLARS,
78 Randolph Street, UMtairs,
OvcrMcGnith* Paper Store. The beat made at *1.50
per dozen ; half dozen at the samemto
Call and examine. It pays. deS-eMUnet '
Henry female seminary.
The second term of this Institution v« s »*
Cooley, Principal, MnuceccM 0n ’ Mri * B * A «
nocoiy, JtDutry 4.
Board, *1.15 per week, room seat InclndM Tni
tlon,from *4tofcfi ; Music <lO PMauarter Ttti *
Henry, Marshall county, lU, H dell-bw-Stnet
force is reduced and would number less than
5,000.
A large Federal force is pursuing him
The rebels are much disheartened. •
The steamer Platte Valley passed with 801
bales of cotton for St. Louis.
Two deputy Provost Marshals of the dis
trict arrested two deserters of tho 109 th Illi
nois near Douglas yesterday, when the de
serters attacked their captors, killing one
outright and beat the other till Insensible.
The deserters escaped.
OUR RICHMOND PRISONERS.
Bai/tuiore, Dec. 13th.—The following dia
patch was received this a. m.
Fort Moneoe, Dec. 13.— T0. C. C. Fulton,
Baltimore.—Please give notice that the rebel
authorities decline receiving any more pack
ages or provisions for the Union prisoners
so that parties Interested may refrain from
forwarding any more goods to this point
(Signed) B. P. Butler,
slaj. Gen. Com'd’g.
Quartermaster Torrence, who went to
City Point with Dr. C. C. Barkley, returned
this a. m. Ho had an interview with Capt.
Hatch, who was sent from Richmond to meet
him. He informed him of the above decision
of the rebel government, and gave as a rea
son there what they alleged to be an imputa
tion on their honor by the press and Gov
ernment authorities that they were not de
livering the goods forwarded In good faith to
the prisoners, and asserted that of his own
knowledge the officers In Libby Prison, from
the immense supplies they received, coaid
have set a table from the stores on hand
equal to any hotel in the United States.
For the present nothing will he received
but letters and enclosures 'of money, and
Southern money had better be sent.
He admitted there had been, some Irregu
larities in the supplies at one time, but the
officers who bad been guilty of neglecting
prisons had been promptly relieved and pun
ished.
As to the bad condition of the prisoners re
turned to Annapolis, he said they were ex
treme cases of consumption, and that it was
a grave error on the part of the authorities to
have allowed such prisoners to return.
NAVAL MATTERS.
New Tobk, Dee. 18.—It Is rumored at the
Brooklyn navy yard that Instructions have
been received from the Secretary of the Navy
at naval stations to dispatch a large force of
naval vessels, now in various stages of
preparation for sea at the navy yards, and ru
mor says ten or twelve of these have been
ordered and the destination named.
The Captured Steamer Chesa*
pcahe.
Portland, Dec. 13.—A dispatch from Hali
fax, this forenoon, states that the steamer
Chesapeake left Shelburne on Saturday
morning with an increased crew and three
chaldrons of coal. She is supposed to be
on the track of some coal vessel.
From IVctt York.
New York, Dec. IS.—A very heavy gale
from the eastward, with rain, prevailed on
Saturday night and to-day. No disasters yet
reported.
From Lonisvillc.
Louisville, Dec. 13.—Intermittent rains
for the past two days, somewhat heavy, and
this evening the thermometer stood at o'i de
grees. Barometer 29 degrees and falling.
Markets by Telegraph.
New Tork Stock and Money Market.
„ , NKW Tom, Dec. 13.1863.
Stocks dun and rower.
Cld.&llo 4IVIO.*C. lOT
wt m ce U .^v ? :::::::::in«
C.&Tol Jll2j< Erie
c. * p. iciji i k, y. o .V.mjf
OOVKUSMXVT STOCKS.
Finn.
V; B. 6a, ■» eoBp w ..lff»X 17-50’« ice ii
Money in fair demand at 7 =p cent, on tall.
Now York 91orket<
Yobk, Dec. IT—Corrox—lffcOc better. Do-
Sf4 d beldbiStcr CtiTe ’ 80 ® 31c tor mlddlln S apl^id^
FLOtm—Active.
G*axx-N° material chanee In the price of Grain.
Wheat—Heavy and a shade lower, fl.fifcl.ts for Chi.
CftßoSpnDc; 5l 45(fcl.<tforMllwaakee Clab. Com
ic lower, with a mortcrato demand. Opened steady
and closed a shade firmer. J
PrrcoLEm—Dull.
PORK-Qulet aud a /bade easier, at $17«17J50 for old
Mesa;slßrorncw: [email protected] new prime; Sl-Jjaa
17 for new prime Mess. * v
j Bzzr-Qulet and steady. Prime Mesa Beef In fair
demand.
f D»^ n no°s-Qulet and unchanged. [email protected]»fc
Laed—Without material change and a moderate
demand.
Boflalo Markets—Dec. 13.
Flour—Quiet and unchanged.
OBxra—wheat—Quiet and Ann. • Corn-Better and
a firm demand, at $1.27. Other Grains quiet, and no
WmsKT—Better, at 85c.
Imfobtb—lo,ooo brls Flour: 8,000 bn Wheat.
Oswego Market—Dee. 13.
Flour—Firm with good demand for Interior and
eastern trade.
Guaix—Wheat Arm and quiet. Corn held 81 30.
Other grates nominal.
Weather milder and thawing.
Sr. Louis Markets—Dec. IS.
Cotton.—Receipts 50 bales. No sales.
Flour.—Dull and drooping. Decline for the week
sc to Mr.
Grain.—'Wheat doll-decUned [email protected], Corn firm—
idvanccdlc. Oats firmer.
Ijonlsvillo Tobacco Market—Dee. 13.
Tobacco advanced [email protected] 9 lot) a*, since Friday
morning.
Neln SRtoenisemeute.
VISITING AND WEDDING
T CARDS. Oillce removed from Sherman House
To SC Dearborn street.
Oar lat a New York stylo Wedding Cards, double
Card Satin Tic, are deservedly popular. Orders from
n>e country sent bv first express. Address A. KID
PER. P. O. Box 731, Cheapo. Hi. delt-9519-U
WHAT TOWN WANTS A
FLOURING MILL?—A miller Intending to
erect a Custom Flooring Mill desires proposals irom
towns where ouo Is needed. The advertiser is a prao
cal miller and would cither crcet a water or steam
mill. Address “MILLER,” Post OUlce Drawer 29u,
Chicago, Dl. Has the machinery on hand for a steam
“MK delt-*36J-3t
Teeth -positively ex-
TRACTED
WITHOUT PAIN,
Bythenseof the new Anaesthetlc-tts “Mahrlteof
Oxygen,” or Improved Nitrous Oxld, at the Dental
dooms of Drs. BUSH & NOBLE. ISO Clark street
dell-sSSI-lt
wM. LITTLE & CO.,
COITEtnSSION ittEBCHANTS,
Sell or purchase Floor, Grain, Seeds, Pork, Butter,
Lard, Hides, Broom Corn, Ac.
■Warehouse, 231 South Water-Si., Chicago.
„ We refer to the well known houses of Messrs. Davis.
Sawyer & Co., Wholesale Dry Goods t 11. W. Hinsdale
& Co.,bplesalo Grocers; Smith Bros., Wholesale
Grocers: Pollard A Doane, Wholesale Grocers; M. D.
Human A Co., Wholesale Grocers; Gould A Brother.
Wholesale Grocers; C.B. Blair, Esq., Banker; orany
of the old and well established Bankers or Wholesale
Merchants. dell-aS3J-3t-awA?-net
Having opened a large
SUITE OF
PHOTOGRAPHIC AM) OIL PAKTOG ROOMS
At 147 & 149 Soutls Clark-St,,
Tye would Invite all those Interested In or desiring
either pictures or instruction, to call and examine
our specimens.
SATISFACTIOH GUARANTEED.
105 Randolph-st.,
~ vr
Ncto ahbertfeements.
HOLIDAY GOODS.
CAU and examine
• One of the flneet selected stocks of
SILVER WARE
EVER OFFERED IN THIS MARKET.
1 Gold Watches (Swiss and American,)
Ladies' Chatalain and Leontine
Of the most exqnlalco workmanship.
Peart Opera Glasses, Marble Clocks, Plated Tea Seta.
lee, PRchers, Castors, Batter Dishes,
AlbataCake Baskets ami Caps, very heavily plated
and richly ornamented. A choice selection of
J E "W" ELRY
Of the latest and most approved styles. Silver and
Pearl Card Cases, and a variety of articles for
CHRISTMAS PRESENTS.
NOWLIN & McELWALV,
57X Clark Street, Opposite Sherman House.
jyow READY—
“ C E PH ERIN E.”
A Talc of Underground Life in Washington, By Dr.
J.H.Bobixsok. Illustrated by Dablxt.
PRICE TWENTY-FIVE CENTS.
This story from the pen of Dr. BoMnson cannot fail
Th5 r «w c .15 {L re ?i »«“*a‘Jon throughout the country.
J. rfi™ hscidcntaare as startling and absorbing
as those of Sac’s “Mysteries of Paris,** while tho
gumpsea which the work affords of the animus of the
Rebellion, and of the plots, counterplots and In
trienes ofthe secret agents ofthe Secessionists, are
calculated to arouse the deepest Interest among all
lovers of Hie Union. s
Mailed tree of charge on receipt of price.
FREDERIC A, BRADY; Publisher,
For sale In Chicago by Bamford A BaVdwln, 13 Lake
street, ana J. B. Walsh, Madison street, and by all
Booksellers. decl>s337-lt
pKOF. YON VERAES’
My Discovered Female Remedy
Will prove a blessing to all Females. It has proved
Itself to be the
Only Reliable Remedy
Ever yet discovered for the removal of nil obstruc
tions, from whatever cause. IT NEVEU FAILS.
Observe the directions -when It should not be taken.
Warranted In Every Instance.
f " nr P ost3 Ro stamps enclosed to E.
1.. bllAtv, Post OlDce Drawer Osi, Chicago, will
ensure a bottle hy return mall. ®
The Trade supplied at 80 per cent.-discount,
tor further particulars send for circular. Direct as
above. e jj SHAW
“* for Trnl,cli SMci aii CaMli “ s -
QLOAKS AND SHAWLS,
FOR THE HOLIDAYS.
STRIKER & CO.’S,
I'll Lake Street,
Until the Ist of January, ISCI.
We shall offer our extensive stock of ihe above
Goods at
Greatly Reduced Prices,
Comprising aU the Latest Styles of
CIRCULARS AJiD SACQUES,
Made from the beat materials.
BROCHE AND WOOL SHAWLS
OP EVERY DESCRIPTION,
TVe call espccffll attention to these goods, as we have
ns extensive a stock as has crer been exhibited in tbs
ar y nave determined to sell them WITHOUT
ItEOAKD TOCQsrni: vatttr. " UUUUI
New Styles of Dress Goods.
Jnst received.
.A of French Merinos, Poplins. Scotch
Plftlds, Ottomans, Empress Cloths, Alpacas, Para
nialtac DeLelnea. ’
THE liAP.GEST STOCK OF
BALMORAL SKIRTS
«S«.v^ , ., Sonla J » s » Sca rfi3. All of these goods .JUST*
be*oM at only a SjLIQHT AD*
VANCE FROM FIUST COST.
Bonnet and Trimming Ribbons,
„A f rf„ h ,. s '. 0< * nowready. Jon.ln’a t Alcitmlert
Kid Gloves, Valenciennes and Point Lace Collars,
laice Sets, Cambric Sets. Crochet Collars, Cloths and
Casslmercs, (Ivercoallnss and Cloak Cloths, notv goods
iyyssrai l " 1 ,' s s > d ra ,’?. tcts ’ fciij
or BUjctfcilA. Ladles’ anti Gents’ Underclothing. in
great variety; Gloves and Hosiery, of every dcscrip-
Call and examine our Goods before purchasing.
STRYKER & CO.,
.41 LAKE STREET.
de7-rSU-sbi-wdeF.net
LARGE LOT
Knife and Scissors Sharpener.
The beet Sharpener ever used for House Knives.
Scissors and fchears—made of Solid Emory, and will
hist a life-time. All housekeepers should have them.
We furnish a lastcning with wluch It can be used on
any table. With this machine anypersoa can sharnen
a pair of scissors In a moment, ana with
PERFECT ACCURACY.
And for knife grinding there U nothing that will com
pare with lu we Invite everybody to call and see It
operate. SMITH & TANNER, Agents,
86 Washington street.
We aregeneral manufacturer's agents for the sale of
Rotary Needle Sharpeners. All buyers of Singer’s.
Howe’s and the Florence Sewing Machines, can buy
them at their oinccs. We also sell all sues. J
, , SMITH A TANNER, Agents,
deS-rSI.-lwls S6 Washington street.
JJESIDEXCES FOR SALE
WALKER & KERFOOT,
89 Waiiliingtoii Street.
Several choice residences on Ohio street, near Wol.
cott, containing ga?, water, bath room, and all the
modern improvements.
Fine residence on West Washington street. In com
plete order.
Also, one on Monroe street, near Aberdeen.
Residence lots on Indiana, Calumet and Michigan
avenues. °
Neat Cottage cornerLoomla and Van Boren to rent.
WALKKR& KERFOOT.
Real Estate Brokers.
89 Washington street.
4e13-sS£l-2tnefc
jyjASQUERADE COSTUMES
FOR LADIES AND GENTS,
At the Millinery Store of
Mrs. C-A-Tli. OEHM,
188 North. Clark street, Chicago, HL
A beautiful and large assortment of
niASQUEBADIS (OSXUMES
ON HAND.
They can be lent or made to order after numerous
samples. de!3-sSW-2t buawz
The best music book of
THESBASOi'.
“THE HARP~OF JUDAH.”
The best CboJre are using It: the beat Slneinz
Schools use!.; the best Singers are procuring it.* 111 *
nVE.\TY THOVSAiTD SOLD
AND THE DEMAND DAILY INCREASING.
S?.‘S' C |n!ao°rl!f! ,a " t7 - Varl OaM
T»^*& 8 SS c £* ea Tunes sent free. Price of the
S“Tnd *oi,kMsK r dCZ '°- SollbynllMMlc Deal
delt»BM.?SSw gPITS ° ir * C °- P “ Wi y i S n .
gUPERB PIAVO.
ONE OF
ST E I N WAY’S
PATfcm CBAFFE SCALE PIAXCS,
to caifandVee 1 ° rrlTalS * Mas, ° IOTm m ■»
SMITH & Nixoy,
15 street » Chlcs S°* and Fourth street,
Cincinnati. del3»a3ii-2;pet
J. n.FBHBELL
METAL WAREHOUSE.
TIZST
SHEET IEOH,
TINNERS’ STOCK.
YISDERVOOET, DICKERSOS&CO.
199 & 301 Randolph Street.
Steam to Europe.
The Steamship KANGAROO, cf the Liverpool, New
• Yoik and Philadelphia Steafesolp Company, will sail
from New Tort on WEDNESDAY, Dec. i(Uh, at
coon, for Cork and Liverpool.
BATSB OF PABSAGB IX CTEMNCT!
New York to Cork or Liverpool, Ist class «s
New York to Cork or Liverpool, Sd class as
Pereooawlsbtng to bring out their friends can hoy
tickets from Liverpool or. Cork to Chicago for IS tin
notes. Balling ship carnage *93 to Chicago.
deSaWSlnet 3K
Ob, THE SECRET CABAL.
A. T
OP THE
BY-
call and see our instruments, whether'wiahlng to bay
or not.
tr A liberal discount to Clergymen, Churches and
Teachers. Address all letters.
ALANSON REED,
TEMPLE OF MUSIC.
NXJMBEKIS6.,
Kcto Gilbert(scments.
REED’S
TEMPLE OF MUSIC!
88 & 90 Randolph Street,
•AND 69 DEAEBOEN-ST., CHICAGO.
the:
LARGEST
PIANO ESTABLISHMENT
In the Unitea States.
CONCERT GRANDS,
FULL GRANDS,
SEMI GRANDS,
PARLOR GRANDS,
SQUARE GRANDS,.
COTTAGE PIANOS,,
WHS XIY, Elaborately Caned, Pearl Eejs,
Inlaid Nameboard, &r.
ions XIY, Plain, Full Round Corners.
“ “ Front Bound Corners*
PIANOS, Four Round Corners*
PIANOS, Front Bound Corners*
CONTAINING EVEBI MODERN ntPROTEItEXT,
French Grand Action, Overstrung
Bass, Full Iron Frame,
FROM
CHICKERTNG a SOHS, JOHN E. MoHEH,
J. P. PAT.F a C 0.,.
ERNEST GABLES,
HILSENG a HARYESEN,
UNITES PIANO-FORTE MAKERS,
And others whose reputations are world wide.
The Subscriber, haring- been a practical Plano
maker by trade,, spent a-oamber of years under kbe
celebrated Chlckerlng, and for the past TWXHTT*
FIVE YEARS a dealer, .flatters himself he under*
stands the rations qualities congltctlng a good and
durable Instrument—a knowledge which can be ae
qnired only by experience—and of great importance
to the purchaser, as be selects his Pianos in person,
and Is thus enabled to warrant them with confidence
and discretion.
The stoekkept constantly on hand at tha sales
rooms afford an opportunity for a SELECTION from
the best Hew York and Boston makers, from all the
spproredlmprorementa of the day, from the latest
and most fashionable stylos, and—as Pianos like
Violins differ widely In tone and quality tor no per
ceptible reason—of a GOOD TOSED Instrument;
thus not limiting the purchaser to tho narrow <£holee
of one or two instruments, a fret we can commend
to your attention as one of the utmost Importance,
and one too often overlooked.
Being determined to maintain our former reputa
tion, for selling the lowest prices, we announce to
our customers that wehava made a
Reduction in Prices
To the same held before tho recent advance* of tho
past year, thus enabling the purchaser to buy from
115 to SIOO less than any other place.
Pianos at Wholesale.
The dealers of the Northwest arc respectfully Inrl
ted to examine our stock.
3VCA3ftH: TUXS :
As many ill-disposed persona are persistently asser
ting' o the contrary, wa wish It distinctly understood
that we no take old pianos In exchange for new ones,
or If wished, will sell them and apply the pro:eeds
toward a new instrument.
Kanos Tuned and Repaired
IN THE VERY BEST MANNER.
\
No charges made unless the work gives satisfaction,
Good Second-hand Pianos for-sale at
Low Prices.
IEL9DEONS, MEIODEOI,
"WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
The attention of the public la called to the fact that
I have secured the exclusive sale of the celebrated
Treat & Llnsley Melodeons
In the five States of Illinois, Michigan, Minnesota,
Wisconsin and are now prepared to famish
both dealers and the public superior Instruments at
factory prices.. Also the
MONITOR ORGAN,
The splendid Instrument* which at present Is crea
tion such a sensation among musical people, fonts
beautiful and deep
ORGAN TOaSTE,
Designed for Parlors and Churches. Can be used
by any Melodeon player.
N. b.—All instruments sold Ijy us warranted five
years, the same as though sold by the manufacturers.
Any personbnylng Pianos or Melodooas of os, will be
allowed the privilege of exchange.
gd'Tho words “ TEMPLE OF MUSIC* are used as a
Trade Mark,
Every one when In Chicago, is Cordially Invited to
Sit® tkis aid bring It with joi.
P. 0. Box 9373, Chicago.
Ntto a^jbcrtismenta.
rjIHE GREAT RETAIL
CLOTHING
c HI ICAGO.
G. T. BELBING & CO.,
RANDOLPH STREET.
2,000 OVERCOATS,
Ranging in price from $7 to $59.
CiiIVER BISRESS SUITS,
English Suits,
BLACK DRESS SUITS,
AIL G HADES.
Officers’ Cape Overcoats,
Officers’ Uniforms.
ALSO
A VERY LARGE STOCK OF
GISTS' mraSMG GOODS.
Under Wear of eierj Deseription,
DRESSING ROBES,
Sole Leather Tranks, Yalises
Traveling Bags, &c.
We manufacture onr entire stock of
CLOTHING
And willing to compete with the world for rood.
durable •
onLOTiEiinsra-.
Woaroaotadvertlalngmeroly a handful of
OLOTHIIiTa-.
Wo have a Large Store and
Mammoth StoZk,
AND SHALL OFFER
STRONG INDUCEMENTS
T(J EVERT CUSTOMER.
Citizens of Chicago, and the traveling pabllc, wc ask
of you a
Candid and Careful Examination
CLOTHING.
large Double Store,
0 & 102 EaMoljM, Chicap.
G. T. HELPING & CO.
de7-rt2T-it carnet
IT. S. 5-20’ s ,
,We shall continue until farther advices from the
SS?o7ths P3rtment » t0 recelY ® subscriptions AT
United States 5-20 Tear Six
Per Cent Bonds,
Both Frindfd and Interest Payable la Gnu
INTEREST WILL COMMENCE ON DAT OP SUB
SOPTION AND RECEIPT OP MONET.
*S^\« e il T r^ e .?V^ ofl l ce * 07 0Q th ® Une of tha
received «e
i!^o^SATCOSQ;g r aISSSS‘ tH ' “
a The usual Commission nllowed to bonks and book
wtahine Bonds to establish National
Bants, in which case subscribers will pay their ova
express charges. y w “
PEESTON, WItLAED & KEAE,
Banker, anil Aecnu for Flve-TVanty Loan, corner or
nomun-rSSr? Soulb Wa: "
H O FOR CHRISTMAS!
RICH HOLIDAY PRESENTS.
The largest, Host tsefnl and Valuable As-
PKESMTATION GOODS
Ever offered la Chicago, at
117 Tift HE STZUBXT,
CmS lI fSSSi? 1 5f ' Watches, Diamond,
sSK®,i^g£ on “ “ ,au “> r-p-to
de6-r?3»2wnct __JAME3 B k HOES.
SECOND-HAND SAFES.
1 Daryee k Forsyth, - tost died at sllO.
I Wilder’s, - - -Cost SI SO at $125.
I Daiidsou’s, - . Cost $125 it $ 80.
1 mile’s, ... fost $225 at SIOO.
1 Herring’s Double Door, Cost $275 at $l5O.
ne"and??ela?," lUlCl '' at,re ' It 10 Exch “B» »*o«r
GREAT AMERICAN SAFES.
FOB SAXE BT
W. PRATT, ISLasalle-st.
deis-asss-ctaet
QHAS. L. NOBLE,
WHOLESALE DEALER IN
L-A-IMIIPS,
CARBON AND KEROSENE OIL,
175 Lake Street.
>pl7-cgglj-net-
QJEO. G. POPE
Wholesale Oil and Lamp Dealer,
123 CLABK STREET,
de2r7S2-CCtx=T
H OGS, HOGS,
HOGS!
The undendzued would Inform their customers and
all nersoos shipping to this market, that they bar*
increased facilities this season for handling
UTE ANI> DRESSED HOGS!
We will giro our personal attention to all sale**, and
will guarantee the HIGHEST PRICES AND PROMPT
RETURNS. BATES. STONE A CO.,
no2C-r5tC-2m 219 South Water street.
HERRING’S PATENT CHAM
PIOS
FIRE PROOF SAFES*
HERRING’S CHAMPION
BURGLAR PROOF SAFES*
WITH
HERRING AND FLOYD’S
PATENT CBTST.IU2ED IRON.
de?-r9ST-ISC-Mrrarnet ♦ 40 STATE 8t„ Chicago.
Wrought Iron Pipe
AND FITTINGS TOE SAME,
A twbolcsale by R. T. CRANE A DEO,
aulOOCMfrnet 105. Ibi and lea West Lake street*
ORIENTAL POWDER CO.'
V-/ • Offer for sale a superior quality of
GGNFOIVDEB,
From Rifle sire to Coarse Ducking. Sportsmen art
offered the celebrated Diamond Gram Powder.
O. NEWHALL, Jx.. Agent,
dcl-rSC-STtnet 18 River street.
NEW BUCKWHEAT FLOUR.
WARRANTED PURE,
Put up In barrels or 115 pound s».cks. Orders from
the country promptly filled, S PCD ANC L. PHE3TOS
* CO., 179 south water street, delO-al3Mtoet
deU-sSMfc
HOUSE
100 &: 103
Comprising all tbs Xew Style*;
SELL FOR CASH CELT,
OF OUE
sortment of

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