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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1872-1963, October 17, 1872, Image 1

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VOLUME 26.
STOVES.
ABB UNDOUBTEDLY THE
Cheapest to Buy, Best to Use, Easiest to Sell,
And never foil to give entire satisfaction.
Having a Full Stock of COOKING
and HEATING
STOVES,
For the use of both Wood and Coal,
AND
ESPECIALLY ADAPTED
TO THE WANTS OF THE
Western People,
We are prepared, to fill orders
promptly, at prices that will be
satisfactory to ■ the Trade. Our
stock, and assortment of STAMPED,
JAPANNED, an‘d FRENCH WARE,
and TINKERS’ STOCK, is one of
the largest in the West, and we
GUARANTEE OUR FRIGES as
low as the same class of goods can
be purchased anywhere. New Price
lasts now ready. Address
EXCELSIOR K CO,
612 & 614 Main-st.,
ST. IjOXJXS, 3VCO.
Tho AMERICAN 8.-13E BURNER, thojrroat " Kina
of Stoves,” can be fomu atWM. £ A. W.wHEELEE'ST
Sls Stato-st.
FURNITURE.
D.M. SWINEY&BRO.
MAJJUFACTUKEES OF
FINE OFFICE FDIITIE,
Counters, Partitions, Rails,
Cylinder Desks, Etc.
FACTORY: 507 TO 513 KDEIE-5T., CORNER REUBEN.
CENTRAL BLOCK. Room 57. '
FASHIONABLE
FURNITURE!
f.f.mOKGMmiRECO,
853 to 359 W. Eandolph-st., Chicago.
Branch Salesroom, "Wabash-av. end 23d-st.
T7e call special attention to onr stock of Low Priced
Goods suitable for present demands.
CAMPAIGN GOODS.
Jb“ Xj A. C3r 2
BANNERS, BADGES,
uisriPoiiMs 3 <sco_
GEO. P. POSTER,
REMOVAL.
REMOVAL.
FARRINGTON & SCREE,
Tea Importers and "Wholesale Gro
cers, have removed to their new and
spacious store,
■3=, 6 -AJSTD S LAKE-ST.,
Corner Miehigan-av.
Dyßrenfurtli Business College
haa removed to Clement A Sayer’a new marble-front
block, )84 and 288 Milwaokee-av., and is in session day
and evening. Circulars to be had at the College office.
REMOVAL.
We have this day removed our
Real Estate Office to 168 Wash-
Ington-st. REA & COATES.
SHUSHES, &c«
HAIR AND CLOTH BRUSHES.
A splendid assortment of Hair and Cloth Brushes.
"Wholesale and Eetail—Very Cheap.
GERTS, LOMBARD & CO.,
MISCELLANEOUS.
Attention, Soldiers!
By Act of Congress June 8, 1873, provisions were made
by which every soldier who served 90 days or more, and
was honorably discharged, may obtain 160 acres of land.
lam prepared to give all information, and to locate the
lands, having a man in the West right ontho'gronnd.
BENJ. F. WOOD,
NOTICE.
The partnership heretofore existing between
Job W. Angus and John Weston, builders, is this
day dissolved by mutual consent. The business
will be carried on in future by Job W. Angus,
who will discharge all liabilities of the late
firm and receive all moneys or debts due the
same. Dated Oct. 10, 1872.
(Signed) J. W. ANGUS.
JOHN D. WESTON.
Witness; JOSEPH ZAPP.
JOB PRINTING,
. At Culver, Page, Hoyne & Co.’s,
118andl20Moarae-st., Chicago.
SO,OOO.
BARB BUSINESS CHANCE—One of tbo best estab
lished Grocery stores in the city for sale. Stock and fix
tores new, and of tbo very best quality and style. First
class trade. Owner wishes to leavo the city for health.
Cash down, tbo only thing acceptable. Address B 75,
Tribune office.
WANTED:
W.AJSPX'IEIID.
The Rputable Life Assurance Society of the
United States, whose business is larger than
that of any other in Die world, want three or
four of the best men in the city to represent the
Company here as Agents and Solicitors. Apply
at the office of the Northwestern Department,
comer Dearborn and Washington-sts.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
DEUG STOEE FOE SALE
In a town of n.ow inhabltan's in Central Illinois. This is
a rare opportunity for any one seeking nn investment in
this branch of trado. Store first-class in every respect,
and business good and increasing. Good reasons for soil
ing. For particulars inquire of TOLSIAN A ILLNO or
LORD. SMITH A C 0... Chicago
POLITICAL.
4tli Ward.
A GRAND RALLY
OF THE
LIBERALS
WILL BE HELD
This, Thursday, Evening,
XJhlich’s Hotel,
State-st., comer Tw6nty-second-at.
Grood Speakers "will be in
attendance.
CONFECTIONERY.
DYBALL,
THE POPULAR OOBICTIOm,
HAS OPENED HIB
SWEET LITTLE PALACE,
AT
srs W. MAJDISOIV-SX.,
Where may always be found every variety of
PUBE and CHOICE CONFECTIONS and
CANDIES. ;
FURS.
Furs! Purs!
BMOF & BAB9IS,
Fashionable Hatters and FUR
Manufacturers, at their New Store,
No. 164 State-st., corner Monroe,
have the largest stock of ladies’
Fine Furs ever offered in this city.
HATS.
BOYS’ HATS!
A variety ot New Styles received
this day, by
J. A. SMITH & CO.,
. 513 and 515 Wabash^av.
FINANCIAL.
$2,500
On hand, tofioan on first-class
Inside Property.
W. D. KERFOOT & CO.,
STOCKS FOE SALE.
Home national Bank.
Cook County National Bank,
National Bank of Illinois,
Merchants* Savings Loan and Trust Co.,
Chicago City Railway. By
HAMMOND & WATSON,
Financial Agents, 54 Washington-st.
GomercM Paper Wantefl,
By HAMMOND & WATSON,
Financial Agents, 64 Woshington-at.
A. O. Slaughter,
BANKER,
Corner Clark and Madison-ste. Boys and sells Stocks,
Bonds, and Gold. Receives money on deposit and Iran*
acts a General Banking and Brokerage Bnslneg.
Loans M"esotiated
On real estate, in the city or suburbs, at current rates.
G. S. HUBBARD, Jr..
IS3 East Washlngton-st.
RANGES.
VAN RANGES,
For Hotels, Restaurants, and Families.
STEAM HEATING APPARATUS,
CLOGSTON’S PATENT. :
Estimates made on application to
HERRON, SMITH & MOOERS,
76 West Washington-st.
HEAL ESTATE.
UFLIWaiII
ADJOINING OLD OITY LIMITS.
Only Four Miles from Court House, accessi
ble by Steam Cars.
COMMUTATION FARE.
Large frontage on Humboldt Boulevard, Fullerton and
Westom-avs. Trees have been set out over the entire
property; sidewalks have been laid; artesian well, supe
rior to any other in this vicinity, flowing at rate of 350 gal
lons per zninnto of pure water, equal in every respect to.
that of Lake Michigan. Purchasers of those lots avoid
city taxes, while at the same timo the property Is rapidly
enhancing in value by the city improvements, which wiU
soon reach this vicinity. Lots for salo on cosy payments.
No cash payments required of parties making improve
ments. Price of lots, from £375 to £475. Wo can furnish
printed abstracts of title to the above proycty.
■WI3STC3- <Ss I’-A.E.X.XIsr,
Wo. 68 East Mndison-st., corner of
State-st., Boom 4.
POE SALE,
A two-story gothic frame bouse with brick basement,
containing eleven rooms, five closets, and batb-roomj all
finished in firsUclass stylo. Also a two-story house 16x16
in rear of above, on lot 25x178 feet, cast front, Evans-av.,
between Forty-fifth and Forty-slxth-sts., and Langley and
Cottage Grove-avs.—all for $6,C00; M cash, balance on
easy terms.
B. F. CLARKE A CO..
Room 4 Oriental Building,
122 LaSalle-st.
TIIBEE LOT.
A splendid Timber Lot of 160 acres (estimated to cut
8,000 or 9,000 cords of wood), in Allegan Connty, Mich
igan, 2)4 mllos from Mack’s Pier, midway between San
gatuck and South Haven, can be bought on very favora
ble terms. Inquire of . __
B. F. CLARKE A CO.,
Room 4 Oriental Building,
DISSOLUTION NOTICES.
DISSOLUTION.
This is to certify that the copartnership heretofore ex
isting between Jas. O. Morphy and John H. Winterburn,
lathis day dissolved by mutual consent. Tbo business
will bo carried on as formerly by Jas. O. Murphy, who fa
authorized to collect and settle all debts of tho firm.
JAS. 0. MURPHY,
JOHN H. WINTERBURN.
MEETINGS.
MASONIC.
Union Park Chapter, No. 143, E. A. M.—Regular con
vocation Thursday, the 17th inst., at 7)6 o’clock p m'., at
the P&11, 681 West Lako-st. Work on the R. A. Degree.
Companions of other Chapter* cordially invited. By or
der of tho M. E. IL P. CHAS. PERKINS, Scc’y.
MASONIC.
Tho Regular Conclave of Gourgas Chapter of Rose
Croix, will be bold at the hall corner of Cottage Grove-
IMPERIAL
FIRE
Insurance Co.,
Cash Resources,
$10,898,489.92.
Deposited in this country for security to
American Policy-Holders.
81,055,505.82.
The IMPERIAL pays a loss of ONE HUN
DRED THOUSAND DOLLARS with less friction
than most Companies pay One Thousand.
Her Losses hy the Great Fire were paid in
CASH, upon presentation of proofs, WITHOUT
DEDUCTING INTEREST or DISCOUNTS of any
kind.
Prominent among her roll of lienor, she paid
FIELD, LETEEE. & CO., $40,000 Cash, J. V.
FAEWELL & CO., $40,000 Cash.
The Company confines itself to FIRE BUSI
NESS, having no complications with LIFE or
MARINE Insurance ; and insures Dwellings,
Household Furniture, Stores, Rents, and all
kinds of Merchandise in each division of the
city and surrounding towns.
DAVIS & REQUA, AGENTS,
CONTINENTAL
Insurance Co.,
NEW YORK.
CASH CAPITAL, - - - $1,000,000
SURPLUS, 1,250,000
CASH ASSETS, - - - $2,250,000
This Company having paid
$1,500,000
Losses.by the Great Pire, and show
ing the above splendid condition,
respectfully solicit a continuance of
the patronage of the insuring public.
0. W. BAEEETT & GO.,
No. 120 LaSalle-st.
[mm Ape;
GEO. G. GLARES & GO.,
.6>s CENTS.
3 & 4 BEYAN BLOCK.
Loudon Assurance Corporation,
LONDON, A. D. 1720.
Total Assets, Gold, - $13,234,425
Eire Assets, Gold, - $5,064,000
Manufacturers’ Insurance Co.,
BOSTON, A. D. 1823.
Assets, .... $1,485,519
Home Insurance Co.,
COLUMBUS, OHIO.
Assets, .... $871,453
Hoffman Fire Insurance Co.,
NEW YORK.
Assets, .... $314,000,
Northwestern National Ins. Co.,
MILWAUKEE.
Assets, .... $250,000
Organized - - . 3.853.
WIILI4MSBDRGB CUT
Fire Insurance Co.,
OP BROOKLYN, N. Y.
Cash Ms, - - - - $553,381.74
Policies Issued on Dwellings, Stores and contents, and
other desirable risks, at
FAIR RA.TES.
As we make our own rates on all classes of property,
owners will consult their interests by applying to ns be
fore Insuring elsewhere.
Dan. M. Bowmar,
AGENT, •
150 LaSalle-st liasemeut of OtisßlocL
CHICAGO, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1872.
INSURANCE.
LOISTDOISr.
16-4 LaSalle-st.
POLITICAL.
Developments Concerning the Elec
tion Frauds in Phila
delphia.
The Regular Republican State
Ticket Elected in South
Carolina.
1 Democratic Congressman Elected in
the Fourth District.
How the Liberal Cause Is Progress-
ing in Wisconsin.
letter from Hon, Daniel W. Voorhees,
LETTER FROM HON. D. W. VOORHEES,
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Washington, D. C. Oct. 16.—A letter received
in this city to-day from Mr. Yoorhoes, dated at
Terre Haute, Oct. 11, says that be does not re
gret bis defeat for Congress, bat is glad to be
remitted to tbe practice of bis profession, -winch
is more congenial and lucrative. As to the
cause of bis defeat, Mr. Yoorbees says he fore
seen it when be said that tbe Democrats could
not organize in tbe short time given them before
tbe election, and that it was simply a stay-at
home vote in bis party that beat him, and
hurt tbe cause everywhere. Nobody thought there
was a possibility of bis defeat, and over-confi
dence led hnndrods to stay away from tbe polls.
He writes, as follows, in regard to the lateral
movement: “A word or two now about the
movement, itself. It is right in its principles
and objects—a movement destined to restore
self-government to tbe people of the South, and
to relieve them from thieves and pirates, to
bring about general amnesty, peace, and recon
ciliation between the sections, to purify the
departments of the Government, now infested
by a plandering ring engaged in the civil
service of tbe country. A movement,
I say, contemplating such results as these, can
not fail to elicit my zealous and unfaltering sap
port. Tbe only mistake our friends made was
m supposing that tbe prejudices of tbe masses
of the Democratic party, of thirty-five years
standing, against Mr. Greeley, could be entirely
overcome in a brief canvass of sixty days. It
takes more time than this to work such a change
in the minds of honest, slow-thinking people.
I thought so when 1 tried to prevent the nomi
nation of Mr. Greeley, and now I
know it was right. I have en
tire respect for this element in
our party, and in time it will harmonize with the
cause in which wo are engaged; but it takes
more time than was given in this movement.
Allow me to say a word on another point. Mr.
Greeley has personally raised himself a thousand
fold in my estimation. His course has been all
that could bo desired, and 1 believe he would, if
elected, be perfectly true to the principles he has
so grandly proclaimed in his unrivalled addresses
to the public. I shall vote for him in November, -
not only unhesitatingly but with ploaHure r aa a
man who has established his claims to my admi
ration, notwithstanding my previous prejudice.”
r-*- ■ • *
DEVELOPMENTS CONCERNING '(ELECTION
FRAUDS IN PHILADELPHIA. ;
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
New Yobk, Oct. IC.—The greatfrauds in Phil
adelphia are daily coming to light in the form of
exact information. The following document
has appeared in print: *
To the Reform A esoeiation of Pkiladelphid ; --
Gents : In the official count of votes for Gov
ernor, in the Fifteenth Ward, it is Represented
that the vote for Governor was 1,597, as follows:
For Hartranft, 4,490; for Cuckalew,
2,893. The undersigned, Judges of Election,
signed no such return or paper. The true vote
for Governor was as follows, they having signed
the same: For Hartranft, 4, 890; for Buckalew,
2,993; majority, 1,307. By exposing the above
fraud, you will oblige friends of Reform in the
Fifteenth Ward, and show how our ffeturu Elec
tion Judges alter the returns to suit their own
partizan way of fixing up election returns.
Respectfully yours, John Phitneb,
Judge of First Division.
James Nash,
Judge of Second Division.
W. J. Mubbay, .
Judge of Seventh Division.
Alfred Mtjbfhy, .
Judge of Twenty-second Division.
Philadelphia, Oct. 16.— I Two hundred votes
were counted more than were polled in each
ward. In twenty-nine wards we: have 5,800
fraudulent votes, but the Nineteenth Ward poll
ed 1,500 fraudulent votes; Twentieth, 500;
Tenth, 500; Fifth, 500; Fourth, sold out to
Hartranft: Sixteenth, 500; Seventh, the same,
etc. The fraudulent votes and false counts in
Philadelphia amounted to 15,000. ,
LIBERAL RALLY AT CHARLESTON. ILL.
Special Despatch to the Chicago Tribune ,
Charleston, HI., Oct. 16. —3? he meeting last
evening in this city was large and 'enthusiastic.
The Court House was crowded early in the even
ing, and Governor Bross spoke for| two hours,
and was frequently applauded. He’was followed
by Hon. D. W. Hanna, of Torre Haute, in a
ringing speech. 1
The election in Indiana has convinced the few
Bourbons in this vicinity of the utter hopeless
ness of their cause, and they have all deter
mined to vote for Greeley. The Liberals and
Democrats in this part of the States are not dis
posed to give up the contest by I any means.
They still have strong hopes that with hard
work the State may be carried for ‘Kcemer and
Greeley. '
APPOINTMENTS OF LIBERAL SPEAKERS IN
ILLINOIS.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune, -
Springfield, lIL, Oct. 16.—Governor Palmer
will address the people at Louisville, Clay Coun
ty, Illinois, on Thursday afternoon, Oct. 24; and
at Fairfield, Illinois, on Friday afternoon, Oct.
25.
Senator Trumbull speaks at Cairo on next
Saturday; at Marion, Williamson County, Illi
nois, on next Monday; at Belleville, Illinois, on
Wednesday, the 23d, and at Carllnville, Thurs
day, Oct. 24. \
The Liberal cause in Illinois is in a splendid
condition, and our camp fires bum brighter
every day. i
SOUTH CAROLINA STATE ELECTION
Columbia, Oct; 16.— 1n the State elections to
day, for Governor, State officers, and five Con
fressmen, the only decided opposition offered
y the Democrats was in the southern district,
where Hon. B. F. Perry, ex-Provisional Gover
nor under Johnson’s administration, was. nom
inated for Congress. It is thought that he is
elected, defeating Wallace, the present repre
sentative. It is generally conceded that the
Begular Republican State ticket, with Moses for
Governor, is elected, defeating what is known as
the Bolters’ ticket, with Tomlinson os candidate
for Governor,
Charleston, S. C.. Oct. 16.— Everything pass
ed off quiet at the elections to-day. No conclu
sive returns are in, but the probabilities are that
Moses and the regular Republican ticket. ore
elected by a largo majority.
CONGRESSIONAL NOMINATIONS,
Lowell, Maas., Oct. 16. —Tho Democrats and
Liberals of the Seventh District to-day nomina
ted John K, Tarbox, of Lawrence, for Congress,
and Geo. Stevens, of Lowell, was nominated for
the short Congressional term.
Hartford, Conn., Oct. 16.—The Democratic
and Liberal Committee of this city to-day
nominated W. W. Eaton for Congress, to fiU
the unoxpired term of 8. L, Strong, deceased.
Tho Republican Convention meets to-morrow,
and General J. B. Hawley will probably be nomr
mated.
Boston, Oct. 16.—General Butler was renomi
atedfor. Congress by the Republicans of the
Sixth. Massachusetts District, to-day. The
Democrats and Liberals in tlie some district
have nominated Charles P. Thompson for Con
gress.
. • St. Louis. Oct. 16. —Brasilia Wells and W. H.
Stone have been nominated as the Democratic
candidates for Congress respectively in the
Second and Third Missouri Districts.
ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING OF LIBERALS AND
DEMOCRATS AT INDIANAPOLIS—THE RE
TURNS YET INCOMPLETE.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune .
Indianapolis, Ind., Oct. 16.— The Democrats
and Liberal Republicans held a magnificent
meeting at the Academy of Musio to-night.
The house was crowded. Speeches were
mode by Governor Hendricks, the Hon.
G. W. Julian, General Manaon, Judge Gooding,
and Dr. Vftiito, of New York. Tho enthusiasm
was very great, and a determination, evinced to
go into the coming election with colors flying
and presenting an unbroken front.
In the course of his remarks, Dir. Hendricks
said: “I wish to refer to one fact. I have
been for many years, conspicuous in the politics
of the State, but never experienced such bitter
attacks as in the present campaign. For
my public acts I ask no cover; but private af
fairs, for contemptible purposes, had" been
brought into question, without reference to the
truth. But all their attacks added to the votes
1 received. There is a sentiment of fair play
and justice /in the minds of the people
which induces them to defend a man
when unjustly assailed. A little more effort
would have elected both the Congressmen-at-
Largo and the whole State ticket. The vote of
the Bepublicans in the election just closed was
in favor of reform.” He was gratified to ex
press his obligations for their support, aud also
gratified to know that the Democrats stood
side by side with Liberal Bepublicans in favor
of reform and good government. He regretted
that there is a single man in the Democratic
party that received Grant money, and, in
return for it, struck a blow against the law.
“ They will hereafter be rejected by the Demo
crats, and neglected by the Bepublicans, as
unfit to bo trusted. Indiana can be counted
for Greeley and Brown if we work vigorously.
There is not a single man in Indiana but knows
that thcro is occasion for reform. It is said that
the fight between the boys in blue and the boys
in gray is still going on, but I dispute it in toto.
The war ended seven years ago, and 1872
should be a year of jubilee, general rejoic
ing, and gladness. I ask the soldier
to make his ballot mean just what his bullet
meant,—not to make desolation, but that the
legitimate authority of the country might be re
stored, an/1 our Bepublio continue a united na
tion. Let the hatred which separates the North
and South pass away, aud we shall be brothers
again as in days of old.” Mr. Hendricks,
in closing, said that the Grantites
had expended all their money and could not get
any more to import votes with, and, with proper
organization and diligence on the part of Demo
crats and Liberal Bepublicans the State can be
carried for Mr. Greeley by 5,000 to 10,000 ma
jority.
The official returns of the State election are
yet incomplete. The result will be but little
different from the figures already published.
THE LIBERAL CAUSE IN WISCONSIN.
Whitbwates, Wla., Oct.
To the Editor of The Chicago Tribune :
Bib : The October elections have not, in the
least, disturbed the equanimity of mind of the
Wisconsin Liberals. Every man is “in line,”
and ready for the contest. The redemption of
Indiana from the Executive control of the domi
nant party is, indeed, a great triumph for the
Liberal cause. Tbe irreproachable character,
eminent abilities, and pore patriotism of T. A.
Hendricks, the Governor elect, give euro guar
antee that for tho next four years, tbe Hoosier
State will be vouchsafed good ana honest gov
ernment, so. far. as the Execu
tive will be enabled to secure ■ it.
His election is, indeed, the . first sub
stantial victory winch has been achieved in the
Northwest over the Washington “ Bing V and its
nefarious schemes. This grand result, has in
spired tbe Liberal forces with courage and zeal.
The result in Pennsylvania is a victory of the
Grantitcs, of which they feel heartily ashamed,
knowing the same to have been secured by tbe
most infamous frauds ever concocted. Tbe Lib
erals ore not in tho least dispirited over that
result, while several in this vicinity who have
heretofore acted with the Grantitcs declare that
they will no longer sustain a party JJwhich has
proven itself so utterly lacking in every element
so essential to good government.
Allow us to assure our Liberal friends in othrr
States that Wisconsin will do her whole duty in
November. We hsvo visited over 200 towns
since tbe Baltimore Convention, and have found
that there are from ton to thirty, and, in some
instances, os many as 100 Republicans who will
support Greeley; while the defection of Demo
cratic voters is infintisiznal. Tbe German Re
publicans claim 9,000 voters in this State, and
give us the assurance that seven-eighths of this
class of voters will cast their votes for the Lib
eral ticket. If this be so, the State will most as
suredly be carried for the.Befonn ticket.
From various parts of the State, wo receive
the most encouraging news. The Grantites are
relying upon the prestige of former successes,
rather than excessive labor, to carry them
through. In short, there is no enthusiasm for
their ticket. The charges of, corruption upon
the reigning dynasty they know, to be true, even
if not admitted by them, and, as a consequence,
the ticket drags heavily. .
The Liberals will elect four of the eight Con
gressmen, and possibly one more. Mr. Mitchell
will be re-elected from the Milwaukee District
by at least 10,000 majority, while Eldridge will
beat his competitor anywhere from 4,000 to 6.000
votes.
The Legislative ticket will be close in the
State; but the chances are decidedly favorable
to the Liberals. A gain of eleven Assemblymen
will give us the control of the Lower Branch;
and, of this number, the four Counties of Mil
waukee, Waukesha, Bodge, and Jefferson alone
will furnish a gain of ten. A gain of six Sena
tors will give us the control of .the Higher Legis
lative Branch; and these, it is believed, can be
secured.
All in all, the skies look bright in Wisconsin..
Let no Liberal feel the slightest discouragement.'
Let us advance our whole line upon the enemy,
and, with the watch-words of Reconciliation and
Reform, victory will porch upon the banners
borne by the Liberal army in the November con
test. B.
A DEBATABLE QUESTION,
Pittsbdbgh, Penn., Oct. 16.— The Gazette will
contain an editorial to-morrow morning arguing
that the recent amendment to the Sixth Section
of the Sixth Article of the Constitution of the
State of Pennsylvania takes the election of State
Treasurer out of the hands of the Legislature
and remands it to the the people, that
as some time must be consumed
in developing the details of the law bearing on
the subject, the election will be remanded to
the people at the general election next year.
Under this view Hon. Bio Mackey, the present
incumbent, will hold over. The question will no
doubt excite animate discussion, it being one of
considerable importance.
DEMOCRATIC CONVENTION AT COLUMBUS,
OHIO.
Columbus, 0., Oct. 16.—The Democratic State
Central Committee met here to-day, with prom
inent Democrats from all parts of Ohio to con
sult relative to the political situation. The meet
ing was strictly private. A very hopeful spirit
was manifested, and it was agreed to prosecute
the campaign with vigor. Among those present
were Goo. N. Pendleton, Geo. W. McCook, Sen
ator Thurman, and several members of Con
gress.
NEW YORK CITY POLITICS.
New York, Oct. 16.—The Liberal-National
Committee have issued an address reviewing the
late elections, and urging voters to renewed vigor
in the campaign.
A meeting of the German-American Reform
Association last night indorsed the nomination
of O’Brien for Mayor.
To-day, 39,033 persons were registered in this
city, against 63,080 on the second day last year,
and 9,246 in 1863. The total registering thus
far is 06,512, against 01,816 the same period in
1871, and 92,669 in 1868.
NOTES FROM OUR CORRESPONDENCE.
Dubuque, lowa.— There was a small gathering
at Dubuque, Oct. 15, to hear a Bourbon speech
from LeGrand Byington. He' failed to evoke
any enthusiasm. “ Prospects are doily increas
ing that Dubuque will give Greeley a handsome
majority.”
Elkhart, Ind. —“The Liberal Republicans
and Democrats all feel sure of a majority of at
least 5,000 in Indiana, for Greeley.
Kane and DuPaqb County, III.—A 3?emo
itlltlL
cratio ConTention for the district comprising tno
counties of Kane and DnPage will be held at St.
Charles. Oct. 19, to nominate candidates for Sen*
ator and Representative in the Legislature.
anscELLANEotra.
Caibo, Oct. 16.—The Cairo Bulletin , the Head*
ing Democratic paper in Egypt, in a loader this
morning, evidently favors the President’s San
Domingo and Mexican policies, and gives Charles
Snmner and Carl Sohurz no sympathy. The ar
ticle creates not a Itttle talk.
Dubuque, Ia. t Oct. 16.—The name of J. B.
Weaver, Republican candidate for Elector in the
Sixth District of lowa, has been withdrawn on
account of ineligibility, and that.of George W.
Yocum substituted. General .Weaver is Assessor
of Internal Revenue, and holds an office of
profit and trust under the Government, and
therefore is not eligible.
Boston, Oct. 16.—The Central Committee of
the Labor Reform party of Massachusetts have
urgently requested that Labor men ignore old
parties m the coming Presidential election, as
their cause has been ignored, and vote for
neither, candidate.
Columbus, Oct. 16.—The Republican State
Central Committee have issued a special circu
lar urging all County Committees to perfect
their organizations, and have resolved to prose
cute the balance of the campaign vigorously.
All localities that wish meetings should notify
the State Committee at once.
St. Louis, Oct. 16.— The Liberal Republicans
held a Convention to-day, and nominated a fall
connty ticket made up mainly of selections from
the Republican and Democratic Connty tickets.
The following are the nominees: Presiding
Justice of Connty Court, Charles Speck O’Con
nor, Democrat; Sheriff, P. 0. Taylor, Demo
crat ; Connty Collector, Charles A.
Montz. Democrat; Circuit Judge, Chester
H. Krum, Republican; County Marshal,
Adolph Ehlor ; Liberal; Coroner, Dr. Wilcox,
Liberal; Public Administrator, Henry Gombs,
Republican; Circuit Attorney, W. Lnebe, Lib
eral; Assistant Attorney, L. B. Beach, Republi
can; School Superintendent, Geo. Murphy, Re
publican.
Detroit/ Mich., Oct. 16.—The Republicans of
this city, to-day, put up the following city
ticket: ' Police Justice, David E. Harbangh;
Justice of the Peace, Albert Schcn; Represen
tatives, John GreuseL James Bums, H. D. Ed
wards. James Caples, John J. Speed.
NEW YORK.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune,
STOCKS.
New York, Oct. 16.—The stock market in the
main was irregular to-day and lower. Union Pa
cific suddenly became the feature during the
morning, and advanced from 39% to 40%, on a
largo business. Erie advanced from 52% to 52%,
and late in the day declined to 50%. This move
ment in Erie was in sympathy with London fluc
tuations, inspired, it is said, by Americans. In
the afternoon Canton advanced from
97% to 101 on a moderate busi
ness. Pacific Mail ranged from 86% to
87%, and Panama from 146% to 147%, and both
stocks were steady during the day, although
very quiet. Western Union opened at 76%, de
clined to 75%, rallied to 77%, and afterwards
declined to 75%, with the late afternoon deal
ings at 76 to 76%. The balance of the market
was generally heavy, and declined from % to 2%
per cent, with considerable pressure to sell at
intervals. The greatest decline was in
Wabash, which fell off from 74% to 71%
Business was generally less active than
yesterday. Some of the large holders of stocks
have been free sellers during the excitement
and buoyancy of the past two days. The mar
ket at the final close was firmer, with a recovery
of %-to % per cent from the lowest point of the
afternoon. ...
THE MOSEY MARKET.
The Treasury to-day was enabled to buy only
$94,100 bonds at par in gold out of an offering
of SBOO,OOO. Money steady, and ranged from: 4
to 6 per cent on call. Prime business notes
quoted at 9 to 12 percent.
FOREIGN EXCHANGE
advanced to 109 for 60 days, and 110% for sight,
which formed an interesting feature in financial
circles. This advance was made by a leading
prime banking firm, and the other bankers fol
lowed suit. The actual business of the day was
at about 103% for long sterling, and 110% for
short sight. The advance in exchange was
brought about by a scarcity of merchants*
bills against the shipments of grain and
other produce from Northern ports, and
cotton from Southern porta, as
well as the maturing of hankers* credits. Sight
exchange is now at a point which admits of
special shipments, and is also 1% per cent above
sixty.day bills, an unusually wide difference. Ac
cording to the present discount rate, the ‘differ
ence ought to be about 1 per cent, but bankers
are indifferent about drawing sight bills freely
pending a meeting of the Bank of England Di
rectors, to-morrow. The prospect of ehippiug
specie was much discussed among bankers
to-day, but opinions differ widely.
GOLD
firmer and rather more active. The advance was
due chiefly to the improvement in the foreign
exchanges. Price ranged from 112% to 113%.
PACIFIC RAILROAD SECURITIES.
Central Pacific bonds closed at [email protected]%.
BBEAP3TUFF3.
The inquiry for flour was moderate. Large
arrivals checked the demand. At the opening
low grades were steady,vmedium grades heavy,
and family extras firm but quiet. No. 2 and su
perfine in fair demand and firm. At the close
the. market was fairly active for family and
good' Shipping. Other grades doll. Wheat
quiet; holders ask higher prices and buyers hold
back. - The market closes lower. The demand
is very, light, and chiefly for spring. Winter in
fair demand and firm.
- Pork better and more active for future de
livery. Sales of 600 brls mess, seller October,
at $14.60; 500 brls do, seller November, $14.60;
and 1,000 brls mess for this month at $14.75.
Cut meats fairly active and steady. Bacon
scarce and wanted. Lard dull and heavy.
[To the Associated Press. J
the arwTT.TJATtrn case m jebsex errv.
New Yobs, Oct. 16.—The trial of Chief of
Police McWilliams and Detective Doyle, charged'
with complicity in the Jersey City Bank robbery,
has been posponed until the 24, th inst. , The
Chief was admtted to bail. Doyle had previ
ously filed bonds.
BURNED TO DEATH.
Daring the absence of Mary McCormick from
213 Boemm street, Brooklyn, last evening, her
child, three years old, obtained matches and set
fire to the cnb containing an infant, which was
burned to death.
At the meeting of the Long Island Baptist
Association, yesterday, at Babylon, considerable
discussion took place upon the question of close,
communion and on the recent action of the Bev.
Mr. Pentecost in baptizing Mias Smiley, the
Quakeress. The Association was about evenly
divided on the subject.
TEE ITUBDEB OF FISK.
Augustus St. Clair, formerly a newspaper re
porter, in a deposition before Judge Brady, yes
terday, swore that at the time when Fisk was
shot by Stokes, at the Grand Central Hotel, he
saw a pistol in Fisk’s hand. He also says that,
the fear of arrest prevehtedhim from giving this
information on the trial.
New Yoee, Oct. 16.—The new testimony, in
behalf of Stokes, to the effect that Fisk had a
pistol in his hand at the time the shooting took
place, is not generally credited here.
Arrived—The steamship Zemha, from Gibral
tar ; the Cuba, from Liverpool; the Helvetia,
from Havre.
Accident to a Sound Steamer*
New Yobs, Oct, 16.—The steamer Providence,
of the Fall Biver line, while lying-to to avoid a
collision with a schooner, ran into a Govern
ment scow, in Hell Gate, at 6 o’clock last even
ing, on her way east. The scow was smashed to
pieces, all the upper works of the steamer were
carried away, ana she became nnmanagehle and
drifted upon the rocks. The greatest excite
ment prevailed among her 600 passengers, hut
fortunately nobody was injured. TheStoning
ton came alongside and took off the greater
number, and a few were returned to this city in
tugs and small boats. The Providence was float
ed off at a late hour.
NUMBER 60.
<fs ® Jo 45 :
?^' , »ngton.
• •-^jsr.
Important ClaiiH Before the South
ern Claims Commission.
A Firm Policy to Be Adopted
Toward Mexico..,,
Texan Border Distorknces Investi
gated by the Mexie&n An
thorities.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune,
IMPORTANT CLAIM BEFORE THE SOUTHERN CLAIMS
COMMISSION.
Washington, Oct. 16. —An important claim was
partly heard to-day by the Southern Claftns Com
mission. The claimant is Mrs. Anna*M. Fitz
hugh, of Fairfax County, Ya. Her farm was
occupied alternately by tho Confederate and
Federal forces, hnt she having a letter from
General Winfield Scott, ashing the army officers,
as a personal favor to him, not to destroy hez
property, neither side did so. Tho husband of
the claimant was General Wm. Fitzhugh,
for many years a State Senator of Vir
ginia, ‘ who, shortly before the war,
liberated all of his slaves/and provided for theii
colonization in Liberia. Quito a number of wit
nesses wore examined to prove the loyalty oi
Mrs. Fitzhugh, although she has tho’ order given
her by Colonel Green, then Chief of the Quar
termaster's Department, who was also present
during the hearing to-day, stating that the Gov
ernment needed the wood on her farm,
and intended to immediately cut it. Tie
witnesses testified that on 2,000 acres
ef her farm fifty cords per acre
were cut. The Government’s price for
standing timber at the time was $1 per cord.
The claim is for 6375,000, which is the largest
in amount that has jet been hied before the
Commission. The Commissioners intimated
that they had a certain witness in rebuttal that
they would examine, and, as the counsel for the
claimant have not concluded their case, another
hearing will be granted. _!
OUR RELATIONS WITH MEXICO.
In view of the fact that a considerable portion
of the forthcoming message of the President
will relate to Mexican affairs, and that: the Ad
ministration propose a positive policy in that di
rection if the facts justify, it has made the
headquarters of the Mexican Legation a
resort of some importance here' of late.
.The Brownsville Commission, appointed un
der an act of Congress last ' winter,
to investigate the crimes of the lawlessness on
the Bio Grande, have made their report to the
State Department, and it is understood that it
deals severely with the negligence of the Mexi
can Government to punish outrages : in that
quarter, or protect the lives and property of
American citizens. But the Mexican. Govern
ment does not propose to lot this investigation
into these disorders be a one-sided
affair. It has also appointed &
commission to take, counter evidence os to
the, cause of these with/ instruc
tions to report as speedily as possible, and at all
events before the- assembling of the American
Congress. The Mexicans charge the border dif
ficulties to that condition of society on both
sides where the law is not respected,' and where
the strong, irrespective of nationality, prey
upon the weak in the same careless defiance.
They propose to charge that so far! as the
report of the American Commissioners is
concerned, and which is now in possession of
our Government, that it is made simply in the "
interests of speculators, and that other consid
erations besides motives of public policy in
fluenced the American Commissioners in mak
ing their statements so entirely one-sided. It
is stated that Mexico also proposes to be firm
in this matter, and, although relatively weak,
will not submit to any exorbitant claims fer
damages, especially upon ex parie statements of
facts. Asa compromise, and with a-view to
placing the case fairly in the may of Interna
tional treatment, the Mexican Government will
agree to a special convention having power to
make a treaty with regard to the country in
fested with the alleged outrages. Mr. Nelson,
the Mexican Minister resident, is now on his
way to this city, charged with the special mis
sion of arranging this Convention. The
legation here also claims that various
misrepresentations have been made from
time to time with regard to tho
harmonious workings of the Mexican
Amfln’ran-nTflfm Commission, now in session
here. Among other things it has been stated
that the death of Franz Lieber, Esq., of this
Commission, caused a dead lock. This is
especially denied. The Mexican representatives
state that there is no disagreement, nor is there
any cause for any. The removal of Guzman,
the Mexican umpire, has only the' signifi
cance that he was recalled by
his Government simply to present the good will
of the American Government, and to settle all
international difficulties amicably. The inter
national difficulties of Mexico are so great that
the Government there, above all things; desires
harmony in its American diplomatic relations.
It was announced by. the Mexican Charge d’
Affairs to-day that Joso- Maria Tgleaias,
late Minister of Justice at the . City of
Mexico, and one of the most promi
nent and upright citizens of his “country, had
been appointed to succeed Guzman, so that, in
future, everything is expected to go oh smooth
ly in the Commission. According to the Con
vention under which this Commission came into
existence, there can hardly bo a posesibility for
disagreement over contested claims.' . In the
cose of the failure of the two Governments to
agree upon one umpire, eace is empowered to
select its own umpire, and the cases upon which
disagreements arise are settled by lot. :
Vinnie Beam has just finished a new work of
sculpture, which has been sold to a Philadel
phian for $4,000. The subject is Miriam, the
Prophet, and sister of Aaron.
Telegraphic Brevities#
At the Base Ball Tournament in New York,
yesterday, the Bostons defeated the Mutuals,
the score standing 7 to 3.
—On Tuesday last a railway train ran into the
horse cars, near Paterson, N. J., injuring a lady
and breaking the arm of James Freeman, of
Chicago. The other passengers had a narrow es
cape. , . , t
—ln a melee in Cairo, HL, on Tuesday night,
between a man named Baugh and his wife, Baugh
was shot in the head. The wife was committed
to jail; Baugh’s injuries are not thought to bo
fatal.
—Yesterday afternoon, as Jas. W. Woods, a
clerk in the Old Colony Bailroad office in Bos
ton, was passing from the Paymaster’s room to
the Treasurer’s office on the same floor, and but
a few yards distantjhe was knocked down and
robbed of $4,000. The robber escaped#
—The jury in the case of the
Check, of Indianapolis, have brought in a ver
dict of guilty of murder in the first degree, with
the death penalty attached.
A Defaulting Teller Arrested*
PmpA-ngT.’PTTTA- Oct. 16.—John L. Martm, re
ceiving teller of the Cratesville National Bank,
was arrested at Bethlehem, to-day, charged with
embezzling funds of the hank to the amount oi
$26,000. ■ Martin has been a fugitive for nearly
two wdeks, and is said to have used the money
speculating in stocks.

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