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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1872-1963, October 24, 1872, Image 1

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VOLUME 26.
BEAL ESTATE.
THE IST ATTRACTIVE
SALE OFTHETEAR.
Beautiful firove Lots,
EACH 50 FEET FRONT,
-SlT 5 auction
ON THE GROUNDS,
AT WASHINGTON HEIGHTS
On SATURDAY, Oct. 25, 1672. bi
C. C. THAYER * CO.,
Real Estate Auctioneers and Brokers.
These lots are in the Vincennes KoadSobdivision,being
the west of southeast of Section 19, Township «7,
north of range 14. They arc finely located, adjoining the
celebrated Morgan Park on the oast, and haying a half
mile frontage on both sides of the Vincennes road, r rom
the northeast to the southwest line of this property. Vin
cennes road passes through a beautiful grore, ana on &
high ridge, making it exceedingly attractlre for homes.
In fact, no point could be more desirable. - The facilities
tor reaching the property are excellent, ana cannot be
surpassed. The Hock Island 4 Pacific
through the southeast comer of the sobdlylslon, at which
point a depot will be built, and the Washington Heights
Branch Railroad runs along the west line of the property,
and at its junction with Vincennes road and pharpsnoot
ers Park--v. a finejdepot is being built. With two depots
upon the property, great advantages and faclUtlea are
given. In the immediate vicinity of this subdivision im*
provenaents are rapidly going on; Quite a number of hne
consos are completed and cottages are being erected. At!
educational institution, upon an extensive scale. Is pro*
jocted by parties interested in property northeast of this
subdivision, and we have assurances that it will be a suc
sess. In brio/, for beauty of location, attractiveness, anr*
accessibility, the Vincennes Road Subdivision isnotsr^
interested in possessing pleasant sabar'am
homes, with beautiful groves ana delightful sum>und*
lugs, free from the dust and noise of a busy city, * attend
this sale. Title to property perfect. Abstract id title
furnished. . , , , .
Terms of sale, one-fourth cash, balance in one, two,
and three years, with interest at 8 per coal. /*, deposit of
10 per cent will be required on the day of sale, and the
balance of the first payment within 30 days.,
A free train will leave the depot of the Rock Island A
Pacific Railroad on Saturday, Oct. 28, nt 10 a. m., and
return after sale.
A free lunch will be served on the ground.
Let all go who can, for a pi eusant ride to this charming
suburb will prove beneficial, to the health, and a liberal
Investment in lota decidedly so to the pocket.
Plats of the property cai a be obtained at the office of the
Auctioneers-
C. 0. TEAYEE, & CO.,
186 East Madison-st.
ItTSICAIi.
Pianos
Organs.
200 Pianos and Organs for the
Trade, on the most favorable terms,
A large assortment of Pianos and
Organs to rent.
Grand, Square, and Upright Pianos
for sale. Payments received in in
stalments.
W. W. EnVTBALX.,
Cor. Wabash-av. and Thirteentli-st.
FURNITURE.
FASHIONABLE
PORNITURE!
W. W. STRONG EMTURE CO,,
353 to 359 W.Bandolpli-sti, CMcago,
Branch Salesroom, Wabasb*aT. and 22d*Bt.
"Wo call special attention to onr stock of Low Priced
Goods Bailable for present demands.
D.M.SWINEY&BEO.
MANUFACTURERS OF
ME OPFICE FURNITURE.
Counters, Partitions, Rtlils,
Cylinder Desks, Etc.
FACTOEY: 507 TO 513 KIHZIE-ST., CORIfER EEUBEH
ngVTRAT. RLOCg. Room 57.
TO BENT.
OFFICES m THE
Trim Bnilttf
At© nearly finished. Several are
yet untaken. Fire-proof, with
vaults. English tile floorsthrough
out. No offices in the city equal
these in every first-class respect.
Plans of the Tribune Building can
be seen at the office of
W. C. BOW,
Boom No. 1, Nevada Block,
WANTED:
WANTED.
The Equitable Life Assurance Society of the
United States, whose business is larger than
that of any other in the world, want three or
four of the best men in the city to represent the
Company here as Agents and Solicitors. Apply
at the office of the Northwestern Department,
corner Dearborn and Washington-sts.
. 150,000. M Drift VanteA
Immediately. Not particular as to looks; may bo rough,
but rnuit be hard. Address, stating where they may be
•mb, with price delivered, _
seen, wiux v FERGUS PRINTING COMPANY,
CAMPAIGN GOODS.
3F" LAGr S!
banners, bajdges,
<sscl
GEO, R. POSTER,
12 SouthMarket-st.
BRUSHES, &o.
FT&Tr, AND CLOTH BRUSHES.
A splendid assortment of Hair and Cloth Broshes.
Wholesale and Eetail—Very Cheap.
GERTS, LTJMBARD & CO.,
167 East Madison-st.
FINANCIAL.
MONEY TO LOAN
On Chicago city real estate. Fnnds in hand.
MEAD & COE,
79 West Madison-st.
A. O. Slaughter,
BANKER,
Comer Clark and Madison-sts. Boys and sells Stocks,
Bonds, and Geld. Receives money on deposit and tran
acta a General Banking and Brokerage BusineS.
Loans 3NT egotiatoci
Pn rwl estate, In tie city or suburbs, »t current rater.
G. B. HUBBARD, Jr.,
168 EMt.TVMilMtoa-rt.
fSfot Pail®
CLOTHING.
STATE-ST. 322
32
823
f! f| II
*%o U. U. U. JP
220 523
320 823
320 823 >»
320 223 “
320 823
320 323 •
320 323 a
822 220 C
323 820 H
2: •• 322 .320 H
z sa • 320 e
to „ 322 320 5
323 330 •
j-“ CHICAGO. ■ %
jP MYORK.
PITTSBURGE Y ™si™
“k ROCHESTER,
. MEN, YOUTHS.
C 3 MEN, YOUTHS, S
g MEN. YOUTHS, 5
2 MEN, YOUTHS, r
H MEN. YOUTHS, i
5 MSN, YOUTHS, 2
S5 MEN, YOUTHS, S
CHILDREN, BOYS. H
CHILDREN, BOYS, B
. CHILDREN, BOYS. a
< CHILDREN, BOYS, g
CHILDREN, BOYS. P
CHILDREN, BOYS.
CHILDREN, BOVS,
B So|s, s
cj&SSSg* B b^s.
320
320
320
S2O
cs
LARGEST AND MOST COMPLETE STOCK OF
FINE CLOTHING !
EVER OFFERED IN THIS MARKET, FOR
ALL AGES AND ALL SIZES.
EXTRA LARGE MEN FITTED.
A. J. NUTTING,
THE ONLY NEW YORK C. O. D. FINE CLOTHING
HOUSE IN THE WEST.
ADDITIONS TO OUR STOCK RECEIVED DAILY
FROM OUR
NEW YORK BROADWAY HOUSE.
320 and 322 STATE-ST.
BBANOH, 48 WEST MADISON-ST.
ASSURANCE.
LoMoi Assurance Gorpration
LoisriDOisr.
I
Ijooal Committee. \\
J. P. GIRAUD POSTER, GORDON NORRIE, f;
Of Foster 4 Thomson. Of Boorman, Johnston 4 Co. rj
CHARLES M. PRY, HOWARD POTTER, 'j
No. &9 Wall-st. Of Brown Bros. 4 Co.
GOOLD H. REDMOND, Of Denaiatoun 4 Co. . j
Total Funds, Gold, - $13,334,425 ‘
Fire Assets, Gold, - - $5,064,000*
G-EO. 0. CLARKE, Agent,
3 and 4 Bryan Block.
Insurance effected on Business Buildings, Merchandise,
Provisions, Dwellings and their contents.
HATS CAPS, AND FURS.
New Store.
New Stock.
BISHOP & BARNES,
Tie Poplar Hatters anl mr Manufacturers,
Hare remored to tbelr New Store.
Corner State and Monroe-sts.,
SIGN OF TWR BLAOK SEAR.
UNDERWEAR.
SMITH’S PATENT
PERFORATED
BUCKSKIN
UNDERGARMENTS.
ELMER & BALL,
AGENTS,
30 &*32 West Washington-fit.*
PAIEBANKS*
irr] standard
I 1 SCALES
TrJL OF ALL SIZES.
IfiSSiHFAIBBAKES, MOUSE SCO
Mr ' £5 WEST WASHINGTON-ST.
FORSYTHES
U. S. Standard Scales.
Forsyth’s Scale Warehouse,
4S S. DESPLAINES-ST.
MISCELLANEOUS.
PROTECTION AGAINST FIRE!
leHtn ii fence!
An exhibition of the new Eastern system of “Sprin
klers,” or Perforated Pipes, for the Instantaneous ex
tlnction of fires, will be given at Brown Brothers* Works,
northwest comer of South ClintonandWest Jackson-sta..
on Thursday afternoon, Oct, 34, at S o'clock sharp.
All interested are Invited to attend. .
Peiiers&Pajer Fasteners
At Culver, Page, Hoyne & Oo.’s,
STB! -ATSTP EAR.
DR. J. B. WALKER, Surgeon,
For Diseases and Deformities of tho EYE anoBAE.
200 WEST MADISON-ST.
Established In Chicago A. D. 1861.
Anderson’s Steam Laundry.
State-st. and Eldridge-courfc.
J3?" Goods called for and delivered. Branch Office, 319
West Madison-st.!
Regular Assembly of Oriental Consistory, S.*. P.'.R.*.
S.-. at their Rendezvous, cor. Twenty-third-at. and Pral
rio-av.. thin (Thursday) evening. A full attendance is
desired, as business of vital importance will be presented
for action. By order of the 111,'•Cora.'. In Chief.
J. B. SLIGHTER, Grand Seo*y.
There will also be a Special Assembly of Van Rensselaer
Grand Lodge Perfection, A. &A. Bite Masons, at same
time and place, for work. All oretnren elect who have
been notified by the Secretary, are requested to be pres
“*• B,orderof theT -'- biWteb. m,
CHICAGO.
SCALES.
118 and 120 Monroe-at.. Chicago.
MEETINGS.
Masonic.
POLITICAL
How Grant’s Inspectors
Propose to Carry
New York
City.
Grand Exodus of Clerical Voters
From Washington.
Liberal Demonstrations in
Belleville and Bock
ford.
A Venomous Lie Nailed,
HOW THE ELECTION COMMISSIONERS WILL
DO IT IN NEW YORK.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
New Yobk, Oot. 23.—Commissioner Daven
port, of New York, was an aid under General
Bntler, in New Orleans. As to the comments of
the New York press bn his condnct, be remark
ed, in the presence of numerous bystanders, in
his office, yesterday: “I am independent of
them. I shall carry out the enforcement of the
law to the letter.” In a comer of Davenport’s
office there is a telegraphic instrument, which
communicates with bis house, and also with the
headquarters of the Custom House Re
publican Committee in the Fifth
Avenue Hotel. This instrument, it
is said, is to be used by Davenport in ordering
arrests of obnoxious citizens before, and on the
day of, election. Blank warrants bearing Daven
port’s signature will be in readiness in every
district, and it will only bo necessary to write
in the names of parties who are to be taken into
custody.
A telegraphic instrument has also been placed
in the Grand Jury room, at the dis
posal of Colonel Desanges, Chief Depu
ty Marshal, who is to have, next
to General Sharpe, complete charge of the polls
on the day of election.
Davenport has assured his Bepnblican friends
that he will so administer his office as to re
duce the vote of this city to 120,003, in which
case he calculates there will be a majority of
5,000 for Grant. The Grant frauds in Philadel
phia are to be cast in the shade by the Grant
frauds in this city, which gave Seymour in 1868
60,000.
GRAND LIBERAL DEMONSTRATION AT BELLE
VILLE.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune .
Belleville, 111., Oct. 23. —The grand rally of
the campaign was had here by the Liberals to
day and this evening. People came in from all
parts of the country, and were addressed this
afternoon by Senator Trumbull and Jndge
Eustace, in Turner's Hall, which was crowded to
suffocation. The Senator spoke to the citizens
of his home in early manhood with much feel
ing, and was very effective. Judge
Eustace mode a most telling address,
driving a nail home with almost every sen
tence, and producing intense enthusiasm.
This evening the town has been absolutely
wild with excitement. The pyrotechnic display
was truly magnificent. For a time the rockets,
Boman candles, and blue lights made the scene
bright as day. The air seemed filled with fall
ing stars, and thousands of people were gath
ered on the streets, all partaking of the general
ioy, rendering the scene if possible more bril
liant. was the grandest torch-light procession
that nas ever marched in Southern Illinois. A
large processions were formed in each ward and
marched towards the Court House square,
which was dazzling to behold, as were all the
streets leading from it for the distance of sev
eral squares. It was nearly impossible to get■
through the crowd, which was cheering vocifer
ously for Greeley, Brown, Koemer, Trumbull,
Eustace, and other Liberal leaders. No pen
can picture the vast enthusiastic assemblage
of men, women, and children tonight, <
crowding the streets of the home of Koemer.,
The vast multitude were eloquently addressed,
by the next Vice President, Hon. B. Gratz,
Brown, from the Court House steps. He was
followed in a telling speech by Hon. Casper 1
Butz, who evidently produces a deep impression.,
St.Clair County is alive to the momentous issues '
of the hour, and will prove the thoughtful in
telligence of her citizens by giving the largest
Liberal gain in November of any.county in Illi
nois.
THE DEPARTMENT CLERKS ABANDONING BUBL
NESS FOR POLITICS.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune,
Washington, Oct. 23. —From this time until
the week after the Presidential election the pub
lic business in Washington will be left to take
care of itself. Every Grant voter, from the head
of a Department or Bureau down to the poorest
messenger, is required to be on hand, and the
exit from the city has already begun. All the
clerks in the departments have been
already paid for the month of Oc
tober, six or eight days in advance
of the usual time, and, by the last of next week,
if the exit continues, there will not b© officers
enough in the city to attend to the current busi
ness of the Government.
The report telegraphed from this city to the
New York JSxening J*osl t that Hon. Josm D. De
frees concedes the election of Grant, istemphati
cally denied by that gentleman, who says he
believes that it only requires courage nod effort
to elect Mr. Greeley, and that he will be
elected.
The Administration is still sending stumpers
down into North Carolina, not feeling altogether
assured of that State. John A. Bingham, who is
now in the city, will leave for that State to-mor
row, in company with Allen Butherford, the
Third Auditor.
LIBERAL MOVEMENT IN ROCKFORD,
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Bockfobs, HI., Oct. 23.—General Farnsworth
addressed a large and enthusiastic audience in
Brown’s Hall to-night. His speech was oneof the
most stirring of the campaign. He defied any
Grant man present to answer his clinching argu
ments, and fearlessly exposed the corruption
that is undermining the whole Administration.
The cheers at the mention of the names of
Horace Greeley, Charles Sumner, Lyman Tram
hull, and Carl Schurz were deafening, and
demonstrated clearly the state of public senti
ment.
The manner in which the speaker defended his
character against the vile calumnies that have
been circulated about him, was well received
by the audience, and their whole sympathy
seemed to go with him. At 11 o’clock he
closed bis speech, which was listened to
throughout with the most profound attention.
The reception of General Farnsworth in Bock-i
ford was more enthusiastic than that of auyl
speaker during the campaign.
The Liberal element is gaining ground every
day in Bockford, and that, too, in the very teeth
of the dark ways used by the opposition party
to get votes.
THE LIBERALS AT SPRINGFIELD. ILL.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune .
Spbinofielij, HI., Oct 23.—The Liberal Demo
cratic Central Committee for this County met im
this city to-day, and every township was repre
eented, and the utmost harmony prevailed.
Views were interchanged, and established the fact
that, so tar as this county waa concerned, there,
was a determination to bring ont every vote to
be cast for Greeley and Brown. There are no
Bourbons, and hut few persons reluctant to vote
the Liberal ticket in the Democratic party.
There is no hope for Jo. Ledlie, as he is btidly
complicated with tho Grant managers here to,act
independently. It is believed that his will be
the only ticket caet for O Conor and Adams in
tho county.
LIBERAL MEETING AT EFFINGHAM.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Effingham, m., Oct. 23.—General Black ad
dteewa «19 ot this scanty at the Opart
CHICAGO, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1872
House this evening. His audience was largely
composed of farmers from the various town
ships in the county who are here attending the
fair. The General’s address was well received
throughout, and has done much to stir up the
friends of reform in this county. The Germans
here are solid for Greeley and toe State ticket.
The Hon J. N. Gwinn, candidate for Elector.
B. F. Kagg, Wm. Gilmore, F. Gilmore, and
others, are making a vigorous canvass and doing
food work. Effingham County is good for a
andsome Liberal majority in November.
THE ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OPINION ON NEW
YORK POLITICS.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune,
Washington, D. C., Oot. 23.—Attorney Gen
eral Williams, after hie return from his canvass
in the interior of New York, expressed the belief
that it was not possible for Greeley to carry that
State, as the party managers in the various dis
tricts since the October elections had abandoned
all hope of electing Greeley, and were now ex
pending their whole energy to elect Keman. To
this end the Democrats and Liberals were trad
ing votes for Neman's benefit, famishing a vote
for Grant, and obtaining in return one for Ker
nan. By this means, the Attorney General said,
they hoped to defeat General Dix for Governor.
AN INFAMOUS LIE NAILED.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune .
. Quincy, Oct. 23.—The Herald will publish to
morrow the statement and affidavits of 100 citi
zens of Palmyra, Mo., denying the infamous
libel that a Rebel flag was raised at that place,
at a Liberal meeting last Thursday. The denial
is positive and complete.
"A STRAIGHT-OUT” FIZZLE.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune
Dubuque, Oot. 23.—The straight Democratic
County Convention called for this evening was
the worst fizzle known in this campaign. Only
four straight-outers were on hand, and they
soon adjourned.
THE INDIANA ELECTION RETURNS IN FULL.
Indianapolis, Oct. 23.—T1i0 complete official
returns of the October election received at the
Secretary of State’s office show the following
On the State ticket—For Governor, Hendricks,
Democrat, 1,118 majority. For Lieutenant Gov
ernor, Sexton, Bepubiican, 880; Secretary of
State, Curnr, Bepubiican, 184; Auditor, Wild
man, Bepubiican. 275; Treasurer, Glover, Be
pubiican, 783; Attorney General, Denny, Be
pubiican, 644; Superintendent of Public Instruc
tion, Hopkins, Democrat. 957; Beporter of the
Supreme Court, Black, Kepublioan, 427; Clerk
of the Supreme Court, Schall, Bepubiican, 1,503;
Congress-at-Large, Orth, Bepubiican, 162; Wm
■Williams, Eep., 633 ; First Congressional Dis
trict, Nibiaok, Dem., 182; Second District,
Wolfe, Dem., 6,654; Third District, Hnlman,
Dem., 1,328 ; Fourth District, Wilson, Eep.,
880; Fifth District, Cobum, Eep., ,793; Sixth
District, Hunter, Bep., 657; Seventh District,
Cason, Eep., 197 ; Eighth District, Turner, Eep.,
2,939 ; Ninth District, Neff, Liberal, 124; Tenth
District, Saylor, Eep., 2,185; Eleventh Dis
trict, Packard, Eep., 985. The total "number of
votes cast for Governor in the State was 377,-
700, an increase in four years of over 65,000.
The straight-out Democratic ticket received
about 130 votes in the State.
Adboba, HI., Oct. 23.—The anti-Masons in
this vicinity meet in convention to-morrow at
Bt. Charles, HI., to consider the propriety of
potting county officers in nomination at the com
ing election. p
THE MADISON LIBERALS.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Madison, Oct. 23.—The Liberals are making
preparations for a big meeting Friday night,
when the Hon. Ignatius Donnelly, of Minnesota,
speaks.
NOTES FROM OUR CORRESPONDENCE. ;
Woodstock, 111., Oct. 22.—The Court-House
in this town was packed last evening, to hear i
General Farnsworth, who addressed his audience ' t
in a speech of over two hours and a half, com- •
manding the closest attention, and frequent ap- ,
plause. The meeting was afterwards addressed
by H. W. McLean, Esq., one of the old wheel
horses of the Bepubiican party, who has recent
ly pronounced for Greeley, and by the Hon.
Bichard Bishop, candidate for theiegislftture,;
both of this county. The meeting was a decided
success. '
Deoatdb, HI., Oct. 22.—The Liberals of Cen
tral Illinois hold a mass meeting at Decatur on
Wednesday, Oct. 80. The Hon. Thomas A.
Hendricks, the Hon. B. Gratz Brown, the Hon.
Gustavus Koemer, and the Jlon W. W. O’Brien
have each and all signified their intention to be
present.
Senator Morton talked to the Bepubhcans here
yesterday. Ho had the best of -weather, and
everything favorable, but not more than 1,000
hearers. Both parties were much disappointed
in the crowd.
Pawpaw, Mich., 19.—The October elections
have not hurt the Greeley cause in this (Van
Buren) county. We still find the Bepnblioans
coming over. They are following the Hon.
Chandler Eichards and William H. Tucker,
Esq.,—two of the leading lawyers of our. her,—
men who have been prominent in the Bepubiican
I party of this county. Mr. Tucker is a splendid
I speaker, and is engaged in canvassing this Con
i gressional District in behalf of the Liberal
cause. Not a Greeley Bepubiican has taken a
backward step since the late elections; they
; seem to be more determined.
MISCELLANEOUS.
New Yobk, Oct. 23.—During a political pro
cession at Passaic, N. J., on Monday night, it is
reported that a fight occurred, in which sixty
persons were more or less injured.
The Committee of Seventy last night discuss
ed a proposition to urge Lawrence to withdraw
his candidature for the Mayoralty.
Alonzo B. Cornell has resigned the Surveyor
ship of the Port of New York, to accept his nom
ination for the Assembly.
White Biveb Junction, Vt., Oct. 23. —L.P.
Poland has been renominated to Congress by the
Republicans of the Second District.
Memphis, Oct, 23.—The Hon. David A. Munn,
ex-member of Congress, has announced himself
an independent Republican candidate for Con
gess in the Eighth Tennessee District. H. W.
. Vaughn, the present incumbent and Demo
cratic candidate, has withdrawn, leaving three
other independent candidates in the field.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune,
New Yobk, Oct. 19.—A leiter from Woburn,
Maes., says the alliance between the Liberals
and Labor Reformers in the Fifth District in
sures General Banks’ re-election to Congress,
over Gooch, Republican, by a heavy majority.
Ho EastemltailwayDlsastcr.-Otlier
Portsmouth, N. H., Oct. Jj3.—Atthe Coroner’s
inquest to-day over the body of Captain Norton,
lulled in the recent railroad disaster at Sea
brook, Charles G. Dow, of East Salisbury, brake
man of the freight train, who was accountable
for the condition of the switch that caused the
smash-up, was examined, and, before he had
concluded, the inquest was adjoumad. He said
he placed the switch right for the express train,
but did not lock it.
Detroit, Oct. 23.—A serious accident occurred
on the new Flint River Railrord, near Flint, yes
terday* A construction train was thrown off the
track by running over a cow, and the following
persona were injured; John Murphy, killed,
his body being mangled in a shocking manner ;
John Doty, leg broken, but will recover; James
Qrunly, spine injured, and it,is feared that he will
notrecover; JohnMuglan, two ribs broken and
other slight injuries, buthe will recover; Patrick
Mnlgon, slightly injured about the head, not
dangerously; Michael Murray, two ribs broken
and injured about the head and neck. A num
ber of others were slightly injured.
Cedar Rapids, lowa, 0ct..23. —A train on the
Chicago & Northwestern Railroad was crossing
a bridge near Bertram, lowa, at 6 o’clock last
evening, when the track spread, after the engine
and four cars passed over safely, and one car
was off the track, when the 1 bridge broke, and
threw twelve cars into a ditAi. Trains are all
delayed, and passengers and baggage have to he
transferred. No one was injured.
—A fire at Masonville, lowa, yesterday mom*
Ing, destroyed the large bam of S. T. Oviatt,
filled with grain, The loss is $25,0Q0; partly in
sored*
ANTI-MASONIC MOVEMENT.
DEATH ON THE RAIL.
Accidents*
WASHINGTON.
Settlement of the San Juan Boun
dary Question,
The Emperor of Germany De
cides in Favor of the
United States.
Diplomatic Intrigue—Probable Cabi
net Changes.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
THE GEORGETOWN COAL TRADE.
Washington, D. C., Oct. 23.—The people of
this District, surfeited with politics, are now ex
periencing a genuine sensation in the growing
up of important commercial connections with
England and the British Provinces, growing out
of the coal famine. Coal is now being shipped
from the port of Georgetown direct to India, to.
South America, and the West Indies. It is au
thoritatively stated that several hundred
thousand tons of American coal have recently
been purchased here on orders transferred
from England to the United States. The great
er portion of these purchases is of the soft bitu
minous coal of Maryland, and will be filled at
the Cumberland mines, and will be sent thence
to Georgetown by way of the Chesapeake .&
Ohio Canal for transhipment. Several vessels
have already left this port within a few weeks
with cargoes of soft coal for foreign countries,
and others are expected to arrive and clear be
fore the close of navigation. Foreign bottoms
are mainly employed for this service, because of
their peculiar rig and construction, which ren
ders them more seaworthy than American ves
sels.
ALSATIAN mmOBATION.
The advance guard of the large body of emi
grants from Alsace and Lorraine, who
are to settle in the neighborhood of
Alexandria, have reached that city, and
are now engaged in prospecting for favorable
sites wherein to settle. Some time will be de
voted by these immigrants to the inspection of
several tracts of land which are in the market in
that section of Virginia. They desire not less
than 4,000 acres in a body, though they would
prefer a much larger quantity, and will be gov
erned by the price and location of the land. The
colony now numbers about 200 families, who
are skilled in arts, manufactures, and farming.
They propose to form a joint stock company,
locate a town, and lay out farms, etc. Their
purpose is to exclude all others from the colony
but those who came with them, for the term of
five years, during which time no one of the
colony will be authorized to dispose of any por
tion of the lands purchased and embraced with
in their survey. If they can be suited in Vir
ginia on good terms, they say they can increase
their colony to 2,000 families without any.
trouble.
THE CUBBEKOV QUESTION.
Application has been made to the bank-note
companies of New York to have engrossed and
printed'certificates of deposit made payable to
bearer in the similitude of bank notes. Parties
are here to urge this action by the Treasury De
partment. The letter of the law does not pro
hibit this, but the spirit of the law is believed to
be conclusively in opposition thereto. The law
designates what should be currency, and explic
itly provides that nothing shall be issued in the
shape of a circulating medium but National Bank
notes and legal tenders. At present the National
Banks issue certificates of deposit which are pay
able to order, but not in a form to be used in the
way of general circulation. If, then, these cer
tificates of deposit are commonly issued by
banks, quite naturally they, as this proposition
would indicate, are intended as notes for gen
eral circulation. By the adoption of the mode
now proposed, the so-called wild-cat banking
would bo again inaugurated in its worst possible
form. The banks from which the certificates
are to emanate would have the sanction of the
United States Treasury to do business as Na
tional Banks. Although such banks may have
given security for only 850,000, they might issue
ieir certificates of deposit with impunity to al
most a fabulous amount.
diplomatic nrmounra— fish, washbubne, ei
It is pretty well authenticated that the Secre
tary of State is not now among the most popular
of the Cabinet ministers at the White House. Of
course time changes all things. One year ago
when Mr. Fish decided to retire, the
President was so averse to the change,
that he caused a paper to be
circulated requesting United States Senators to
ash Fish to remain. The condition of affairs is
now so different that the President has caused
it to be intimated to the head of the State De
partment through an intimate friend of both
parties that the resignation of the latter will be
accepted whenever it is found convenient to
tender it. The cause of this change of friend
ship, it is stated, is the desire of Washbumeto.
return from Europe. Our French Minister has
not found his position a bed of roses. The reasons
for this repugnance are partly political, but
largely of a social character. Mr. Fish has long
desired to go abroad, but only in the capacity of
Minister to St. James. If the arrangement can
be amicably made to transfer Schenck to Paris,
there will be no difficulty in satisfying this in
trigue all around. This is the latest piece of
diplomatic gossip going the rounds here, and it
is oased on more than ordinary authority.
SETTLEMENT OP THE SAN JUAN BOUND ABY.
Washington, Oct. 23.—The following despatch
was to-night received from Minister Bancroft:
Beblin, Oct. 23.
To Eon, Hamilton Fish
The three experts to whom the American
Memorial on Canal De Haro and the British case
were referred, have made, each for himself, a
very elaborate report on the question, supporting
their opinion by the reasons stated with tech
nical precision and exactness.
The Emperor has also with the highest sense
of official duty given bis personal attention to
the subject, and after most careful study and
deliberation has arrived at a conclusion satisfac
tory to his own sense of justice. The reports of
experts with reasons have not been, communi
cated to us.
The decree of the imperial arbitrator, which
has been communicated, has a form not so much
of a decree in council as of a cabinet order. It
does not enter into any elaborate exposi
tion of the decision, but, without diverging
in the least from the point presented for arbitra
tion, decrees that the claim of the United States of
America as most in accordance with the true in
terpretation of the Treaty of June 15,1816.
I shall forward the official copy of the decree
by special messenger.
(Signed) Banceoft.
the fbeedmens* savings bake.
There are now in the Freedmens’ Savings Bank
and its branches, principally from the South, an
aggregate of deposits of over $£,000,000. Re
ports as to the onsoundness of the institution
are groundless.
WALL STREET.
Review of the money. Bond) Stock
and Produce markets*
Special Despatch to the Chicago Tribune .
New York, Oct. 23.—The money market was
rather irregular to-day, though not so dear as
yesterday. The general rate on call was 7 per
cent, and the market was very uniform at this
rate until nearly the close, when there was a de
cline to £ per cent. Time loans are quoted at 7
per cent and a commission, the latter varying
according to the collaterals and standing of the
borrower. Gold loans on time are quoted at
% per cent for the use of gold; %to % P er
cent for the balance of the year, and ££
per cent for six months. The best mercantile
paper sells at 10 to 12per cent, 9 per cent being
an exceptional rate. The prospect of an advance
in the Bank of England rate to-morrow was
much discussed. Private telegrams from Lon
don to-day in some cases report money stringent,
and in others easier. The outflow of gold from
the bank is the pivot upon which the rate of
interest turns, and we are entirely ignorant here
of the extent of this outflow. Some arrange
ments ought to he made whereby the cable
would give some light in regard to thia import
ant matter.
THE GOLD CORNER.
The comer in cash gold was renewed with in-
creased vigor in ihe Gold Boom to-day. Before
•the case of the Clearing Honse most of the
loans were made at % to & per cent, but during
the afternoon cash gold was made still scarcer,
and as high as 1 per cent was paid. It was
stated that one broker alone borrowed $1,000,000
at this rate. The Bank of Montreal is still cred
ited with making this squeeze in cash gold, and
among those who had to borrow gold
there was much feeling against that
concern. The effect on foreign ex
change rates was comparatively trifling, but
business generally was checked. The November
interest is coming out of the Treasury slowly,
and has not yet bean of much assistance in easing
the gold market.
STOCKS.
The stock market was driver to-day, and de
cidedly in contrast with the ’“vaent and ac
tivity for nearly two week/
were important only in f
time during the morning ■. ~*A l£
disposition towards firmness, ; «
noon there was a weak feeling,acc()iL • :
a gradual decline in prices. The
have sold stocks freely within the past few
days, and the market feels the weight of this
load of long stocks. Pacific Mail fluctuated
between 100% and 102% with the late dealings
at 101% to 102. Canton rose from 105 to 107 on
the announcement that the Hon. Daniel Drew
and others had gone to Baltimore to sell some
property. Chios advanced from 46 to 47, and
later declined to 46% Western Union advanced
from 78% to 79%, and reached to 70%. North
west common advanced from 74% to
75, and afterwards 'declined to 74%,
Atlantic Mail declined from 19% to 18%. The
fluctuations in the balance of the list tfbre % to
exchange dull, and closed at 108% for
60 days, and 110% for sight.
Gold firmer; advanced from 112% to 118%*
WANTS TO KNOW.
The Bulletin would like to know how it came
to pass (hat a demand was made.aimutaneonaly
in high business circles at Philadelphia. Pitts
burgh, and Chicago for a re-issne of the $44,000,-
000 legal-tenders retired by Mr. McCulloch.
There was evidently concert of action in the
matter, but whether the movement was started
for political purposes or for speculative effect, it
baa quickly come to an-end.
Government bonds a'fraction firmer but quiet*
Central Pacific bonds dosed at 99%@100; union
Pacific firsts, [email protected]%; land grants, 77%@77%;
incomes, 80%®80%.
THE PRODUCE MARKETS.
The market for flour was quiet but finply
held. Bow grades were fairly active s medium
extras dull and tame, and family very strong and
salable. No. 2 and superfine fairly active. At
the dose the market was dull and rather low
er for most grades, under 39. In wheat, prices
were better and the market doses firm for good
spring, and fairly active demand, chiefly for
export. Winter steady. Pork doses with more
steadiness, with a fair local demand and little
inquiry for future. For future delivery, 250.bar
rels of mess pork, seller this month, at $10.45.
Gut meats steady. Bacon stronger for winter
months. Sales of 1,000 boxes short and long
clear for the winter months on private terms;
600 boxes short dear for February and March at
8 S-16c. Bard steadier; demand fair.
FOREIGN.
CReAt BRITAIN.
London, Oct. 23.—(A large meeting in favor of
amnesty to the Fenian prisoners was held last
evening in Manchester, at which Isaac Butt, M.
P., leader of the Irif&iome rule party, was the
principal speaker. Mr. Butt, in the course of
frig remarks, said that Ireland newer could wel
come Gladatone«to her soil onleafc amnesty to her
eons was made complete. He also spoke in
terms of vigorous censure of the treatment ac
corded to prisoners, who, he alleged, have suf
fered during their confinement gross cruelties at
the hands of their jailors.
The market town of Norihwicht in the County
Chester, was partially flooded yesterday by an
overflow of the Biver*3Veaver, which occasioned
considerable damage toVproperty. The waters
have now subsided, antfT the danger of greater
disaster is over. :
MEXICO.
Havana, Oct. 21.—late advices from the City
of- Mexico have been received. The Mexican
Congress bad created a Soxsate.
City or Mexico, Oct. I#.— The political sitna-:
tionis improving, and it is; thought the Admin
istration of Lento de Tejbola will be snccessfoL.
The primary elections toc|h place on the 18th
lost. '
Lardo do Tejada’s nomination was unopposed, •
and the result, probably, ivdl be declared in time
for him to enter npon the - regular term of office;
on the Ist of December.' - ~ : '
The Minister of the Interior has presented a
message to Congress urging a concession to the
International Railroad, now under contract from
the Capita], Lagoa, and Mazatlan to the United
States. The recommendation of the Minister is
in the strongest terms, showing the great inter
est felt by the Executive in the building of rail
roads.
The Government grants- the Company a sub
vention of 89,500 for each kilometer of road it
an*ii build, an extra premium of SIOO,OOO for
every .year the road is finished inside of ten
years, and many other advantages.
A Commission has been appointed to investi
gate affairs on the Bio Grande.
Mazatlan is again in possession of the Govern
ment. Forfirio Diaz and Donalo Qaerra are the
only rebels of note who have not accepted am
nesty.
RUSSIA.
St. Petessbusq, 0ct.23.-bfßcial advices report
the discovery of a conspiracy in the Caucasus
for the overthrow of the Russian authorities in
that province of the Empire. A general rising
of the tribes was intended, but the leaders of'
the contemplated revolt were secured and.
thrown into prison. Quiet now prevails. I
CUBA.
Havana, Oct. 23.—The insurgents under Dias»
attacked the village of Cano. The fighting was*
severe, but reinforcements arrived from Cata-J
lano, and the insurgents were compelled to re
tire. Six rebels and three Spaniards were killed..
Another body of Diaz’ forces made an attacks
upon Lasal, but it proved unsuccessful.
PORTO RICO.
Havana, Oct. 23.— The correspondence of the
Havana journals indicates an excited state o£
affairs at Porto Rico, and a disturbance between,
the Liberals and Conservatives is thought prob-,
able.
It is reported that Governor Bivea baa re
turned to Spain.
Destructive Fire at East Saginaw#
Detroit, Mich., Oct. 23.—Last night a very
destructive fire occurred at East Saginaw. It 1
first broke out in the grocery of A. F. G. Wood
ard, in the Crouse Block, from spilled kerosene,
and destroyed the entire block. The Oronsa
Block was owned by Jesse Hoyt, of New York.
Theloaais about $25,000, fully insured. Mr. Wood
ard’s loss is $20,000, insured for $4,400, A. A.
Dunk, druggist, loses $20,000; insured for
$6,000. Schatt A Co., clothing dealers, lose
largely, but the amount is not known ; insured
for about $25,000. Goldsmith Bros., cloth
ing, loss not known; insured for $9,000.
Large quantities of goods were carried out
and secured from these stores. In the two
upper stories were the offices of Dr. Wheel
er; W. J. Baiter, dumber; the Huron
Booming Company; Edward Avery 4 Co.,
lumber; John F. Driggs; Bipley A Bose, land
dealers, and the photograph gallery of Good
ridge Bros. The latter loses $3,500, with no in
surance. Baxter has $5,000 insurance on his
furniture; the others have none. The fire at
one time threatened the whole north side of
Genesee street, including the Everett House and
several of the finest blocks in the city. The to
tal loss is from SIOO,OOO to $125,000.
Important Decision.
Oct. 23.—A colored man nam-
Detboit, Mich.
Ed Hedgeway, who was refused registration as a
voter, applied to the Supreme Conn for an order
compelling the Board to register him. His
parents were slaves in Virginia, but ran sway and
escaped to Montreal, where the petitioner was
bom. He claimed that he was a citizen under the
act of 1855, declaring; that Children of citizens
bom abroad were natural citizens of the United
States. Other claims were advanced, but this
was the principal point, and the cause was de
cided adverse to tne (petitioner, and to the ef
fect that he was a foreigner and obliged to tase
oat ofttanlizfttiqQ era m eaclj-
NUMBER 67.
NEW YORK.
Another Arbitrary Arrest by an
Election'lnspector.
Rogers, the Murderer, Sen-
tenced to be Hung.
Boss Tweed and Mayor Hall in Court.
ijo a . Miscellaneous Local News.
Special Despatch to The Chicago Tribune.
ANOTHER FEDERAL OUTRAGE.
New York, Cot. 23.—Another American citi
zen in New York was dragged from his own
premises to-day for declining to talk to As
sistant Election Supervisor, all these Supervisors
being active supporters of Grant, and in a con
dition of involuntary servitude to Tom Murphy.
This morning, John Heenan, a special Deputy
Marshal assigned to duty in the Seventh Ward,
entered the store of Mr. Chaa. Hussey, a liquor
dealer on the comer of Madison and Oliver
streets, and began asking him several questions
touching his right to vote. Mr. Hussey declined
to reply, and told the Marshal that he had no
right to put them. The Marshal insisted he had
authority, and would arrest him if he persisted
in refusing to give him the information sought.
Mr. Hussey told him to leave his store, but ha
declined, and Mr. Hussey then ejected him. He
then rushed to the office of Commissioner Dav
enport and made a charge against Hupey for
resisting bim in the execution of his duty, aud
Davenport issued a warrant. Hussey was taken
before Commissioner Davenport. There were
quite a number of Radical politicians
m the court room. all eagerly
waiting a disposition of the case. When Mr.
Hussey was arraigned. Commissioner Daven
port informed him that he was charged with the
offence of resisting a special Deputy Marshal
while engaged in the duty of verifying the regis
try. Mr. Hussey said he believed he had a rigut
to refuse to answer questions put to him by
complainant; He had, he said, - read an editorial
in a morning paper in which citizens were told
that they need not answer questions
put by election officers, and he
believed that that was good
legal advice. A Radical politician here exclaimed
that it might bo necessary to haul up young
James Gordon Bennett, Jr., for writing such an
editorial as that. He would, he said, go in for
doing that if necessary. Mr. Hussey said he
thought every citizen had a legal right to be sa
enzefrom interference in his home or place of
business. Commissioner Davenport fixed the
bail at SSOO. Mr. Hussey then left the court
room with his friends.
BOSS* TWEED.
The appearance of Boss Tweed*in Court, to
day y in the custody of a Deputy Sheriff, made a
Seat sensation around the unfinished Court
ouse that has cost ten millions. Tweed droy®
down town in a coupe, and. having justified in
SIO,OOO additional bail, he left the scene in com
pany with his. brother Bichard. The “ Boss ”
looked well and smiling. He was dressed neatly
in black with a white cravat. His immense dia
mond pin was not visible. Before he arrived in
the Court, Mayor Hall had pressed for an imme
diate trial of his own case, which was acceded to.
As soon as Hull had pleaded not guilty, Tweed
came *in and-transacted his little business.
Tsfreed will thus be a spectator of whatever ugly
developments may come out in Hall’s trial, and
rfl-p Judge from'Hall’s fate what he must appre
hend. it is believed .hy. many that Tweed will
become a fugitive the moment he begins seri
ously to fear for his liberty.
.MAYOB HALLs TBIAL.
A jury to try Mayor Hall was quickly empan
elled, he having his former tactics in
challenging.. His. trial willproceed to-morrow.
IOWA.
State Baptist Convention*
' Custom, -lowa,. Oct." 23.—Tne Thirty-first
. Meeting of the lowa Baptist Convention'
commenced at the Baptist Church, in this city,
ftin evening. The • house was crowded, —80 to *
100 delegates being in attendance; The Sabbath'
School union meeting came first. In the ab
sence of the President, Vico President Prescott,
preaded. -Thirtyminutes of devotional exercises
were led. by Bev. Bloodgood, of Florence. The
opening sermon was preached by Rev. J. W.
Daniels/of Cedar Rapids. Subject “Relation
of the Bible to the World.” He showed the ne
cessity ,of nations keeping an open Bible for
their own prosperity.
. The Committee on nominations reported S. H.
of Ames, for President; Rev. J. Sun
derland. of Sioux City, Corresponding Secre
tary ; E. T. Cressey, of DesHoines, Treasurer,
fepri twenty vices Presidents. The report was
adopted.
Bev. Dr. Gardner, Secretary of the Missionary
Union, arrived late, and spoke briefly on Bev.
Daniel’s theme, urging the great need of more
Bible in schools, and less mechanism.
Half an hour was spent in hearing reports of
Slhe Secretaries of twenty Sabbath-school Asso
ciations, pertaining to work done within their
borders last year. Most of these showed an en
couraging degree of prosperity and increase.
The officers elected to-night appointed a Com
stittee of Credentials on the expediency of put
ting a State Sunday-School Missionary into the
ffielcL
Adjourned.
Delegates and visitors are hourly arriving.
Telegrapliio Brevities*
Burwin Loses, an old citizen of Dwight,
Mich., was run over on Tuesday, and seriously
injured.
—Over 100 pedagogues are in session in Dela
ware County, lowa.
—Rates of freight from Dubuque to St. Louis,
by river, have advanced five cents per hundred
pounds.
—A man named Thomas Handon, living near
Mt. Hawley, Peoria County, 111., was thrown
from a runaway team on Tuesday night, and had
his skull and head hurt so badly that his recov
ery is impossible.
—A Tnun named Gronk, who lived at Wayne,
Iffiob., was instantly killed on Tuesday night by
the falling of a derrick at Groase Isle, near De
troit.
—A Boston despatch says: “Reports of the
accident on the Eastern Railroad, on Tuesday,
depreciated the stock of the road from 110 to
102. The price was again raised to 105.”
—Rev. John L. Dudley, pastor of the Ply
mouth Church of Milwaukee, was married at the
Park Hotel, in Madison, yesterday morning, to
Miss Marion V. Churchill, connected with the
Milwaukee Sentinel for many years as a writer of
rare accomplishments. The ceremony was per
formed by the Bev. C. H. Richards.
—At Rockford, Floyd County, lowa, on Tues
day, a farmer set a stack of waste straw on fire.
The flames spread rapidly to adjoining fields,
burned up a number of large stack
yards, and consumed the entire grain crop of
a large number of farms. The loss will reach
S3 ,OM.
—Two men, named Gustave Schafer and Fred.
Springer, workmen in Ludlow’s wire works fac
tory, m St. Louis, quarreled, on Tuesday, about
a division of wages, and Springer struck Schafer
on the temple with a pair of tongs, fracturing
his akulL Schafer died yesterday. Springer
was arrested.
—Edward Jackson, one of four negroes who
engaged in a riot in Springfield, UL, a short
time since, in which the police were badly cut
with razors, was yesterday convicted by a jury
before A. N. J. Crook, Judge of the County
Court. He has not been sentenced yet. His
confederates escaped at the time, and are still at
large.
—The contract for the labor of 150 convicts in
the Illinois Penitentiary, advertised to be let on
Hie 17th iuet., has been awarded by the Commis
sioners to Emery Brothers & Co., of Chicago.
—The fifth biennial meeting of the National
Conference of the Unitarian Churches is now be
ing held in Boston. The attendance numbers
573 delegates. Various reports from local con
ferences were read yesterday showing the en
couraging progress of Unitarianism throughout
the country.
—The funeral of the wife of Colonel Thomas
H. Kelson, Minister to Mexico, was attended at
Terre Haute, yesterday, by a very large con*
c9«3s<£si(ia«Dß,

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