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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1872-1963, April 16, 1873, Image 8

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FOREIGN.
No Change in tho Condition of tho
Pope Yesterday.
Decided Change In the Situation In
Khiva—A Philo-Russian
Sentiment.
Oen* Ccspodcs on tlio Present
Condition of tlio Cuban
Rebellion.
ITALY.
Romb, April IB—Noon.—Tho condition of tho
Pope Is unchanged to-day.
Cardinal DoAngells, Chamberlain of tho
Roman Church, has boon summoned to Romo.
1 atub, April 15— Evening.—There was a rumor
on tho Bourse late this afternoon that tho Pope
was dead. It has received no confirmation.
GREAT BRITAIN.
London, April IB.— A riot occurred in Chat
ham, yesterday, between tho engineers and ma
rines attached to tho arsenal, and many were
wounded. Troops wore called out. and restored
order, after arresting a largo number of rioters.
Tho'flvo gas-stokers Imprisoned some time ego
during tho strike of tho gas-men, for a violation
of tho laws against conspiracy, wore released at
Mardbtone to-day. the terms of their sentences
liaving expired. A great demonstration of sym
pathy was made in tnolE cause at Mardstono. A
public breakfast was given them, at which 250
persons were present, and Messrs. Potter and
Odger made speeches.
CUBA.
Havana, April 18.-Tho life of O’Kolloy, tho
corrcsponclont of tho Herald, iB In no danger.
His proposed trial is regarded aa a mere matter
of form, In order to savo oppoaranooa. O Kelloy
■wants to oomo to Havana, and it 1b oxpootod that
tho Captain-General will comply with hisi wish
la a fow days. Tho authoritios baao their prooo
cntionof O’Kolloy upon tho foot that ho had hi
tie poaaoaslon, when coplurod, lottoni from Oea
rodo. Tho English Conflul at Havana favor* the
release of O’Kolloy, although the prisoner haa
acted contrary to the advice of the Consul, in
violating tho laws of tho country. |
■ New Souk, April to
morrow, a long letter from O Kelly, dated at
tho residence of tho Government of " Cuba
Xibro,” March 14. Ho Btates that General
‘Qaroia, Commander of tho Eastern Department,
Bays reconciliation with Spain la impossible ex
cept on tho baaia of independence. The onlr
Jldrma Cabans have to offer are that tho Spaniards
Shall pro away and leave Cuba to take care of
Its own future. They have no faith in the per
manent establishment of a Spanish Republic.
O’Kelly accompanied Garcia’s force of 700
•nnod men. about, one-third whites, and the
xrialority of the other two-thirds other than black,
on an expedition, during which several sitoaU
engagements wore fought with tho Spanish
iroops with varied success.
Thereafter he visited President Cospodes, who
■aid to him that the present Government of Spain
may last a fow mohths, but, before four months,
you will see a struggle between tho Monarchists
end Republicans. It is impossible to say how
the Republic may affect tho cause of Cuba. It
can make no difference to the men in
arms, for tboy will accept no .conditions
from Spain but independence. Wo are separated
from Spain by an ocean of bloodshed and cruelty
unnecessarily used by the Spanish Government
In thoir efforts to subdue us. Tho blood of our
fathers, brothers, and helpless families slaugh
tered in cold blood forbids our ever accepting any
conditions from the Spaniards. They must go
away and leave ns in peace, or continue tho war
until we are aU dead or they are exterminated.
At present wo look upon all Spaniards os ene
mies, and treat thorn bo; but, if tbo independ
ence of Cuba wore conceded, those Spaniards
who remain, would receive tho same treatment
as other citizens.
No authoritative proposition was ever made
for tho purchase of independence for a certain
.sura, to bo guaranteed by America, but if such a
solution would bo accepted by Spain, and tbo
sum required not unreasonable, tho Cubans
would be willing to accent tbo terms in
order to end tho war. They desire peace
and to return to tho reconstruction ef thoir
homos and the well-being of tbo country, but
before everything tboy want independence. If
Spain will continue tho war. they will fight until
tho country is a desert. Rut Cospodes behoved
(ho public opinion of tho world would not bo
long in coming to tbo aid of tho Cubans. Ho
gold the prospect for Cuba is very favorable.
The Spaniards are everywhere abandoning tho
towns and encampments in tho interior, because
they have no longer tbo strength to defend all
tho country. In his opinion, they intend retir
ing to tho soacoast, and trying to maintain
themselves, but as soon as tho Cubans
procure cannon and organize thor
oughly thoir array, they will attack the
Spaniards in the towns. There was, says Oos-
Cedos, a moment about a year ago, when wo I
ore reduced to terrible oxtromitiee, and wanted
everything,—clothes, ammunition, and arms, —
but to-day we have all thebe things, and in groat
part taken from tho enemy. If tho war should
continue, wo hope to profit by tho expe
rience of tho past, and to continue
our system of attacking tbo enemy, which
his produced such good results. In fact wo are
njw living on tho enemy. In the beginning wo
acted with too much generosity, sotting at hbor
iv Spanish prisoners, oven after tho proclama
tion of tho Spanish Government, that all taken in
armswouldbo shot, and women captured in insur
gent districts subject to 10 years imprisonment
or deportation. Several times have I made ef
forts to induce the Spanish Government to car
ry on the war in a civilized manner, but without
xoeult. The Spaniards have resorted to the moat
barbarous expedients to subdue us. Six differ
ent commissions have left Havana with tho in
tention of assassinating mo. Throe returned,
having abandoned tho enterprise, and two
of the others are supposed to have perished.
The third was a man who presented himself to
enlist in tbo body-guard of Gen. Quosada.
suspicious about him caused his ar
rest, and ho confessed his mission and was
banged.
Cospodes, In conclusion, stated the force of
the Cubans at ton to twelve thousand armed men
in the field, with about an equal equal number
of conveyers and servants, who perform service
in tho army. Tho strength of our forces is also
(liable to groat fluctuations in moments of de
feat. Largo numbers disperse or dosert, and
when any success has boon gained tho army is
Suddenly augmented to an extraordinary ex
tent. We have been lately receiving largo ac
cessions from the Spanish ranks, principallyfrom
Caban volunteers, many of whom came over
Vlth arms and ammunition. Nearly 400 pre
sented themselves in tho District of Bayamo,
end similar things happened in Mayarl. lie be
lieved all the Cuban volunteers would eventually
aide against Spain, and the triumph of tho Cu
bans would be assured.
CANADA.
Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune,
Toronto, April 16.—An extensive robbery took
|)lace in the Phcenix Block, on Saturday night,
of fancy dry goods, silks, laces, etc. The loss
is not yet known, but of tho single article of
laces over $4,000 worth were taken from one
Arm. No trace of tho perpetrators as yet.
. Port Stanley, April 15.—Tho steamer San
dusky, from Cleveland, arrived hero last even
ing, being the first arrival this season. Tho
Captain reports largo fields of ice in the lake.
• Kingston, April 15.—The Ice in tho harbor is
gradually disappearing. Navigation is not ex
pected to open for several days.
Pout Coldoune, April 15.—The harbor and
canal are clear of ice. Tho ice in tho lake ap-
Sears firm, and no water is to bo seen. Vessels
o not expect to leave port before the latter part
of tho month.
• Cornwall, April 16.—Water will be run off
tho Cornwall Canal, to-morrow, for tho purpose
of repairs. Tho canal will not bo ready far navi
gation until about tho Ist of May. The river is
clear of ice. , , ,
. Collinowood, April 18.— I Tho Ice In tho harbor
has not yet moved, but it is quite rottou, and
liable to break up with the first favorable wind.
Bowuanville, April 15,—Navigation is now
open in Port Darlington harbor. Schooner
Vienna, with cargo of barley, has cleared for Os
wego. Several vessels have left for Canadian
ports. _
GERMANY.
Munich, April IB.—Baron Liebig Is dangorous-
Strasbourg, April IB.—Tho Governor of Al
race has removed the Burgomaster of this city,
because the latter said he only remained in the
country in the hope that It would bo<restored to
Franco. PoUce-DlrootorDaoh has been appoint
ed to the vacant office. Tho Common Council
protest against the - appointment, and,
refusing to sit under Bach’s Pres-
idonoy. have held no meetings nine®
tho change waa made. The members of iho
Council have consequently boon auapondod for
iwo months from tho cxoroieo of their functions,
whloh have boon transferred to a new burgo
master as commissary extraordinary.
RUSSIA.
Bt. rKTEnmuno, April 16.—News having an
important bearing on tho future of tho Khivan
Expedition has boon received hero. Internal
dissensions havo broken out In Eblva. The
reigning Khan has executed his Chief Counselor
ana imprisoned his uncle and other influential
Khtvans, who wore enemies of Russia, lie has
also released the Russians long hold os prisoners
In Khiva, and sent them to moot a detachment
of tho Expedition which is advancing from Oren
burg. ,
An American correspondent and the Secretary
of tho United States Legation in this city havo
loft Bt. Petersburg for Khiva.
SWITZERLAND.
New York, April IB.—Tho Swiss Times reports
that whllo Father Qavazzlwas preaching recently
on tho suppression of religious corporations,
two mou, a tailor, and a Roman student, at
tempted to fire a largo bomb at the door of the
ohapol. Thoy wore discovered in tho act, and ar
rested in time to savo many lives.
MEXICO. . „
City of Mexico, April 18, vis Havana, April
14.—President Lordo’s message announces the
prolongation of tlio term of tho United States
and Mexican Mixed Commission for two years.
SPAIN.
Madhid, April 18.—Tho Eodicala and Conatl
tutlonallsis bavoresolved to abstain from voting
in tho election for members bf tho Constituent
Cortes.
SPORTING.
Pigeon-Shooting: Tournament Near
Now ITorlc City—Tho Bin? TUo
Oar. „
Special DUpateh to The Chicago Tribune.
NewYouk, April IB.—To-day tho grand shoot
ing tournament was begun at Hall’s Driving
Park, Long Island. Tho conditions were to
ehoot fifty birds, each twenty-one yards rise,
eighty yards boundary, according to tho
Rhode Island rules. Tho entrance foe was SIOO,
and was divided into three prizes of S3OO. S2OO,
andsloo. Tho entries wore: E.W. Tinker, of
Providence ; A. H. Bogardua. of Calumet, HI.;
Myles Johnson, of Yardvillo, N. J.; \Vm. Car
son, of Philadelphia; James Carling, of Fair
villo, N. J., andlra A. Paine, of Now York. John
son killed 40 birds and secured the first
prize; Paine took tho second on 43 birds,
and Bogardus third on 41. Tinker killed 40, Car
ling 40, and Corson 89. George Lamphoer was
Toforoo, and each man acted as Wb own judge.
About &H) spectators attended. The Philadel
phians wont away dissatisfied, declaring the af
fair a fraud. To-morrow there will be a private
match at twelve birds and sweepstakes at double
birds; entrance fee, sßo,opon to all.
New Yonit, April IB.—The first deposit of SSO
a side baa boon mado In tho prize fight between
Peter Crokor and Jim Boylan, to take place two
months from Friday noxt, for SI,OOO a Bide and
the championship of the middle-weights.
Henry Coulter, of Pittsburgh, will row in the
race with John Biglln and Ellis Ward at Spring
field, Mass., July 15, for $1,500 and tho cham
pionship of America.
KENTUCKY.
Murdered T>y Ku-Klnx—Sbootlngr Af-
fray in Lexington.
Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Lexington, Ky., April 15.—Some time last fall
a negro family of throe persona, husband, wife,
and child, wore taken from thoir homo by a
party of disguised men, and have not since
boon soon. It was supposed they wore drowned
by the Ku-Klux in Marblehead creek, Jessamine
County. The supposition was verified on Sun
day by the finding of a portion of the decomposed
body of Mabola Hawkins, the wife mentioned,
which was identified by her clothing. A
negro while fishing drew the object
out of the water with a hook and lino. Her
arms wore bound to her body with a rope,
which was then tied about her logs, and a heavy
stone attached to it. Doubtless the other
bodies .are in the same stream. A
shooting affray occurred hero this even
ing between Wm. Owens. Lyman Shepherd,
and Bobort Bishop resulting in serious, if not
fatal, wounding of Owens by a pistol shot. Ho
was fired at by both Shepherd nua Bishop, the
latter’s shot taking effect in the back, the ball
passing through the body.
FIRES.
Tho Burning: of tlio Chicopee Cotton
nillN«-&'lrea in St. Loulh and Woion,
nio.
St. Louis, April 15.—At ft lato hour last night
& fire broke out in tbo boot and ahoo house of
Wood & Brothers, No. 125 Market street. Most
of tho stock was cither burned or destroyed by
water. Tho loss is estimated at $20,000; in
sured in tho German American, $5,000 5 Ameri
can Central, St. Louie, $5,000; iEtua, $2,500}
Provident, of Washington, $2,500. Tho print
ing office of Edwards & Sage, on tho upper floor,
was somewhat damaged by water.
Tho High School building at Weston, Mo., 'was
burned yesterday. Loss, $20,000.
Boston, April 15.—Tho insurance of tho Chico
pee Mills, which wore burned last night, was
$618,000, the full amount required by law, and
tho limit prescribed by tho insurance rules. The
Boston and Rhode Island Mutual Companies lose
SIOO,OOO. The greatest loss to tho mills is tho
interruption of work. There wore about 000
looms in the two mills and the oloth in them,
about 2,600 cuts, which were burned, together
with about 22,000 pounds Ailing, and 10,000
pounds ooarso yarn. Eight-hundred hands are
thrown out of employment by tho, fire, throe
fourths of whom are girls. Punning on extra time
in the remaining mills, and preparing for rebuild
ing. will afford employment for a considerable
portion of this force, but many of them will be
obliged to seek work elsewhere. Tho fire will
prove a very serious disaster to the general
prosperity of the village, as tho operatives are
largely indebted to morouants for supplies fur
nished in anticipation of tho monthly pay-day,
which was to have boon to-morrow. The loss of
the Company is now estimated at $500,000.
POLITICAL
municipal Elections Yesterday.
Evanston, 111., April 15.—At tho village elec
tion to-day in Evanston, there wore 447 votes
cast. The excitement at the polls was intense,
fts the result of tho election decided tho much
debated question of wotor-works. Tho follow
ing ticket, in favor of tho water-works, was
©looted f j?or Village Trustees—J. Gilbert, H.
G. Powers, Lyman J. Gage, William Blanchard,
Wilson Phelps, O. A. Willard; for Village Clerk,
Charles K. Bannister } for Police Justice, Orris
Preach. m >t
Special Dispatch to Ths Chicago Tribune. .
EmNoiiAM. 111., April 15.—A warmly-con
tested city election hero, to-day, resulted in the
success of the entire Democratic ticket. The
majorities range from 132 to 276. Tho Demo
cratic gain is 176.
Trenton. N. J., April 16.—Tho Democrats
elected their Mayor and their entire city ticket
yesterday, also have a majority in tho Oooncil
and Board of Freeholders.
lowa Cm, la.. Fob. 16.— I Tho Daily Press,
organ of the Chairman of tho Democratic State
Committee, contains a communication from one
of tho leading Republican politicians and office
holders of tho State, not resident hero, fa
voring tho election of a Democrat
to tho Supremo Dench to AH Judge Beech’s va
cancy. Tho Bench has been strictly partisan
sluco 1806. and this proposition, coming from
the majority and mado feasible by tho general
breaking of party linos, duo to the Grange move
ment, must excite muon comment.
Telegraphic Brevities*
A telegram from Centerville, Mich., Bays that
tho jury in tho case of Tho People v. Dick Lane,
on trial for tho larceny of tho St. Joseph County
records, returned a verdict of guilty, aud ho was
sentenced by Judge Brown to State Prison for
the term of live years.
Our Spencers (lud.) special says a man, giving
hla name as James Dewitt, with two fine horses
In his possession, waafollowodimd arrested here
to-day. Tho horses wore stolen from Oapt.
Apley ZoleyvlUo, near Torre Haute, on Sunday
night last. Ho was lodged In jalL to protect him
from a Vigilance Committee on his track.
On Monday evening, William Stuart, a promi
nent livery man at Amboy, HI., while smoking
his pipe, was shot in tue eye and severely
wounded by the explosion of a cartridge which
had been mixed in with his tobacco and put into
his pipe without his discovering it.
Patterson, the convict who stabbed Mr. Shaw
an officer of tho Massachusetts State Prison,
on Friday last, was yesterday sontonoed to ton
days’ solitary confinement aud twenty years at
hard labor,
THE CHICAGO DAILY TRIBUNE: WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1873.
WASHINGTON.
Ex-Sonator Pomeroy Still Hope* to
Eoavo tho “Ex ” from I3U Title—
Groat ExodWß of Public Doonmonti
—Poor Nows for Oonirresamon ITho
Roollno to Accept tho Salary Grab at
Present The Gorornment Suits
Against the Pacific Railroads—The
Japanese mission.'
Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune,
Washington, D. 0., April IB.—Senator Pom
eroy is still horo superintending iho fitting up of
a new residence which ho has just purchased.
He spends a large amount of hla time in tho
Departments, looking after tho interests of his
ox-constituents In Kansas. Pomeroy seems to
ho of tho opinion that ho wUI bo elected Senator
next winter, and bo is determined to keep up his
relations with his constituents.
Between fifteen and twonty-flvo tons of free
matter now loaves tho Fost-Ofiloo in this city for
tho various States daUy. Heretofore many
public documents, belonging to members of Con
gress, havo boon stored at tho Capitol, but
as tho franking privilege cannot be exorcised
after tho Ist of next July, this accumulation of
years is being transmitted to iho Senators and
Representatives. From fifty to sixty bags of
documents addressed to members are forwarded
daily in different directions, and probably by tho
Ist of July aU deadhead matters of this de
scription will have been sent to their destina
tion.
It Is generally conceded by lawyers who havo
examined tho matter that the Government will
bo completely beaten in its suits against tho
Pacific Railroad Company. To oppose such
lawyers as Messrs. Ashton, Perry, and
Jenoks, tho Railroad Company has engaged
tho best legal talent, men like Evarts, Cushing,
and Curtis, besides their own regular counsel,
Aside from this, it is generally believed that tho
law is on the side of the railroad companies.
The blunder In attempting to prosecute tho
Company is partly attributed to Congress, and
l-actljr lu tho n.piu'tm.ut of ih* Ootwu
moot.
. Sergoant-at-Arma Ordway, of the House, har
ing received * largo number of lettora from
members, tolling Mm that thoy did not Intend to
draw the amount duo them on the salary-atoal,
applied to the First Comptroller for his opinion
and advice. Tho latter decided that the let
ters wore sufficient to antborize the covering
of the money into the Treasury without any
further authority. This will be a matter of sur
prise to a largo number, some of whom had said
they would not draw their money until tho storm
abated and the matter had gone ont of the public
mind. Thoy supposed that thoy could notify
Ordway that they did not intend to draw
tho money, and that It would thus Ho subject to
their order for two years, when it would be
turned into the Treasury. The Comptroller said
tho Department was very lenient abont receiving
money, that there was no rules prohibiting tho
receipt of money, but it was more difficult to go*
money out.
\To th» Associated Press.]
Washington, April 15. —The Secretary of State
laid before the President to-day a letter from
Minister DeLong, of Japan, received on Satur
day evening, somewhat in too nature of a resig
nation, but leaving it optional with the President
to accept it as such. * _ „
The President has appointed Thomas P. Fuller
Collector of Internal Revenue for Montana;
also, the following Postmasters, whose commis
sions are about to expire: John B. Cameron,
Ottawa, 111.; Thomas H. Foulds, Cincinnati, 0.
The President also appointed Fred. H. Conant
Postmaster at Black Hawk, Col.
Legal tenders outstanding, $358,658,612.
INTERESTING AGRICULTURAL INFOR-
NATION.
Tlio Rotation of Crops*
Washington {April 11) Correspondencs of the Kew York
■ journal of Comment,
The Department of Agriculture h&a received
answers from all parts of the country to some
questions propounded in a circular sent out In
March, and the results brought out in last
mouth's report are of value to tho practical
farmer. Tho monthly for March contains an
swers regarding tho rotation of crops, soil Im
provements, tho relative profits of selling and
feeding hay and grain, tho most profitable
branches of farming, value of farm lands com-
Sared with their value In 1800, and the causes of
iscouragoment existing among farmers.
In regard to rotation of crops, tho general re
sult shown is, that there Is no systematic rota
tion in any considerable portion of tho United
States. A thorough system is found only in a
few counties In Now England, the large number
of towns and cities creating such a demand for
garden products that rotation is very difficult.
In Coos County, N. H., India wheat is said
to produce twenty successive good crops whero
the laud Is annually manured; in Hamp
shire County, Moss., tobacco has been raised
for twenty years on the same land, highly fer
tilized. In Rhode Island, field-crops of onions
are repeated from five to eight years, or until
the smut destroys them. The high price of hay
in the Boston market keeps a largo area of Now
England land in grass. In tho Middle States,
systematic rotation is pursued to a greater ex
tent and with more marked results than in any
other portion of the country, but special indue*
trios largely interfere • with tho routine. Tho
Commissioner says: _
About a third of tho reported counties In New York
pursue a regular and uniform system; another third
mrsue a partial rotation, while the remainder seem to
guore it entirely. The following remarks of our cor
respondent-in Seneca will give some idea of tho first
elans:
Comparatively few ignore rotation and practice
slipshod farming; that class soon drops out. Two
jcuoral courses are pursued by lulelllgent farmers :
ho first is to turn over a piece of clover or clover and
timothy sod for com; the next spring the field is
ilowod again and sown to oats or barley ; in tho fall
he ground is again turned over and fitted for winter
wheat, receiving a top-dressing of barn-yard manure.
The next spring the winter-wheat la seeded to clover
or clover and timothy, and allowed to remain In clover
for one to three years, when the foregoing process is
again repeated. Tho second course is to spread dur».
lug tho winter all tho available manures made upon
tho farm on a piece of sod intended for com; turn
early and harrow thoroughly at proper time to plant
to com, then follows the rotation aa practised In the
first case.
Near the large cities the market-garden system pre
vails, while in the rural districts large areas are de
voted to dairying aud cheese factories. In the latter
the loading aim is to secure aa largo an amount of
forage crops as possible.
Even in those countries whore fanning is intelligent
and systematic, there still exists a class of so-called
farmers, whoso sole method is found in a merciless
succession of the same crops, generally grain'or
root-crops, with shallow cultivation and little or
no fertilization. This shiftless husbandry, however,
la undermining its own existence, and promises short
ly to relievo the country of its presence. As the soil
finally refuses to answer this destructive system with a
bare subsistence, tho funner sella out in order to 44 go
West” and diffuse the blessings of his exhaustive
system over a quarter-section of frontier virgin soil.
In Delaware County, rye aud buckwheat have been
repeated through a whole decade. In Cattaraugus
flvo to seven successive crops of oats are raised
year after year. In Chemung County, tobacco crops
are raised, the leaf, It la said, growing finer and
elcaner every year. On the cheaper highlands of the
same county bay and oats have been raised till they
would not bring half a crop. Onondaga County seems
to have measurably got rid of this system, which
loft large areas covered with Canada thistle. In the
Valley of the Mohawk, crops of broom-corn have boon
raised for thirty years without any apparent exhaus
tion of the soil.
In a majority of counties In Now Jersey crop
rotation is tho rule. In Burlington County, a
large area is continued in cranberry marshes. In
Pennsylvania, but throo counties arc reported aa
entirely ignoring rotation. Tho usual routine
thero is com planted on sod broken in the spring,
and thoroughly manured. Thou follow oats,
wheat, and two crops of grass, the whoat being
treated with superphosphates.
In Maryland, rotation is general, but in some
districts there is a decided tendency to excessive
grain and grass cropping. In Somerset County,
com has boon ralsea thirty years with Httlo cul
ture. Tho tendency of repeated croppings in
Maryland is found mostly among small farmers
and tenants.
Of tho South Atlantic States, Virginia shows a
considerable tendency to crop rotation. About
one-fourth of Virginia counties report a some
what regular routine, embracing 1, corn; 2,
wheat or oats: 8. olovor. Another fourth
Ignore it entirely, and tho remainder
niako only partial efforts. In North Carolina, a
majority of the counties reported au entire ab
sence of crop rotation. Tho repetition of crops
is pursued to au astonishing degree. In Catawba
and Caldwell Counties, low lauds Uavo been
planted in com from 75 to 100 years, in Pasquo
tank for 50 years, aud in many others from 10 to
40 years. In river bottoms, whore tho soli Is an
nually renewed and fertilized by overflow, thoro
is no end to repetition. In some counties they
give up everything to raising cotton, aud con
tinue mat crop till the land refuses to yield a
profitable crop. ...
In South Carolina, Georgia, Arkansas, and in
all the Gulf States, systematic rotation is very
little thought of. A correspondent from Colum
bus County, Georgia, gives about tho clearest
opinion of tho Ideas in this respect prevailing
among the people of the South, as follows:
Although the benefits foUowingrotallon are acknowl
edged by the majority of farmers in this section, yet
it is practised by comparatively few. Many think the.
extensive use of “commercial fertilizers M does sway
with the necessity for this annual change of
crops, and the fertiliser used is selected with direct
reference to the crop to be produced, and the
crop is thus fed and grows by this outside help, thus
preventing too groat a drain upon the soil itself.
This creates an idea in the minds of - those who prao
tlce this system that the outlay of money is a salvo
to the soils, and to this extent not only preserves
but increases its fertility; others maintain that thin
extensive and general use of etlmnlatlng manures,
while they may and do increase the production, do it
at the expense and the ultimate deterioration of the
soli, in other words they “ kill the land,” and tho old,
worn-out lands of Virginia aro cited In vindication of
this theory.”
Tho Ootomißsloner of Agriculture makes iho
following comment s
Cotton, corn, small grain, sugar-cane, sweet potatoes,
and a fow other crops are grown, according to prospec
tive, local, or general demand,'and often in exhausting
succession upon the same land. Soil preparations and
fertilisation aro often entirely ignored, and when
practised at aU aro Very Imperfectly attended to, ex
cept in the case of cotton. Many ' counties
report the repetition of this crop through twenty or
twenty-five years, while in one—Wilcox, Alabama—
. lands havo been kept fifty years in cotton without in
termission. Occasionally this crop is alternated with
com, small grain, or grass. In some districts tho soil
appears to boar this strain with but little indication of
exhaustion. In other oases, however, tho normal re
sults of this ruinous system are painfully apparent.
In Louisiana new-comers occasionally attempt to In
troduce Improvements, but are unable to resist tho in
fluence of universal example, and ultimately fall Into
tho old routine.
In speaking of tho special Industry of rice pro
duction, tbo Commissioner estimates that two
thirds of the rioo lands have lain waste since tho
war. In Tennessee, West Virginia, and Ken
tucky an entire absence of systematic rotation
Is reported in a majority of counties, but In somo
counties it is practised with considerable regu
larity and excellent results. Tho rotation gener
ally embraces corn, small grain, and grass, to
bacco being sometimes interpolated in iuo series;
generally corn, then wheat, tbon olovor. Inju
rious repetitions of com and tobacco crops on
bottom lands, and of small grain and homp on
uplands, aro frequently mentioned.
Of the States north of tho Ohio River, considera
ble portionsof Michigan and Wisconsin have boon
too recently’settled to admit of any organized
rotation system, but the tendency is in that di
rection. flotation is tbo rule in about half tbo
counties of Ohio, hut in the groat river bottoms,
fertilized Dy overflow, tho tendency is to-re
peated crops of the same product. Boloto bot
toms, after fifty yoare’ repeated crops of corn,
still yield CO to 100 bushels per acre. Rotation
is tho rule in one-third of tho counties of In
diana, in another third it is tho exception, and
in the remainder of the State tho farmers never
Sraotice it. In Illinois, two-thirds of tho couu
es entirely ignore rotation, while of tho remain
der, about one-half pay very littlo attontion to
it. Com has boon repeated for fifty years on
alluvial bottoms, and wheat on uplands for
twenty years. In tho States west of tho Mississ
ippi River, rotation is gonorally.tho rare excep
tion, and destructive repetitions of particular
crops are too frequent to mention. With re
?;ard to the Pacific coast, tbo following passage
rom Commissioner Watts’ report tells tho story
in brief, and the details indorse the original
statement:
On tho Paolfio coast rotation is bnt little
known. In California, where the great staple
wheat crop has boon grown in destructive suc
cession, it is becoming common in some locali
ties to vary tho crop every few years, either with
a volunteer crop of wheat-hay,’ or by seeding in
barley, oats, or corn. The increasing growth of
wood and tho constant multiplloation of foul
sood is compelling somo alteration of crops.
In somo counties, Humboldt for exam
ple, now land ie planted from two
to five years in potatoes, followed
by several years of wheat, and finally by gross
crops, which ore sometimes oontinuod till they
run out. The host wheat-lands, which havo as
tonished tho world by their enormous produc
tion, ore visibly declining in fertility.”
The Commissioner reasons from his answers
of correspondents that homo productions for
home consumption as a permanent policy is a
more profitable policy than tho opposite idea,
that profits of production oro vastly affected
by coat of transportation to markot (a truism,
to be sure), - that tho profit of feeding
hay and grain is greater than the profit
of selling those products, that roanuro produced
by the farmer’s stock is far more profitable and
beneficial as a rule than commercial fertilizers,
besides discussing tho relative values of farm
lands in 1860 and 1673. and handling the labor
question with some skill.
Of 872 counties, tho following responses wore
received: Dairying, 104, Now York giving
23, the largest number of any State ;
mixed husbandry, 01, Indiana giving
14 : sheep husbandry, 142, Ohio giv
ing, 17; fruit growing, 71, Ohio giving 0: mar
kot gardening, 33, Virginia giving 7; stock rais
ing, 278, Missouri giving 34; pork, 87. lowa giv
ing 0; cotton, IG6, Texas giving SO; Mississippi
27; Georgia, 26: Alabama, 22; North Caroluia
18 s Arkansas. 14; tobacco, GO, Virginia giving
19; wheat, 133, Missouri giving 14; corn, 107,
Missouri giving 10.
THE WEATHER.
Great Storm in Nebraska—XVar De-
partment Prognostication!.
Wab Department, Oftice op the Chief Sig
nal Service, Division op Telegrams and De
ports for the Benefit op Commerce, Washing
ton, April 15. —Probabilities—Tho areas of low
barometer continue as local storms on Wednes
day in the lake region and tho middle Atlantic
States* Bor Dow England and tho Middle States
northeasterly winds, increasing to brisk,
with cloudy and threatening weather
on the middle Atlantic coast. For tho
South Atlantic States, continued southwesterly
winds,with cloudy and threatening weather. For
the Lower Lakes, increasing northeasterly
winds, clouds, and rain. For tho Upper Lakes,
Increasing northeast winds, booking to
north, Northerly winds, cloudy weather.
and, possibly, rain or snow, will
extend eastward from Nebraska to tho Upper
Mississippi Valley. _ , „
Cautionary signals will continue at Doluth,
Chicago, Milwaukee, Grand Haven, Detroit,
Toledo, Cleveland, Buffalo, and aro-ordorod for
Oswego, Boohester, Wilmington, Norfolk, and
Cape May. ....
Omaha, April 15.—Tho storm on tho lino of
tho Union Pacific Ballroad proves to bo ono of
tho moat violent of tho season. It began two
days ago, and continued last night and to-day
with unabated fury. There aro no moans of
communicating with Ban Francisco, or of ascer
taining anything further about tho army move
ments against tho Modoo Indians. Tho linos of
tho Western Union Telegraph Company west
of Grand Island aro all down, while
tho linos of tho Union Pacific Food aro
worse off, reaching no further than
Bchuylor Station. Tho wires aro loaded with
sleet. Tho storm is from tho north, and mostly
between North Platte and Fremont. No ono
can face tho storm yet at Grand Island or in
that vicinity, which appears to bo tho centre.
No trains aro moving.
Omaha, April 15— Evening.—Tho western
enow anu wind storm appeal's to bo abating.
Trains will probably all bo moving on time to
morrow.
MISCELLANEOUS.
•Women prcachera are increasing rtiplly. Ton
new names have boon added to tho list within
the last six months.
—Prof. Agassiz has been lecturing on eggs,
and ho assorts that “ ell living beings, what
ever their diversity of form, have grownup
from eggs which areat first all precisely similar.
Deviations take place little understood that
eventually change these beings into widely dif
fering This oxplano whore everything
comes from except eggs. ...
—An inventor has attached to a pair of bar
bers’ shears an elastic, hollow ball, which is
compressed by tho operation of cutting, and a
current of air forced out from ball Is direct
ed along tho edges of the blades, and blows
away the fragments of hair as fast as they aro
out. This does away with tho onion or. garlic
and tobacco-laden zephyrs that too often sweep
over tho victim in tho chair.
—llio man who sells the lease of the corner of
Broadway and Pulton street to tho Now York
Evening Post for $250,000 was an oyster-catch
er working in Now York Bay, seventeen years
ago. Getting a little money, ho worked his way
up and dually invested all he had in along
lease of that land at $19,000, which ho has just
sold for $250,000.
—Even tho Integrity of tho “Father of his
Country ”Is now questioned. The Troy Times
has a story that a gentleman residing in tho
vicinity of Sandy Hill holds a uoto against Qon.
Washington for SI,OOO, given fur supplies during
tho American Revolution. There is an indorse
ment on tho uoto for about ono-half tho amount,
and it is alleged that the balance has never boon
paid.
—At a recent fancy dross hall, a young lady
represented a witch, whoso costume consisted
of a scarlet cloth petticoat, trimmed with full
sized cats of velvet all round tho skirt, black
brocaded overskirt, open in front, looped with
scarlet bows, a pretty white muslin apron, also
trimmed witii scarlet, muslin handkerchief for
nook, mob cap, hat, aud birch broom, altogether
making one of tho most novel—if not tho most
oharroing—costumes on tho floor.
—A husband in Salem, Maas., recently over
heard a neighbor remark, with sympathy, that ho
was henpecked. Of course, ho would havo boon
less or more than man if ho had quietly submit
ted to this scandalous imputation, and ho forth-’
> with took strong measures to prove its ground
lessness. Ho rushed home j he hurled a boot-
jack at his wife; ho reduced to fragments two
of her best drosses \ and as & conclusive climax
ho smoked his pipe In tho parlor, 'wltli his foot
on tho tablo In a basket of artificial flowora. It
In now generally admitted by tho people of Salem
that this gentleman Isn't henpecked, Inasmuch
os ho still survives without a scar.
—Lord Macaulay thus wroto to Honry S. Ran
dall in 1857 1 “ I never uttered a word nor wroto
a lino Indicating an opinion that tho snpromo
authority In a Btato ought to bo Intrusted to tho
majority of citizens told by tho head. I havo
long boon convinced that Institutions purely
Democratic must, sooner or lator, destroy liber
ty or civilization, or both. Your Constitution Is
all sail and no onchor. Dither some Crooar or
Napoleon will soizo tho reins of government
with a strong hand, or your Republic will bo as
fearfully plundered and laid waste by barba
rians lu tho twentieth century as tho Roman Em
pire was In the fifth, with this difference—that
the Hnno and Vandals who ravaged tho Roman
Empire enroo from without, and that your Runs
and Vandals will havo boon engendered within
your own country by your own Institutions.”
Mysterious Attempt at Murder*
Concord, N.H., April IC.— ln Oandia, last
night, a mysterious attempt was made to murder
a boy 16 years of ago, named John Emerson,who
was temporarily stopping at tho houso of Charles
Rowo, a farmer. A noise alarmed somo of tho
family about midnight, whon young Emerson
was found in bed insensible, with throo
terrible gashes upon bis bond and faco Inflicted
with an axo, which was found on tho floor. Thoro
Is slight prospect of his recovery. Tho assassin
obtained ontranco through (ho window, and es
caped tho samo way. Somo of tho neighbors
think tho act was 'committed by a boy
about ibo samo ago named Eitz, while asleep.
Fitz is a somnambulist, and has frequently got
ten up in his sloop, and, ono night last wook,
was found In tho attio of a neighbor’s houso,
fast asleep on tho floor, with a largo hroadaxo
by his side. Ho did not soom to know ho camo
thoro, but investigation showed that ho had
got out of tho second-story window at
omo, gomo to a tool-cheat, taken out this
axo. procured a ladder, and gono to this neigh
bor’s Louno, wbaro bn wnn found. Thoro is
much speculation about tbo affair.
MARRIAGES.
BOYD-HARPER-At No. 264 Sonth Ollnton-it.. by
Ilor, Dr. Fowler, Mr. Joseph Boyd and Mary Alloa II*.•
por, both of this city.
DEATHS.
CARLISLE—On tbs 16th last, of dropsy, Mrs. Elslo,
wife of llobort Carlisle, atHinsdalo, 111.
Relatives and frlond* are requested to moot at Central
depot to-day ata p. m. Carriages to Qraoeland. Bor*
vices at tho cemetery.
BOOTH—A tbo residence of William L. Church, Labs
View, Tuesday morning. April 15 1873, infant daughter of
Oloror L. and Oarrlo O. Booth.
LINDSAY—In Cleveland, 0.. Sunday, April 0, Allta
A. Loveless, wife o! Thomas B. Lindsay.
KNIGHT—Nn Monday evening, April 14, of acute perl*
ebarditls, Charles Goorgo Knight, of Camberwell, Lon*
don, England.
Funeral services at tho City Hotel. corner of State and
Slxtoontli-stß., on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock.
PHIPPKN—Attbo residence of hta son-in-law J. W.
Mills, 45 Kgan-nv., on Tuesday April 16, In the 84th year
of his ago, tbo Itev. Goorge Pblppona native of Salem,
Mass,
fiT*Boiton, and Hartford (Conn.) paper* ploaio copy.
Notion of funeral hereafter.
MACHINERY.
FOR BALE-OHEAP-ONB SECOND-HAND up
right boiler: good ns now. Inquire FRASER,
CHALMERS <t CO.', HSFuUon-at.. Chicago.
UNTIL MAY 1 WE WILL SELL OUR MACHINERY
at a liberal discount, as wo intend moving to our now
stores, 89 and 40 Booth Oanal-st. Wo do not noli our
machinery at cost, hut will mako a liberal deduction.
Parties wanting, or are anticipating buying, machinery,
it will bo to their Interest to call upon na bolero purchas
ing, at Rochester Machinery Manufacturing Company, 87
andßßSouth Oanal-st., Chicago.
WANTED-TO EXCHANGE—A 76-HORSE-POW
er steam engine, manufactured by Qroonwalt, Cin
cinnati. Also, 1 No. 4 llrioo A Stillwell Ilmo catcher for
a second hand steam engine abont 25-horse-powor. Also,
for a second band steam onglno and bollor, 10 to 15-horse
power. Inquire of E. 8. BARROWS, 203 Lnke-st.
WANTED— A GOOD SECOND-HAND 10 OR 13-
borsi'i power engine. Address AB, earo S. 8. Bald
win, 354 Wabash-av.
WANTED-A GOOD SECOND-HAND OR NEW
small flue boiler, 15 to S3 horse power. S. S. BALD
WIN. &*>4 Wabash-av.
FINANCIAL.
Loans of large and small sums on real
estate; moderate amounts on second mortgages, M.
O. BALDWIN A CO., 81 and 86 LaSallo-at., Room 34.
Money advanced at lassen’s loan of
fico, lato K. Jacobs A Co., on diamonds and other <
valuables. 177 Clark-st», corner of Monroo, Room 6.
TO LOAN-MONEY TO LOAN FOR 8 OR 5 YEARS
on Improved oily property. D. COLE A SON, 168
West Mautson-«t»
TirE CAN MAKE SEVERAL LOANS OF SUMS OP
VY $3,000 and $6,000. on good real estate security.
MoKINNON A MARSH, 185 Olark-st.
eo Knn to loan on first-class city
«J)i£,OUv property. MEAD A COB. If»3 LaSallo-st.
S(T nnn TO LOAN ON INSIDE IMPROVED
fflO.UUu roal estate or to improve. Apply, for 3
days, RoomS, 193 Washlngton-st.
at: nnn to loan, also $2,000. on instob
tpO.UUU Chicago clly property. SNYDER A LEE,
11 Nixon’s Building, northeast corner of Monroe ami La*
Halle-sts. .
CLAIRVOYANTS.
Chicago spirit rooms, 311 west madison*
st. Public seances every evening, at which
many spirit facet will appear and are recognized. Pri
vate titling* at all hourt, with good reliable trance, busi
ness, clairvoyant, tost, physical, healing, and developing
medium*, who will toll of Business, marriage*, journey*,
law-suits, loat or atolonproperty; reveal past, present,
and future events; oxamtno, proscribe, and cure all
diseases that are curable. Good reliable mediums
wanted.
DR. MATHEW AND MADAME MAYNARD CAN
toll of business, marriages, journeys, law suits,absent
friends, lost and stolen property, or anything you wish to
know; cure fits, paralysis, rheumatism, deafness, sore
eyos, seminal weakness, consumption, liver complaint,
ague, catarrh. Delicate diseases cured in a few days.
Curs or no pay. 105 West Madlson*st«, up-stairs.
MRS. DR. 8. K. TATUM, GERMAN AND ENGLISH
Dootross, has removed to 178 North Halsted-st.,
near Milwaukee-av.
Madame parte, the wonderful gypsy.
Consultation, 10a. m. to 9p. m., Sundays ex
cepted. Foe, CO cents. No gentlemen admitted. 209
West Mttdlson-at.. Room 15, upper lloor.
PARTNERS WANTED.
PARTNER WANTED—SI,OOO— A YOUNG, ACTIVE
man, capable of keeping books can form a very desira
ble partnership; business has no competition ;psysßoo per
cent. Address, for five days, 812, Tribune office.
PARTNER WANTED—WITH SIOO, IN A WELL-EB
- business, paying that amount monthly, lie
BastlWasblngton-st, Room 33.
PARTNER WANTED—WITH A CASH CAPITAL
of $3,000, to engage In a flrat-rato raying mechanical
business, la ono of tho best cities In lowa. This adver
tisement moans business. Address X 98, Tribune oflloe.
PARTNER WANTED—FOR SALK. HALF INTER
est In carpentering and building business; shop and
machinery In llrat-olats order; business well established:
reasons for selling, sickness la family. Apply roar 19
Abordoon-st.
PARTNER WANTED—(SILENT) TO INVEST S3,MO
In good paying business. Boat of reference given.
Address, where can be seen, P 62, Tribune office.
PARTNER WANTED—WITH $100; A GOOD OP ;
portuulty for an aotlro man in an established, good
paylngbusiuoßSjjiorjsk i^J)3Jjouthi ollnitomßt^^^ i^>B>>B
FOR SALE.
FOR SALE—orockerywarb suitable for
restaurant, walnut aud oak chairs, tables, plated
ware, also circular counter. Basement 871 Wabash-av.
For sale—a good new miloh cow. appli
at 13 Oentr«*av., between Monroo and Adams-sls.
For hale-a large size van’s range, in
perfect order, very cheap. Apply at M. SOUWEI
ZEII, 118 South Olark-st.
Foil SALE—LOW FOR CASH, IF APPLIED 101 l
noon. of tho achoonor Liberty, now lying near Ml},
lor'a dry cfoclc. Apply, for a low day*. toWM. BOAR
LETT, W0 WostMadlson-st.
I7OR SALE—A GOOD SET OP TINNERS' TOOLS,
X 1 cheap. Addreßß Y 14. Trlbuno olltco.
POR SALE-BAR. OOUNTER.IMND FIXTURES.
J? Apply to Room 43 Exchange mqldlng, corner Clark
and WainlnKtOH.ata. .
TO EXCHANGE.
TO EXCHANGE—SMALL COTTAGE WITH GOOD
Joaao of lot, noar Union Park,, for or
city lota, with or without Inoumbrance. ELA4PAR.
HER, IMWaahington-Bt., Room 85.
frio EXOHANOE-W ANTED JOB PRINTING
X office, email, but now. In exchange for bouio and
aorelot, near Beloit, WU. Address T 41, Tribune office.
fXT ANTED—BUILDING MATERIAL FOR IOWA
YV faming ianda. 8. B. BROWN. 70 Haat Adamsst.
WANTED— WESTERN LANDS IK EXCHANGE
fora uloo brick store, witb lot that Ib worth 88,000
and oioar of inoumbranco. A. U> STORY £ BON, Room
S, H6 Olark-BU
WANTED-A PEACH ORCHARD IN RXOIIAKOE
for suburban property. WM, GARNETT AGO.,
85 Otlg lltook.
PERSONAL.
PERSONAL-MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 14-
X the young ladies In a buggy, Wabasb-av., wbo recog.
nlzod Kent riding on top of an omnibus, please sond ad
dress to R. R. CHESTERTON, Chicago Poit-Gflloo.
iVerhonal-if MIS 3 It., THE LADY IN BLUB,
X will send her address to tho frlond wbo spoko to bor on
llatstod-st.. ami afterwards on Washlngton-st., yesterday
afternoon, showlll hoar of sumothiug greatly to bor au
vaulagu. Address Q 90. Trlbuno office.
PERSONAL - INFORMATION WANTED OF
X Motbow Henry Carsley: and it Matbow Henry Carsloy
will call or eommunloato with Thomas A.Haros, lift Dear*
born-st.. Chicago, ho will hoar of something tabis advan
tage. JOHN UARSLEY.
FiBSONAB-ftf IUSNKY OIIONE, roiis;i!HLY;oF
Dos Moines, lowa, will call at tho offioaof tho Platte
River Land Co., basement, 137 Flftb-av., ho may learn
something to bis
MUSICAL.
* 11AIU! OBANOK TO BUY A GOOD PIANO AT
J\. halt price. 7-ootavo, overstrung bassi nearly new5
In good order. S2OO will buy it. 951 Park-av.
1 REMOVAL OF PIANO-ROOMS TO 974 BTATEBT.S
XX pianos to rent aud fur sale 1 rooting a specialty.
WILLIAM R. PROSSER, established 1660.
PIANOS FOR SALE AND TO RENT. THE BEST
X fn the market, at 859 East Randolph-st. J. IRKS
TON.
rno RENT—A GOOD TONED 7-OOTAVB ROSE-
business changes.
alaroe poukhoub^the city
Aof Missouri, 117 miles above St.
Louis, on tho Mississippi Hirer. with MHho noooißftnrnr
rangomonts for tho pork business, smnko*houso, oto.,
wllfi throo acres of ground attophod.Thlsli ararochsnco
for any party desirous of going Into tho pork and proylslon
Duslnois. as tho surrounding country Is well stocked with
hogs, and a toady market for thosalo of tho product cither
in V. Louis or Chicago. For farther parllonlars, apply
to GILBERT PRYOR A 00., Provision Broken, Wo.
166 Kast Washlngton-st.
A GREAT BARGAIN—ESTABLISHED SION AND
A paint shop, brushes, ladders, signs, tools, Ao., Ao.
Address Box Bofl Post Oflleo, city.
A COPPER DISTILLERY, FIXTURES COM-
A plelo, for sale at a bargain. Capacity of still, 600
gallons. Address B 83, Tribune office.
CIGAR STORE FOR SALE, 170 BLUE ISLAND*
A FIRST-GLASS BARBER-SHOP FOR SALE ON
A East Randolph-st. For partloulan Inquire at 73
East Uarrlsoa-st.
A GOOD CLEAN STOCK OP CLOTHS AND~DRY
goods for sale or exchangeforj-ulncumberedl Chicago
city property. Amount, SB,OOO. ULRICH * BOND, 87
Dearbom-st.
A GOOD STOCK OP HARDWARE AND TIN-
A. ware will bo sold low for cash, Addroas X 89, Trib
une office.
A SALOON AND RESTAURANT FOR BALE,
A called "Kalian Joe's;" In a good location, woll-ea
tabllsbod s has a big rnn of custom: well lilted ups to bo
sold on reasonable verms. Apply at the saloon Sol Bonth
Olark-st. ■
A PAYING FIRST-GLASS JOBBING BUSINESS
A In the country forsaloj Iho wishing to enlarge
their trade In Chicago, Apply to DALY, LOBBAGO,,
146 Wabash-av. _____
•BUSINESS INTERESTS BOLD. PARTNERS PRO
JD cored. Good openings on band for men with 8300 to
SI,OOO, Worth Investigating, J. E. KIMBALL, 136
Doarborn-st. '
Balbeo smelting and refining works fob
saloor rent at a bargain, comer of Clark and Forty
aooond-sts., on Michigan Southern A Rook Island Rail
road, with side-track for accommodation of works. In
cluding tho around, four brick and one frame buildings,
and nearly all tho machinery nocessaryihas boon worked
for several months under the Balbeo system. Tho build
ings are suitable for other manufacturing or business
Eurposos. J. E. BUROHELL, Room 4, Republic Life
gliding.
Dining-room and ioe cream parlor for
sale. Good location} South Sides cheapest rent In
America. Bestoponlngln town foreman capital. J, E,
KIMBALL, ISO Dcarbom-st.
Hotel to rbnt-thb well-known olipton
House, on the West Side, Is for rent, and can bo had
with Ml nr part of ihm fnrnUnro. as •oaUilna 60
Suou rooms, all in good ordor: will bo loasodat lower rent
aan any otbor botol of Its capacity In Ohloago. Inquire
at tho hotel- W. A. JBNKINH, Proprietor.
Light, nice manufacturing business for
sate; well established and paring; expense* light;ev
erything In order; price $2,000; fall Investigation permit
ted. Address P 63, Tribono office,
Meat market for balk with all tub
fixtures, 807 Ndrth Wella-it. Reason for leaving,
business elsewhere.
Restaurant for sale, toe well-known
and popular restaurant, 61 West Madlion-st. oan be
bought cheap, with lease for one year. Part cash dowu
will do If deferred payments oan bo arranged satlsfaoto
rlly. Inquire on promises.
SAMPLE ROOM AND RESTAURANT FOR SALE,
complete, In one of tbo host locations on tho South
Rldo: rent lows good reasons for soiling. NELSON BIG
LOW, US South Doarborn-Bt., Inbnaomont.
QALOON, BTOOK AND FIXTURES AT A GREAT
O bargain If taken at once. West Hide. Good control
location. INGHAM, 64 South Desplalnos-st.
STEAM OANAL STONE-BOAT J. L. ALEXANDER
foraalo. Inqulro at ladlana-st. bridge, or 662 North
Clark-»t. .
STOCK AND FIXTRE3 OP A WBLL-ESTABLISII
od news depot, tobacco, and confectionery store at 116
North Market-st., for sale.
QBVERAL LEGITIMATE MANUFACTURING IN-
O tomats for sale; will boar oloso InvoiOgatlon. D.
STONER A CO., 125 Olark-at., Room 72.
STOCK, FIXTURES, AND LEASE OF A WELL,
established hoot and shoo atoro in one of tbo boat lo
cations in tbo city, doing a business of about $30,000, for
sale. Address N6B, Tribono cilice.
THE MOST EXTENSIVE SAW AND SHINGLE
mill in Memphis, Tonn., foraalo; sawsSO,ooo foot per
day; lumber worth from 920 to $35 nor m; logs coat, at
mil), $8 to $lO per m; owing to my health am compelled
to 101 l all or half; $3, OOOoaah wanted, balance on long
llmo In monthly payments, running ton years. This is a
splendid ohanco for ono or more men to clear full SIOO par
day; slabs and saw dust will pay running expense*; I will
furnish cash orders for all tbo lumber. If wanted. None
need answer who can't furnish tho cash reunited immedi
ately. Address J. M. DUDLEY, Memphis, Tonn.
The best grocery store and fixtures on
tbo North Bide foraalo; buyer oanloaao bulldlngfora ,
terra of years. Reason for selling, sickness. MORTON
CULVER, Room 4, Metropolitan Block.
WANTED— $100, OR MORE, WILL BE INVESTED
In eomo sum paying business. To receive reply,give
particulars. Address Q 16, Tribune office.
A TO «200-A MAN OF GOOD ADDRESS AND
this cash wanted at once In every city to establish
an agency and push a novel scheme. Big thing; SBOO per
month. Gentlemen, don't (ergot your stamps. Address
MONOPOLY, Box 87, Post-Olfioo.
© C fi n-* SMALL FORTUNE TO ANY ONE WHO
tpOUU will Invest S6OO In a legitimate business. 119
Dcarborn-st., Room 6. Good patents wanted-
£r AAA TO $9,000 OAN BUY A FIRST-GLASS
Si).UUU grocery store, doing a largo busloets, la a
good location. Tho above amount can ho roMlsod In ono
year. For particulars apply to P. MURPHY, 68 West
Madison-st., botwoon tho hours of 7 to 0 a. m. and 1 to 2
BOARDING AND DODGING.
West Sido.
o A BISHOP-COURT, SECOND DOOR FROM
Madison-st.—Largo front alcove, finely furnished j
also other good rooms, with first-class board. Brick
house, finely famished; good table, desirable location.
SOUTH PKORIA-BT.—BOARDERS WANTED.
on SOUTH SANOAMON-ST.-FIFTEEN MINUTES’
Oy walk from pourt-house, furnished room with board.
Inn WEST WASHINOTON-ST.-a ROOMS FOR
Jiyy gentlemen, with first-class board. A few day
boardirs accommodated. Location desirable.
00/ i WEST WABHINGTON-ST.-TUREB UNFUR-
niahod rooms, connected, on first floor; also, ono
largo famished room, will bo vacated about Ist May, to
rent, with board, to adults.
nOQ WEST ADAMS ST.. NEAR UNION PARK-
OiwO One elegant unfurnished suite of rooms. Also,
ono furnished largo room for two; location and accommo
datlons No. 1. .
r>(\n WEST MADISON-ST,, NEAR UNION P ARR
OW 4 Pleasant front parlor, with first-class board. Alto
tldo room with bay window. Terms reasonable. t
TOIINHTON HOUSE—II 4 AND 116 WEST MADISON
tI at. Just opened; everything llrat-olais. Pleasant
rooms, single or on suite. $2 por day; table board, $5
per week.
South Side.
A Q HUBBARD-COURT-NEW BOARDING-
O. bouse; first-class board, with room, $4 to $6.60 per
week, with use of piano; day board, $4. ,
*1 ,\ Q THIRD-AV.—TO RENT, WITH BOARD, THE
XxO parlor, with or without furniture.
OOQ OALUMET-AV.—DAY BOARD, 94.60; BED
/iOO and board, $6; pleasant rooms {dinner at 6p. m.;
throe meals Sunday; stable for two borsee.
nnt WABABII-AV.—ELEGANTLY FURNISHED
00** rooms, with first-class board. Table boarders
accommodated. .
'A AH WABABH-AV.—ELEGANT FRONT SUITE,-
4 with first-dags board.
A On SOUTH DEARBORN (BURNSIDE) BT., near
tbefa Twenty-ninth, a nice, ohoorlul family hotel;
excellent table; surprisingly low prices. Front room for
married couplo, sl3. Single rooms, $6.
nCA WABASH-AV. ONE FRONT PARLOR
4 o4: well-furnished. also other rooms, to rent with
board. References exchanged.
North Side:
n K AND 97 NORTH OLARK-BT.-A FEW PLEAS
yt)ant rooms, furnished or unfurnished, with flrst-olass
board, can bo had at very low prices.
OnQ SEDGWIOK-ST. NICELY FURNISHED
ZUO rooms, with board, for lady and gentleman, or
■lngla men at $5 a week. 3 minutes' walk to the oars. _
BOARD WANTED.
BOARD-A SINGLE GENTLEMAN, WITH UNBX
coptioual reference, desires breakfast, tea, and ulcely
furnlshod room, in a strictly private family. Will be per
manent and no trouble. Don't care ter table variety.
Quito particular though as to family and location. State
terms. Address L 80, Tribune office.
OARD—A ROOM AND BOARD IN PRIVATE
family by two young gentlemen: whore there la young
company preferred. Address, stating terms, L 65, Trib
une oflico. .
TJOAUD—A COMFORTABLE ROOM WITHBOARD,
J3 by an elderly lady In a prlvatq,famlly, either on the
North or Sooth Sides. The host of references given. Ad
dress RR, H33 Mlohlgan-av.
OAnuTIN A PLEASANT LOCATION, SOUTH
Side, foralamllyofSaclults-roau, wife, audOsous;
two good-slzcd rooms, with closets, and two slnslo rooms,
noatlad; rooms neatly-furnished and well-kept, with good
board. Address L 81. Tribune office.
■nOAKD -BY TWO SINGLE GENTLEMEN, WITH
J5 room. In a private family on tho West Side, oast of
Groon-st. and south of Randolph. References gUon lJ
required. Address, stating terms and locality, AU, 2*B
Fast Lake-st. _____
BOARD-AND ROOM BY A YOUNG LADY, IN A
private family In tho vlolnl yof Union Park. Refer
enoos given and roqulrod. Address F 69, rribuno office.
IJOARD— TWO GENTS DESIRE A ROOM, WITH
) good board, convenient to business portion of olty.
Address 877, Tribune oßloe.
TJOARD-ONB LARGE AND TWO, SMALL UN-
Jj furnished rooms, with board, for family of three
adults. Must be botwoon Tbroop, lloboy, Adams, and
Washlngton-sta. Potsosslon May 1. Address X 100,
Tribune office. '
BOARD-ASUITEOFROOMSWITIIBOARD.NEAU
Twenty-socond-st., for gontloman and wife. Thera
must bo none or very few other boarders. Address Jfi IS
R, 181 Twonty-second-st.
BOARD-FOR GENT AND WIFE WITH 2 ROOMS
communioatlng, on second floor. Accommodations
must bo lint-class. References exchanged. Address,
staling terms, etc., N 18, Tribune office.
TjOAIID-A GENTLEMAN AND WIFE. AND SIN-
Jjgle gentloman are doiirour af obtaining board Jn »ome
private family? wUI furnish rooms, exception ol
o.rnwH. Address, stating terms, I, I*6 SUte-st.
TJOARD—FOR GENT AND WlfcE, LARGE. PLKAB
- au t furnished second story room, with board. In good
location, on West Side, above flangamon-«t. Reforonoos
oxcbsnged^_AddressJCß tM^lbum^oUicej M><^M)MM^M^
STRAYED OR STOLEN.
S'tRAYED OR JACKSON'S
farm, JofTorson, one sorrel horse, throe whlto foot,
white stripe on face, 6 years old. Also one bay mare, 4
Vnars old i no marks. A suitable reward will bo paid for
fbSl? return? J. T. BALTER. 4*l Wabash-ar.
S- TRAYUD A BAY HORSE IN . HARNESS.
Rather of a relndoer build? 16M bands high?good
style, and fine traveller? star on forehead. By returning
to llvory, 148 and I*7 South Hangamon-st., wlllbe suitably
rewarded. __
TRAYKD—FROM 285 MKJIIIOAN-AV., APRIL 15,
a small rod cow, with white spots. Whoever will re
turn her shall bo llbrraPy rewarded.
DIVORCES.
DIVOROES-LEOALLY OBTAINED—FBB AFTER
decree. Scandal avoided, Nlneyoara’practlso la tho
courts of Ohlcago. Addrcas P. O. Ifo* 1037.
NO DIVOROB, NO FEE—DIVORCES LEGALLY
obtained for causes ? all law business attended to.
Room S, 847 South Olaik-st. Inclose etamp.
TO EEASE.
TO LEABB-A 1 DOCKAGE, FOOT OP RIVER AND
Doek-ats.,formerly occupied b/ Olianman. FoMOf»lpa
on demand. Apply to F. W. BUOKLNOHAM, C3B Wa
bssh-av,
TO LEASE—TUB DOCK, WITH LOTS IN TUB
roar, on Canal-st., north of Lako-at. bridgo, now oc
cupied by John Granger. This property adjoins th*
track of (ho Danville Railroad, and tins a front o< 110 foot
on the river, It has superior advantages for a coal-yard,
ami osn be lossed for a term of yean. Apply to MAT*
TOOKH A MASON, 623 Wabash-av,
TO LEASE-DOCK—ALL OR PART OF KO FEET
front, In onoof (ho host locations on tho North Ilranoh
for « I nmbo r* wood, or coal yard. Inquire of ANSON
SPERRY, No. 16 Congress-si., nr 140 Klngsbury-st.
mo LEASE—THE DOCK ON THE WEST SIDE,.
X north of and near Lako-st. bridge, now occupied by
tbo Union Steamboat Company. Tula dock lias a river
front of 800 foot, with lots also In the rear. This property
Is finely located for steamboat and railroad business, ana
specially adapted for nleratoror warehouse purposes. For
terms apply to MATTOCKS A MASON, 623 WabAsh-av.
TO LEASE-DOCK PROPERTY ON SOUTH
Branch, near Twcnty-socomlst., 100 footon rlror by
930 feet, to Ohloago A Alton Railroad. Apply to lIENStx
P. IBIIAM, 16 Ooogress-st.
rno LEASE-TUB BEST COAL DOCK IN THE CITY;
X lot on Canal-st., near Adams, formerly occupied by
Holbrook: dock 120 feet. Inquire at 249 But Madlaon-sU
A. U.’HOLDEN.
TO LEASE-VALUABLE DOCK PROPERT Y.FRONT
Ing on West Ohloago-ar., adjoining O. A N. W. It. R.
Round House, 160 foot front and rear, by MS foot deep s
railroad track on lot; rory desirable (or Inmbor or coal
yard. Apply to BARNUM A RICHARDSON Mann
rapturing Company, 64 South JefTnraon-st. .
AGENTS WANTED.
A GENTS WANTED—EVERYWHERE—TO SELL
.a. Hewitt Fluting and Polishing Iron, patented Feb
ruary, 1678. Flutes any length with a gloss, two Irons In
one. Bold only by agents. Largo commission. KNOTT
A DOUGHERTY, 179 East Madlson-st., Ohloago.
GENTS WANTED-OAN MAKE MONEY FAST.
l. Gall at 367 West Madlaon-st. GREEN A SPEAR.
Agents wantbd-to sellournf.w button-
Uolo Gutter and Noodle-Threading Thimble. Agent*
clear S2O per day. W East Madlson-st., Room 6.
Agents wanted-gebat inducements to
agents and lady canvassers for tbo city and all part*
of tho United States, for the Excelsior Solf-lUtlng Drose
Charts: agents are making S6O to SIOO a week. Gall at SOT
West Madlson-st., Room o.
AGENTS WANTKD-BVERYWHBRB, BOTH SEX
es, quick sales, light and genteel employment; sl.6s
will start a paying business. Call or Bond 20 cents, and
receive by mail (post-paid) sample goods that soil for
double the cost. M- LaUANSIEUR A CO., 266 and 369
Month Halsted-st., Ohloago.
A GENTS WANTED-TUE UNION ERA, FOUNDED
UX to advance a positive union of all evangelical Chris
tiana; Smith’s Dictionary of tbo Bible givea.toevery enb
sctlber, 106 East Madlson-st.
A GENTS WANTED-TO BELL OU NEW BUT
-CL ton-hole cutter; latest stylo; silver finish, at $1 per
doe. 116 North Greon-st.
AGENTS WANTED—GOOD CANVASSERS ARB
A making from $lO to sl3 a day with my needle books,
button-hole cutters, etc., etc.; particulars free. O. M.
LININGTON, fflWoit Mnnrno-st.
LOST.
LOST— Off TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 16, A
pookoihook, containing a small amount of money,
and a note very valuable to the owner, going from dmr
store at the oornorof State and Twpifth-eta., to Curtis'
flsh-honso, 107 East Tweltth-rt. Tho finder will bo re
warded by leaving at drug store, ,or IX. U. CURTIS*
fish homo, 107 Ease Twolfth-st.
I OST—YESTERDAY, PART OP A DIAMOND
J „ ear-ring, somewhere on Blue lilnnd-av., botwoon
Mazwoll and Harrison-*!*. Howard will bo given for re
turn to 67 Blue I*land«av.
T OST-SUNDAY MORNINQ-A BLACK AND TAW
I i dog with some white on borleft foro foot, has had.
both front log* broken and somewhat crooked., Answer*
tothenamonf Fido. Anyone returning hor to Room A,
48 West Madlson-it. will be suitably rewarded.
LOST-A GROUND PLAN OF A THREE-STORY
building, on or near thocomorof Clark and Indiana
*ti., on the 14th (mt. Tho finder can have £6 by leaving
tbo samo at MARTIN PAULSIN'S hardware store, cor
of Ontario and Clark-sts.
AUCTION SALES.
By EDISON & FOSTER.
824 & 826 Wabash-av.
ELEGANT
Honseliolfl Furniture
_A_T -A-TJaTIOHSr,
feMaylcriig, Amll 16, at 10 o’clock,
At 824 and 820 Wabash-av.,
Consisting of Parlor. Library, Chamber, Dining-Room,
and Kitchen Furniture, Body, Brussels and Wool Oar-
Eats, Mattresses, Bedding, Linen, Crockery, Cutlery,
llasiwaro, Stoves, Ao., do..
Also Hotel Cook Stove and Steam Table.
ELISON A FOSTER. Auctioneer#.
Honsetiolil Furniture!
Wo am instructed by James *Worrack, Baq.,
to sell at his residence, No. 70 Twenty-third
st.y corner of Pralrio-av., on THURSDAY
MORNING-, April 17, at 10 o’clock, tho
whole of the ELEGANT EUHNXTURB and
effects therein (with the exception of the
Winna, etc.), and consisting of Handsome
Parlor and Beautiful Chamber Sots, in Solid
Rosewood, -Mahogany, Oak, and Walnut;
Mirrors, Oil Paintings, Choice Engravings,
French Marble Clock, Piano; part of Libra
ry; Dinner and Tea Sets, inPaintod and Bur
nished China; Table and Silverware; Wil
ton, Brussels, and Ingrain Carpets: Oil
cloths; Bedding; Dining-room, Kitchen,
and Laundry Furniture; Crockery, Glass
ware, Sowing Machine, Pony Gig, etc., etc.
Sale positive, as the family are going
abroad. ELISON & FOSTER,
Auctioneers.
ELEGANT FUENITURE,
At tho realdenoQ of JOSEPH ULLMAK)
372 WEST WASHTNGTON’-ST.,
j&JV AXTOTION,
On Friday morning, April 18, at 10 o’clock, consisting of
Volvot and Brussels Carpets, Hoaowood Parlor Furniture,
beautiful Chamber Sots, Library, Dining-room and
Kitchen Furniture, largo' Mirror, Curtains, Sodding,
Crockery, Glassware, do.
ELISON A FOSTER. Auctioneers.
GBO.P. GORE <Sc CO.,
S3, 34, and26Randolph-st.,
Will offer by catalogue,
On Wednesday, April 16, at 91-2 a. m.,
One of the Finest Lines of
BOOTS, SHOES & SLIPPERS
ever opened la this city, and retailers are Invited to look
them over.
718 WEST fASHINGTOm.,
COEmSR HOYltfE.
Tho Intonts of Household Furniture, at
718 WostWashlngton-st.,
CONSISTING IN PART OF
Parlor and chamber acts, marble top tables, French
plate mirrors, bedsteads, mattresses, What-nots, exten
sion tables, Ice-cheat, chairs, reckon, stoves, and' Bru
ssels oarpnls In all tho rooms. _ ...
On WEDNESDAY, April 16. at 10 o'clock.
O. P. GORE A CO., Aootlonocn.
HAVENS & CO.
820 WEST VAN BTTBEN-ST.
Eteil lonssil Firim
-A.T
Friday Morning, April 18, at 10 o’clock,
Consisting of anontiro housohold-Oharahor and Parlor
Sets, Kltohon Furniture. Carpots, Bedding, do., <xo.
Also, ONE ELEGANT PIANO. Goods can bo examined
Friday morning before tho salo. Halo positive, and with*
out rosorvu. HAVENS A CO.. Anottoueers.
By TAYJLOR & HARRISON,
EXTENSIVE SALE OP
DRY GOODS, CLOTHING,
NOTIONS, &0., &0.,
THIS MORNING, AT 9H O'CLOCK.
Full linos of Hdkfs., Towels, Napkins, Hosiery, 811k
Dress Patterns, Hamburg Edgings and Insertions, Chil
dren's Rmbrolilorod Waists, lino of Clothing, Hats and
Caps, lot Perfumery and Fancy Soaps, Cutlery, do,, do.
Special inducements to country buyers.
TAYLOR d HARRISON, Auctioneers,
By A. BIICENS.
For sale at Public Auction, Thursday morning, April
17, at 10 o'clock. Stock and Fixtures of a Grocery and
Saloon, consisting of Winos, Liquors, Oils, Scales, Soaps,
Glass Jars, Vinegar, Lamps, one extra large Ice Box, la
good order, at 443 South Olark-st., to be sold without re*
servo. A. LIKENS, Auctioneer.
By BRUSH, SON & CO.
POSTFOZUBADQN’T.
The Auction Bale of Furniture at 408 We»t Madlson-st,
U postponed until THURSDAY. April 17, at 10 a.m..
when tno ontlro stookof Furniture wiU bo sold without
rsietve, regardless of the weather. ___
BRUSH, SON A 00.. Auction*an.

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