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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1872-1963, July 13, 1879, Image 13

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SOUTH TOWN.
Assessor Drake Finishes His Work
in Excellent Time.
And slakes a Generally SatiS'
factory Assessment.
annnaiison Between the Figures of 1878
* and 1879.
Why and Where Reductions Were Made-
The Heavy Taxpayers.
Assessor Drake turned over the books of the
South Town yesterday afternoon to the County
Clerk, having succeeded in completing the wort
even sooner than he expected, wjien the Town
Baud of Review adjourned sine dfo. A no
ticeable improvement is observable In the expe
dition attending the assessment this year as
mopsK'i with the long siege the Assessor had
of it last year. The real-estate books then
vat turned over to the County bn the 29th of
July, and the personal-property books on the
Istb of August. This year the Assessor began
vork sbout the 7th of May. By the 23d of June
tin results of the deputies’ tours around town had
beta cooled off ou to the sheets, aud everything
ns in readiness for the meeting of the Town
Bostdof Review to hear complaints. Owing
to the admirable system adopted by Mr. Drake
iu notifying people by postal card of the assess?
meat, and thus giving them an opportunity-to
show in advance any. injustice that might have
brea done them, the complaints before the'
Board of Review were few in number and, as a
rule, unimportant in chaiicttr. After remain
ing in session a week, the Board adjourned.
That was on the 30tb of June. Yesterday, just
two weeks later, with a smaller force than that
employed last year, the work of transferring
the results to the permanent books was com
pleted, and by 2 o’clock in the afternoon the
volumes were on the way across the river. The
cilice has been conducted on
STRICTLY BUSINESS PRINCIPLES,
and to this is in great cart due tne excellent
alionimr thus made la point of .expedition, it
is a well-known fact, too, that men work harder
and better when paid for their labor as it is per
formed and when, also, they are paid in cosh.
Last rear the Assessor and his force took their
payin orders on which they bad tostanda shave
at the hands of the 11 ccnt-per-ccnt men.” This
year the Town Board was in fnnds, the Super
visor paid tlic-Assessor’s vouchers as they were
presented, the pay of the deputies having hcen
fixed by the Board at $4- a day last spring, and
the men drew their money without having to
submit to a discount, and without any vexatious
delays. The result is apparent.
As to the assessment itself, it may be said,
generally, that while there are redactions in
many instances from the figures of last year, it
is believed to be on the whole a more nearly
just and equitable assessment than any that has
been made in the South Town for years, the
paucity of complaints being substantial evi
dence of that fact.
ins HEAP-ESTATE ASSESSMENTS
has been made with a good deal of care in order
to place values according to Income, and to get
as near one-third of the full value as possible.
In some localities, such as portions of State and
Madison streets, the assessment is as high or
higher than last year, while In other localities
where business is dull and rentals light there
has been a considerable reduction. The
valuation this year on property north of
Madison street is about $10,030,000, against
tILIOO,OOO last year: and la the district be
tween Twelfth street and the river it is a little
less than $20,009,000, against $22,203,000 m
IS7B. The greatest redaction has been made in
the valuation of buildings, the figures being
based on the best of authority to be bad as to
the cost.pi erecting buildipgs..%t Ji H)e.,nressnl,
time. In the district ’ between • Twelfth arid
Twenty-second streets, west of State, the re
duction is $730,000, or about 45 per cent; and
cast of State, $233,000, or 8 per cent. South of
Twenty-second to Thirty-first, east of State,
tile reduction is $189,233, or 8 per
cent, and from Thirty-first to the
limits, cast of State, $1,204,570, or S 3
ncr cent West of State, south of Twenty
second, to Thirty-first, and east of flalsted the
reduction is $026,170, or 18 per cent. South of
Thirty-first to the limits, west of State and east
of Hoisted, the reduction is $212,189, or 26 per
cent. West of Halsted street the reduction is
$130,000, or 20.pcr cent.
. AMONG THE NOTABLE REDUCTIONS
is the assessment on the Palmer House. ; Last
year it was $426,000, and ibis year It is $333,000.
The Assessor refused to make any
on last year’s figures, and kept bn refusing
until the reeeiut of the following communica
tion, which itemed to indicate the line of duty:
Jir. Prank Drake, Aettttor for South Chicago—
Daia Sia: We have been asked by Mr. Palmerto
valne bis hotel, the Palmer Qonse, and it ia our
opinion that $1,000,000 is a most liberal valua
tion, sad do not believe it possible -to sell ttie
properly for that ocice, after most thoroughly ad
vertising it A . J. AyEBELL,
Albert L. Cue,
Henry c. Moner.
William X>. Kerfdot,
Jakes U. Reese.
THE TQLLOWINS COMPARATIVE TABLE
*Ol show ai a glance Uie difference between the
assessments on the more prominent blocks in
the central portion of the city for 1878 and 1879:
Metropolitan 810 ck...
fidelity jisnk Bnlldlnc.
Mooley's Theatre
Athltnd Block
Klnpebonr 810 ck....
bprlngerßnlldlne
Si. Jtmee Hotel BnUdimr.
McCormick Block ..
Beaper Block
Sherman House.,,,
JwmontHonie..
**uner House *****
Grand Pacific
Plctey Bonding.
Ukcfiide Building.*.’.*.’****.”
Phonal Bank
T Building 49,000
*«?. BjnWing (Clam ’street) 37,000
“J aa t*‘*ft(un(f Building 2d, 000
Building fcLOOO
CcrmaaNational Bank Build- .
BuiidinV V.V.V.' !!”**" "oo u!o
Tbieune BullSlne ... *■ ** **3U'boo
■ --.IV' ll^Sor
Kw t i 2 er / wh °lesale);.. Ba,ooo
a^esr*
corner Ctark'iS iJJIS, th ' WMt
Jlr«X»Uon«l Bmp 111,011 •• 28.000 26,000
Gose«ce’«.... *“* Cl,r>oo CO, COO
Portland Block • 80.000 75. 000
Manlerre BoUdtai lo s.ooo 83.040
I'oreßlock, 1 v... 34,000 3:1,000
Dt.ene Block 86,000 72,000
Jloane Block (newi 48.000 40.000
7«.rlorßnlidink ‘ ,23,000 48,000
Papeßnlldin* - 63,000 54.000
■ 88,000
M«r«h«l| Field BiiiVdV;; 48,000 43,000
Male Buildla “ ° 05,000 60,000
| iS:So. iS;SB.
“•° OO
Machine Company ***■
gb akoClubßiTnatae -43,500 - 42,000
JilitameßnUdl". S 33.500 25,300
£• I- PaneelU o; 48-000 • 75.000
Major Block. 07.0J0 5.5.000
AmericanEipreeV’nnn.u '*** 85,000 , 74,050
JkoßciidiS Bn Mdln E .. 58.000 - 55,000
McVicteFe —• 70.000 85,000
70S “ *
amouDtin/r ° F teksokal PHOpntir,
Jeuta short of last
Quoted Tor hr . ,1 ®- This it in part ae
bxnkers, etc. *®' r 7alnation on banka,
J»ar’6 liijji, taken Wariihit; by’last
Ee| Tes ttiih United 8 ?. 6 ? 1, , and Prepaid them
pi so »j to enehi?ti, late - s . boDds *4“? leeal-tend-,
to a TerT r.f ~lcm to swear conscienlldhs-
S'errlthafawal li?°n“ taxable property/
National S ve.»m ***? Corn Exchange from the
* ssesE mentlrnr?»o,iflSS tketn to reduce their
tfaeal
tapite] K ’ c 're assessed oh one-tblrd of tlieir
01 theirreali.t». rde ductipg theaaseasedvalue
Ettarantee thoil%. and a reasonable reduction to
-00 bia'-, “ r ~ ls receivable/ The reduction
•tttOßDu tr, “Jf JaDker * from Inst year
«*); boot* ’OOO’OOO; dry good?, *BOO,-
*bolS? 0 ? nd ahoe |> *80,000; iron,' $50,003;
000. Xhlrfr e^‘ Other. lines *350,2
«€re arc IjiOg legs names on household
11*78, 2879.
Hf’"'* ; ...4,749 * 331.931 6,135 f 196.615
3“!!* 4 ? I 635 1H 730
tiO?8 Q 150 * s6o
steam engines, 130 67.055 luo 46.675
4D.h7U 4 l»t 22.649
Billiard table*., sao 12.425 274 M.C6B
Carriages S.OII 247.304 3.119 178.4HU
bewinginWns 1,643 25,3:19 1,749 14 953
Melodeona C 5 2.»xx) 240 f 1.275
Incorporated
compauie*....
Vessels
Merchandise....
M’/ifra tool*, etc
Gold mud plated
ware
Diamond* and
jewelry
Natural and
manufactured
• articles
Muncyslnbanks
Ajrrlc’lt’l cools.
Credits
B'nds.stVka.oic •
Stock otic of
this Stare...
Pawnbrokers’
Household fur*
nßure 2,034.035 1,338.090
All other prop’y 201.U0Q 302.100
. The personal prooerty assessments, or those
in which the teires are
SIO,OOO OB UPWARDS,
show up as follows:
1879. I * 1879.
B. Adams *Co SIO,OIO Jerome Beecher..,. 15,000
Armour*Co 25,du0 I.ynmn Blair 12.5(0
American Express. l.*»,ooo James Boulton 10,000
George Armour..., is.ooo Cameron, Amherg*
Best, Bussell * Co.. KXUK) Co 13.000
Brintnal, Lamb&Co 20. UK/ S. 11. Chase and oth-
William Blair*Co. 80,000 era 20,000
Sherman llouscfur* Carson, Plric. Scott
nfttire 25.0*1 Co .110.000
W. E. Burlock * Co 14,003 Chapin & G0re...... 2«.!*X)
August Beck* Co.. 12,CKXi Crerar. Adams & Co 15,000
Burley* Tyrrell.... 2ti,&o c.
Boles, Fay * Coukcy 11,0.10 Clark. Friend, Fox &
Baruum Bros 15.T09 Co 25.000
JuUih Bauer 10.000 ’
Cleveland paper Co. KXQCOIEddy. Harvey* Co. 10.000
W. B. Clapp, i*oung Felix, Maretdn *
„ &C0... v 15.000 Blair. 2i,C00
W. H. Colvin * Co. 10,COOFaningtoti&Schnu»ll 18,000
Cahn.Bampold &Co 50,0 X) Fairbanks, Morse*
Clayburgh, Einstein I Co* 15.450
&Co 25,000 Farwcll. Miller *Co. 15,000
Clement.Banc* Co. 4u.000 Frank Bros
Henry Corwith 1C.220*C. H. Fargo * C 0... :i5.000
S. IS. Cobb lO.OtO'Fleld, Lelter & Co. .90X000
N.H. Dudley&Co.. !0,t0l!J. V. Farwcll &Co.4Ui.ao
J. A. Dale *Co in,ooO|Fuller& Fuller 35.000
Davlsßros 10,400 J. IC. Fisher* Co.. laoOO
Dennis* Wheeler.. 10.350,N.K.FalrUauk& Co GS.OuO
David Dows &C 0..; 10,‘IKX) H. S. Fitch 201000
John B. Drake, iFtcld, Benedict *
Grand Pacific fur* Co 20.003
ulture 40,000 D. B. Fisk * C 0.... ftu.oo9
Durands *co 6a 000 L. C. P. Freer. 25,000
Doane&Co.. 10.000 L. Gould &Co 12.000
F. A. Elliott * Co.. lo.u*» Grodie * Strut* 10.000
Gray Bros ao.oon B. P. Hutchinson*
M. Goldsmld 10.000 Co 10,000
Giles. Bro. *C0.... 15.000 Hlrsch, Meyer*Co 12,500
Charles Gossage * !c. M. Henderson *
Co ; co.ooo c0...* 80,000
George P. Gore & IHlrsch. Klud*Co. lo.tOo
Co iaooO Hart Bros 20.C00
Greensfelder, Hoaea* S. Hvmsn * Cu z 5,000
thal*Oo 35,000 Holtou * Hildreth.. 14.UC0
I Gage Bros. *C0.... ao.ooG Harmon, Merrlam
Gould & Briggs 17,000 *Co 10,000
. GardncrUousc(fur* 'Hale. Cleveland,
nlture) 12,000 Bonncll & Co 20.000
! ,T. G, Goodrich..... 15.9.™ E. 11. Haddock..... 11.750
1 W. M. Bovt*Co.. 45.000IndcrwcdenBros... IG.OOO
P. C. Hanford & Co 10.000 D. W. Irwin & Co.. 20,000
| Gilbert Hubbard* l lngraham, Carlin *
Co 15,000 May 15.000
P. Hayden * Co ... so f ooU S. S. Jewett & Co.. 10.00
Hibbard, Spencer* !Jones & Raymond.. 10,009
Co 85,000. Judson * Co 10,00)
Bart. Bradley*Co 10.txoJansen. McClure*
Heath * Milligan.. 15,350 Co 25.000
Knowles. CloycsACo 12,00 Undaucrßros.*Co. 20.000
Kelly. Hitman * Co. 15.C00 A. Lewis * C 0...... 15.00/
H. W. King* C 0... 80,00 b. Lovreosteln 15,(00
Keith Bros 50.f00 W. F. McLaughlin. 15.000
C. P. Kellogg * Co. 90.000 McNeM* Higgins...-14,000
B. W. Kimball Z5.C00 Morrison, Plummer
Kellogg* Barrett., in. ooo &Co 20.000
B. Kuppcrhelmer.. 20. ooOiMarkley,Ailing*Co 35.000
H.A.Kolm* Bros..i2o,ooo;McCann, Fitch *
p. JJ. Keith * Co«..sa«<X)i Converse.... 10,000
S. D.Klmbark ..... 25.(XX)FMever. Strauss *'
Albert Keen........ icvoool Goodman 90.000
TutUUl King........ 15.5]u;McCormick. Adams
Larrabee* North.. 10,000; &Co 15,000
Leopold Bros. *Co. saom McKlndlcv,Gilchrist
W. H. Linn 10.000 1 *C0....'. . 25,"00
Lyon*Healy 20,OoaMandel Bros oo.QK)
Llhhy, McNeill * Meriden Britannia
, Libby 20,000 Co. 1 15.000
Lord, stoutenburgh (N. Matson & Co au.ooo
25,000 John J. McGrath... 10,000
Franklin MacVeagh iPhelps. Dodge *
&Co 4a 000 Palmer 55,000
John W. Masury * W. J. Quan & C 0... 20.(XX)
Son... laooojHoswell, Skecie *
M. J. Ncaber * Co. lo,ooo| C 0..... 10.000
A. J. Nutting laOOOIE. A. Robinson laooo
National I.ife-lnsur- J. T. Byereon & Co. 20,000
ance Company.... 15.800 Ktssor *R;etz...... 12.0U0
B. F. Norris* Co.. lO.OOOlKlndskopf, Barbe *
Ortmayer, Lewis & Co 2a COO
Co 10.090.Hothschlid, Schroc-
Orington Bros lanoo dcr AEIIeL...
—> t dcr 4: 15,000
Perry* Co ir.,200;J. A. Rice (Tremont
Pitkin* 8r00k5.,.. 14.0001 nouse furniture), 20,000
Parkburst* Wilkin-* Root* Son in,ooo
son 35,000.Kced*Son 10,0#
Putnam Clothing fucld. Murdock *
House 15.000; Fisher 90,000
Frank Parmelee.... 15.000 Spauidinc&Mcrrlck
o.l>. Peacock I 5.«» Sherer * Parsons... 12,000
C.W.&E. Pardrldge 50,000 Slblev. Dudley* Co 14.000
Potior Palmer(botel Seebcrger* Ilreak’y 25,*00
furniture) 53,000 William Stewart.... 25,000
Sidney, Shepard * C. C. Thompson *
Co 11,000 Co 10.000
Sprague, Warner* ‘Joseph Ullraan 14,980
Co 70.000 Van Schaack, Stc*
Steele* Price .20,000 tcqsoq*Co 25,000
8. A. smith 15,a0 Vergo, Buhling *
W. F. Storey (Chi- t Co 20.000
caeoTime#) 18,000 Western News Co.. 25.000
Stcctauer Bros. * Western Methodist
Co 125.000 Book Concern.... 13,620
Sclz, Schwab* Co. 40,000 Wilton Bros 20.000
Sweet, Dempster* M.D. Weils *Co.. 70,000
Co 12,000 W. A. Wood Mow-
Slmon, Strauss*Co 23,000 Ine Machine C 0... 12,600
H. H. Shufoldt * Wamßnw.... . lo.O'jO
Co laooo G. W. Weber 15,000
Slower Manafg Co. 15,000 Willoughby, HUI*
A. T. Stewart 4 C 0.450 ,000 Co 18,000
Silverman. Ltndauer James Wilde, Jr.. *
&Co 12,500 Co 12,7)00
Thompson * Taylor 20.000 Wheeler* Wilson S,
Tolman * King... 30,000 M. Co 10,000
Tobey * Booth 12.0C0 Montgomery, Ward
Towle* Roper 25,000 *Co 12,000
1879.
$42,000
44.000
22.0U0
85.000
63.000
32.000
62.000
46.000
80.000
150.000
„ 120,000
, 333, 000 -
141.000
60.000
50,000
1878.
..SOO,OOO
.. 60,000
.. 31,000
00,000
.. 69.000
. 21,000
.. 78,000
45,000
. 88,000'
175,000
. 135,000 .
. 430,000
. 162,500
. 66,000
. 55,500
Bradner Smith & [Northwestern Lea*
c;o $30,000 ther Co SIO,OOO
Culver,t'affc.Hoync Onondaga Dock Co. JJ,B*O
& Co 30,000 Pullman P. C. Co.. 83,470
Conrad Selpp Brew* Hand.McNfllly & Co 20,u00
tag Co 44,150 Tub Titinroz C 0... 10.400
Chicago City Kali* Traders' Ids. C 0.... 43,810
was- Co 63,320 luUf'Ounti Pub, Co P.BBO
Chicago Gaslight & ' [Journal Company.. 13,300
Coke Co 75,000 Chicago Stamping
Downer & Bcmls , I Co 16,000
Brewing Co 37,730 Chicago Carpot Co.. 13,000
D. li. Shipman Lead {Chicago Newspaper
Worn Co 35,100 ‘Union in,COO
Dogcett, Bassett & Alston Mfc, Co 18,000
Hills 30.000 J. M. 17. Jones S.&
Goodyear UubberOo 30,000 P. Co 130,000
H-A. BurlbutACo. 15,000‘AlIertonPatkltijrCo 15,000
J. W. Butler Paper , union itolUuc-Mllls
Co 20,000- Ct)‘. 30,000
46.000
33.000
21.000
70,000
22.000
45.000
. 3U. 000
10,030
68.000
200.000
45.000
75,00 U
154.000
104.000
95.000
L Chicago, July 12-—Baring the “heated
term ”of last summer I administered amyl
nitrite to quite a number of persons who had
been “ sunstruek,” and with so Croat success
that lam anxious that a lorecr number may be
benefited by its use than would naturally come
under my personal observation.
20/000
22,000
The drug should be reduced by alcohol, and
cotton saturated with the dilution should be
packed in small vials or vinaigrettes. It is best
aoministered bv olfaction.
I will he very glad to supply my preparation
oralis to superintendents of gang, of then ex
uosed to extreme heat. Gibers who may call
for the remedy wilt he supplied by my oflice
attendaut at a merely nominal expense. ’
Nicno. Fiuxcts Coosa, M. D.
Husband and Wife,
AVuj T</rk Rerttld.
• “Tour husband was arrested by an officer,
Mrs. I’oyers,” said the Justice in Essex Market
Court Yesterday to a sad-faced little woman,
‘•on a charge of cruelly beating von. I have
sent for you to make a complaint against him."
“Against my husband, sirl" she asked in a
low voice.
“ Why, of course. Tour face is cut and swol
len,your arms black aud blue, and your lips
quivering now from the pain nis brutality has
. caused you. Your cries were uitlful to hear,
your neighbors say, and they add that your hus
■ band is a drunkard and that yon have to sup
.pbrt him.”
“Oh! let him go,” said the little woman, cry
ting. “He didn’t mean to do it. We’ve been
’ married just a year and a half. - Our little boy
is home asleep. I would not have it said his
father ever had been arrested for beating his
mother. You’ll letulm go; please do," and the
woman wept afresh.
“And what do you say, Powers I” answered
the Court.
' “Sa»!" answered the drunken brute. “ Why,
I say damn her! I’ll give it to her when X get
her again. I’ll stop her blubbering and her.
babv-stories.”
“’You will not If I hare the power to prevent
you. You are committed for six months in de
fault of *OOO to keep the peace.”
SStS 111 y ' ar ’-* “
cip^f C Qre assessments ol the prin-
BAKES AND BANKERS,
IK7&
FifUi. N " l !? nal 8 StfMOO
Merchants’’. o-n’222
Northwestern “70 non
Union 01 * ** ant ° f Il,inob " MsloM
Commercial" iTt’nSS
Bank of Montreal. .. loo’ ooo lan’nnn
fnS? d t“r I! “? kuf Commerce.. ,30,'000 a.-,’ not)
u»n uhet ’ " >/5i5 i«:po
International an - 000 5 Sim
Illinois L.&T 17 QOO
Merchants’S., L, &T 25U,’0U0 15TOOO
•Union 1 rust ... . n inn n
% C VI% Kcßa& Co 5*300 tooo
r ‘- chaffner X 6.580 rooo
wwSV"* For 16T8 ’
cre^fS'^n^YL? 0 * 81116 lDCre “ e ° r d *
VARIOUS CLASSES OP TAXABLE PROPERTY
as compared with the figures for 1878, together
wun the corresponding increase or decrease in
the assessments thereon:
. 808.380
* mo-to
0,005,067
429.814
31.000
52.223
591.135
135, (CIS
18,345
124.100
54,000
CORPORATIONS.
REMEDY FOR SUNSTROKE.
To the Editor of Ttte Tribune,'
THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE: SUNDAY. JULY 13. 1879-SIXTEEN PAGES.
• LABOR.
A Discussion ot the Eight-Hour
The Plasterers Will Be Apt to Get Their Increase
EIGHT HOURS.
ABOUT jL HUNDRED AND PIPIT PERSONS
assembled in the West Twelfth Street Turner
id all last evening tor tlie purpose, as was un
derstood, of discussing the merits of the etght
hour system. Mr. J. BoJden called the meeting
to oraer, and was elected Chairman, Mr. H. Ras
mnssen acting as Secretary.
Mr. Dantzinger, from the Committee ap
pointed at a previous meeting to wait upon the
employers and , ascertain -whether they would
consent to the introduction of the system, re
ported progress. The Committee found fortv
two of the largest employers of labor in the
furniture business who were willing to adopt
the eight-hour system provided that Grand
Rapids and other cities could he induced to do
the same thing. The Committee were well re
ceived, and felt satisfied with what they heard.
Mr. T. J. Morgan was called upon for a
sncech, but declined temporarily in favor of a
representative of the employers.
UR. JACOB BEiERSDOHF
854,420
said that be was in accord with the elslit-hour
movement, but the question was whether the
system was practicable. Clncaso manufactur
ers could not consent to it, unless Grand Rap
ids, New York, and other furniture manufactur
ing centres could be brought in. Unless this
was done be could not see how anybody could
look for the adoption of the svstem- Mr.
Beiersdorf’s remarks were received with ap:
phase.
Mr. Morcsn tlren took the platform, and an
nounced himself as an eight-hoar man. He
complained that on a previous occasion be was
choked off by representatives ot trades’unions
who were opposed to a full discussion of the
svstem. The discussion would do good, for it
would show the people what the facts were. It
must be recognized that what Mr. Beiersdorf
said wits perfectly true, and that nothing could
be done in Chicago unless other cities would
come in. He understood that the men were will
ing to work eight hours for eight hours’ pay.
This would give employment to many of the
workmen now stigmatized as “ tramps.” It
was a great pity that odier trade organizations
besides the Furniture-Workers’ Union had not
learned the lesson.
THE COMPETITIVE SYSTEM
G7,5'.»0
8,459,748
259,632
4,548
* 16,070
143,245
64«,at7
111,2)5
11,000
22,000,
34.100
18,000
was the chief stumbling-block in the way of
the adoption of eight hours as a normal day’s
work. The speaker advised the men to work
right along, eight hours a day for eight hours'
nay, and by-and-by they would be able to do
better, lie congratulated bis bearers on
the presence amongst them of employers
of labor, lor it was necessary for them
to understand tins labor question. He had un
derstood thafßrunswick, Balke & Co. were will
ing to adopt the . eipbt-honr system if others
would do the same. Both employers and em
ployed mnst learn and realize that mutual con
cessions mnst be made for the common advan
tage. In conclusion, Mr. Morgan heartily-abused
Uie competitive svstem. and said things would
never go right until that system was eliminated
from the economic problem. He did not explain
how this was to be done.
PAUL OnOTTKAU, TUB ALIEN,
followed with an address in German. He said
tliat after the great demonstration on the Fourth
the qorkingmen could not afford to give up the
good work, for it they missed it this time they
might as well give It up altogether. The only
cities entering into competition with Chicago
were Cincinnati and Grand Rapids, and the
work of agitation mnst be kept up there. He
referred in severe terms to the course taken by
Brunswick, Balke & Co., ami said that firm were
opposed to tiic eight-hour movement, although
they professed to be willing to adopt it if others
would. . .
Mft Staetzknecht moved that telegrams be
sent to the furniture-workers in other cities and
to the Central Com mitten- of the Trade and
Labor Union in New York, notifying them of
the stand taken by Chicago workmen. It was
also suggested, to scud two delegates to Grand
Rapidsas agitators, and. a vote being taken,
both motions were declared carried. A nerson
in the audience requested all furniture-workers
to attend the regular meeting ot the Union at
No. 54 West Lake street:
The Chairman said he hoped it was under
stood that none of them-woutu work more Hum
eight hours a day, and thaton-Mondav morning
they would not go to work until So’cJock. The
expression was applauded: hut no actual vote
was taken.
On motion, It was decided to again Invite the
employers to be present at the next regular
meeting of the Union Tuesday evening. The
meeting then adjourned.
MORE -WAGES.
tus plasterers’ onion.
The Chicago Section ot the Plasterers’ Union
held a meeting in Maskell Hall, on Desplainea
street, near Jackson, last evening, for the pur
pose of taking action upon the matter of the
demand for an increase of wages, and also to
listen to the proposition of the “ bosses,” that
they would grant an increase of wages provided
the men would have nothing to do with any
work in the city except through them (the
bosses). The men bad determined before com
ing to this meeting to bring their employers to
time or strike on Monday morning, but all
the ” posses ” except two agreed yesterday to
accede to the raise. One of the two who stood
out slated that he would come to time if he was
compelled to do so. but the other declared that
the men should not dictate to him in the matter
of wages, and said ho would not pav the increase
demanded. ‘The men have been getting $2.50
per day, but they claimed that this was not
enough, in view of the nature of the work and
the fact that they could not get employment but
a few months In a year, and they want $3.
Their whole attention last night was devoted to
devising ways and means for bringing down the
obstreperous boss who had talked so
independently against the Union. Nearly
every plasterer in the city belongs to
the Union, and they virtually 'control things
here. They refused to consider the proposi
tion of the bosses, last evening, to be per
mitted to control the business of Hie city, hut
claimed that they would be able to carry their
point in their own wav. It is not probable
that there will be a strike to-morrow among
these men, as they "will doubtless get the ad
ditional 50 cents per day which they ask.
PUBNITURE-WORKRR3.
A Tribune reporter called at Clark Bros.*
furniture works yesterday mornimr, to ascer
tain Uie attitude of the strikers at that place.
He was informed by a member of the Urra that
the cabinetmakers, some fifty in number, in
the employ of the firm, had lately been stopping
work earlier than usual, ami 'seemed to be
awaiting further movements on the part of
other Unions throughout the country before
taking any decisive steps. There some 230
men in the employ of the firm, but the cabinet
makers are the only ones who have as yet made
any move. None but friendly relations are
said to exist between the Company and its em
ployes, and everything is expected to be all
right again in a few days.
Same of the most prominent furniture houses
in the city were visited yesterday, and no
trouble with workmen was reported. At Blers
dorfs the men are paid by the piece, and as yet
have made no move toward a strike: while' at
the factories of Swiuey ami Neuberger some of
the men are working bnt eight hours’a day, but,
us all are paid by me piece, they arc the only
losers. The movement is by no means general.
NORTHWEST FAIR-GROUNDS.
To the Editor of The Tribune.
Chicago, July 12.—Will you allow me to In
quire, through your valuable paper, wbat is be
ing done to secure the land, and onen to the
farmer/ and stock-men of the Northwest fair
grounds which shall be permanent, and where
every man in the whole West wno has fine cat
tle, horses, sheep, swine, poultry, or other farm
products, could bring them once a year for exhi
bition, sale, or exchange?*
.The grounds should he easy of access by steam
railroad from all parts of the city, so that, at
the close of the day, when 20,000 or 30,000 peo
ple wished to return to the city for the night,
they could do so with ease and comfort; and I 1
am grcat|y mistaken if the number, on good .
days, with favorable weather, would not reach
50,000!
The grounds should be large enough so that.
If a stock-man in Kentucky, lowa, Minnesota,
or any place else, wished to bring his whole hera
for exhibition, sale, or exchange, be could do so.
There should be a good track on which to
speed ami train horses, together with stables
and sheds for the care of slock; and these, with
the track, should be oped all the year.
We have nothing here now which esneeially
interests the farmer and country-oeople general
ly, and with this enterprise once well established
with the largeness and liberality with which
Chicago usually carries out what It undertakes,
the number of people who would assist It would
Question.
—Furniture Workers.,
be limited only by the capacity of the railroads
to bring them to the city, and the means of
feeding and lodging them during their stay.
Any one who has ever visited the St. Louis
S ock, Agricultural, and Industrial Fair, knows
of the great rush of people, and the impossi
bility of getting out to the grounds, or back to
the city after once out, with any sort of com
fort, or of finding a place to sleep at night.
But Chicago, with its unlimited railroad facil
ities, and its larger hotel and boardlug-hoose
accommodations, could do better.
As a money-investment it would pay. The
railroads, the hotels, or our merchants could
either well afford to set this on its tier.. No
time must be lost AlLthe work can be done
in sixty days. With grand militarr en
campment iu September, the Industrial Expo
sition on the Lake Front, ami the opening of a
great Agricultural and Stock Fair, who would
not come to Chicagol One Who Knows.
A MURDERER'S HEAD.
Cox's Phrenological Chart—A. Bamarksble
Document,
jvrro York Herald.
Tou have a powerful constitution, are much
stronger than tne ordinary run of men, are able
to do more, put forth piore effort and more
continuous manifestation of strength than most
men.
. There is a prcdominence of the motive of mus
cular temperament, while the vital and mental
are fairly represented. Yourpowere are mnch
concentrated, your continuityJs large. Tou are
able to give your individual attention to n par
ticular class of subjects, are liable to be absent
minded, can be thoroughly absorbed io a sub
ject when any one thing occupies your mind,
and when yon have formed a desire you retain
that desire until it is gratified. Your head is
strongly marked, some organs being particularly
strong, while none arc very small.
You are characterized for great independence,
self-reliance, willfulness, and have the disoosi
tion to take responsibilities, have always been
in your element when at the head. You are not
so polite, pliable, easy, and showy as you are
proud. Independent, and anxious to be your
own master.
Firmness is very largo, giving uncommon per
severance, determination, and disposition to
earry your purposes to the utmost, and you
could be exceedingly stubborn. You have great
nresence of mind in fimps of danger, were bom
to be a bead man som.ewbere, would have suc
ceeded as captain of a ship, an officer iu the
army, or as overseer in some employment. You
are remarkable for your watchfulness, guarded
ncss, suspiciousness, reticence, and you keep
your own affairs to yourself. Yon may talk
with some freedom where your own matters are
not concerned, but you develop only so much as
you please, and no one can get from yon that
which vou are disposed to keep.
You have always had a desire to acquire prop
erty, to have money, things; as a boy were fill
ini' your pockets, mekimr up and accumulation
in one way or another, but the specialty of your
desire in this respect was to keep your things
under lock and key. and not to allow others to
know anvthing of yonr affairs. This tendency
of yonr mind is very great: must have had an
inliueuec upon you when yon were very young.
You have very large combntivencss, are truly
courageous, amf, although cautious, disposed to
measure your difficulty, vet, having made up
your mind, y;ou persevere to the end. You are
not necessarily cruel or revengeful, but von are
bound to overcome and bo master. You are
some time in becoming augry, but a long time
in getting over it or forgetting - it.
Are quite atrict, and often rigid, with
others In matters of engagement, whether
you arc rigid with yourself or not: are severe
. on those who tail to keep their promises or arc
dishonest. It you were a preacher vou would
consider that you had discharged your duty
when you had fold a sinner three times to re
pent, and if be failed after that you would give
him over.
You have a good appetite and enjoy your eat
ing.
You love women and children, but are not so
mindful of kin. You have but few particular
friends, and even with those you are not verv
familiar; in fact you must; have isolated your
self from the majority of mates and companions
and lived alone within yourself.
Hope, spirituality, and' Veneration are not
specially developed, and, ''although not defect
ive, thev would require considerable encourage
ment to have much modifying influence in your
character.
Benyvolencc is not large, ; though not small.
There are cases where your sympathies would
be manifestcu, and at mignt be lib
eral, but they are not special cases. Yon mind
vour own business, and, wish others to mind
■ theirs.' V '7.V '■ j. ' ■
Yon have a favorable development of thought,
judgment, and understajiaing, but are not
characterized for quick perceptive power, ready
memory, or scholastic ability. You could have
succeedeu in the study of 'figures, mixed mathe
matics, so as to become a surveyor or navigator.
Your memory of events is hut ordinary, but van
can plan quite well. ’ a*
You love fun, althoughyou do not let your
self out orten to the free expression of wit; but
you enjoy it highly when you ore where there is
plenty.
All things considered, von should be noted
for wtll power, independence, suspiciousness,
reticence, and for your determination to over
come and conquer, for your concentration of
mind on any one thing that occupies it. desire
to acquire and hold property and for your plan
ning talent.
You have not the qualities which would
necessarily make a bad map of you, but you are
capable of carrying your designs and desires so
far as to render you bad if not properly con
trolled. Favorable circumstances and good
culture might have done’ touch for you. as you
have the natural capacity to be improved: but
b.d habits and unfavorable associations would
be likely to pervert so strong a nature as yours,
and. once off the proper track, you would be
dable to great excesses. L. N. Fowi.be.
married die of a Duke's Daughter.
OalltmanCg Jfrvvmger, June 21.
A suit fur judicial separation which will ex
cite interest, both from the nature of the de
tails and the position of the parties, has just
commenced before the Fourth Civil Chamber.
The husband is M. De Chcvries, and the wile a
daughter of the late Duke de Persigny. The
proceedings were flret Instituted by the wife,
but a counter-demand was subsequently put
forward by the husband. M. Daehaud stated
tlie allegations of Mine. De Chevries as fol
lows: From the time of the marriage, which
took place three rears ago, tlie husband com
menced to treat her brutally. He. told her that
she must consider herself fortunate to have
found him, as no one else would have married
her. He reproached her with the monev her
wedding corheille had. cost him. He called her
‘‘Sale Bonapartist!” 'On their wedding tour at
Nice and Monaco, he attempted to strike her.
and pulled her hair under thq pretext oi play
ing with her. Ho was accustomed to drink
immoderately, and oue day, when Intoxi
cated, threw her watch and chain out of
tlie window of a carriage in which they
were driving. He had entered her bed-chamber,
accompanied bv tlie house porter, and insulted
her grossly. He annoyed her by ploying on tlie
piano night and day. He bad" threatened to
bring an action for a separation,' aud to drag
the name of Persigny in the mire; be accused
her of tm morality, and set spies to watcli her. He
declared that she deserved to be flogged, and
that his father would rise in his tomb did he
know that he had contracted such a marriage.
He took triends into her room when she was
half undressed, and he has called medical men
to examine her mental state. On the other side,
M. Maugras supported the demand of her hus
band for these reasons: In JS77, during their
stay at Monte Carlo, sue refused to allow her
chambermaid to levae her side night or day; she
appeared in public with women of questionable
reputation; she created scenes at Uic hotel in
which they were staying, and bit him in the
cheek; she boasted openly that she badonlv
married him for his fortune, and accused him of
depraved morals. Tile Court ordered a private
inquiry into tlie allegations of the two parties.
Building Statistic*,
According to the 2forthtcestim Lumberman,
1,000 latliß will cover 70 yards of surface, and 11
pounds of nails put them ou, Eigut bushels of
good lime, 15 bushels of sand, 1 bushel of hair,
make enough good mortar to plaster 100 square
yard*. A cord of stouc. 3 bushels of lime, and
a cubic yard of sand will lay 100 cubic feet of
wait, One thousand shingles, laid 4 inches to
the weather, will cover 100 square feet of sur
face, and 5 pounds of nails fasten them on.
One-fifth mor6 siding and flooring fs needed
than tne number of square feel of surface, be
cause of the lap in the sidingund the matching
of the floor. • Five courses ol brick will lay 1
foot in bight on & chiaincv; 6 bricks in a course
will make a flue 4 inches wide and 12 long, and
8 bricks in a course make a flue 8 inches vide
and 16 long.
The New Eddystone r.lcrhtlionse.
The Duke of Edinburgh will. lay the founda
tion-stone of the new Eddystoue Lighthouse
about the middle of August. The Duchess is to
lay the top stone, which, however, will not be
readv for three years. The new lighthouse will
be sixty feet higher than the present tower, and
will cost about $350,000.
Edward Compton, son of the late well-known
English actor, was secured bv cable on the 28tb
ult. to support Adelaide Neilson during her
American tour.
SANITARY.
Dr. De Wolf Gets Mors Volunteers
■—Their Assignments.
Commissioner Waller Will Do What
He Can About Street-
Cleaning.
Thecal! of Commissioner De Wolf for twenty
fire volunteers to Inspect tenement-houses and
see that they arc kept in sanitary condition dar
ing the Summer is being responded to by so
many that he expects to hare fifty by Tuesday
noon; and he proposes to find work for that
number by reducing the si(e of the districts
originally marked out, thus insuring more
thorough work, since there will not be so much
to do. The following physicians,—young men
and women,—active and intelligent, who may
make a reputation in this way, were enrolled
yesterday: T. F. Shanahan, Emma F. Gaston,
Mary L. Vincent, Oliver Sollatt, Wells.
Andrews,'J. W. Starr, William A. Crocker, J.W.
Akers,F.Mdore,Louis Goeschel.Cnarlcs Gaylord,
and W. W. Winter. Only three or four of them
were assigned to duty. All, as well as others
who may scud in their names, will be given
districts Monday.
“WBATASI TOTTIODO!"
asked a reporter of Dr. De Wolf.
“They are to examine the tenement honses,”
replied he,‘‘and Indicate their faults, if any;
and, every two days, hand their memoranda to
the ward sanitary policeman, who will see that
their suggestions are carried out. Once a week
they will report to me the condition of their
charge. The tenement honses all over the city
are in good order to-day, but they hare to be
looked after or they will go down.”
“Do you know anything about
THE STBEBTS SKD GUTTERS!”
"I have nothing to do with them, and do not
hold myself responsible for their condition.
They should be under the control of the Health
Department. I onlv act in an adyfaory wav
•with the Department of Public Works. X have
advised them to clean the streets, and I under
stand more men than usual have been put to
work in the Filth, Sixth, and Seventh Wards.”
“Do you Intend to ask the Council for more
money? ”
“Yes; f0r*12,000.”
“Is that on account of the 23 per cent reduc
tion?”
“ No. I need the monev for scavenger work.
The 25 per cent was made up from salaries and
the item for Small-Pox Hospital.”
“What was this year’s appropriation for
scaventrer work? ”
“A little over *20,000.” ■
“ Was that all you asked for? ”
“Yes, but I put in a lump sum for the De
partment, and the Finance Committee cut it
down *15,000.”
“ What is the monthly allowance for
SCAVENGER WORK?”
“ One thousand six hundred and ninty-one
dollars and slxtv-six cents.”
“How much has been expended since Jan 1?”
“Up to July 1, $8,678, which shows a saying
of *1.503 in six months.”
“How much have you left of that item?”
“Eleven thousand eight hundred and ninety
three dollars.”
“ And yon need $12,000 more?”
“Yes, 1 propose to set flfty teams to work.
' We now have twenty-six.”
“Will von spend all of the *12,000 in July.
August, and September?”
“No. I want money available in case of an
emergency. They are to have yellow fever all
over the Sonth this year, and there will he many
fugitives come here, and I may want to establish
a fumigating chamber to disinfect their baggage.
If that is done there will be no dancer to
our people. And it may be ncce c sary to
use disinfectants larcelv. I saved *26,500 from
the health appropriations for IST7 and 1878, and
I want a portion 01 that money placed to my*
credit now.”
HEALTH-OFFICER MEREI
says the distribution of scavenger teams two
aml-a-half in the First Ward and one in the
Fourteenth, for. instance—is superficially un
just, but this fact must bo fatten into considera
tion: In the First "Ward there is no con
sumption of swill or garbage, and all of it
has to be removed (amir, the hotels and
restaurants furnish great quantities), while
in the Fourteenth Ward . a great many of
the people keep cows and other animals, the
owners of which feed them upon the refuse of
their neighbors’ tables. So, although the Four
teenth Ward has a population of 47,000 neopfle,
and the First Ward nominally one of 14,180, the
latter furnishes more stuff to be removed than
the former.
COMMISSIONER waller
“Anythingnew about the streets?” said a
reporter to Commissioner Waller yesterday
afternoon.
“Nothing, excent that I have given instruc
tions to spend a little more than was proposed
to clean the gntters, so as to meet the present
exigency. We had cleaned them, but the re
cent rains washed the dirt back to a considera
ble extent”
“Can’tyon control the sprinkling-carts on
improved streets? They make a great, deal of
mnd.”
“ X have been investigating that matter, and
have given aomc Instructions, and propose to
see that they arc lived up to. The sweeping
machines can do effective service only when tite
streets were dry the day before. But property
owners get impatient, and send for the sprink
lers, and they wet the street, and the result is
that tlie sweepers cannot remove the mud.
•But I can control the sprinklers, and I am go
ing to do it.” i
The Camorra and Its Victim*.
Pan MaH Gaeette.
The following episode (says our Roman cor
respondent) affords some slight idea of tlie
state of morals in Naples, and the tardiness of
the administration of justice. Two years since
a former Camorista, Vincenzo Boreili, sold his
services as a spy to the police. His quondam
companions, piecroft{,—the last grade bot one
to wuich the Caraoristl attain by dint of some
“special act of courage,” or “of some deed
useful” to tlie corporation,—decided on bis
death, cast lots, aud the lot fell on Raffaele
Esuosito. At Sp.m. he met his victim, fired,
and mortally wounded him, Boreili only having
time to say.'“Thou hast received the mandate
from tlie Camorra or thou wouldst not have
done this thing”; and to the bystanders,
“ Arrest him! arrest him! ” Some soldiers, in
fact, seized tlie murderer, bat he was literally
torn from their grasp, and they themselves
were nearly murdered. Boreili died. Espo
sito escaped for the time. Such was the
enthusiasm created by bis crime m the
minds ot the demoralized populace, that
collections were set on foot and a
largo sum ot money was presented to ■
him. Moreover, the infuriated mob,
chiefly composed ot women, went in
procession (o the Old Cemetery, tore the body
from the guardians, the inflicted nameless
horrors bn" the corpse. Some days later,
Esnosito signified bis intention of giving him
self up.tc lastlce, and was escorted to orison by
an imii' ,se crowd, auowcring cigars and
flowers’V rtheir hero. A year since, visiting
the prisons, Esposito was pointed out. Be then
maintained that he hhd no mandate, no accom
plices; aud the Governor assured me that, do
what they would, it was impossible to prevent
letters, food, and presents of all descriptions
from reaching him, such is the organization of
the Camorra even among the jailers and
gnardians. For two years be has been allowed
the. pleasant prison life of Naples, bat in the
end seems to have tired ot “ heroism,” and re
vealed his accomplices, who now ait beside him'
at the bar. Tlie trial commenced yesterday.
0£ course the ball ia crowded. President Sal
vati, who directs the case, has excluded women
from the tribunal, and has made no provision
for the press; but the trial raises a perfect fury
of excitement, if It be proved that the crimi
nal has betrayed his accomplices, he will, bv the
rules of the Camorra, he dealt with as be dealt
with Boreili.
Tife Panama Canal,
M. de Lesseps, in a lecture at Amiens on the
Panama Canal, stated that in Nuvenibcr he
should start for the Isthmus, that the first sod
would be turned on New-Year’s Day, and that
with 30,000 or 40,000 navvies, some* of them
Chinese, but 15,000 of them free negroes from
Brazil, whom the Emperor Pedro would doubt
less agree to send, the work would be completed
iu seven or eight years.
THE TKIUVNK iIKANCfi OFFICES#
TN ORDER TO ACCOMMODATE OUR NUMEROUS
J. patrons throughoutthe cltr. we have established
Branch Oillces in the different Divisions, as designated
below, where advertisements will be taken for the same
price a* charged at the Main OUlce, and will be received
until H o'clock p. ra. during the week, and until 9 p. m.
on Satnrfljrs:
J. & u. SIMMS. Booksellers and Stationers. 123
Tweotjr-tecoad-st.
S. M. WALDEN. Newsdealer. Stationer, etc.. 1009
West Madlson-sc.. near Westem-av.
ROBERT THIIDMSTON. West-Side News Depot, I
Blue Island-av.. corner of Halsted-st. _
11. C. HERRICK, Jeweler. Newsdealer, and Fancy
Goods, 720 Lake-st.. corner Lincoln.
LOUIS W. H- NEKBB. Printing and Advertising
Agent. News and Stationery Depot, 435 East Division
al.. between LaSalle and Wells.
PEBSOSAL,
P E IS KU TO MfcET SOMK LADY:
welS^h^t'rW'SS 11 * ■trltali, fond ot drlrlne, and
ot.J*ct tn.iHi 1 ;:? iS° I ,o,m<ts i sillier widow or flndr:
lial* tive r n ?i plea^il *", wl " :r « inr '’rrlew can bo
e roil name. Addrcr 1. 1. h\ Tribune offlce.
P«eodh?rMdilS L j'„ MlSS ri? K V, l ' ii CHAMBBRtAijf
dre». MU. N r u?,,n°> ll ° r . 1 ,1 n „ tchoulmate - **
P E S« t
AiJMsaji! a I>dy
pERSONAL—A GENTLEMAN DESIRESTTHE~AC.
X quaintauce of a young lady; muse be of attractive
T?lbSS n omce^ llr “*' iUUDK et£TS?
P EKSONAL-A MIDDLE-AGED GENTLEMAN
£—a I ?#** «>e acquaintance of lady of same age, oof
-9* ȣ . refinement; references sx
change<L_y 67, Tribune office.
Personal— if 'miss mart moore will send
her address to Mrs. James Clark, of Utica, IIL. the
win hear of something to her advantage.
pERSONAL—A GENTLEMAN OF 40. WITH SOME
f ®, c , allt » wishes to form the acquaintance of arc
ipectahlc young widow of pleasing address; objecl
amuscmenL Address X 89. Tribune office.
pERSON’AIr-AK HONORABLIT YU UNO MAN OF
X good ability, a stranger in the city, desires the ac
quaintance of a lady of means who would assist him in
a small way. Address Y 93. Tribune office.
PERSONAL— DISGUST FTP OBSERVER. LET Mg.
_ hear from you further: it will be all right.
■pERSONAL—TWO'YOUNG.*RkVpECTABLE GEN-
X tlemen. 20 years of age, wish to make the ac
quaintance of some young ladles; arc Jnot very longln
the city. ObJecLsodcty and amusement. Address A 80.
Tribune office.
HOUSi
HOLB GOOD!
A %^,!?r G E£E& F Qh careful iTdters—thk
Ar.£& I £ : £.« Po I M * rroßß COMPANY, 5»« WEST
MADXbON-ST., have now a complete stock of
f HOUSEHOLD GOODS,
Including furniture, carpets, crockery, stoves, etc.,
which they are selling on their
SPECIAL-PAYMENT PLAN,
at very low prices and easy terms.
Cottage chamber set ( cheap), $7,
Black-walnut chamber sets, 823. $35. S4O.
Marble-ton dressing-case sets. S4O. SSO. $63, $75. SDO.
Parlor suits la terry, raw silk, olush, and linen. In
Turkish, Queen Anne, old English, and antloue from
$35 to SIOO.
Eauy chain in endless variety from $3 to 525. the Club-
House. Empress, Pinafore. Black Queen, being the
latest styles. Lounges all price*.
A full line of tapestry and ingrain carpets, and oil
. AWp stoves and ranges of newest am! war
ranted brands, and crockery, glassware, silverware,
cutlery, tin and wooden ware, etc., etc. lufact. ev
erything needed for housekeeping, useful and orna
mental. Toucan buy these goods by making a small
cash payment, and paying the balance In monthly par-
SIOO will furnish a few rooms handsomely.
S.W will start you fairly. Don't waste money boarding,
but buy your furniture and save money.
UMOS FOBNITUIftB COMPANY.
- ,603 WEST MADISON-ST.
Open Monday. Thursday, and Saturday til! i) p. m.
A T ~ “
«iw—;trv.' RlSE FURNITURE COMPANT.
-- 455 west Madlson-su. you can buy a camp-chair
top Sl.wO; camp rocker. s2.f»o; large easy rocker, up
holstered arms. $4.5n; Delaware veranda rocker. 5i.75.
a Rem; walnut bedstead (Queen Anne strle). Ss.ob;
woven wire soring $5.00: clejria; plop Bias* isxio,
S 7; walnut chamber sot, $18; handsome walnut set.
Sis; murble-topdre-aJnr-casc suit, S4O: an elaborate ash
suit In nine pieces, m ule expressly for outtrade, S4O;
enameled dressing-case suit in nine pieces. sas; e-holc
range, So. 8, SI2.W), warmnled; crockery, Rogers’ A
l silverware, glassware, bedding, and all house furnish*
log goods at equally low prices. All goods fully guar*
antecd. - An inspection follcltcd. open evening*.
PQOLK7 & MITCHELL, 4.55 West Madlsoa-at,
ATTENTION
WK MEAN BUSINESS.
THE CHICAGO FURNITURE COMPANY
desires to inform cverv person that Intends to dispose
of second-hand household goods Inside of the next
twenty davs that ihev will buy any lot from $lO to
$5,000, and will pay a fair price for the same. I
GEOHEGAN * RBV2LL. «
91. 53, and 55 Fifth-ar,.
under Briggs House.
A FEW CHOICE ARTICLES OF USED lIOUSR
noId goods at low prices. FIDELITY STORAGE
CO.* 76, 7s, and 80 East Van Buren-st.
All kinds of furniture, carpets, cook
atoves, and honsebold goods sold 'cheap for cash.
Howes furnished throughout at bottom prices, on easy
payments. HIRAM BRUSH, 273 East Kadlson-st.
near the bridge.
BARGAINS— ELEGANT PARLOR SUITS, S3O Up
ward.
BARGAINS—Handsome chamber suits. $25 upward.
BARGAINS—MarbIe-top tables. $3 and upward.
BARGAINS—MI kinds of furniture under value.
BARGAINS—Red spring*, $1.50; woven wire; $5.
BARGAINS—Easy chairs and rockers si.so to sls.
BARGAINS—EIegant goods below regular price.
R. T. MARTIN, 263 and 2oTStatc-st.
'CUTUN ITU RE OSi EAST TERMS CARPETS,
r stoves, and crockery,on terms to suit the purchaser.
We carry the largest, most reliable, besc-flnlsned and
selected stock of goods to befonnji In any house-far
nlahltvr establishment In the city. Our goods being
largely of our own mi sufaeture. weean make our cus
tomers a lower figure on better goods t ban most other
dealers. We have a large line of the latest designs In
Brussels and Ingrain carpets, that we offer at the low
est cash prices, on easy payments. In our furniture
department we have everything, from the finest,fin
ished marhlc-topdresslng-case salt to the lowest-priced
bureau; also parlor suits and lounges In every ssvle and
color In an endless variety. Oar stock of stoves con
tains some of the best and most favorably known parlor
stoves, cooking stoves; and kitchen ranges ever offered
In this city. We sell all our good t on easy terms, and
are the only house In the city that sells exclusively In
that way. We invite all huvcr< to post themselves by
learning our prices and examining onr goods before
completing purchases elsewhere.
JOHN M. SMYTH. 134 West Madison-st.
Fob furniture atthe lowest prices, the
lamest stock on the West Sloe; everything to fur
nish n home: furniture, crockery, stoves, &c.; roods
to suit everybody; on easy payments. At COGS
WELL'S. the West End Furniture House, 233 West
Madlson-st. CSS
T?OR SALtC-I HAVE MANUFACTURED 6 MAR
-1 ble-top chamber salts: party cannot pay for them;
must and will sell one and all for -less than wholesale
price. 1011 State-fit. Furniture Factory, comer Twcn
ty-sccond-st.
FOP. SALE—COOKSTOVK WITH ALL IMPROVE
raents; also dining-room and kitchen furniture.
Address M B, Tribune office.
FOR SALE—A SOLID SILVER TEA-SET. SEVEN
pieces. Grecian pattern, verv handsome: also a
cake-basket and water-pitcher, with gobler*. at one
half of their cash value. Can be seen by addressing X
55, Tribune office. . ...
For sale-cheap-skcond-haxd range;
call early. BRAMHALL, DEANE A CO., 86 Mar
ket-fit.
For sale-household furniture ok four
rooms verv cheap— Dressing-case, a nice cook
stove for SIS. extension table, bedstead, springs, and
mattress, and Wheeler A Wilson Sewing Machine, at
381 State-st., dree door, back moms.
FOR SALE-CHEAP-TWO SECOND-HAND COOK
stores with reservoirs, one with water back and
two plain. SEA VET &CO.. 49 State st.
Florence and adams & wbstlake oil
stoves and all sizes gasoline stoves. SBAVGY A
CO.. 49 State-st.
Household goods wanted for cash; will
pay good prices; furniture of private residences
purchased. Address AFW, 78 and so East Van Bnrcn.
ON EASY TERMS-AT . CASH PRICKS-ALL
styles of furniture, Brussels and Ingrain carpets,
cook-stoves. *anges. oil cloths, crockerv, and cntlerv.
everything to furnish a home complete. DLICIt
BOURKK, 92 West Madison.
PALMER HOUSE CAKPETS-ancO YARDS MORE
of t!»o*e fine English bodv Brussels carpet* Just re
ceived. which will be sold very cheap. GEOHEGAN
ft RKYELL, 191 and 183 liaodolpb-»t.. corner Flfth-av.
Repairs for stoves manufactured at
Trov, Albsuv. Rochester. Clev-land. Cincinnati,
and elsewhere, at W. C. METZNER’S, 127 West Ran
dolph-fit.
YOU CAN PAT FOR HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE,
piano*. and organs with scrip at par. R. T. 3IAR
TIN. 265 and 267 State-st.
INSTRUCTION.
A CLASSIC? LADIES AND GENTLEMF.N FOR
the study and practice of bookkeeping Is being or
ganized a*ravoffice. 87 Washington-fit., Boom3l. C.
J. BISHOP. Prof. Accountant.
A LADY ON THE WEST SIDE WILL GINE LF.S
sons In portrait painting for $1 a lesson. Address
T 70. Tribune office.
A LADY LIVING NEAR UNION PAP.K WILL
give lemons In chfaa painting; oil or water colon.
Address Y 77. Trlbuuesofflce. •
BENJ.' OWENS, TEACHER OF VOCAL AND IN
strumental music. 71 Randolph-*;.. Room 5.
Pupils received dally. Mrs. L. C. HARRIS, easiness
Manager.
CIHICAGO MUSICAL SEMINARY, 06 AND 06 STATE
s st.,corner Washington, guarantee* mat In ooe term
of Instruction the puoil will be able to perform on pia
no. organ, or guitar, what would require rears by the
old method. Send for prospectus. J. H. MACDON
ALD. Principal- •
Family school for boys, highland park.
111., Prof. John U. l. Soule, Preceptor. This
whool. In successful operation. Is open for pupils at all
times. The regular academic year will begin on
Wednesday. Sept. lu. I*7». Increased fatalities for the
coming vear. For particulars and general references
apply to'ProL J. Jl. L. SOULE. Highland Park, 111., or
toF. P. HAWKINS. Esq.. 90 La>alle-tt.. Chicago.
7S ERMAN LESSONS IVANTED BY A YOUNG
VT man. A lady teacher residing on West Side pre
ferred. Address A AS. Tribune office. •
opens Monday. July 14, 335 and 337 Wabaah-av.,
between garrison and Congress-sis. _
PIANO TAUGHT THOROUGHLY BT AN EXPE
rlenccd lady piano teacher; terms $8 ner quarter.
Address Y 29, Tribune office.
SUMMeV. TERM OF MISS H. M. WHEELER’S
Select School. 334 West Randolph-ss.. will open
July It, 1879. Same books used as* In public schools.
SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 814 MICHIGAN-AY.. COR
ncr Twenty-thlrU-st.. conducted by Miss Theodora
W. Howells and Mrs. Stella Dyer Lorlng, begins Sept.
15, is?*). • For Information address Mrs. LURING a*
the school. _
Telegraphy-instruction in telegraphy
fitting persons for employment. For terms apply
atßoom2, fifth floor, 77 and 7.i_SUue-aL^^ b^_^^M
PBIXTING HLAXEUff At.
rpo ' PRINTERS AND PUBLISHERS—JUST THK
I thing for a small dally paper, u double-cylinder
Hoe press, 22x28. warranted in good order; price.
sl.ooo. Also, drum-cylinder Hoc Prc-M, 3U4A In‘•‘*’3
order: price, Sson. Address GOODW II.LIK. WI..IAN
i-UO.. 43 Kcdcral-st. Boston, or 153 East Moaroc-st.,
Cldeago.
SPOBTS.'VG GOODS*
party DESIRES
torenta breach-loading shot-gua; Is "JR;®**
pay fair rental. Inquire at Room 23 Howland is lock,
cor, of Dearborn and .Moaroe-sts. ,
dookn*
nV) LAWYERS AND LAW-STUDENTS—FOB SALE
T-A new anil well-selected law library, fur 2e»i turn
half original cost. If bought at once. Addreas X 95,
Tribune otflee. i
AfiE.MS WAITEK
gents WASTED—TO SELL TEA, COr't I
Jsl bitfn* powder to ftmlllet: goode giMMjteedi
nntdt free. PEOPLE'S TEA C0..801 r,001..>t. Louljb
bffl'CE WHNITCBJb.
A36, TBIB-
S? aue oiHoe.
T?XCHA*rOIf-fl« ACCEPTED OX [BST-CLAS3
Aj tailor for shoes. Clpora for onc-aird cash; btl*
ance painting. Hare other personal prbbcrty. X 63.
Tribune office.
FOR' KXCH ANG
tj*. and wlil pay some cash or assume Incumbrance,
win give a nice comer, clear, and In rood locality.
For Madison-at. property, a pood brick boJldiM; clear,
on west Vanßurea, near Ceocre-ax.; Trill par soma
difference. *
Corner Klngfe ud Curtm-st*., for a nod
*1.500 cash will be peld difference.
Lot 25x3W, on West Madison. for good bouse and lot.
Nice block on Milwaukee-*?-., comer Noble. for clear
farm or Intide lota. D. P. NEWELL.
POR EXCHANGE- FINE BRICK RESIDENCE, WITH
J 7 acre of garden and orchard, at Klein for vacant
loti and cash. ISAAC CLAFLIN A CO.. 158 Lake-st.
rpo~RXCHANGE-840-ACRE FARM (CLEAR), OKB
X mile from depot, and one of the best stock farms la
the State, eight miles from Mexico, Audrain County.
Mo. Wants city or town property (clear). Price,
sl3. coo. This la an elegant farm, nicely Improved.
12.C00 acres of the best rtock-graxfng land In tha
state of Texas, sixteen miles from Houston, one ail*
from railroad depot: over 10,COO head of cattle now
kfaxlngthe land; i.CVX)acres trader cultivation. Win
pit* a good trade for city or town property. Price.
SiVi’O, It Is worth SIOO,OOO.
w»-acre farm all under cultivation, fine 13-room
frame dwelling, barns, orchards, water, etc., clear, one
mile from depot In Audrain County, Missouri. Went
cltv or town property.
r * l » 2 9Pr^s > * acr * farm four miles from Wlnnenatc,
Sii£*2L5 #ir swel5 well Ing.five rooms, stables. crU**, etc.;
f «nceand plow; is acres fine timber:
eight miles from Chicago. Want cottage and lot In
13 one °i ifie finest brick dwellings la
arn ** an< i 30x125; bouse cost $20,000, and
boflt four year* ago; on West Side, good neighborhood;
mortgage. s4.oooat7oercent. Want dear lota, farm,
orgood gram lands for equity.
51.V>00-Two good itnrM, with fine selected stock of
groceries In one of Sl.ono, and fine dwelling and I(i f .
g??e pSSI trSde^* 1 ° f 320wr “ In " Will
.J 4 ;J yt °”. F } rst:cl l” «sorted stock of boots and shoes
instore doings fine business in No. t to*m of 2,500
Sj.otxv-jo acres, ane 12-room dwelling;barm and
C h or ?h* np n th s way of large and small fruits and
shrubbery: one of the nicest houses In Aurora, lIL, 3
b ocks from depot. Want stock of good*.
s:to per acre—Fine Improved farm, 210 acre*, near
Bloomington. 111, (dear), for s;ockof goods; farm la 3
miles from depot; is first-das*.
SOO.Ono—i»neof the finest and largest hotels In Illi
nois tout of Chicago), completely furnished (co« S4O -
coo to furnish). In city of 2aCOO people. Want larua
stock farm with stock. House pars SB. 000 per year
T. B. BOYD, Room 7.17 P mSu/d-su
fpo EXCHANGE—BY GRIFFIN & DWIGHT, COS-*
J. ner Washington and Halsted-sts.:
30x125 feet, with 2 good frame houses, on Warren-ay
will exchange for farm or vacant lot*.
2 good brick houses on Clccro-coart, near Van Boren
»L. to exchange for lou In Washington Heights or a
farm.
soo-aere farm la Kankakee County; win exchange for
cltv property. . .
160-acre farm In Champaign County for good boose
and lot.
30-acre farm 25ml1es from Chicago for boose ud lot.
r EXCHANGE-SIGN PAINTING AND ATX
lands of house painting for clothing; nt»o
painting In all Its branches cheap for caih. Ad
dress Y 96. Tribune office.
r’ KXCIIAKf»E—:)no FEET OF UNIMPROVED
property in Philadelphia, entirely clear, for home
and lot In Chlcatro or annhln? of vrlue. such aa bom* -
and carriages, to amount of sl, GOO to $2,000. Add real
F. X. M., Tribune office.
r\o EXCHA'NdE-STOCKOFMERCirANDISE SUIT-
I able for Western trade, for one-third cash and two
thirds real estate. O. D ORVIS. 95 Washington*«-
rpO EXCHANGE-FINE BRICK DWELLING AND
1 lot, corner Montgomery and Parkc-avt.. la Phila
delphia, for house and lot la Chicago. T. B. BOYD 4
Room 7, 179 Madison-st.
'ro exchanoe—on for sale-t want to
I. sell or exchange at a bargain lowa land contracts,
free of taxes for ten years; land well selected. Ad*
dress A so. Tribune office.
TO EXCHANGE—OR FOR SALB-A NICE SMALL
factory, with all kinds of wood-working ma
chinery. Address A 63. Tribune office.
TO EXCHANGE-LOT ON THIKD-AV.. NEAR
HarrlJon-st.> for snburbaa property. Address a
74, Tribune office.
rnoEXCHANGE-HOUSE AND LOT. 791 HUBBARp'
jL *t.; Is free from incnmbrance: will pay SI,OOO In
exchange. Apply to HENRY SCHEIDEMAN, on the
premises.
rpO EXCHANGE—FOR A SECOND-HAND PIANO.
I or buggy, or for sale, one of the best mares In the
city for buggy,saddle, or double. Adams X $3. Trib
une office.
r PO EXCHANGE—DENTISTRY. JOB FEINTING.
JL and photographing, for millinery. Address Y QT,
Tribune office. •
r PO EXCHANGE-160 ACRES OF GOOD LAND.
1 about half under cultivation. In Central Illinois, for
Sontb bide real estate. Y 33, Tribune office.
TO EXCHANGE-HAVE' YOU HORSES. KRAL
estate, or other property to exchange for fixtures
complete of fim-class laundry. Including Improved
hot and cold maneler and patented baud machine for
ironing and polishing shins, collars, cuffs. etc> YB2.
Tribune office.
T° EXCHANGE-FINE BRICK RESIDENCE NEAR
I Union Park, clear, for 'feat Mmtfson-at rropertr.
Will assume. HENRY WALLER.Jr., Ot Washington.
WANTED— TO EXCHANGE—DRY COOPS FOR
lot aonb of centre-at. Y 41. Tribune office- '
YTTANIkD-TO EXCHANGE—4 BRICK HOUSES
>V am) lots. West Side, Incumbered for gl.omteacb.
What have you for equity? Address V r». Trioums,
Tir ANT ED—SO M E O.NF.TOBCILDME AN OFFICE,
»V )6xH feet. In exchange for coal. Address Y 74,
Tribune office.
WANTED-TO EXCHANGE-A LOT IN JEFFER
son for a light, stylish top buggy, a 96. Tribune.
IX)R SALE—WE ARE SELLING AN UNLAUN
' dried shirt made of Wnmsutta muslin and 2.300 ex
tra heavy linen- all finished and read v to laundry, for
SI each or 6forSs..V>. ThUiaunrunnled br any other
shirt-house In the world. Quick sales and small profit*
aro what we want. Call and see them. Best quality
(pantaloon cuO loan drawers, the finest made, for 75
cents a pair, sold everywhere fop SI.2S. Seoonranw
patent yoke-band collars at 20 ceuM each, or $2 o-r
dozen, harvest stock and assortment of linen collars
and cnfN In the dry. Give ns a trial. •* LONE STAR *•
SHIRT Co.. 193 Doarborn-st.. opposite Honore Block.
FOR SALE-TWO ITALIAY PUPS SEVEN WEEKS
old. Address Jeo. Tribune office.
Fob sale-a good fresh milch cow for «o:
Inquire of cmrhman In barn rear of 43 Calumet
av., comer of Twcaty-flrat-st.
FORSALK-TO PAY ADVANCER-SOME LADIES*
and cents* gold watches and chain*, diamond studs
anti rings; also one piano ami organ. 272 East Madison.
FOR SALK ir«.ono LETTERS OBTAINED
through advertising for agents waswdlo the lead-*
Ing dally panen throughout the United States and
Canada. Address X 53. Tribune office.
For sale-onk of the rrst-locatrd and
best stands In the Exposition Bonding, on the mala
door. Address X 66. Trihue office.
For sale—state rights, omo and Missou
ri. patent adjustable die. now used by tbs leading
printing and lithographic houses in this city. Apply
to L. BELLMAN. H 2 Lake-fit.
T?OB SALE-GAB FIXTURES AND WARDROBE,
r Call at 69 East Randolph-it., third floor.
T7OR SALE—TWOKW KOCHfcSTKR BARBER
F chairs and floe rectangle stand and glaa thaw-ease
at a big bargain. IG North Morgao-st. .
■pOR RALE—AT YOUR OWN PRICE, OR WH.L
V exchange, a new Marsh health-lift In perfect or
der. Address Z 35, Tribune office.
For sale— telescope suitable fob street
use, cheap. L. REESE, 257 Eluiie-st.
For ""sale—we have a few imported
wool mat* left: vonr choice fortl each; worth 92
to $4 each. BISHOP, 261 West Madlaon-M.
PR SALK-THREE 5-BAP.RKL * IRON TANKS.
They will bear a pressure of 125 pounds, and will
be sold cheap for cash. MATHEWS ft HOLT. 7S Dear
born-st.
PR SALK—FIRST-CLASS 16-BALL POOL TABLE,
all complete, for onc-thlrd cost. Address X 70.
Tribune office.
For sale-id bath-tubs, large size, sec
ond-hand, with pipes, faucets, ami everything
comnlete: also a circulating boiler and tank. Call ana
see them Monday or Tue-nlay. No. 173 West Madlfiou
st. Mwt be moml.
WATCHES AND JEWELftk*
/NALL AND HAVE TOUR DIAMONDS RET BY A.
\ j LAUDRKHACK. diamond Jewelry manufacturer;
full value allowed for old gold settings. TOMadbon-tt.,
corner of state, second door.
FOR SALK-ONk GOLD .JULES .TUKGRNSEff
watch. 6r bock and atom-winding. for $323. cost
SSOftt one gold Tiffany ft Co. for 8150. co*t 300; on«
gold American Park Hoad for S’*o. cost ?2”4j: one E.
Howard ft Co. for $65. rust $175; one B- W. Bavroond
for $66, cost $150; one Ono in diamondcluwcr ring for
?TOO. cost s2v»; one 12 diamond cluster ring for 350. coat
$125. All sold to pay advances. Room u, 12uBan
dolph-st. _
WANTED— PAIR SOLITAIRE DIAMOND EAR- .
Tines, weight 2'i carat* op over; must be pore
stones, and very cheap for cash; give full doicripttoa 1
and loweat price, or so notice will be taken of answer.
Y 4 r t, Tribune office.
CIiAIBVOYAAYN
Astrologer and palmist—uns. tract, op
New York. hxs taken parlor* at (Cl EHzabcth-sL.
first doorotT Madlvoii; tells full names, of Wanes and
gains, business attain. and marriage: can bring tna
s.-paraied mge'hcr. and cause speedy marriage; aatia
fftctioii given or money refunded. 10 a. m. to op. m.
Fee, so coals to $2; no gentlemen.
CLATRVOTANCE-A TEST-NO IMPOSITION—
Look here—The greatest Independent biwloeu
and medical clairvoyant U MRS. POUTEIi, burn with
a natural gift. She has been tested bv some of tbo
groat nobility of Europe and America. Tells you tha
name of the one you will marrv; that of her visitor;
also,deceased.and friends lu lull; shows likenesses: has
that great French secret for such as lore and spoedr
marriages; enres all diseases: she succeeds where all
others fait Fees. 50c and *l.* Parties residing out Of
the city can consult MRS. PORTER by letter. Inclosing
alockof hair. SI. and stamp. Oflloe&V2 Wabaab-ar..
near Thtrtrenlh-st. No gents.
CIONSULT MADAME CLARE, NATURAL CLAUS
/ voyant nad renowned charm worker; always re
liable. and never falls. Gents. GO cents; ladles, 25
cents. 110 West Potfc-sc.. near Clinton, lower door.
FOR A CORRECT BEADING UF THE PACT. PRKS
cot, and future, go to M. A. GENE VIA. 370 West
Lake-at. ■
/>OOD NEWS—IF YOU ARB IN TROUBLE OR
\7 heavy-hearted, go see the acventh oauuhtcr uf
the seventh sou. the wonder of the world, tclltnc
past, prescut, and future; also of bwt or stolen goods:
brings the separated together through Charms. ana
makes home happy; half-price to the poor; satisfac
tion or no nay. MADAME TKKUDNE. 339 RuhMrd
st.. near Curtis. •
n’TMK. LS MOYNE, INVENTORY? THE ORACLE
It! cards, will give you lu valuable Inflight into biial
nraa and social matters, None should fall to see her
(for a short time; at 255 West Madboa-at., second
floor. . ■.
MifE. MILSUJf. CLAIRVOYANT, REMOVED TO
1475 South stge-at.. over Pusi-ofllcc; esc. idfis.
M' ris7 DrfWALD, PHRENOLOGIST AND CT.Alß
voyant. Tlic place to hear the troth- SGShoito
st.. near Polk. West Side.
MMB. DELAFORET. THE GREATEST CLAlß
voyant and magnetic nbnlclao of the sfr, guar
antees complete satisfaction, or money reloaded; gives
charm* that are Infallible. 42U otatr-at.
cn Ann reward-madam mattahd tells
u)I.ULM.I put, present,future, whit la beet for you
to do. or anything you wish to know, give* free *secret
Infallible charm lor luck, love, or boiiaess. alto show*
pictures, gives lottery numbers- Her son. Dr,
Mathew, cures nervous debility ami all other disease*,
References girea to parties he has cored* 0 Wal
ilOdiiOQ-St.
'rTKE,
13
TO EXOHAKGjE.
FI
FOR SALK.

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