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Chicago daily tribune. [volume] (Chicago, Ill.) 1872-1963, July 31, 1881, Image 5

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WASHINGTON.
Money Needed to Support the
Sioux Who Have Lately
Surrendered.
gam White, Pardoned by President
Hayes, Again Arrested for
Highway Eohbery.
The Treasury Department Behindhand
in Bnjing Its Bcgnlar Sop
plies of Silver.
i Large Humber of News Items Gathered
Yesterday at the National
Capital.
cpKial DUpatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Wasuixsiox, a C., July 00.-A report is
"rod in a short lime from the United
Sis District-Attorney at Chicago on the
wooositions submitted at the Treasury for a
Lmpromise of the Pekin whisky cases.
Those interested have expressed aconlidenee
here that the report will be in favorof a com-
Moinise. The decision of the matter will
L„ nainlv rest with the Solicitor of the
Treasury, who is reported to bo averse to the
propositions as submitted.
. , VOIiKTOWX.
The general program of the Yorktown
Centennial Association was to-day accepted
hr the Congressional Commission. Several
otthe gentlemen invited to lake part have
already accepted. Bishop Keane, of the
Catholic Diocese of Virginia, Secretary of
the Treasury Windom. and Joseph Patter
tffli. President of the Philadelphia Clearing-
House. ate among them.
One question of importance has been to
construct wharves at Yorktown for the ac
commodation of all the vessels that will'be
at the Centennial. Senator Butler and ex-
Congtessman Goode, of the Commission, who
trent to Baltimore to-day, reported to the
Connnissiouat the meeting this at ternoon that
it had beta arranged that -Ur. Foster, agent
cifthe Clyde line of steamers in Baltimore,
should build two wharves at Yorktown
ample to meet all purposes. This arrange
ment was approved by the Commission. The
program of celebrations as finally agreed
uponincludes four days,—the ISth, 19th, 30th,
aal 21st of next October. On the first day
an address of welcome will be delivered
hy Cov. Holliday, of Virginia. The
corner-stone of the monment will be
laid with Masonic ceremonies. Ex-Gov.
ffinthiop, of iassachusetts, will be orator
if me day. CoL Hope, of .Norfolk, will be
poet, and Paul H. Hayne, of South Caro
lina, will aI\Kl act the, rendition of the Xa
iiomlOde. On the I9th President Garfield
had promiseddo deliver an address, but will
hardly be able. On the 20th a grand military
display of United States troops and militia
if the different States will take place, and
sn the 21st a naval display. There will be at
least 20,000 militia present from the different
States, and over 5,000 Masons. The Gov
■rnora and staffs of ail the States will be
present, and a representative of the French,
Eovenunent will be an honored guest.
AXOTHEE SOCIAL SCAXDAL
Is exciting Washington, involving a married
jtmleman who was until recently promi
lently connected with the Signal Service
with the tank of Captain. It appears that a
residence be owns has been occupied by a
former female Treasury clerk of great
beauty, and the Captain supported her in
elegant style. The Captain’s wife found it
eut, and the matter is now known.
THE INDIANS.
2i tie Western Associated
A large delegation of Indians from the
tribes of the Northwest will arrive hereon
the 15th of August to consult with the In
dian Department about a division of lands
in severalty and other questions of interest
to the tribes. The delegation will consist of
Standing-Bear and two other Ponca Chiefs,
from Dakota; Little Chief and two other
Cheyennes and Arapahoes; several Chiefs
from theStaadiiig Rock Agency; three Chiefs
Into the Pine Ridge Agency; Spotted-Tail
ud Tonng-ilan-Afraid-of-llis-Horses; Red
Goad and two other Crows, from the Red
BndAgency; three Omajias; and three Win-
BnKgOE.
WHITTAKER.
Cnkeau will be responsible for postponing
> anal decision of the Whittaker case. The
jotuuiinons record of the court-martial has to
w trig over by Gen. Swaim, Judge Advo
raus General, ana reported up to the Presi
tu „ . S,rainl wUI uot be able to. give it
7 s attead P :i uuUl the President is out of
™wr- There will thus necessarily be a
toKdelay even before the case is ready to
viinL en *° Presi(l ent Of course, there
WJI be more delay before the President can
Meantime, Whittaker will re
inthe army as a cadet, though it is
open tact that the verdict of the
be shouldbedismissed
m. ,1 ?'^F J ‘ SCBY AGE *T BISSELL
tw'wiS* 16 ??.? 11 ’ Department to-day. He
i"i niioU1 ’ and told him «>nt
BetfUmru hreatclled Ule Secretary’s
<rritlßilirr- ere '!. aS llot reraove( l was uot
SSir Ua added that he "-o«id
tews “ y man for 811 °® ce - Oc also said
w J f^ that U ' e allesed threat «>-
Sr ,a,t While Bisseli was in
» ”°° ln quitu 8 "°" (1 of dorks
ifS COr r idor 111 Dial vicinity.
“%lam\ L° Ut he Said: “ Th «f “ust
SweLul™ 1 ? sllQ ' v -” Secret-Service
tuts pointto alf 5 *v° 1110 ense, and indica
“UK nf c f? r y arrest of Bisseli on a
Ihrnglh tho Cn . l ntr threatening matter
,- ® ads ' Bisseli was formerly a
cf« at Department
Ir tOWsf.,‘.n Al 'P OI ' PH CARPENTER,
•“rf, daring t 5 i, S 101 °" 1)16 Ilight of the 23tii
Bsch-sS?? “re contusion of a Are at
CoI °” byJ - P - True, owner
•riwto nin^rt upposed 11115 fire ' vas P arto£
SWdlWotttL vi "v T lhe W3r corre
the iork Bcrald with tne
Hfllal TheWa^ 1 ' lae ’ 115 crr o ne ously pub-
2!f w' IS^ n UcrnU l a ™iy cor
%cjtv fors^.y 1 Sa,lmel Carpenter, of
Clfa,"® connected with the
'»aptain M dlCds f eral tears ago of con-
TwebeenSh,7t G ,,^ E ' v post-offices
rua »Q> m Uu! ' Vc£t: Williams,
Ha; Puea. r,u ,“ a: Flat "ood, Plielps Co.,
Sl» S G v Wont.; Vera Cruz ,
w, o;- Mexico; McCurdy, Ross
J et -: ho\vdelL E \v° n ’i o ln? Co ” Washington
°° 4 C °-’ W ’ Va ’i Sieves,
He fa..--.WyosnxcED.
offices ,la 'e been
- Co'"- 5
P®ttyCo., Colo . n 0? „ C " Io - ; Bee > Mont
ijk; Forest Griir P'dge, Bourbon Co.,
> s^oTm st£ r °;^ il g' t,;o ' n ? ri - Co -’ ;
Farrell " ilt0 “ Wasica
IWpWs, v d . ISOn C<> -’ Montana;
n lec 0-,yeh-n ’ Xeb - ML Dell, Salt
. :i Promontory Box, Elder .Co.,
m ofU c tT feasso
iimselt Co ß fe deratcs, sur
,;p s “oniing, and that
hilt . ““r jdispn tpok him to Green,
resi Pued.
t® 4 * that hm v F TUE cbubexcv
the commencement of re-
funding operations. 5313,:23.550 of 5 and 0
per cent bonds, .535,000,000 of 4% per cent
bonds, and of 4 per cent bonds
as security for circulation, and 54,000,000 of
Pacilic Railroad. os, making a total of
over 5354,000,000. The total amount now
held is 5303,054,000. They now hold $19,000,-
000 more of extended than they held of
5s and Gs at the time the refunding opera
tions commenced, and about 511,000,000 Jess
4 per cents. All of the 5 per cent bonds held
by the banks have been extended, except
$4,007,450, which are owned by a hundred
different National banks.
coj[maxi>i;r wadlkigii,
of the steamer, Alliance, reports his arrival
at Reikavik, Iceland, July 12, and that after
coalinK lie would leave for tire Arctic on the
15th. Xo ice on the coast. The Parliament
of Iceland was in session, and he had fur
nished the memberswith a description of the
Jeannette,with an offer of a reward for infor
mation therefrom.
SII.VEIt.
• Superintendent Davis, of the New Orleans
Mint, reports to tiro Treasury Department
that lie will, during the movement of the cot
ton and sugar-cane crops, put out from New
Orleans eight or ten millions of standard sil
ver dollars. The annual demand for the sil
ver dollar is about to recommence, to be fol
lowed inevitably by a backward How of the
coin into the Treasury vaults. The Treas
ury Department has not furnished the full
amount of silver bullion required by the law
for coining into silver dollars for several
weeks past. The cause of this is the high
prices whicli have been placed upon bullion
by dealers, rendering its purchase impractic
able.
A NOTED DESPERADO AX'D MAIL-UOBIIER.
Washington, D. C., July 30. —A notorious
highway robber named Ham White was a
year or two ago tried and couvieted of rob
bing the mails in Texas. He was a noted
and desperate highwayman. He bad robbed
stage-coaches and individuals, and had com
mitted several murders. Upon convic
tion in Texas lie was sentenced to impris
onment in the West Virginia Penitentiary
for life. Upon the recommendation of Con
gressman Jones, of Texas, President Hayes
pardoned White. The postal authorities
knew nothing about the pardon until White
was released. He immediately resumed his
career of .highwayman, and has now been
arrested in Colorado, where he will be tried.
He was arrested under the name of Renton.
Ho has numerous aliases, and has robbed
mails in Arkansas, Texas, New Mexico, and
Colorado. Warrants have been procured in
Arkansas and Texas, and White will be tried
for crimes committed in those States as well
as in Colorado. The Chief Inspector of the
Post-Office Department lias several masks
worn by White in his different robberies.
He is one of the most desperate of Border
highwaymen.
the national banks.
Washing-fox, D. C., July 30.—The recent
discovery by the Commissioner of Interna!
Revenue that one or two of the banks of Chica
go bad been remiss in their payment of taxes
to the Government lias caused Gen. ifaum to
institute an examination of all the banks in
cities where there are Clearing-Houses, to as
certain if and to what extent the law in re
gard to National-bank 'taxation has been
evaded. lie has sent special agents for this
purpose to Baltimore, Philadelphia, New
\ ork, and Boston. It will take some time
for these agents to make the examination and
report consequent upon them. The Commis
sioner says Uiat he is determined to see tl(at
every bank pays to the Government the tax
which is levied upon it by the Internal-Rev
enue laws. After the banks in the cities just
named are examined, he will send agents to
investigate the banks of Cincinnati and St.
Louis.
oun ALLEGED NAVY.
Following the recent appointment of a
Commission to inquire into and report upon
the best plan for building up the navy. Secre
tary Hunt has concluded to organize a sub-
Commission in each of the navy-yards in the
country. These Commissions will be in
structed to,ascertain theamouutof old worn
out material accumulated during and since
the War. and which is of no use to the serv
ice. He takes this action with a view to ask
ing authority from Congress for the sale of
such old material. Secretary Hunt proposes,
so far as he is able, to inaugurate a thor
ough system of renovation in the navy. He
lias also determined to replace a number of
his bureau officers by the substitution ot
younger men. His first point will, however,
be to clear out the rubbish of worthless ma
terial at present stored in the shops of the
differeutnavy-yards.
drum’s hobby*.
Gen. Drum, Adjutant-General of the
Army, has, ever since his succession to Gen.
lowusend, been anxious to secure the estab
lishment of a School of Infantry and Cavalry
for officers of the army at some place in the
West, lie is a great admirer and believer in
the Artillery School which has been in
vogue at Fort .Monroe for many years. The
school, he thought, should be founded upon
the same general plan that the School for
Artillery exists at Fort Monroe, lie has suc
ceeded in this, and the school will he estab
lished. The Secretary of War to-day di
rected Capt. Marshall, Assistant-Qqarter
master, to proceed to Leavenworth to super
intend the construction of the proper build
ings for the use of such school. The diffi
culty heretofore has existed that the Western
cavalry and infantry regiments were so
scattered and spread that a school of that
character about to be established was almost
entirely superfluous. The Indian question
having about solved itself, the regiments will
now remain more stationary, and the prac
ticability of the school, Gen. Drum thinks,
will Ire fully established in the course of a
year’s experience.
THE EXPENSIVE SIOUX.
One of fixe first things that Congress will
be called upon to do at the next session is to
vole a deficiency for the support of the Sioux
Indians who have recently surrendered in
the Northwest.- The regular Army Appro
priation bill provides only for the mainte
nance of 500 Indian prisoners. The mimberof
Sioux who have surrendered is about 3.000;
most of Uiese are now at Fort Vatcs, and
only about 300 at any other point, except
those at Fort Keogh. The Government Is
compelled to support these prisoners, and,
there not being .sufficient money under the
proper appropriation, a deficiency will have
to be involved. How much it will amount to
cannot be now estimated. Congress will
also have to decide what shall be
done with the surrendered Indians. They
will be Kept at Forts Keogh and Vales until
the. matter lias been settled by Congressional
action. Gen. Drum said to-day that it would
he recommended to Congress that they be
distributed over the different Indian reserva
tions. and as many as possible be put where
there was good opportunity for compelling
them to-work and earn their own living by
civilized means. Uesaid that the question as
to what should be done with Sitting-Bull
had not yet been determined, nor had it been
fully considered, when Gen. Sherman re
turns from the Northwest it will be probably
taken up. hut Gen. Drum thinks that This
celebrated Indian Chief will be treated just
the same as any other prisoner who lias come
hack from over the border and surrendered
himself to the United States authorities.
ALLEGED MALFEASANCE.
C. S. Beattie, the attorney, swore out a
warrant betore justice Meecli yesterday
charging Constable Fred 0. Garter with mal
feasance in office. Fred gave bond to appear
for examination next Tuesday afternoon.
Here is the way the case came about: Good
win & Cp., property brokers, brought an at
tachment suit before Justice Scully against
Mr. a. Parkius to recover a claim for 550.
Goodwin &. Go. had sold some property
for Parkius and the firm wanted the
550 as commission. Tiicy also claimed
to have expended §lO in advertising the sale
of the property, but did not include tins
amount in tlie bill for §SO. The attachment
suit-wasquashed, but the Court gave the
plaintiffs an ordinary judgment forSlOfor
the advertisements. This ‘ 510 Parkins
offered to nay, and then he asked for the §25
and the ring. Carter refused to ‘ make tlie
return, saying the attachment suit was to be
appealed. Then the other side offered to
give a forthcoming bond to secure tlie Con
stable, but he still refused. Hence the war
rant .■■■.-
ALLEGED EMBEZZLEMENT.
Morris W. Bull was locked up at the "West
Lake Street Station last flight by Officers
Umgrosemid liillon uppp a charge of em
bezzling §SO in collectionsfrom Jacob Frah
heb the proprietor of a laundry at Jfo. 169
B est Madison street, in whose employ the
prisoner was for ’ nearly eight months prior
to the 30th msf *■ - *
THE CHICAGO TRIBUNE; SUNDAY, JULY 31, 1881—SIXTEEN PAGES.
CRIMINAL NEWS.
A Reign of Terror Prevailing in
Perry County, Arkan
sas.
Gov. Churchill Dispatches a .Com
pany of llilitia to Enforce
the law.
A Mother and Her Child Assasinatcd
with a Shotgun While Asleep
in Bed.
The Orphans of a Murdered Man Enter
Suit Against the Murderer.
A REIGN OP TERROR.
Special Dispatch ta The Chtcaoa Tribune.
Little Rock, Ark., July 30.— The out
lawry in Perry County, which culminated in
the assasination of J. W. Mathews, editor of
tlie Perryville Times, assumed a different
phase to-day. An investigating committee
sent out by the Governor reported this morn
ing, stating that- it was impossible for the
civil authorities to act, as Justices have been
deterred from issuing writs for the arrest of
the murderers. Gov. Churchill, mi hearing
this, promptly issued an order directing
Miij.-Gen. Ik C. Newton, commanding the
militia of the Stato of Arkansas, to pro
ceed with the Quapaw Guards to Perry
County and assist che civil authorities iu the
enforcement of the law and the preservation
of the public peace. This order created great
excitement here, and nothing else has been
talked of all day. The militia left lor the
scene of the troubles on the steamer Rose
ville at l) o’clock to-night. It is believed that
they can. restore order mid secure the arrest
of all the parties implicated in the recent as
sasination. Further developments are anx
iously awaited.
Ta the Ifcstcm Associated Press. .
Little Rock, Ark., July 30. —The desper
ate condition of affairs in Perry County, in
defiance of law and order, has resulted in
Gov. Churchill placing the county under
martial law. Not only has Matthews been
assasiuated and old man Harris bulldozed,
but the magistrates leave beeu deterred from
issuing writs for the arrest of murderers.
Ihey are afraid to issue papers, a Justice of
the Peace stating that lie would leave the
country before lie would become involved in
the matter. The following order was issued
this morning:
Little Rock, Ark., July 30.- Special Order
J\u. 1C: It being officially reported to the Gov
ernor that the civil authorities are powerless to
execute the laws iu Perry County, and that tho
lives of the officers of the law are unsafe there,
Maj.-Gcn. R. C. Newton, commanding thenillltfa
or the Slate of Arkansas, wili proceed with the
Quapaw Guanls to that county, and assist the
civil authorities in the enforcement and nrescr
vatlon of the public peace. He is authorized
mid directed to call out any ether portion of the
militia he may consider necessary, and take
such othgr steps as he may deem proper for the
suppre.'QiuD of disorder and for tne accom
plishment of the general purposes of tho in
structions given him. T. G. CntmcHiLL,
Governor, Connuander-in-Chiof of Arkan-os.
In conformity with the above, the Quapaw
Guards, twenty-four men in line, departed,
this afternoon for the scene ot trouble.
State’sA.ttorney Wood, who arrived from
I erryviile this morning, represents the ex
citement intense. A few outlaws, by threats
and intimidation, have inaugurated a reign
of terror. The officers of the law are power
less to punish them. Gov. Churchill is de
termined on prompt and vigorous measures
against the outlaws, and intends that the
Jaws shall be enforced at every hazard.
SUIT AGAINST A MAN-KILLER.
Louisville, Ky., July 30. —The following
petition in a suit for damages arising out of
the killing of Robert E. Little by James 11.
Arnold, was filed in the. Common Picas
Court to-day: Robert E. Little, .Mary H. Lit
tle, Ilord Little, plaintiffs, vs. James H. Ar
nold. defendant—petition ordinary. The
plaintiffs state they are the children of
Robert E. Little, deceased, and Unit
their next friend, Bettie 11. Little, is
their mother. They state Uiat, in De
cember, 1870, the defendant, James 11.
Arnold, with a pistol, a deadly weapon, shot
and killed their father, .Robert IS. Little,
while he was sitting in his oflice in Rieli
mond. Ky., and that said shooting was
wantonly and maliciously done, and not in
defendant’s self-defense. They state that
they are minors, each under the age of 10
years, and that they have no statutory guar
dian. wherefore they pray judgment for the
amount of 550,000.—tins being the amount
they are damaged by the wicked,wanton, and
malicious act of the defendant, in shoothi”-
their father, and they also pray for all proper
relief in the premises. This suit revives in
terest in a murder case which created ex
citement at the time of its commission and
during the trial. Little and Arnold married
sisters. Roth men were prominent, tne
former in politics and the latter as a mer
chant. The murder was the outgrowth of a
quarrel over a division of property bequeath
ed to Mrs. Little and Mrs. Arnold. The trial
resulted in the acquittal of Arnold.
A HORRIBLE CRIME,
Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Atlanta, Ga., July 30. —Information
reached Atlanta to-day giving tile details of
a shocking murder in Decatur County. It
appears that last night, while Mrs. Martha
Brockett, a most estimable lady, was sleep
ing on a bed with a child by her side, some
unknown party fired a load of buckshot into
lierside from a gun through a window. She
died almost instantly, only living long
enough to say to her sister, who rushed into
her room a few moments after the fatal shot
was hied, “ I apt shut jill to pieces.” and to
hear the nerpet rators of the heartless crime
fleeing from the house. The child was pain
fully injured by some of the contents of the
gun.
BOUND TO CATCH HIM.
to The Chieapo Tribune.
Omaha, Neb., July 30.—Yesterday at
Waco, Neb., a man boarded the west-bound
train on the Burlington & Missouri Raijrpad,
and, refusing to pay farej was put off by the
conductor. He attempted then to get on the
rear platform, when the roadmiister again
put him off. Tlie man thereupon pulled a
revolver, and fired two shots at the ruad
master and then disappeared. He is being
pursued, and the railroad officials are hound
to catcli liim if possible.
BURGLARIZED.
Special Dispatch to The Cidcaoo Tribune .
Muncie, Ind., July 30.—The stores of Mack
Bros, and Morris Jones were burglarized last
night Oyer 51.000, chiefly goods, rewarded
their nefarious labors.
CUT HIS THROAT.
William Kiissbacii, a German living at JT
195 Orchard street, attempted to commit
suicide at 6 o’clock yesterday morning by
cutting bis throat with a razor. Hr. Landis,
who is attending him, considers ids re
covery doubtful. He has led a dissipated
life for some time past, and only a few weeks
ago was obliged to pun away to the country
to avoid arrest for a criminal assault upon
his own son, and another upon Ills nephew,
bright and intelligent boys of about il
years. He came home early yesterday
morning, and said he intended ‘ to
kill himself. His nose was broken and his
head badly bruised, which lie claimed to
have received during the night by attempt
ing to coiujiiit suicide by throwing himself
ou the tracks of the Milwaukee & St. Paul
Bailroad. The cow-catcher struck hint and
threw bin) off the track, and he then con
cluded to go home and finish the job.
THE NEW ULM CONCERT.
The concert to be given by the German
singing societies next ‘Friday evening at Mc-
Cormick Hall fpr the benefit of the Xew
Uiin sufferers, will undoubtedly prove an
artistic, as it should a financial, success. It
will fie ffY.oa under the direction pt Jlans
Balatka, who led Ihe recent Gangerfest,' and
Qie program will contain many of the gems
of the male chorus' work at the late’fcstival,
to be sung on this occasion by a chorus of
over 400, as well as several cboice selections
by individual societies and well-known iocai
solpistsVinviu.dmg Mn Hugo Liudau, of Cin
cinnati; who, In the opinion of some, prom
ises to cxcpfjiwf Candtons, the chief tenor
fit the Silngrerfcst. The full program is as
follows:
1. “ Prayer Before the Battle ”
Grand Chorus.
2. Tenor solo
Mr. Eil Sdiuttzc.
o. “Llcbesfruehnnff
Gesanyvcrcin Frohsinn
4. Soprano solo.. • ••••• •.v ••
Affcw McCarthy,
6. Fantaslo from u Klgoletto,” solo for
piano Uszi
Mr. Christian Tialatka.
7. “ Osskiiu” chorus and soil ..BeschnlU
Schiller lAedertafel Chieao ;•> Saengerbitnd, Singttto
Section of the Cath. Casino and “ Frohninh."
8. “ Frucbllngslied ’* . Wilhelm
Sdnvcizer Mnennerchor.
9. “ Aria from 44 Joseph Mehui
Mr. Limtoth Cincinnati.
10. Aria from 4 * lirnani ”
Mr. A. Livermnmu
11. Solo— Sod? - —....
Orpheus Maennerehur.
13. “ Mutterseolcn Alicia ”
Grand Chorus.
13. “ Guto Nacht" .. Fischer
AlleuuiiiiaMacunmhor.
11. “Solomon’s Tcinpelwcihe ” ....Till
Grand Chorus.
The price of admission to the concert will
be but lifty cents. The expenses will be
borne by private contributors, so that the en
tire proceeds will go to the relief fund of the
New Ulm sufferers. The object for which
the entertainment is to be given, and the
musical attractions in store for those who at
tend, should fill the halt
THE WEATHER.
■SIGNAL SERVICE.
Office of tiif. Chief Signal Officer,
Washington, D. C., July.3l—l a. in.—For
tlie Ohio Valley and Tennessee, fair weather,
variable winds, mostly easterly, stationary
or lower barometer, and nearly stationary
temperature.
For the Lower Late region, slightly
warmer variable winds, mostly east to south,
and stationary or lower barometer.
For the Upper Lake region and Upper
Mississippi Valley, slightly warmer fairer
weather, variable winds, and stationary or
lower barometer.
For the Lower Missouri Valley, slightly
warmer fair weather, winds mostly souther
ly, amt stationary or lower barometer.
Northeasterly winds continue on the New
England coast and in the Middle and South
Atlantic States, and easterly winds in the
Gulf States. Elsewhere the winds
are variable. Local rains are reported
from New England, the Lower Lake
region, and the middle and northern
portion of the South Atlantic States.
The Ohio River lias risen eight inches at
Louisville and nineteen inches at Cincin
nati. The indications are that fair weather
will prevail in the Upper Lake region. Ten
nessee, Upper Mississippi and Ohio Valleys
to-da and to-morrow. The rivers will con
tinue stationary and fail slowly.
The Chief Signal Otlicer of the army fur
nishes the following special bulletin to the
press;
The barometer is highest in Nova Scotia
and on the New England coast,-and lowest on
the extreme north west. The temperature has
remained stationary in the West Gulf
States and the districts east of the Missis
sippi. The following temperatures are re
ported from stations on the Northern
frontier; Eastport,s7: Burlington, 73; Que
bec, 71; Montreal, 72; Alpena, 70. ■
LOCAL
mSEUVATIOXS.
cn.o.'c.u. July Xl— inns p.in.
Hu Vital. Vd Jt'n. Weather
Tim?. }H-ir* Ther.
85 >*....
Si S. E.
a x
71 N......
G 1 N. K.
C:lsu. m. .TUG 3 01.7
UhlSa. ni.lOUii '72.1
,j:au:n 7G.7
IJW.IS7 77.5
2:18 p. m.
G:lSn. m.
10: IS p. io.
for temperature, elevation.
•Barometer correctc
and instrumental cm
ilenn barometer. -HI
Mean thermometer.
Mean humldltv, 0y.7.
Highest teuipcmiurt
Lotreat temperature.
GEXEUAI
•e. 77.5.
e. m. 3.
iL OUSERVATIOXS.
Cn icAGO.Jaly3t>—lo:ls p. m
Stations.
Ther
2:M
p. m.
Tner
ta:li
p.m.
Wind.
/Tn
IPtAr.
S...
Cl’dy.
Alpuua.
74
to
W...
Fresh..
Q
N.E
Clear.
i J
Chicago
N.K.
Gentle.
Cincinnati
PI
75
N»...
Lltfht,..
f
Cleveland.
73
64
S ....
Gentle.
.0!
Davenport.
S3
76
N E.
Gentle.
1
Denver.
74
73
S ...
Gentle.
I.6C
iFair.
Des Moines...
73
ti. K-
Liebw .
Detroit.
7‘J
73
E....
Gentle.
I
Dodue City
71
65
S.tf..
Fresh..
I
CIMy.
Dumio
71
N.W.
Lliiht...
i:
Clear.
Eno.....
71
G7
S-...
Gentle.
.w
hrtcanaba.
76
7U
E....
Gentle.
i
Fair.
tort uarrv
87
tori Gibson....
so
73
Caim...
Cl’dv.
Grand Haven..
75
71
N.W.
Liirhu.
•j
Indianapolis.^.
S3
75
N.K.
Lluht...
ii
Keokuk
85
76
E....
Fresh..
(i
Leavenwortn..
S6
7rt
W...
Gentle.
6
Louisville
m
76
N.E..
Gentle.
(J
Marquette
73
N.... Lurht...
0
Milwaukee
74
76
Calm...
(I
lltuyl
North Platte...
S3
76
S ....
Brisk...
0
Omaha
85
75
s.w.
Fresh..
0
Osweco
75
S H.,
Gentle.
II
Pmsourc
C7
N.K.
.01
Port iluron....
74
61
S.E..
Gentle.
II
Rochester
71
H. 1C..
Fresh..
i)
Sandusuy
74
63
S.E..
u
Sbreveuort...,.
34
7S
N.B.
Sprluctleid......
83
77
N.K.
Light. .
II
Pi
78
N....
Gentle.
0
St. Paul
Til
8.B..
Gentle.
0
Toledo
71
E....
0
V Icksburc
<r>
S3
N.K..
Gentle.
II
5 unkton
87
72
S.,..
Gentle.
(I
Bismarck
34
SI
S. B.
(J
Dcadwood
92
76
S.W.
Fresh..
(1
Denison..
1U
TV
N.E..
0
M.Assinlboine
a)
76
N.B..
Fresh..
u
F U Uufonl
35
78
e....
ilriak...
u
frt. Custer
35
Galveston
91
85
S. K..
0
Moorhead
S5
74
S....
n
Port Eads
S3
S3
B....
Urisk...
0
Sun Anionlo...
92
83
S.E..
u
St. \ intent ....
S3
73
Huron, Duk....
S3
71
3....
Fresh..
0
Clear.
•Too small to measure.
NEW TOUK
Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune,
NewToiik, July 30.—Temperature at3:SO
p. in., (IS; tip. ui., (IT; 9p. im, 6ti; 13 m., titi;
average temnera;ure. average tempera
ture lor corresponding date last year, titik;
average for-the week In ISSO, 714-7; li&L
731-7.
DENVER, COLO.
Denver, Colo., July 30.—A heavy rain
storm this afternoon caused considerable
damage about the city, undermining the
walls of several buildings in course of con
struction and Hooding cellars.
A POPULAR PLACE.
C. L. Woodman’* Bakery, Cafe, and
Restaurant—An Elegant Resort for
Ladles.
Tim popularity of C. L. Woodman’s ele
gant bakery, cafe, and lunch-room lias long
since been established, And no wonder.
Tlie rush to No. 61 Washington street during
almost all hours pf tlie day. and especially
between 11 a. m. and 3:39 p. m.. is simply as
tonishing. and the class of people who go
there is oi the very best. Ladies find there
11 , nleasaiit, cool resting-place, where the
choicest of ice-creams and water-ices are
served at the low price of 10 cents per plate.
While Mr. Woodman keeps a resort at once
elegant and delightfully cool, he has also
stuck to the mpito of the best goods that the
market atjTords at the very lowest of
living prices. And therein lies a
ireai portion of his success. Thu serv
ice is nowhere excelled. Everybody
at C- L. Woodman's is polite. The table
linen is of the snowiest, while the silver ami
crockery ware are all of the best Tlie en
terprise of the genial proprietor has become
proverbial, and in no one tiling is this more
and better excelled than In the system of
ventilation. There are no' screen doors to
bar out fresh air, but there arc in'their stead
two mamunjth gleam fans which are con
stantly pumping fresh air, keeping oht flies,
ranfying the air, and at all tunes maintain
ing a pleasant, cool, and even 'temperature.
A walk through Mr. Woodman’s kitchen
lias a tendency to give' one an ap
petite. A Tiubuxe reporter went through
it yesterday, and no better and
cleanlier or more commodious place of the
kind can be found in' the city. And, better
than all, it is also kept wire and coo)'by .the
revolving fans. The breakfasts and .suppers
as well as the dinners at Woodman’s are ex
tremely popular with Jadias and gentlemen
who have to take these meals 'down-town.
Ihe beefsteaks, chops, fish, and fowl that are
serve,d are exceedingly tempting iii the bilge
ice-house, where tons .of, ice keep them fresh
and wholes,ome. The cooking is also a feat
ure, for there are no better cooks than are
employed by Mr. Woodman. It is a place
that recommends itself, and this accounts for
the popularity with ladies and' geutfeinen of
the bakery, restaurant, and ice-cream parlors
at No. .61 Washington street ' " •
_ PUGILISM. .
John L. Sullivan, the champion pugjljst
of America, is in the city, accompanied by
Billy Madden, a clever light weight Sulli
es 'vill give an exhibition here before long,
wtth o ?? t 0 - aD 7 Person vvho will spar
with him four rounds.
.Storcb
Freight-Agents at New York Get
ting Whatever They Can
from Shippers.
•Zech
So Change Whatever in the Wesl
ward-Bonnd Passenger
War.
■ Verdi
Xe'w Yoi:k, July 30.—The guerilla war
fare begun In western-bound freight rates
at this point recently was stilt continued to
day. While Pool-Commissioner Albert Fink
said that everybody knew that the great
trunk line agents are as busy as they
can be cutting freight rates, the agents
themselves, in a lamblike manner, said
they knew nothing whatever concerning the
matter. Yet they admitted that Commission
er Fink was good authority upon such sub
jects. The Commissioner said there was
nothing new about freight-rate cutting.
That it was being done was as evident as the
fact that the stars shine in the heavens.
There was no telling when the underhand,
or guerilla, warfare would end.
The Grand Trunk Railway of Canada,which
had made the open cut in Boston, was one
of the parties to the Yew England pool on
west-bound freights formed in 1577, and he
had reason to believe that that Company
had always acted honestly and kept faith
with the other companies in the pool. The
cutting of freight rates by the Vermont Cen
tral, one of the Grand Trunk Railway con
nections, followed by the slaughter
of rates by the Boston & Albany
and the Fitchburg Railroads, had drawn
the New York Central and the
New York, Lake Erie & Western Companies
into the wrangle, in a measure at least. The
cutting, it is said, has been going on for over
a month. It is generally believed that the
schedule of west-bound rates has not been
observed since the recent meeting of the
Eastern freight agents in this city, when it
was agreed to maintain rates. It is known,
notwithstanding the statements of the freight
■ Braun
agents to the contrary, that a great deal of
first-class freight is being taken at
from 50 to 40 cents per 100 pounds
from New York to Chicago, the tariff rate
being 75 cents. Shippers know this to he so.
and the freight agents in this city nave
orders to do business with them at
tlie best rates they can get, and
to avoid talking to reporters about
it. Consequently the agents at the offices of
ail the trunk lines to the west would not
admit to-day that the west-bound freight
rates are being cut. Commissioner Fink
seems powerless in the matter. He is desir
ous of stopping the guerrilas, but finds it no
easy task.
Tlie western-bound passenger-rates war
riors were calmly sitting in their tents to
day, waiting for somebody to open fire upon
their cam ns; Tlie New York Central & Hud
son River Railroad Company, following the
lead of the Pennsylvania people, liave
adopted rebate tickets to compet
ing points in the West, and are hoping
that all the other roads will adopt them also,
thinking that they can crush the indefatiga
ble and tireless brokers who are profit
ing by the present war. The rail
road ticket agents’ rates to the West
to-day were the same, as on Friday,—s7
to Chicago, 37 to Cincinnati, and 312.75
to St. Louis. .Mr. James S. Bueklev, Pas
senger Agent of the New York, Lake Erie
& Western Road, at No. ’4Ol Broadway, said
that the business of the Erie Road to-day was
simply enormous.
Perhaps never before in the history of
tlie road had so many tickets been
sold in one day. His assistants were kept
constantly busy all day. This road does not
use rebate tickets. Mr. G. G. Lansing, the
ticket broker of 397 Broadway, said that his
business was uever so great. His offices were
thronged all day. He was asking $7
for tickets to Chicago, 37 to Cincinnati, and
SU to St Louis, the latter rate being 31.75
less than the rates charged by the Passenger
Agents of the four trunk lines. Mr. Lan
sing added that it by no means followed be
cause the roads .used rebate tickets that the
brokers would be compelled to put up their
shutters.
3 .00 llaze.
5 ... Clear.
7 .00 Clear.
6 ... Clear.
5 .00 Clear.
EAST-BOUND FREIGHT BUSINESS,
There was a slight increase in east-bound
freight shipment, the most of which, how
ever, was taken by the Grand Trunk Rail
way. This lias given rise to rumors that this
road is cutting rates again, and some claim
that it has made contracts as low as 12X
cents. The officials of the road, however,
deny that they nave contracted for any busi
ness at less than the 15-cent rate. No
charges are being made that any of the other
roads have gone below 15 cents, and they say
they can get all the business they want at
that rate, and have, therefore, no cause to go
below it. The Baltimore & Ohio is the only
line which does a small business from tins
city, but the officials say they do
not want much at the present figures.
Even it the Grand Trunk should make con
tracts at" l-}i cents the other roads would
hardly follow suit. The capacity of the road
is not very large, and oven if it does run
ahead, it would do no harm, as it is now
about 200,000 tons behind its regular pool
percentage. It is not believed that cast
bound rates will go below the 15-cent basis,
although one or the other roads may occa
sionally make a cut. The fight will no doubt
be now continued on the west-bound busi
ness. The cut made by the Vermont Central
and Grand Trunk from Boston is being methy
the otherlifies, and although it is denied that
the rates from New York have been cut in
the same measure, yet it is positively known
that shipments have been made from New
York west at about one-half the regular
rates. It is even asserted that some of the
lines are making heavy time contracts at
such-rates*
. The total shipments of grain, flour, and
provisions for the week ending July 30 by
tlie roads leading east from .this city
amounted Jo 50,020 tons, against 41,971 tons
for the week previous, an increase of 5,655
tons.
;ity.
The following table shows the amount of
flour, grain, and provisions carried by eacli
of tlie six lines leading east from this city
during the past week:
\ >
Michigan Central,
take Shore..
Fort Wuyne
Pan-Handle
Baltimore & Ohio,
Grand Trunk
Total,
The percentages were: Michigan Central,
25.G0: Lake Shore, 29.60; Fort Wayne, 17.30;
rac-iliiiidle, 10.70; Baltimore & Ohio, 3,30;
Grand Trunk, 13.60.
KIXG COLE,
Bof.ctal Ditvaieh to The Calcaoo Tribunt
Atlanta, Ga., July 30.—Tliere is a strong
belief here that Cole’s object in getting a
charter to Some is for the purpose of cre
ating an impression that he is going to build
to that poiiit, and that, after getting the char
ter, he and his friend? will then begin advo
cating the sale of the Western & Atlantic,
which property belongs to the State, with a
view of having the Legislature pass a reso
lution authorizing the sale .of the property,
in which event Cole will buy
the line and then not build the
line to Home, but will hold the
charter, so as to keep competing lines out o£>
the State. President Brwltn, of the Western
& Atlantic, is a strong advocate ot granting
a charter to Cole, and it is said that lie'.will
be in witli Cole if the State’s property is so fd
and Cole purchases in Col will do every
thing to get possession of file Western &
Atlantic, and also to bottle up the route to
Home so as to hedge the Louisville & .Nash
ville, he never having forgotten the inauner
in which he .was .by that corporation
a few yearssmee, and it ' Is' believed
that Brown ha? some hard feeling
against the Louisville .& Nashville for at
tempting to displace him from the Presi
dency 61 the Western & Atlantic soon after
Newcomb gobbled a controlling interest in
the Stated property. Some of Brown’s
strongest friends in the Legislature are al
ready talking about favoring a sale of West
ern & Atlantic, so eager are they to get
through with the work that is cut out for
them. The belief that there a ‘.‘gat in the
THE RAILROADS.
THE WAR.
Special Dinaich to Tie Ckleaoo Trilmne.
Gram,)
, tons of t
2,m
lbs.
\Proo's,
i tom of
2,000
lbs.
Flour,
brie.
i«,s4
11,183
12,638
13.467
1,76»»
80,346
3,318
3,070
2,569
3,761
52)
84-1
0,101
11,734
4,010
978
3,015
10,973
31,075
65,828
meal-tub M Is causing members to act
cautiously, and the Cole charter will be de
feated if something is not done to dispel a
belief that Brown and Cole are not, after {ret
ting possession of Western Atlantic and
using the applicatibn for a charter to Rome,
to draw off fire until the trap Is sprung and
the bird caught
BROKEN PROMISES.
7b the Editor of The Chicago Tribune.
Chicago, July 30.— Tlie Wabash, St. Louis
& Pacific Railway has posted notices in Its
Englewood depot to the effect that on and
after Aug. 1, in accordance with an agree
ment with the Western Indiana Railroad
Company, its trains will not carry suburban
passengers, and the tickets issued by . the
Chicago & Eastern Illinois Railroad Com
pany will not be good on its trains. Thus
do the promises anil agreements of
corporations fade Into thin air.
The Western Indiana Railroad Company
was granted the free right of way through
the Town of Lake on one of its. handsomest
north and south streets, with the understand
ing that all trains should stop at Sixty-third
street and other convenient points through the
town, and the fare was to be only live cents
to all points north of Sixty-third street. Peo
ple who were opposed to giving nn this
street said the Railroad Company would find
some way to creep out of the agreement,
which seems to be the case. Those who
have patronized this road are very indignant
that their accommodations are to be cut off.
Gkowler.
KANSAS CITT.
Special Dispatch to The Chicago Tribune.
Kansas City, Mo.. July 30.— The great
passenger-rate war from the East to Chicago
has at last reached Kansas City, and orders
were received to-day from the General Pas
senger Agents to begin selling tickets
on Monday to Eastern points on a basis
or\the local rate from Kansas City to
Chicago added to the advertised rate
from the last-named point. Representatives
of the Chicago & Alton, Chicago, Rock
Island & Pacific, Hannibal & St. Joseph.
Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific, and Missouri
Pacific Companies had a meeting here this
afternoon to talk over the matter, but no
conclusion was arrived at, ami, unless con
trary orders are received, the cut-rate tickets
go on sale Monday.
IN DEMAND.
Xptctol Dieoatch to The Chicago Tribune,
Bedford, Ind., July SO.— lt is reported
here to-day that Air. Lyons, a Chicago capi
talist, lias offered 5500.000 for that portion of
the Narrow-Gauge Ituad leading from here
to Eliinghain, 111., between Swit/. City. Ind.,
and Effingham, 111. An agent of Jay Gould
is also trying to effect a purchase. The In
dianapolis Rolling-Aliil Company is also re
ported as desirous of getting possession, so
that they can make a continuous line of
their own from here, as they own that por
tion of the line known as the Bedford &
Bloomfield, which connects with the proper
ty mentioned at Switz City.
CHANGE OP GAUGE.
Memphis, Teun., July 30.—The gauge of
the Alississippi & Tennessee Kailroad, run
ning from Alemphis, Tenu., to Grenada,
Aliss., 100 miles, -was changed to-day from
five feet to tour feet eigh t and one-half inches.
Tlie work was successfully done in ten hours,
with no interruption to south-bound trains
and traffic of the road.
FREIGHT CONTRACTS.
Boston, Alass., July 30.— The Grand Trunk
is making time contracts on west-bound
freights at low rates, extending into the win
ter months.
The Alilwaukee & St. Paul Railroad has
issued the following circular: " All freight
destined to points on the Alineral Point Div
isisn of this railway must be delivered here
after at our regular freight houses, between
Jefferson and Union streets, West Side, in
order to secure benefit of through rates; and
prompt delivery.”
Air. George F. Wilson, who lias for the past
seven years held the position of General Fore
man of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway shops
at South Chicago, left yesterday for Gar
rett, Ind., to fill tifc position of master
mechanic over tlie Chicago Division. Before
his departure tlio employes presented him
with an elegant sold watch and chain.
Charles Macabe, who was at one time chief
assistant in the passenger department of the
Chicago & Alton, and lias since successively
occupied the positions of General Ticket
Agent of the International & Great Northern,
chief assistant to the Trcasurerand Auditor
of. the Wisconsin Central, and who is now
General Ticket Agent of the Peoria, Pekin
& Jacksonville Kailroad, has accepted the
position of Pacific Coast Agentof the Chicago
A Alton Kailroad, with headquarters at San
Francisco. His appointment takes effect
Aug. 1. -Mr. Macabe’s long experience, ex
tensive acquaintance, and unlimited knowl
edge of the passenger business, and general
cleverness of manner, particularly adapt
him for the important position which be is
to take.
The Chicago & Northwestern Railway
gives notice to the public that on Monday,
Aug. 1, a branch of the Dakota Central Hall
way, extending north from Huron to Red
field. a distance of forty miles, will be opened
for business. The rates at present applying
between Chicago, Milwaukee, Racine, Ra
cine Junotion,Kenosha, and Huron, will also
apply between those points and the stations
on the new branch. The names of new sta-
lions are as follows: Brondland, Clarksville,
Alinden, and RedtieKL Freight for Broad
land and Minden must be prepaid. It is un
derstood that the line from Redfield north,
pointing in the direction of Jamestown on
the Northern'Pacific Road, will be opened in
the very near future as far as’ Ordway, some
fifty miles further north of Redfield. We
have nq doubt that the Chicago & North
western Railway Company’s object in press
ing this line to an early completion is to en
able it to move the crops raised this year in
the recently settled Janies River Valley.
A PROMPT PAYMENT.
A peculiarly gratifying instance of the
waiving of all possible technicalities by a
life-insurance company in the payment of a
loss came to light recently and started an in
vestigation by a ’SmncxE reporter yesterday - .
Ur. A. C. Bell, the ill-fated companion of the
late S. N. Wilcox, was insured in the Berk
shire Life, of Pittsfield. Mass., tor $:;,000.
While Ids body lias never been recovered,
the presumptive evidence all goes to show
that he was drowned in Lake Superior.
Within five days after the proofs of loss, the
Company forwarded Mrs. Bell, who related
Die facts to The Tihuuxe reporter, a cheek
for SJ.ttll.-iii—the face of the policy and the
last dividend thereon. It goes without say
ing that Mrs. Beil was more than pleased
with the Company’s prompt action.
Total
tom.
12,045
14,023
6, io9
5,434
1,673
6,893
SAFE-BLOWERS AT WORK.
The safe-blowers have not been very in
dustrious during the past two weeks, but
they made up for lost time Friday night by
blowing opeu the vault in Gardner & Spry’s
lumber ollice, thereby securiug about S3OO
cash. The office is a small structure on
Ashland avenue about 300 yards south of
Twenty-second street, and in the shadow of
the West-Side Water-Works. .Entrance was
effected by cutting out a panel in a rear
door. They then drilled three boles about
the lock in- the vault door, filled in some
powder, and blew the lock off the inside of
the door. The burglary was hot discovered
until S o’clock in the morning, when the
ollice was opened for business. The money
they found in envelopes ip a box'just in
side the vault. They ransacked- the' safe,
which was open, and went over everything
in the office, but took nothing savecaso.'
THE CORNER AT ST. LOUIS.
50,628
St. Louis, Mb., July 30.—The .cprper In
oats culminated to-day ip establishing 44
cents as a settling price for July .deals. The
principal “long” took in 250 ears cash at
that price and bid the same fop July. Host
of the shorts arc understood to baye settled
this afternoon at the ruling rate, but some of
them refused to do so, and demanded arbitra
tion.'
A GHASTLY DISCOVERY,
Little Rock, A.rk,,.jn,ly,3tt—A day or two
since Hrs. Preston, liyuig in Eastern Tex
arkana, strolled out into her kitchen garden,
and, .while examining vegetables, was .aston
ished to find, a niaii 'standing up .against her
fence! Greatly frightened, she ran into .the
house and gave tbe alarm. Several persons
ran Into the garden, and, upon going ,up to
the man, found him cold and dead. The
body was standing'bolt upright, with the
head and arms hanging.pver the fence. It
had apparently been there for several days,
for .thehair.was beginning to fall out.' An
inquest was held by the Coroner, but noth
ing was discovered (hat .could Lead to its
ITEMS.
beg leave to draw tbe attention of parties desiribff tA
secure a burial place for themselves and family t<
their burial grounds. Located miles weet of citj
limits, between Madison and West Twelftb-st.,lfat
trecta general attention by its unsurpassed beauty ol
natural scenery, and Is accessible from ail parts oi .
the West Division by good carriage rbada. special
attention is called to the folic iring/eatnres embraced
In the management of this Cemetery!
odder theoontroi of all lot-owners, ,
bos been provided, .intended to secore tbe futurd
maintain unco and improvements Of tbe Cemetery,
called tbe ** Forest Komelmprpverrierit Fund/*'cre
ated and steadily increasing- by an aftsesment Of If
per cent on the gross Income of tbe Company. ao«
qulrcd by the sale of lots. ' *' -*'* -»*•••■• v*
Second—The introduction of the so-called ?Lawn.
System.” which experience has abown'.to de.thd i&Qb6'
desirable system for beabty and’economy.' - v *— -•
-Due notice will be given In sbort time of tbe com-’
pfetloa of & dummy Uric going directly to ttatf burial:
grounds. Parties desiring to inspect onr Cemetery t
will find a commodious omnibus leaving everr Sun
day morning at9;:h abarp, from 7i Fifth-ari ' - a
ft-Trni/ I / WA-H THI WhT ■
UPRIGHT PJ.A.tyO
BinnihllT I ' v blt:h received “special men
nyy SI.U I ; tlon” at the centennial, Ptalla
lir fllllfl I delphia, Do not full to- call and
examine these superb Instrn*
m A &IAA ments before you purchase. * +
Kl fIIUIIX General Agency.
riAIUIO. SO. gos
identification. Deceased’s supposed death was
caused by heart-disease, as there, were no
marks of violence on the body.
A MAGNIFICENT OUTFIT.
Over 30.0>J pounds, over fifteen tons of flrfc
and burglar-proof protection! That Is what 8.-
P. Norris & Co. have just purchased and are
having: placed in their spacious salesrooms.
These safes have been on exhibition by John W,
Norris. Vice-President, at the headquarters of
the Diebold Safe & Lock Company, 57 State
street, and every one acknowledges that they
are the finest wholesale-jeweler safes in Chica
go, and that means In the world. These safes are
fitted up to hold the stock that has to be ex
hibited to customers, and the cabinetwork Is
superb, and che nickel-plated knobs and label
holders arc very handsome. Tbo safes will be
placed In position fo-morrt>w, and will create a
sensation. Corner of Washington and State
streets.
BUSINESS NOTICES.
Arend Kumyss Miionld be the reliance
of tbe physician lu all those cases of debility in
wblcb prompt improvement of the general tone
is imperative. Kumyss is tbe blandest and most
easily digested food, and as such the best nour
ishment fora yrcak stomach; at che same time,
through the process of fermentation which
Kumyss undergoes, medicinal qualities are de
veloped wblcb wo vainly look for la materia
medico. In nausea, vomiting, extreme cases of
dyspepsia, Kumyss acts like a charm, promptly
relieving all che distressing symptoms of such
cases. When the stomach rejects all else,
Kumyss is retained and assimilated, affording
the patient nourishment, strength, and comfort,
and,as a logical consequence.nervousncss cease*
and.refreshing sleep follows. Inscarlecjotermit
tent, gastric, and typhoid fever, Kumyss is th«
best diet, it satisfies thirst and hunecrand allayi
the fever. Kumyss has considerably the ad
vantage over drugs. In that it never can dt
barm. To dose an irritable stomach with drugf
fs an absurdity which no Intelligent pbystefatf
attempts in this day. But not only in extreme
cases should Kumyss be resorted to; It should be
the chief remedy fora weak stomach under ail
circumstances. The dyspeptic omin-worker
~a * e ' v Kisses of Kumyss a day will improve
bis digestion and his nerve force.. Ladies would
be less nervous, more vigorous, and healtbier
looking if they would add to their daily checs
few glasses of Kumyss.”
Send for treatise on Kumyss. Beware of imi
tations.
Arend’a Kurayss Is not sold to tho trade, buft
to consumers only. .
A. Arend, chemist, corner .Madison street and
Fifth avenue.
SUITS, LAWXS, Ac.
“SffEEPIiG
REKDCTIOIS.”
WE OFFER AS A
SPECIAL INDUCEMENT
TO CLOSE AT ONCE:
i lot $4 Elegant Lawn Suits at
si-49; made STYLISH and
trimmed with lace.
300 doz. more of those 75c Corsets,
only 39c; most wonderful bar
gains in the city.
20 cases Dress Lawns reduced to •
5c and 6 1-2 C; just half origin
nal cost.
200 pieces French Organdie Lawns
worth 30c, marked down to 15c
An additional new lot of those 44-
inch 75c Lace Buntings placed
on our counters at 39c.
We have also made FURTHER
reductions on our entire stock
of
HOSIERY,
UNDERWEAR,
PARASOLS,
FANS, Etp*
Close buyers will study their
own interest by patronizing the
Lowest-Priced Dry Goods House
in the city.
Open till 9:30 Saturday Night.
Orders from the country prompt
ly executed.
P. F. RYAN & CO.
EPPS’ COCOA .
GRATEFUL—COMFORTING*
BREAKFAST.
**By a (borough knowledge* of the natural laws
which govern the operations of digestion und nutri
tion. and hr a careful application of the line proper
ties of well-selected Cocoa, Mr. Kpps has provided
our breakfast-tables with it delicately-flavored bever
ace which may save us many heavy doctors’ bills. It
is by the Judicious use of such articles of diet that a
constitution maybe gradually built up until strop*
enough to resist every tendenev to disease. Hun
dreds of subtle maladies are floating around us. ready
tQ attack wherever there is a weak point. We mar
escape many a fatal shaft by Seeping ourselves well
fortified with pure blood und u Droperly-nuarlahfcd
frame.Clvll-Servlco Uazctte.
Made simply with boiiinic water or milk,
bold in tins only (>*-Ib. und 1 Ib.j, labeled
JAMES EPPS & CO~
Homoeopathic Chemists. London, on*.
Also. EPPS’ CHOCOLATE’ ESSENCE, for After
noons.
FLORIDA WATER.
■a>EC£l
IMPERISHABLE
PERFUME.
'Murray & Lanman’s
FLORIDA WATER
Best for TOILET. BATH,
and SICK ROOM.
CEMETERY.
p/Ayos.
5

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