OCR Interpretation


The Billings herald. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1882-1885, August 17, 1882, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036001/1882-08-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE BILLINGS HERALD.
VOL. I. NO. 12.
BILLINGS, MONTANA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 17, 1882.
PRICE TEN CENTS.
T HE B ILLINGS H ERAL
BILLINGS, MONTANA, AUG. 17,18S2.
Entered at Billings Post Office as Second Class Matter
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY
BROMLEY & DEVINE.
SUBSCRIPTION.
Three Months............................................... ç
Six Months...................................................
One Ycht...................................................... 4
ADVERTISING RATES.
One inch. 1 insertion.................................... ç
" 1 month..........................%........... 3
" 3 months.......................................
v*' " G months......................................
Coo yenr......................................................24.00
Locnl notices sot in Minion type, 15 cents ft
dich insertion.
Special Rates Riven on long time rnul la
space ndrertiscnients.
JAS. R. GOSS. HENRY DICKIE.
GOSS & DICKIE,
Lawyers,
Buy and Sell Real Estate. Collectionc
will receive Prompt Attentention.
Office over Munds Bank, Blllingo
D. M. PARKER, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
OFFICF IN P. O. BUILDING.
T. A. DAVIE, M. !>.,
Physician and Surgeon,!
MINNESOTA AVFM
Billings,
OrrO.-ITL HEADQUARTERS
- - Montana.
H. H. Griswold, D. D. S.,
Dental Surgeon.
Montana A'.enue,
BILLINGS, - MONTANA.
J. .1. NIC KEY.
Contractor i Builder.
Plans nnd specification« furnished at short
lotiec. Job Work neatly done. Order, in writ
rig left at this oftlce promptly attended to.
CLARK HOUSE
L. M- Harriman, Proprietor,
ntrr
in-at-il. Meals at all hours. Pood
.- leeping Accommodât ions.
No. 4, South 28th St. Billings, M.
Asa Fisher,
Wholesale Dealer in
Wines,
■«ailAnQ
-AND
Cigars.
-OLE At. ENT FOR
VAX. BLATZ'S
Export Lager Beer.
L. H. FENSXE, Resident Man'gr.
BILLINGS, - - MONTANA.
Pioneer Drug Store.
SHANNON & HULL, Prop's.
VVc have ju.'f received
formerly in our Frag stor
mid adde<
?, a full 11
to the stock
1 C of
Toilet Articles,
Meerschaum Pipes,
Patent Medicines.
Oni establishment it the largest in this vicinity
f.ml our PfO'k rn.t surpassed in the West for
raricf y and quality,
8HANNON & HULL.
Couison, - Montana.
Wustam & Garter.
LUBMER
Dealers.
PLAIN AND DRFP.SUIi
LUMBER,
SHINGLES,
WINDOWS,
Doors i Mouldings.
Silverberg & Peaslee,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Wines,Liquors
AND CIGARS.
1872 H&NOR WHISKEY. 1872
And other Liquors of Fine Quality at Wholesale
and Retail.
J. Blatz's Export Beer!
By the Case, Bottle or (;!«««.
Silverberg & Peaslee,
Billings and Couison, Montana.
,no
,no
|
BLUE FRONT
• FOR
General Merchandise,
Consisting of a Full Assortment of the following lines :
Dry Goods, Notions,
and Domestics.
Always on hand a Full Line of
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES,
Tofcacco and Cigars, Coffee, Sugar,
Syrups, Teas, Best Pure Spices,
Dried Fruits, Canned Fruits,
and Vegetables.
CLOTHING,
GKEHSTTS' IFTTIRIfcTXSIECISSrGr 0-003DS,
Business Suits,
Overcoats,
Blankets,
Dress Saits,
Duck Suits,
Gloves,
Hosiery,
Huts and C
Mittens,
STATIOUEEY
A Full Stock of Ladies'
Boots and Shoes
I
:
•«sly foreur trad
X3L, CLOTHS !
; Cali and
not
andre,
in till
expo.-,
,f arri«
. iew the article you wish,
: v,*c can
Come One and All and Judge for Yourself,
..i
Bare of the ptiDlie p
we are, res pec
tfuliv,
Mans &
Post Office Building,
Billings.
II. \V. ROWLEY.
O. WORLEY.
Rowley & Worley,
iREAL ESTATE SURVEYING.
AND INSURANCE.
Tor Sale in Aldersotvs Addition. Only desirable
Business Lot- to be had at Original Prices. Also
500 LOTS
200 Other business and residence Lots
For Snlo in Pilli
Land and Luu; h
«1 I.c
a-ltli
? bought
located.
old on C«.
uiiiiiiPision.
Minnesota Ave., opposite Engineers' Headquarters,
Billings, - - - - Montana.
MILES & CAMP,
-MiALERS IN—
Shelf i Heavy Hardware
Stoves and Tinware,
Barbed Wire, Doors, Windows and Building Paper
-WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
Paints, Oils and Glass.
Cop. Montana Ave. and 27th St. BILLINGS, M. T.
BROWN & DAVIS,
JUNCTION CITY, MONTANA,
Keep their bar well Stocked with the
Choicest
LIQUORS
And Cigars,
That can be Obtained.
Cool and Refreshing Drinks concoc
ted to order.
JACK & JIM'S
I
Restaurant.
H. J. Schmiel & Co., Props.
First-Class Meals
Served at all hours of thc Day and Night.
Billings, Montana*i
Minnesota Ave, 0pp. Thompson's Store.
OLMSTED & PAGE,
CITY REAL ESTATE.
SURVEYORS.
Reference :
m. M. l. i. co. Billings, Montana.
Shaw & Duffleld,
Contractors
AND
SÆ. r r. 36
Milliftery c Dress Making
FaÀcy Goods, Hair Goods, Etc.
All Kirtils uf SYwing taken in axnl promptly it
tcixl' il té. J I«.-; tu return than!;* to tin-ladies
of Piling for tluir patronage in lliu past, uud
trust it V«c continued.
Near Otirk'iS Building, Minnesota Avenue.
_ B| . i STIBBINS, POST & MUND,
Builders. BANKERS
Billin'
5*
Montana.
Job Work Neatly Done.
Boats Built on Short Notice.
; BILLINGS,
Do * General Banking
Business.
Collections promptly made mid remitted for.
Exchange sold on all parts of the t'nited States
and Europe.
M < )NTA N A. Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
.J. 1>. RENTON,
Viee-ITesf. 1st Nat. lîurrk,
Fargo, D. T.
E. P. WELLS,
-t. Red River Nat. Rank,
Jamestown, P. T.
. BABCOCK,
Resident Partner.
i
Billings Real Estate
-BOUGHT AND SOLD BY
BENTON. WELLS &
100
Of the choicest business and
residence lots for Sale.
j
!
j
j
!
j
:
i
j
BENTON, WELLS & CO.
iilgs,
Montana.
CIIAr. IV. THOMPSON.
CYRUS H. THOMPSON,
\M.Th° m P s ° n Sc
r o..
DEALERS IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Groceries, Clothing, Glassware,
Crockery, Boots and Shoes
and Notions.
Corner, Montana Avenue and 25th St. North,
BXXOLiIXT&S,
is
j
;
i
j
1
Burns Smith,
JOHN W. SMITH.
JAS. r.tULDOWNEY.
FINE IMPORTED
wines, liquors
CIGARS,
Bar Supplied with as fine
Liquors as are in
the West.
Billiard Hall
in connection. ,
Corner Main and McCormick Aves.,
Junction City, M. T.
NOW HERE!
A Complete Stock of
Medicines and Mining Chemicals, Proprie
tary Articles, Paint3, Oib, Varnishes,
Toilet Goods, Perfumeries, Hair
Oils, Bath Sponges,
Towels, Fancy
Soaps, Etc.
Meiwood Whiskies,
Selected
Wines and Brandies,
And a full line of
Cigars of Standard Brands.
Wooifofk & Hersey.
billings, Montana.!
The Florence
SECOND BUILDING EAST OF CLARK
& OO.'S STORE, MONTANA AVE.
Imported
WINES,
LIQUORS
-AND
CIGARS
A SPECIALTY.
Most Popular Brands of
Domestic Goods
Always in stock.
;
'
j
!
!
MONTANA NEWS.
Glendive
office.
now boasts a money order
it
Two deaths occurcd in Helena during tlie
month of July.
Colonel W. F. Sanders is recovering from
1 ns recent illness.
Indian girls supply the Missoula market
with huckleberries.
AV. M. Lacey, of Sidney, Neb., lias leased
i the hotel at Benton.
A man named Jones has discovered a
ledge of mica in the Barker district.
Rev. Theo. L. Cuvier, D. D., of New
Aork, is journeying to Yellowstone Park.
The Upper West Gallatin and Bozeman
Canal Co., lias been organized at Bozeman.
Jack Barronctte, <.f Bozeman, has gone
to meet the Sheridan party and act as its
guide through the Park.
Pc!ix Poznansky, an old-time Montaniar.,
is one of the delegates from Dakota to the
National Mining Exposition at Denver.
Milner and Boardinan, of Chotcau
county, have been in the cattle business
three year., ziultlici» profits ore already 13o
per cu.t.
The Masonic Temple Association,
Butte, was organized on the 31st ult., with
Joseph A. llyde, president; A. II. Barret,
secretary, and It. P. Knox, treasurer.
Mr. A. 0. Canfield's appointment to the
position of station agent at Billings, lias re
sulted in the removal of J. J. McLaughlin
from Gleudive to Miles City, where he
takes the position vacated by Mr. Canfield, i
J. L. Duit and his thirteen-year old :
«laughter, who live near Frenchtown, get '
out 300 railroad tics per week. The young !
lady, with a horse, hauls them, two at a !
time, to the river banks, and at night her !
father piles them up.
John Henderson, who was a much rc- !
spected ranchman living near the mouth of j
the Rosebud, lost his life last Friday while '
attempting to ride a young and fractious !
horse across the Yellowstone river. Ill's j
body has nol been recovered.
of,
j The dividend this; year declared by thc !
jîïüjreü cattic company is over 33 per cent. |
! of the original investment. In the four ;
j J cars during which the company has been :
m existence, it has paid 03.33 per cent, in i
(dividends. This is a fair sample of the j
j sheep business in Montana. ;
! During the past month several large j
j bands of cattle have been driven from the !
'vicinity of Moscow, Oregon, bound for the '
: eastern market, going by way of Montana. '
i One drive contained 2.200 head, another I
1,300, and still another 1,700 head, at
which rates it seems as if the supply would
soon run short, but as yet no perceptible
decrease can be observed.—[Laramie Times.
Messrs. John W. Smith, of Miles City,
j and Basinski Bros., of Bozeman, have pur- !
chased of tlm Masonic Order about sixty
feet front next to'the corner of Main and
Bozeman streets, paying therefor £90 per
foot. Upon this fine location they will
erect brick buildings—the one for hotel pur
Nitrl die* other for T.c<'<»nini04la*ir*n of
their large mercantile business. À year
ago this property might have been bought
at$W per loot, but it lias steadily increased
in value, and readily brought the figure
mentioned.— [Avant Courier.
Perry Aspling returned yesterday from a
trip to the mining camps tributary to
Benton and the Judith Basin, in the inter
ests of Ilirshberg A Nathan. Perry is a
good "observer" and lie can grow eloquent
in describing the country through which
lie passed. "The Judith Basin, 1 ' he sa vs,
"is a perfect paradise throughout, and is
fast filling up with settlers. The crops are
excellent, and in almost any part of tho
Basin hay can be cut. The merchants at
Utica, Pliilbrook, Gardenland and Reed's
Fort are enjoying a good trade—in fact,
from every point of view the Judith Basin
is prosperous, and I am deeply impressed
with the belief that in the very near future
this will be the most flourishing fanning
and stock raising section in Montana."—
j [River Press.
Bullion Shipments. i
The following are the bullion shipments j
silver) from Helena in j
; (goldand refined
i tnc last seven months:
j January—gold, §13,000; sih
1 February—gold, $15,034.03
800.
2r $4.150.
silver, $10,
M arcl 1 — go!d, $47,1(30.71;
April— gold, $4,000; sihv
silver, 815,335.
v, $19, WO.
May—gold, v(i(j,500.51; si.
Ivor, 37,7<iO.
June—gold, .st>3,435.02; ri
Ivor. $10.u50.
July—gold. 832,279.33; *i
Ivor. $4,700.
Totals—gtild. $277,300.85,
silver, $78,83
ital of both, $346,1 95.8.5.—
[Independent.
Sporting - .
I Charley Perkins is well known to all
sporting men in Rochester. Yesterday
j was interviewed by a reporter of the Union
j and gave bis opinion of John L. Sullivan, j
Said Charley; "Sullivan is a slugger, and i
' his 'game' is to strike a man with his wrist ;
I
!
j
j
j
I
j
I
!
j
j
aJl I
* lc j
i,
I bone. He readies forward
j hitting a man with his li.-t, lie brings th
blow down with his wrist, and thereby dis
! ables his opponent by weakening thc
! muscles connecting the arms. Tug Wilson
j is a powerful Englishman with a neck like
i a bull.. Wilson is prepared for Sullivan's
j wrist blows, and as soon as he meets Sulli
j van he will allow him to exert himself, as
j Wilson says ho can stand a terrible blow on
; his neck, or is aide to have Sullivan beat
' him for half an hour in order to tire the
j latter. Wilson's forte is to tire his adver
! sary, and, when the oportunity offers, he
! will strike his opponent just over thc belt.
In this manner Wilson expects to down his
opponent, and his friends are confident that
lie will have no opposition to a certain ex
tent, and that his blows, which are report
ed to be something terrible, will weaken
Sullivan's wrist and bring him to his feet."
Perkins says he is fully confident that
Wilson can down the slugger of Boston.
—[Rochester (X. Y.) Union.
Montana Bills Introduced by Dele
gate Maginnis.
Washington, Aug. 9.—Thc following
legislation was proposed by Delegate Ma
ginnis, of Montana:
An act to ratify thc sale, by the Crows of
the western part of their reserve. This bill
appropriates $030,000 for thc purchase, and
passed. Tlie lands are very valuable for
mining purposes.
An act to restore the Fort Benton mili
tary reservation to the public domain. It
adds r portion of the reservation to the
townsite of Fort Benton and opens tlie re
mainder to settlement under the public
land laws. Passed.
An act creating a board to reapportion
the territory for legislative purposes and to
create new counties. Passed in thc form
of a proviso to the legislative appropriation
bill.
An act to grant thc Northern Pacific
railway the right of way through thc Crow
reservation. Passed
and, instead of j
is
all
fill
in
tlie
too
one
a
i
:
'
!
a !
!
!
j
'
!
j
The following appropriations for Mon
tana were passed on different bills:
T«) complete Fort Muginnis....................... « 25,000
For the Improvement of the upper Missouri 100,000
For the improvement of the Yellowstone.. 20,000
.........15,000
lor the improvement of the National park
To survey the diminished Crow reserva
tion........................................................ 4 ,.y >0
To carry out provisions of the treaty........ 30.000
For support nnd civilization of the ('rows 70,000
For support uml civilization of the Black
feet........................................................ 40,000
For support and civilization of the Assin
niboines................................................ 25,000
For support and cirilizotion'of the tiros
Ventres.................................................. 25,000
For support ami civilization of the Flat
Beads..................................................... 15,000
Executive and legislative expenses of the
territory................................................ 30,000
For concluding assay office at Helena....... 27,000
The bill to reduce the Blaclcfcct and
Gros Ventre reservation was referred to the
secretary of the interior for report as to its
expediency to the next session of congress.
Tbe bill granting officers of the army who j
have served in one grade fifteen years the
pay of the gra«ie above, was favorably re
ported from the military committee and is
on the calendar. An act to reimburse
officers and men of the Fourteenth infan
try, passed.—[Special telegram to tbs Pio
neer Press.
The actual work of construction on the
railroad to connect Seattle with the Northern j
of, Pacific road will commence within thc |
next two weeks, and thc entire line be com - 1
pleted, so that trains can run through to j
this city before January 1 st. For thc pres- !
SATT, BOAT.
ent a portion of the Puyallup road will be
used, and also a portion of the Columbia
and Puget Sound road (from Black river to
Seattle), but next year the line will bo built
direct from Lake view to Seattle, as an inde
pendent road. When this is done Seattle
will virtually be the terminus of thc rail
road on Puget Sound.
FE0M ODE CORRESPONDENTS.
Notes from End of Track.
James Rogers, a government driver, was
drowned at the bridge about 12:30 p. m.,
Wednesday. He was proceeding hand over
hand along a rope from one crib to another,
and lost bis grip.......On Tuesday evening
some of the boys connected with the Wins
! ton Bros. & Clark outfit, liad a foot race for
| a watch. F. A. Smith, who runs the lightn
; ing express that goes down to Huntley for
: material, won the race. Tho watch, bv the
i way, had been run over by a tie team the
j day before. Smith declined it with thanks.
; ......William Cronk, the provision car cus
j todian > who Las becn severely ill with dys
! c ' n * rs y L convalescent.......A special train
' bearin 8 General Lewis Merrill and
' °* ber dignitaries,
I
j
:
arrived last eve
ning......Time and Winne have parted;
he will use an hour-glass hereafter......Frank
Murphy, who fractured his l«.'g a few weeks
ago, is able to get about on crutches......One
of the iron men fractured a limb a few «lavs !
ago
rail
r coming
• 111 two
. , , , ... I
into dose contact with a !
days traça laying will
! commence in Billing«. The tie teams will
remain on that
idc of the river hereafter.
X. T. C.
!
Arabi as a Candy-Maker.
i
j
j
j
j
"Doyou know who Arabi Bey is?" asked ; (
Mr. F. of liis friend Mr. A., as they stood j
on the deck of the New Camélia, last Sun-1
day, bound for Mandevillc. 1
I
"Arabi Bey is no other than Dumonteii, !
who used to keep a confectionery establish
I
meat at tho corner of Bourbon and Canal
streets. Dumonteii was a major in the
Orleans artillery and a gallant soldier—an
I adventurous, daring fellow. After the war
he engaged in business, succeeding Bellan
ger at the corner of Bourbon aud Canal,
lie rail into debt for $40,000 or $50,000, and
went to France about I860. Dumonteii
fought in the Franco-Prussian war, and
was distinguished for bravery, receiving the
cross of tlie Legion of Honor. The next 1
heard about him,from a mutual friend in
Paris, was that he had gone to Egypt,
Several years ago the vague rumor reached
me that the irresponsible Dumonteii had
entered the army ofthekliedive and risen
to a positiou of rank. It is said that he
stood in high favor with the army, and was
regarded almost in the light of a native. "I
recollect him," continued Mr. F, "as a
tall, swarthy .follow, with large features, but
clear brilliant eyes, and a heavy black
mustache. In fact, he had a rather Oriental
cast of countenance, and ten years'residence
in Africa would have certainly increased
! the resemblance. Dressed in the Egyptian
j garb I can imagine that Dumonteii would
make a fine-looking Arab,
j The other day I saw a picture of Arabi Bey,
j and was startled at hi* striking likeness to
I Dumonteii. Indeed, no one who knew the
j latter would hesitate in identifying the
picture as that of the quondam confectioner.
There was a peculiar expression about
DumonteiUs mouth which is closely repro
duced in thc picture. This resemblance, ]
coupled with thc faetof Duinonteil'sprcs- J
cncein Eavpt, assures me ho is the Egyptian j
... . .
loader who is just now giving
so much trouiilc."
.i i- , :
the English !
j
, .. , I
Thc above conversation was repeated to :
the writer yesterday, and is reproduced as J
I!ear jy a3 possible from memory.— New j
Oilcan.. Headline. i
Denver's Show.
Denver, Col., Aug. 2.—The Colorado
mining and industrial exposition is now
open, the inaugural ceremonies having
been very imposing and auspicious. More
than than twelve hundred stale militia ap
peared in the parade, and at least 10,000
visitors attended. Tho address of Con
gressman Kelley, of Pennsylvania, was con
sidered one of the finest pieces of oratory
ever delivered on the commercial interests
and mining future of the West, The city
is clothed in decorative attire in honor of
tlie event. Among the visitors at the
opening there were many who had been to
all the recent expositions, including thc
Centennial and Atlanta. They all agree that
the Colorado exposition is the liest ad- I
vanced at the opening and thc most prom-1
ising in results. The building covers more j
than four acres. On May 2 the cornerstone j
was laid,and on July 15th the building was j
completed. Thc marvels of thought and I
handicraft united in producing a miracle as !
regards time. It is one of the most wonder- i
fill pieces of architectural and buildingskill
in thc country. Thc lumber had to* be
sawed from trees then standing in the
forest; tlie brick made from the undisturbed
clay of thc earth; the stone quarried and
hauled from thc mountains and worked;
tlie ground excavated, railroads built to the
location chosen, and many other details
too numerous to mention attended to.
.Since tho breaking of tlie ground—about
one hundred days—the grand structure has
been erected and completed, and is now
receiving machinery of all kinds, ores,
minerals, and exhibits of every nature
from all parta of the continent. There
have been twelve thousand cubic yards of
earth removed, three hundred cords of
j
ial
to
tho
gate
no
thc
sent,
1
t
sued
any
here
in
as
has
than
send
the
lions
foundation stone laid, four million brick
put in place, and three million feet of lum
ber fashioned into the building. ' Four
acres of t in rooting have been required, and
the whole structure is of a most substantial
character, the walls being made of heavy'
masonry, while the galleries are supported
bji solid columns, and the roof by wrought
iron trusses. The dimensions of the build
ing are 500 feet from north to sonth and
310 feet from east to west. It Is In the
form of a cross, with convenient and spa
cious vestibules and entrances. At each of
the four extremes there arc two thousand
linear feet of gallery twenty-nine feet in
width, affording an unsurpassed promenade
with a complete and extensive view inside
and out. The eight hundred windows of
the building afford abundantly the necco
sary light to the remotest comer. Eight
broad and easy stairways lead to the gal
leries, while two more and a pair of eleva
tors reach to the observatory of tho grand
central tower, eighty feet in height. One
stairway leads to each of the eight comer
towers, seventy feet above the floor. The
departments are mineralogy, geology,
metallurgy, metallurgical machinery, ag
ricultural and horticultural general ma
chinery, agricultural and horticultural im
plem ^ ta >. ** m<i &***' tou ^ c «° od3 *
instruments, domestic economy,
chemical and medical preparations, liberal
a . rtj aad naturji science. It is estimated
^ about seven thousand people visited
the es P osltlon *wiay. Rich minerals are
daily arriving from all sectiona of tho
Rocky mountains, and within another
week it is thought the arrangements of ex
hibits will be completed. The building ia
unable to accommodate more than one
third of the applicants for exhibiting space.
Many of the territories and mining dis
tricts are erecting paviliions ou tho
grounds.
The New Hotel Open.
The carpenter and painters that
during the past two weeks have been
giving the finishing touches to the
Windsor Hotel withdrew yesterday
after having completed their work, and
the hotel was declared duly opened.
The first floor of this really elegant
house is occupied by a large office and
bar room, a diningroom covering one
half the size of the building and other
small apartments used as wash rooms,
etc. A wide staircase admits to the
upper part of thc house where are about
thirty of the most comfortable looking
and inviting sleeping rooms that are in
the territory. A profusion of brilliant
silverware, fine table linen of unap
proachable whiteness, and an abund
ance of palatable food, served by at
tentive waiters, are the accompani
ments of each meal. The bill of fare will
be maintained at the standard which
was established yesterday, and should
satisfy even the veriest gourmond by its
variety and extent. The hotel is run a
little on the European plan. Mr. R. J.
Anderson operates that part of it relat
ing to the office, the rooms and thc sa
_
lnon^whilc Mr. H. b. Dodge furnishes
Both departments
food for the guests,
in thar £ e of
lge
de_
gentlemen whose
experience promises well for the future
of the hotel.
! Territorial Democratic Convention.
j The Territorial Democratic convention
j will meet at Butte, on Monday, the 4th
; ( ]av of September, at 12 o'clock m. Tho
j following are thc
1 „ ,
I ßoüvprncüu. ...... it
! Choteuu...... io
number cf delegates
I apportioned to the several counties:
Custer............................................................
Deer Lodre.............................................. ....... 1}
Gallatiu......................................................... j 2
Jefferson.........................................................
Lewis anil Clark............................................. 21
Madison......................................................... 13
Meagher......................................................... 12
Missoula......................................................... 12
Silver Buw...................................................... 23
Total ........................................................ loä
Tho unanimous voice of the central
committee being against thc use of
proxies in thc convention, it recom
mends to thc several county conven
tions the election of delegates and al
ternates to thc territorial convention,
and thc adoption of a resolution in each
county convention authorizing those of
thc delegates or alternates present in
thc territorial convention to cast the
entire ve to of their county in said con
vention. Samuel Woet, Chairman.
W. W. Dixon, Secretary.
Eepublijan Tsrriicïial Convention.
The republicans cf Montana are re
quested to send delegates to a republi
can territorial convention to be held at
Butte City cn thc 13th day of Septem
ber, 1882, at 11 o'clock a. m., for the pur
pose of nominating a candidate for dele
gate to congrese, selecting a territorial
central committee, and transacting such
other business aa may be deemed
proper. The several counties are en
titled to representation as follows:
lîof.verhcad ............
13
Cutter........
Diiiv.on
Deer Lodge.',!!."." !!"'.'",...................................
uallotin...............................V.VV.V.V.V.V.""'~.'.V.T
Jefftanann_______ ______
Chotcau.............................................. .T..!A. e
u
13
14
3
Jeffeoson
Lewis and Ciarke..........................................
Madison......................................... * ......* j")
Meagher.................................. '»
Missoula.................................... g
..................................................... £0
Total...........................................;............"437
The committee respectfully invite at
tention
to the following resolutions
adopted hy previous republican territor
ial conventions and still iu force:
Resolved—That delegates and alternate
delegates shall be elected ia the future
to territorial conventions, and, in
tho failure ol tlie delegates to attend, the
alternate delegates shall cast the vote of tho
delegates whose alternates they are.
Resolved—That in the absence of a dele
gate and his alternate, the majority of tho
delegates in attendance from their county
shall cast the vote of the alternates.
Resolved—That in the absence of tho
delegates and alternates from any county,
no vote shall be cast for such county.
Resolved—That in the county in which
thc convention shall lie held, when any
delegate and his alternate delegate are ab
sent, there shall be no vote cast in their
behalf. J. P. Wooman, Chairman.
R. E. Fisk, Secretary.
The new money order regulations will
provide the following tariff:
CEVW
Ontcrs not exceeding Ç10. ..............................* à
" exceeding $10 and not exceeding « 5 ...... ID
;; •• if» •' •*. so......is
"D ;• *• 40...... 20
-kJ •• " 50...... 25
50 *• •* 60...... 30
" " 00 " •• 70...... 80
70 " " K0...... 40
80 " •* 100......45
Postal orders for amounts under $5,
payable to bearer, wall in future be is
sued for mail transmission, payable aft
any designated office. The postoffice
here is to become a money order office
in a few weeks.
To facilitate business interests, the
postmaster-general has directed th »*.
as bctwcon all carrier offices, a post^
master holding a "held for postage"
letter, that is, one on*which no postage
has becn paid, or one on which lese
than three cents has been paid, «E<«n
send a card directly to the address,
stating that he has the letter end will
forward it ou receipt of the
Heretofore all such matter
the dèad letter office and
lions was sont from thereto

xml | txt