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The Billings herald. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1882-1885, September 07, 1882, Image 1

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THE BILLINGS HERALD.
VOL. I. NO. 15.
BILLINGS, MONTANA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7, 1882.
PRICE TEN CENTS.
THE BILLINGS HERALD.
HILLINGS, MONTAN A, SKIT. 7, 1SS2.
Entered at Billings Post Office as Second Class Matter
I
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY
BROMLEY & DEVINE
SUBSCRIPTION.
Three Months..............................................8 I/O
Six Month*................................................... 2..Y0
Otu» Year...................................................... 4.00
ADVERTISING RATES.
One inch. 1 Insertion....................................$ 1.00
•• 1 month.........'............................... .UK)
" a months....................................... 7.Ô0
" 6 months...................................... 14.00
One year ......................................................24.00
Loral notices set in Minion type, lö cent* a line
eaeh Insertion.
Special Kates giron on long time and large
•pace advertisements.
A. E. HERTZELL,
ZÆag-ziolia
RESTAURANT.
The Best Meal in Town.
B. B. KELLEY, M. D.,
OFFICE:
West of Engineers' Headquarters.
Prof. M. A. STOEL,
Musical Instructor.
Instruction* given on Piano and Organ,
Term*:— ff-0. per Term of, Twenty-four Lessons
BILLINGS SHOE STORE,
J. Losekamp tu Sons.
Superior hanil-icwcd Boot* and Slnx'S. Ladies
aud Children* line goods a specialty.
'AJ Ptrcct near Mund's Bank.
EDWARD FAWKES ,
Deputy Clerk of District Court, !
AND NOTARY PÜBLI0.
Canyon and Billings, Cußter County.
JAx\ K. GOSS. HUNKY DICKIE. •
GOSS & DICKIE,
Lawjrers,!
Bnv and Sell Real Estate. Collections
* will receive Prompt Attentention. ,
Office over Munds Bank,
BIHings
D. M. PARKER, M. 0.,
Physician and Surgeon,!
OFFICF IN P. O. BUILDINC.
T. A. DAVIE, M. D..
Physician and Surgeon,
yiiNVE>u7* ivi MS err
Billing»,
'-ITE IIEiWJt'AHir.P-«.
. Montana.
H. H. Griswold, D. D. S.,
Dental Surgeon.
Vcnt» r .a A.ervje,
BILLINGS, - MONTANA.
CLARK HOUSE
L. M- Harrijuac, Proprietor.
Centrally l.ocat''d. Meals at all hour*. O.vrl
Hts-ping Accommodation*.
Mo. 4. South 28t£ St. Billings, M. T.
S. O. PERRY & CO.,
LUMBER DEALERS.
Lumber in larjp
yar-ls in Hilling*.
(quantities on hand at our
M. M. PEASE, Agt.
VX. IISG.'DI BV.
K. J. JIEHRICK.
Kingsbury & Herrick,
• Dealers in ■
Fruit, Confectionery,
CHOICE TOBACCO ES, Etc.
Montana Ave. opposite Bank Exchange. (
on tract* for Masonary Undertaken. Flue Building
a Specialty.
* 3 'Leave order* at Bruit re.
Pionier Drug Store.
SHANNON & HULL, Prop's.
Wo Lave just received and ndd<
formerly in our Drug {-tore, a full 1
I the stock
of
Toilet Articles,
Meerschaum Pipes,
Patent Medicines.
Out establishment D the largest in thi* vicinity
mid our st.-Hi not surjmssed in the West for
varjetj and quality.
8HANNON & HULL.
Coulson, - Montana.
Silverberg & Peaslee,
WHOLESALE AXD RETAIL
Wines,Liquors
' > AND CIGARS.
1872 HAYNOR WHISKEY. 1872
And other Liquors of Fine Quality at Wholesale
and Retail.
Schlitz's Export Beer!
Ity the Case. Dottle or <3ass.
Silverberg & Peaslee,
Billings and Coulson, Montana.
J. 1». BEXTOX,
Viec-Prcst. 1st Nut. Rank,
Fargo, 1>. T.
E. I'. WELLS,
Prost, lti'il River Xnt. Hunk,
Jamestown, I). T.
J. A. BABCOCK,
Resident Partner.
Billings Beal Estate
-BOl tiHT AXD SOLD BY
BENTON, WELLS & CO.
100
Of the choicest business and
residence lots for Sale.
BENTON, WELLS & CO.
Billings,
Montana.
BLUE FRONT
GOOD GOODS
!
AND
LOW PRICES.

,
Headlight Oil a Specialty.
Goods Delivered to Any Part
of the City ^reé.
Postoffice Building, Marks & Soule.
IL W. ROWLEY".
J. O. WORLEY.
Rowley & Worley,
REAL ESTATE SURVEYING
AND INSURANCE,
For Sale
Business
in Aldcrson's Addition. Only <lcsirnl»le
Lots to be had at Original Prices. Also
500 LOTS
200 Other business and residence Lots
jBillings,
For Sale in Billings. Land and Ixrts bought and sold on Commission.'
Land and Ixrts Suneyed, and Settlers located.
Minnesota Ave., opposite Engineers' Headquarters,
Montana.
(
MILES & CAMP,
—DEALERS IX—
Shelf i Heavy Hardware
Stoves and Tinware,
Barbed Wire, Doors, Windows and Building Paper
-WHOLESALE .VXD RETAIL
Paints, Oils and Glass.
I Cor. Montana Ave. and 27th St.
BILLINGS, M. T.
. \ \S &• THOAfpo
„„„ 0/ V
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES,
Boots and Shoes,
Ready-made Clothing and Gents' Furnishing Goods
IN CREAT VARIETY.
*Sr \Vc have just received a full line in each department, and invite the public
to inspect onr Stock.
REASONABLE.
PRICES
Stores at East Bings anil Park City,
O XT T A. it a. .
OLMSTED & PAGE,
CITY REAL ESTATE.
SURVEYORS.
Reference:
m. m. l. i. co. Billings, Montana.
Shaw & Duffield,
Contractors
AND
MSG. IÆ. T. KC02TET,
Millinery!Dress Making
Fancy Goods, Hair Goods, Etc.
All kinds of Sewing taken in and promptly at
tended to. I beg to return thank* to the ladies
of Billings for their patronage in the past, and
trust it wiil be continued.
Near Clark's Building, Minnesota Avenue.
STEBBINS, POST & MUND,
Builders. BAN KERS,
Job Work Neatly Done.!
fcä?*Boats Built on Short Notice.
BILLINGS,
C1IA.S. \V. THOMPSON.
Billings, - Montana.
Do a General Banking
Business.
Collection* promptly made and remitted for.
Exchange Hold on all part* of the United States
and Europe.
MONTANA. • Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
CYRUS H. THOMPSON,
G
Thompson
o..
DEALERS IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE
Groceries, Clothing, Glassware,
Crockery, Boots and Shoes
and Notions.
Comer, Montana Avenue and 25th St. North,
rBXXiXjiZsra-s, - - zæoxtœ'-a.zt-a..
A
HENRY FRANK,
%
Merchant Tailor!
• MEN'S, BOYS' AND YOUTHS' CUSTOM MADE CLOTHING,
Gents' Furnishing Goods,
HATS UÄ.ZTID CAPS.
Lowest Market Prices. Everything Reasonable.
THE BRICK BUILDING, MONTANA AVENUE.
Wustum, Carter & Field.
LUMBER
Dealers.
PLAIN AND DRESSED
LUMBER,
SHINGLES,
WINDOWS,
Doors i Mouldings.
200
\ 3nÆ. CH,
Choice Business and
Residence Lots,
Located, in. all Farts of tlie CJity
Will be pleased to show lots and give any information, personally or by letter. Correspondence
Solicited.
OFEICE: Minnesota Avenue and 26th Street.
O. F. YATES & OO.,
CommissionMerchants
North. 28th. St. Opp. Engineers' Headquarters.
Yellowstone Park
VIEWS.
Colgate's Toilet Soaps,
Tooth Powder ,
Celluloid Brushes.
Combs.
Tooth, Nall and Shaving Brushes.
MOXLEY'S
STATIONERY
Store and News Depot.
Billings Herald Building, BILLINGS.
Route From the Park.
The Result of an Interview
With Colonel
Wheelan.
The Granduor of the Scen
ery on this side of
the Park.
The Shortest and Most Feas
ible Route for a
Railway.
A MILITARY ROAD RECOMMENDED.
On Saturday evening we had the
pleasure of interviewing Col. J. N.
Wheelan, of the 2nd U. S. Cavalry, who
commanded the military escort which
accompanied the Gen. Sheridan party.
After some general conversation regard
ing the whole trip, and the manner in
which the party enjoyed the grand
scenes which they had witnessed
in the great "wonderland" of the world,
the Colonel described the route which
the party had taken from the Park to
Billings, and which has heretofore been
considered impracticable, but which
has now' been demonstrated to be not
only a possible route, but the shortest,
easiest and best of any yet known or
likely to be discovered. The distance
from the Park line to Billings is only
100 miles, and the party occupied but
seven days in the journey.
The general direction of the route
taken by the party is northwest from
the Park line, crossing the Yellowstone
at Baronette's Bridge, passing through
Cook City, which is the principal mining
town of the Clark Fork district, thence
across the Clark Fork range west of
Clark Fork canyon, and then along what
might be termed a prairie country to the
Yellowstone. We believe that Col.
Wheelan has officially recommended
that a
MILITABY KOAD
should be established over this route; a
road having already been constructed for
forty miles from Baronette's Bridge,
there will actually be only about thirty
miles of road to construct, that is across
the Clark Pork range, and as the engi
neering difficulties are not great the Col
onel estimates that the cost of building
a very good road would not exceed
$20,000. If Col. Wheelan has made this
recommendation there is no doubt that
it will be endorsed by Gen. Sheridan.
The Colonel informs us that the scen
ery after leaving the Park line, was
much grander than any within the Park,
excepting, of course, the Yellowstone
Canyon, consequently those who travel
over this route will have oue
CONTINUALLY GRAND SCENE,
not only in the Park, but before they
reach it
The importance to the people cf this
community of the establishment of a
road from Billings to the Park cannot be
under-estimated in view of the fact that
the Colonel assured us that the route
taken by the party was the most feasible
for a railroad. If a railroad were built
in this direction, Billings would not only
be the outfitting point for parties travel
ing to the Park, but for the Clark Fork
mining district. Since interviewing
Col. Wheelan, we have ascertained that
the fact that the Gen. Sheridan party
took this route was altogether owing to
the Colonel's opinion that it was the
best and shortest, an opinion which the
guides who have been taking parties to
the Park for years did not agree with.
Col. Wheelan is to be congratulated upon
his success in demonstrating the practi
cability of the route, and Billings is to
be congratulated upon the trade which
will certainly accrue to it should this
road be opened up.
FROM 0UB G0BBESP0NDENT3.
Park City, 1
Cept. 5th, 1882. J
To the Editor of the Billings Herald.
With the beginning of another week the
sound of the hammer aud saw is heard in
different parts of the village, where a few
weeks ago was apparently a desert waste.
Besides the numerous stores now nearly
completed, there arc several dwelling
houses an«l three feed stables under way.
We shall commence a school-house at
once......Mr. Clark, who has an interest in
the town, says we can have water in the
ditch this fall......The track is laid to with
in about six miles of the place......Mr.
Holmes, now on his way East, lias pur
chased a press and will establish a news
paper soon......A ball will be given in
Dunn, Lee &• Co's, new store Friday even
ing of this week, to which a general invi
tation is extended......Two of our men
came down from Clark's Fork mines with
Gen. Sheridan and party. They brought
some fine specimens with them, and report
the hills very rich in gold, silver and cop
per ore......Thieves are infesting this local
ity. Three ponies have been stolen from
the neighborhood during the past week.
......Indications of festive bruin have been
found several times this summer on the
ranches near the river. F .
End op Track, M. T., ]
dept. 5th, 1832. j
To the Editor of the Billings nerald:
Yellowstone watermelons arc ripe, and
the gasp of the colic stricken individual is
hoard in the land. "Melonchoiic effects"
to be sure, but after all something must be
ilonc for the melon......At this writing wo
are four miles east of Park City. Thi* great
town has an immense future before it, in
fact its future will reach away down into
the ages—its future development we are not
so well posted on. Report sayeth that
a grand masquerade ball will be held there
on next Friday evening, and wc expect to
attend and gladden our old eves once more
by gazing on revelry by night. N. B.
Wanted: One fiddler, one performer on
the jewsharp, ditto on the "mouf-organ."
Gents will not be allowed to spit on the
floor, and disputes involving tÛç US* of
fire arms must bo settled Outside......Capt.
Clayton is. we ar : sorry to say, at the point
of death, and will in all probability be
dead before this meets the eyes of your
readers. His disease is dysentery of ma
lignant type, induced by indiscretion in
diet and immoderate use of stimulants.
......The bridge force has moved on to a
point about ten miles west of Park City.
w.B. Gregory, a bridjefcrtman.ia
ering from a slight attack of pneumonia.
Track i* going going down at the rate of
two miles per day. A limited number of
able bodied men are needed on the track
laying gang. X. T. C.
MISCELLANEOUS.
The widow of John Brown, the libera
tor, was given a reception in Chicago on
the 31st ult.
The N. P. R. R. bridge across the Mis
souri at Bismarck, will be completed in
October, work on the second span has
already begun.
Six noted 8ioux chiefs with their outfit of
scalps—taken ten years ago—and grain cul
tivated on their farms, are to be one of the
attractions at the Minneapolis fair.
Jameson, the Irish hunter, is going to the
Muscleshell to hunt bear. He has tired of
goat hunting in the Dear Lodge mountains,
although he has met with good success
there.
The Omalia Herald gives a lengthy ac
count of Prof. Samuel Aughey's narrow
escape from a band of Cheyennes, who
gave him chase while he was engaged in
gathering specimens.
Indian Bing Horseshoes.
A Washington dispatch says: Inspector
Pollock sends from Pine Ridge agency to
the secretary of the interior, a horseshoe
labelled, "Would fit Jumbo. Please pre
serve this specimen trick of our Indian
management until I see you." It was
furnished by contractors to shoe Indian
ponies with. It weighs three pounds and
is 8Jx61 inches. It indicates a very loose
way of doing business on the part of In
dian agents, who should not accept such
goods.
no
in
is
Leasing of the National Park.
. t .i . . I
nt ashixoton, Sept. 1.—In the contracts ?
Ouiteau's Skeleton.
Guiteau's Skeleton is now at the Nation
al Army Medical Museum at Washington,
but not to be exhibited to the public. The
final disposal of the bones of the assassin
has not yet been decided upon, and cannot
be until Judge Wagner decides as to the
validity of Guiteau's will, in which be be
queathed his body to Dr. Hicks. The ex
perts engaged in the examination of
Gniteau's brain have completed the work.
It is understood they already disagree in
their conclusion in regard to his insanity,
and there will probably be two reports ren
dered.
New Hoads to Be Made.
Yesterday a lieutenant with a party of
men and a wagon, passed through town on
their way to Fort Keogh. The officer and
his men were so travel stained and dusty
as to be hardly recognizable, but we final
ly made out the features of Lieutenant
Steele, 18th Infantry. The party was sent
from Fort Maginnis to find a practicable
road, if possible, from that post to Qlen
divc. The Lieutenant says no good road
can be made from Maginnis to Glendive.
He will return from Miles City to Magin
iiis. The distance from Maginnis to Glen
dive is 2ÛQ miles.—[Miles City Press.
to-day, by the acting Secretary of the Inter
ior, providing for the leasing of certain
portions of the Yellowstone National Park,
it is provided that the rental shall not ex
ceed two dollars per acre, and that failure
to pay rent or to renew the lease at the ex
piration of ten years, shall cause the pro
perty of the lessees to revert to the United
.States, and the government shall make such
compensation therefor as may be agreed
upon by congress. The lessees are privil
edged to cut timber for telegraph poles and
fuel, and burn coal for fuel, on restriction;
and they are also granted such favorable
ground as they may need for the raising of i
vegetables and forage for the use of visitors
to the Park. The contract expressly stipu
lates that no member or delegate to con
gress or officer or agent of the government
shall have any interest in the Park.
A Card Flayer's Sermon.
Man's life is a game of cards. First it is
'eribbage.' Next he tries to 'go it alone' at
a sort of 'cut, shuffle and deal' pace. Then
he 'raises the deuce* when his mother
'takes a hand in,' aud contrary to Hoyle,
'beats the little joker with her five.' Then
with his 'diamonds' 'he wins the 'queeu of
hearts.* Tired of 'playing a lone hand' he
expresses a desire to 'assist his fair partner,'
'throws out his cards' and the clergyman
takes a ten dollar bill out of him 'on a
pair.' She 'orders him up' to build the
fires. Like a 'knave' he joins tho 'clubs'
where he often gets 'high,' which is 'low'
too. If he keeps 'straigtit' be is often
times 'flush.' He grows old 'bluff,' sees a
'deal' of trouble when at last lie 'shuffles'
off his mortal coil and 'passes in his
checks' and he is 'taken in' by a 'spade,'
life's fitful 'game' is ended, and he waits
the summons of Gabriel's 'trump,' which
shall 'order him up.'
Montana's New Governor,
An Eastern paper prints the following
concerning Col, Schuyler Crosby, Monta
na's new governor: "Col. John 8chuyler
Crosby, lately appointed governor of Mon
tana, has accepted the position, and will
leave Florence, where he at present repre
sents the United States in a consular ca
pacity, in October. He was bom in New
York City, September 1839, and is a grand
son of William Floyd, one of the signers
of the Declaration of Independence, and a
lineal descendant of Ocn. Philip Schuyler.
He entered the regular army as first lieu
tenant of the First Artillery in 18*11, and
served with his battery under General Mc
Clellan in the Army of the Potomac.
Then he l>ccame a member of General
Bank's staff, and was brevetted captain for
gallantry at the battle of Fort Bisbone, and
major for gallantry during the Fort Hud
son campaign. In August, 1304, he was
commissioned colonel of the Seventh
Heavy Artillery by Oovcmor Seymour, but
declined. Subsequently he served on the
staffs of Generals Canby and Sheridan, He
resigned from the army in 1872, and 1876
was appointed consul to Florence. In
Mqni»l]kiMwUiM
an act of congress, a lifç-aftviôg Yfiedal of
the first class, "fur thfc extreme aud heroic
daring 'Manifested by you in saving the life
of Miss Edith May, and in endeavoring to
rescue the late Miss Adele Hunter, and
William T. Garner and his wife, under cir
cumstances of peculiar peril and difficulty
which attended the sudden sinking of the
yacht Mohawk, on the 20th of July, 1876."
June 29,1881, he .received the thanks and
gratitude of the Italian government for
aiding the authorities in arresting and
prosecuting a large baud of forgers of pub
June, 1877, he received, under authority Qf
An Alarming Suspicion.
"Do you sec those men?" said a railway
official to the Alert reporter, at the depot,
yesterday afternoon, as the east hound
train was pulling out, "they arc desperate
men, and many believe that they formerly
belonged to the famous band of Jamcs
Younger bandits." He pointed out several
auspicious looking individuals, with long
hair and an arsenal of small guns on their
persona.
It is a fact tbat many sensible people,
residing within a radius of ten miles of
Jamestown, arc firmly of the opinion that
Frank James, the noted bandit, is in this
section with a lot of his pal*. Of late quite
number of horses have been stolen
between Jamestown and Fort Totten, and
this gives color to the snspicion. There is
no cause for alarm. Frank James Is in
Oregon and most all of his old comrades in
crime are in their graves or within the
prison walls. Sheriff - McKcchnic pronoun
ces the suspicions absurd.— [Jamestown
Alert.
MONTANA NEWS.
It is said a herd of 500 wild horses roam
in the Snake river valley.
Helena is rejoicing over an electric light
recently placed in operation there.
It is reported that the notorious outlaw,
Frank James, was at Rock Island. Missoula
county, recently.
A well informed correspondent of the
New York Tribune says Montana is the
best grazing country in the world.
The trial of a rape case is now in pro
gress at Miles City, the defendant in which
is Nathan Bernard, a photographic artist.
Miles City rejoices that sufficient stock
has been subscribed to construct an irriga
tion ditch. Miles City has much to be
thankful for.
Bozeman had a fire last week which de
stroyed two building owned by Nelson
Storv. The loss of the buildings and con
tents amo tints to about $6,000.
On Saturday last a fire occurred in
Adam's stables at Helena, iu which a valu
able mare and some other animals were
burnt. The total loss amounted to about
$1,500.
The River Press says that the political
contest in Choteau county will be between
the men and not betweeh the parties, "the
sceptre having departed from the political
bosses."
We are glad to observe the following
item in the Benton River Press: "Rev. D.
"L. Leonard, who has been at Billings a
"few weeks past has a good deal of coufi
"dence in the boomed burg.
Benton is determined on the erection of
water worke. Funds have been guaranteed
for preliminary work, and a survey is to
be made in a very few days. It is estimat
ed that the works complete will cost about
$3-5,000.
Father Venneman, S. J., who visited
Billings some weeks since, and who has
been travelling on the mission in Central
and Eastern Montana, La* been called to a
less arduous field of labor, viz: the cliair of
English literature in the St. Louis Univer
sity.
Within about two weeks Helena, Doer
I Lodge and Butte wiii be connecte i Uv rele
? , c ,, , ,
phone, the Montana Telephone Company
having purchased the old Montana Centrai
Telegraph lines between these points. Re
pairers are now engaged in putting tbc lino
in good condition.
According to Mr. VillarJ's report the
bridge over the Snake at Ainsworth will
cost $350,000. The road over the Cascade
mountains to Puget Sound will cost.$10,
000,000. The road from Portland to
Kalama will be +1 miles long and will cost
$33,000 per mile, exclusive of the bridge at
Kalama, which is estimated at $1,500,000.
Some damphool in Helena writes to
i ßradstrcet's, a New York publication, a
lengthy article on the Northern Pacific
route and the towns along the line. Ac
cording to his statements there never will
be a big city between St. Paul, and the
Puget Sound. Evidently the Bradstrcct
correspondent is a little cracked in the up
per story.—[Yellowstone Journal.
A couple of Bozeman deputy sheriffs be
gan firing at an escaped hors« thief before
calling on lniu to surrender. An old
hunter, with whom the thief was camping,
supposed the deputies were robbers aud
was about to return their fire when tho
thief called to the officers that he would
surrender and thereby saved their scalps.—
[New Northwest.
Walter Burke, superintendent of tho
Coulson & Martinsdalc stage line, arrived
in the city yesterday direct from Billings.
He informs us that bis line is doing all the
business it possibly can at present and that
increased service is badly needed. He
thinks that a daily line from Benton di
rectly through to Billings would pay from
the start and is confident it will be estab
lished before many months.—[River Press,
Alford Richards, a miner employed in
the Lcxiogton mine, Butte, was instantly
killed Monday morning, August 28, by a
portion of the hanging wall caving on him.
James Clark and J. A. Williams, who
were working with him, were both badly
injured, the former having his right leg
broken just above the ankle, and the latter
suffering a fracture of tbc right hip, and
receiving bad bruises about the left shoul
der, side and face.
According to the Inter-Monntaiq one of
a party of four tourists recently visiting
the Yellowstone Park, unfortunately was
percipitated into a geyser near Fire IIolo
river, white endeavoring to secure a pieco
of colored formation on the inside of the
crater. His three companions believing
him to Itave met his death from the fall,
returned to camp with sad hearts, but to
their joy and surprise their unlucky com
rad put in an appearance on the next day
about noon. He related a most thrilling
experience, stating that in his fall ho
struck water feet foremost and on rising to
the surface he clung to a rock, and soon
discovered that the water was rising, which
continued to rise until he was able to make
his escape.
The New Northwest says: The track of
the Utah & Normern will be laid to the
mouth qf Mttle Blackfoot this fall, but it is
Lt^onght the road will not be operated be
yond Deer Lodge until next spring. It is
said that the roadbed and the rails of the
extension are all suitable for a broad guage
road, and it is supposed by some that the
Northern Pacific, when it reaches Black
foot, will lay a third rail to Butte, and
both roads use the track in common.
Others think that the object of laying the
track to Blackfoot this year is to give tho
Northern Pacific an opportunity to ship
rails to its line and commence track laying
on the grading already completed. Time
alone wHl develop« the intention if thi
tn Mifufai immutt,

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