OCR Interpretation


The Billings herald. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1882-1885, September 28, 1882, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036001/1882-09-28/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE BILLINGS HERALD
VOL. I. NO. 18.
BILLINGS, MONTANA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1882.
PRICE TEN CENTS.
THE BIL LIXflS HER À T I).
BILLINGS, MONT ANA, SEPT. 28, 1882.
Entered at Bil ling» Poet Office as Second Class Matter
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY BY
BROMLEY & DEVINE.
SUBSCRIPTION.
Three Months.......................................
Six Month«.........................................
One Year..........................................
ADVERTISING RATES.
One Inch, Jl insertion................................
....J 1.00
" 3 month«...................................
» . 14.00
One year..................................................
Local notices set In Minion type, 15 cents a line
each insertion.
Special Rates given on long time and large
space advertisements.
E. N. HARWOOD,
Attorney - Law
Office «rith F. M. French,
Minnesota Ave., Billings.
A. E. HERTZELL,
ZÆ agrnolia
RESTAURANT.
Open Day end Night. Best Meal in To««n.
B. B. KELLEY, E D,
OFFICE:
West of Engineers' Headquarters.
BILLINGS SHOE STORE,
J. Losekamp êu Sons.
Superior hand-sewed Boots and Shoes. Ladies
and Childrens fine goods a specialty.
26 Street near Muud's Bank.
EDWARD FAWKES,
Deputy Clerk of District Court,
AND NOTARY PUBLIC.
Canyon and Billinge, Custer County.
JAB. R. UOSS. HENRY DiCKIE.
GOSS & DICKIE,
Lawyers,
Buy and Sell Beal Batate. Collections
will receive Prompt Attentention.
Office over Munds Bank, Billings
D. M. PARKER, M. 0.,
Physician and Surgeon,
OFFICE IN P. O. BUILDINC.
T. A. DAVIE, M. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
HIKSESOTA AVENUE OPPOSITE HEADQUARTERS.
Billinge, ... Montana.
H. H. Griswold, D. D. S.,
Dental Surgeon.
Montana Avenue,
BILLINGS, - MONTANA.
CLARK HOUSE
L. M. Harriman, Proprietor.
CehtraUy Located. Meal* at all hours. Good
Sleeping Accommodations.
No. 4, South 2Sth St. Billings, M. T.
WILL C. KINGSBURY,
——Dealers in —
Fruit, Confectionery,
CHOICE TQBAOeOES, Etc.
Montana Ave. opposite Bank Exchange.
—o—
Contracts for Masonary Undertaken. Flue Building
a Specialty.
Leave orders at Fruit Store.
BLUE GRASS
Livery, Feed i Sale
» STABLE.
_
In rear of n. Clark A Co.'s building and facing
the railri>ad reservation.
J. N. BELL, Proprietor.
Billings, - Montana.
Chas. Klambeck,
Mason § Builder,
Contracts taken V; build brick blocks, dwellings.
Chimneys, cisterns, etc.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
Orders or communications may be left at the
bank of Stcbblns, Post A Mund.
Wustum Carter & Field.
LUMBER
Dealers.
PLAIN AND DRESSED
LUMBER,
SHINGLES,
WINDOWS,
Doors i Mouldings.
J. D. BENTON,
Vice-Brest. 1st Nat. Bank,
Furgo, D. T.
E. P. WELLS,
1'rest. Red River Nat. Bank,
Jamestown, D. T.
J. A. BABCOCK,
Resident Partner.
Billings Beal Estate
-BOUGHT AND SOLD BY
BENTON, WELLS & CO.
Of the choicest business and
residence lots for Sale.
BENTON, WELLS CO.
Billings, - - - Montana.
BLUE FRONT
■fo:
GOOD GOODS
ADD
LOW PRICES.
Headlight Oil a Specialty.
Goods Delivered to Any Part
of the City Free.
Postoffice Building, Marks & Soule.
BABCOCK & MILES,
—DEALERS IN—
'
Shelf i Heavy Hardware
Large Stock of
Stoves
AND
Hardware
Just Received.
Cor. Montana Ave. and 27th St. BILLINGS, M. T.
\,\s & tho%>o
! \ DEALERS IN w j
DRY GOODS, GROCERIES,
Boots and Shoes,
Ready-made Clothing and Gents' Furnishing Goods
W CREAT VARIETY.
ISTWc have just received a full line in each department, and invite the public
to inspect our Stock.
PRICES REASONABLE.
Stores at East BiHings ami Park City,
MONTANA.
Graves & Barney,
-DEALERS IN
FURNITURE AND CROCKERY,
Glassware, Bar-goods, Lamps and
Chandeliers, Oil Cloths, Win
dow Shades, Wall-paper,
Mattresses, Etc.
All our good $ are well selected. Prices Reasonable.
First store West of Headquarters,
Cor. Montana Av. & 28 th St.,
Wlwre We will open up in Our Mew Store »beat the 28th hurt.
CHAS. W. THOMPSON.
CYRUS II. THOMPSON,
G
^.Thompson & g
fo.,
DEALERS IN
GENERAL MERCHANDISE.
Groceries, Clothing, Glassware,
Crockery, Boots and Shoes
and Notions.
Comer, Montana Avenue and 25th St. North,
B1X.X.IXTO-S, - - MDNTAITA.
Shaw & Duffield,
Contractors
AND
Builders.
Job Work Neatly Done.
*®*Boats Built on Short Notice.
BILLINGS, - MONTANA.
200
HENRY FRANK,
Merchant Tailor!
MEN'S, BOYS' AND YOUTHS' CUSTOM MADE CLOTHING.
Gents' Furnishing Gonds,
HATS ^L.±TJD OAFS.
Lowest Market Prices. Everything Reasonable.
THE BRICK BUILDING, MONTANA AVENUE.
Choice Business and
Residence Lots,
Xiocated. in all Farts of tlie City
Will be pleased to show lots and give any information, personally or by letter. Correspondence
Solicited.
OFEICE: Minnesota Avenue and 26th Street.
J. C.BOND,
BLACKSMITH
AND WAGON MAKER.
Horse shoeing, Wagon Repairing,
and all kinds of Blacksmithing
Promptly and Satisfactorily clone.
Large Building Beyond Olark House.
Silverberg & Peaslee,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL
WINES, LIQUORS
And Cigars.
1872 Haynor Whiskey, and the
Best brands of all other
kinds of Liquors.
Proprietors of the Only
Water Establishment
IZT MONTANA.
Wc manufacture Soda Water, Pop and Champagne Cider, and are prepared to
supply the Western trade with these articles, put up in Patent, Self
Locking Shipping Cases. These cases are far superior to
any previously introduced in the West, and
dealers will lind them both con
venient and labor-saving.
Schlitz's Export Beer !
By the Case, Bottle or GlasB.
Office and Wholesale House at I Factory And Sample Rooms at
SUUXLge, East JRVin-ng«
3&Æ3RS. 3Æ- T. Z2001TS7,
Millineryi Dress Making
Fancy Coods, Hair Goods, Etc.
All kinds of Hewing taken in and promptly at
tended to. I l»eg to return thanks to the ladies
of Billings for their patronage in the past, and
trust it wiil l»e continued.
Hear Clark's Building, Minnesota Avenue.
STEBBINS, POST & MUND,
BAN KERS,
A "
Billings, - Montana.
Do a General Banking
Business.
Collections promptly made and remitted for.
Exchange sold ou all parts of the United States
and Europe.
Interest Paid on Time Deposits.
FRANK'S
cosmopolitan,
Minnesota Avenue.
* 1' inent Stock of Goods in the City
and Best of Fancy Drinks
in the Territory.
Martine & McArthur, Proprietors.
County Convention.
The Republican County Con
vention Convened in
Miles City—Some of
the Nominations.
Special to the Billings Hf.ralt».
Miles City, September 27.
The Republican County Convention
that was called to meet at Miles City on
September 27th, 1882, for the purpose of
placing in nomination candidates for
the several county offices to be filled at
the November election, met as per
call, and after the usual preliminaries
the following named gentlemen were
placed in nomination:
For Sheriff,
P. BRADY.
For Treasurer,
C. B. CURRY.
For Clerk,
S. TAYLOR.
Nominations for the legislature and
the other offices to be filled were post
poned until this evening.
ATTEMPTED MURDER.
Henry M. Taylor, Deputy Sheriff of Custer
County, Shot Down in the Dis
charge of his Duty.
The Wound not Necessarily Dangerous.
About 9 o'clock Wednesday morning
it was rumored that Deputy Sheriff
Henry M. Taylor (generallj' known as
''Muggins") had been shot at Coulson,
by a man named Lumpp. A Herald
reporter was immediately dispatched to
the scene of the shooting and gleaned
the facts in the case.
Henry Lumpp, who runs a laundry
just east of the Scandinavian saloon,
was in the Headquarters saloon about
half-past eight o'clock, and was so quar
relsome that it became necessary to put
him out. Mr. N. P. Fabery forced him
to leave the premises, when he went
home and in a few minutes returned
with a rifle in his hands. Mr. Fabery,
who was standing in the door of the
Headquarters saloon, noticed Lumpp
had a gun, and started to re-enter the
saloon to arm himself when Lumpp
called to him that he was going to shoot
him, and at the same time firing, the
ball striking the ground about six feet
from where Fabery stood. Lumpp
then röturned to his house just as
Deputy Sheriff Taylor came up the
street.
taylor's statement.
Hearing someone call to him to hurry
as Lumpp was "killing his wife," he
crossed the street to Lumpp's house,
tried the door and found it fastened.
Forcing an entrance he found Lumpp
standing in the back room and his wife
in a corner. On seeing the sheriff
Lumpp cried "stand back you S—of a
B-" Taylor rushed up to him and
seized hold of the gun when Lumpp dis
charged it, the hall entering Taylor's
side. He staggered to the center of the
room and fell, when a little woman, who
Mr. Taylor thought was Lumpp's wife,
caught hold of Lumpp's back, when he
dropped the gun.
Ere this quite a crowd had gathered
and willing Lands gently picked up the
wounded man and bore him to a house
close bv. Physicians were summoned,
and in a few' minutes Dr. Ball was by
the side of Mr. Taylor. After removing
his clothing the wound was found to be
just above the thigh bone, the ball en
tering in the front left side and striking
the hip bone glanced upwards and came
out above the hip. After doing all that
could be done to relieve the wounded
man, Dr. Ball left the patient in charge
of Dr. Parker.
The physicians agree that the wound
is not necessarily a dangerous one, and
are confident of a speedy recovery.
Deputy Sheriff Taylor is a man fifty
two vears of age; he has been deputy
sheriff of this county about eight
months, and has invariably shown him
self a man of great courage, pluck and
skill, and no better man for the place
could be found in the county.
The would-be murderer is known as a
hard character, is abusive to his family,
and deserves the extreme penalty of
the law. He is now in the custody.
I
Run Over by an Engine.
About 7 o'clock last ovoning, Judge
Fox, of this place, was run over by an
engine, receiving a bad fracture an inch
and a half long on the right side of the
skull, portions of the brain oozing there
from. Doctors Bolles & Kelley dressed
his wounds, and report this morning
that although Judge is resting quietly,
yet his recovery will be almost a miracle.
PERSONAL.
Joseph Gordon, of Stillwater, was in
town tins week.
W. J. Dohency left for Grand Forks,
Dak., on Tuesday morning. Mr. Dohen
ey expects to he hack in a few months
to engage in business here.
Geo. B. Silverberg returned from the
upper valley by Monday evening's
stage. Mr. Silverberg looks and says he
feels refreshed after his few day's visit.
P. Brady was in town last week and
paid us a visit. Mr. Brady is one of the
candidates for sheriff, ana is in favor of
the division of the county, which will
doubtless bring him some support from
this section.
Col. Lounsbury, one of the well known
a >rietors of the Bismarck Tribune,
us a visit last week. Col. Louns
hury stated that he thought Billings
was a good town no matter what might
be said against it.
Paris Gibson, of Fort Benton, ono of
the largest sheep raisers in the terri
tory, luis been in town for several days.
Mr. Gibson was formerly proprietor of
the North Star woolen mills of Minne
apolis, and his knowledge of sheep and
wool is unsurpassed.
A. F. White and J. T. Anderson, of
Minneapolis, are in town this week.
They are looking over the Yellowstone
and Musselshell country with a view to
to investing in the cattle and sheep
business. It is their intention to locate
permanently in this vicinity.
The Hon. Wilber F. Sanders paid our
office a visit this week. He said that
his own business required so much at
tention that he was forced to decline
the Republican nomination as delegate.
Mr. Sanders expressed his amazement
at the rapid growth of the town within
the last sixty days.
James Davis, president of the Doily
Railway Journal, of Minneapolis, called
on us this morning. He expresses him
self greatly surprised at the rapid
growth of our town since his last visit
(about two months ago) and feels con
vinced that Billings is to be a place of
no mean proportions.
Rev. J. II. Tuttle, pastor of the
Church of the Redeemer, of Minneapo
lis, called on us Tuesday morning. lie
has been visiting the National Park, and
expressed himself greatly pleased with
the wonders of nature to be found there.
Mr. Tuttle leaves here for Fort Benton,
and from there he will return, to Minne
apolis.
MONTANA NEWS.
At Silver Star everybody ia reported to be
in good spirits over the expected rcsnmp
tion of operations in the Broadway mine.
A vein, of silver bearing quartz thirty
feet wide has been discovered near Gibbon
villc in Missoula, and many locations arc
being made.
The Helena fire department has made an
offer of $2,2ôO for the Butte fire engine; the
engine to be subject to the examination of
one of its officers.
The reward offered for the capture of
Frank Adams, who recently escaped from
the Deer Lodge penitentiary, has been
doubled. Two hundred dollars arc now
offered.
Bozeman is holding railway meetings
nightly, and $100,000 has so far been sub
scribed by her citizens, we suppose for the
purpose of inducing the N. P. to run to
their town. The Bozemanites are lncky if
they have not "peeped" too late.
A stock train wa3 ditched just cast of
Crystal Springs last Thursday, and two
cars went into the ditch. The frightened
cattle on recovering from tlieir astonish
ment, elevated their several tails and made
a wild break "cross lot" for their native
stamping ground in Montana. They be
long to Col. J. H. Platt, the great Montana
cattle king.—[Miles City Press.
A special to the Pioneer Press says: C.
C. Slaughter, one of the largest individual
stock owners and raisers in Texas, is en
route to Montana, for the purpose of select
ing and leasing or purchasing a range
somewhere near the line of the N. P. rail
road. The range is intended for the steers
he proposes to send to market, as lie is full
of confidence that the steers will be better
North than in the Texas climate. Each
year all the two year old steers of his
Southern ranch will be told off into a sep
parate herd, which will be driven to the
Northern range to be fattened up for the
market on the rich bunch grass which
abound in the West.
Lynched by Cowboys.
Advices have been received from Fort
Maginnis to the effect that J. J. Bowles, of
the Judith Basin, was hung by cowboys
within a few miles of that post last week.
It appears that Bowles had set the prairie
on fire (whether intentionally or not is not
stated) and that some cowboys who saw the
fire came up and commenced fighting it.
Bowles drove unconcernedly away, leaving
them to dispose of the fire as best they
could. After putting the fire out thejeow
boys followed Bowles, and catching np
witli him, proceeded to hang him without
further ado. Bowles, it is understood, was
one of the men who assisted in capturing
Pelkey, who murdered Charles Tacke, in
Prickly Pear valley in 1SS0. He is said to
have been a hard case on general principles
—[Helena Independent.
More About the Leasing; of the Park.
A Washington special of the 24tli fcays:
Secretary Teiler says he lias not leased
the Yellowstone Park, nor had he a
right to do so, What lie had done was to
grant permission to a company to build a
hotel in the Park and to occupy twenty
visitors. No monopoly or exclusive right
had been granted, and if persons wanted to
go there and build hotels they could get
permission on exactly the same terms
granted the above company. The secre
tary said so many tourists visited the Na
tional Park every year that the building of
hotels there would be of great benefit, and
therefore he had granted permission to a
company to occupy a limited number of
acres at a mere nominal rent. Congre::?
had set apart the Yellowstone Park as a
national park, and it would never consent
to lease it for speculative purposes.
acres of ground, with the provision that
the secretary of the interior should have !
the right to regulate the price charged to !
Suggestive Statistics.
Tlie sales of Northern Pacific lar.ds for
the month of July as compared with the
same month last year, show a most grati
fying increase, and argue the rapid devel
opment of the country adjacent to its land
as well as exhibiting the confidence cf land
buyers in Northwestern soil. These are
the figures: In July, 1882, f>3,180 ec-cs of
land worth $194,559, and $11,560 worth of
town lots were sold, making an aggregate
of 8206,119. In July, 1831, the company
disposed of 21,790 acres of land for $00,337,
and town lots to the amount of $7,155,
making a total of $73,542. The inr*ea.sc in
the number of acres transferred is 31,364,
while the excess of receipts from the same
source is $128,172. The increase of moncy
realizcd from the sale of town lots is $4,
405, while the total increase is the com
fortable sum of $132,579. It is interesting
to note that, although the land disposed of
in 1882 is much farthur west and not so
near the center of population as that sold
in 1881, yet there is a market increase in
the value per acre. "Westward the star of
empire takes its way."
A New Bonanza.
From Mr. A. M. Holter, who has jnst re
turned from Maiden, we learn that the Oro
Cache lead, owned by Messrs. Hauser and
Holter, is turning out splendidly, and
promises to prove the best gold lead in
Montana. The cÜscovery shaft ia down
fifty feet, and 300 tons of ore taken from
this shaft now lies on the dump. Eight
tons of this ore, assorted, assays $400 per
ton in gold. Bevcn tons goes $300 per ton,
and the remainder pays in the mill $106 per
ton. A tunnel one hundred and fifiy-five
feet in length has been run in upon the
lead, which at the end thereof taps the
lead eighty-five feet below the surface. It
is the design to push this tunnel a distance
of 420 feet to the discovery shaft, at which
point it will tap the lead to a depth of 168
feet. The npnc as developed by the tunnel
is much richer than above. At the end of
the tunnel ten and one-half feet of solid
ore has been developed without reaching
wall-rock, and this ore pays in the mill,
without assorting. $164 per ton. If the ore
continues unchanged until the tunnel
reaches the shaft, there will be millions in
sight, the amount of which can be approx
imated by easy calculation. Every indica
tion is favorable, and it is safe to predict
that the Oro Cache is the coming gold
bonanza mine of Montana. We congratu
late the fortunate owners upon the splendid
outlook,—Helena Independent.
OUR VALLEY.
Eev. J. H. Tuttle, ot Minneapolis, Express
hia Opinion of it in a Communi
cation to the Heroic,
Agricultural Resources—Extensiva Cattle
and Sheep Raking—'The Yel
lowstone River.
The National Park —Its Attractions—
Wonders of Nature— Beautiful
Beyond Description.
To the Editor of the Billings Herald.
Billings, M. T., Sept. 26, 1882.
Dear Sib —You ask for my impressions
of Montana and especially of the Yellow
stone valley and National Park which I
have just visited. The opinions of a "Pil
grim," as you call a foreigner, on this
country, can have but little value, and it is
for that reason perhaps, that I am more
writing to give them. I have seen only the
surface of things along the way, and it
would be a piece of unpardonable presum p
tion to suppose that my judgment of the
Yellowstone valley, of its agricultural re
sources, of its future possibilities, of its
most eligible sites for towns, of its most
favorable points for permanent residences
and for profitable investments, is beyond
modification. Even the shrewdest, wisest
observer is liable to serious mistakes in
these matters.
This I will say: I came to the Yellow
stone valley with great expectations as to
its fertility and its beauty and these have
been fully realized. Perhaps I was not
prepared for seeing the earth so parched,
so devoid of green, so generally in need of
irrigation, but the cured grasses seem abun
dant and capable of supplying indefinatc
numbers of cattle, sheep and horses with
both summer and winter food. If the
flocks and herds can find food for themselves
in this valley and on the adjoining hills,
this is an incalculable advantage over
eastern States. It scents almost certain to
me that Montana is to be unexcelled in
stock-raising facilities. It is likely to sup
ply a large part of the world with beef and
mutton. And no better vegetables are
grown anywhere than here.
My friend, Mr. Paris Gibson, a genuine
son of New England, with plenty of love
still left in his heart for his native State,
Maine, now a resident of Fort Benton,
drove his own team from here to the Park,
and I heard him inquire at every place for
Montana, Gallatin valley, oats, and seemed
sadly disappointed, and not a little indig
nant, when put off with the light, gaunt
oats imported from the states. It surprised
me to be told that more wheat, and equally
good, can be raised to the acre, in many
parts of this territory, than in the Red
River valley. Well, if all these signs are
not delusive, if what one now sees with his
own eyes, and what one hears from per
fectly trustworthy sources are taken as a
basis of estimate, Montana will at least
hold rank with any portion of our great
country.
Mr. Gibson, whose opinion is authority
on this subject, (as he has been four years
in the territory, and has great opportunities
lor observation) says that no other country
is so favorable as this for poor men, men o f
small means. Young men with only their
hands and brains to start with, if they are
temperate, honest, industrious, brave, ener
getic, persevering, can be sure in a few
years of a competancc if not of wealth.
Why not? Land is unlimited and the
means for possessing it, temporarily at
least, unti 1 one is ablc'to buy it are as easy as
the most impecunious could wish. With a
riicep, or cattle, or horses to begin
v '^ lc can roundup his thousands in a
lew years. Of course it all involves hard
ships, rough living, frugal fare, but life is a
battle everywhere; the chances of winning,
however, seem to me more certain here, out
on the ranches, than in the cities. Afte
all is the suffering greater, on the whole, ir.
anew country like this, than in the large,
eastern cities ? Wc pity the pioneer. Ar
not many who remain behind, tied to small
clerkships, living in Me surderc cellars and
rickety garrets of New York, quite as plia
ble? One has plenty of room and good
air out here at anyrafe. The raying hs
been somewhat jocu1ariy*u~ed of late, but
the great Horace Greely coined a wire ad
vice when he said "Go West, young man "
These words have not lost their appropri
ateness yet.—But I did not intend to preach
I have followed, going and returning, the
banks cf the Yellowstone, mi or seve
hundred miles, more or les3, and am quit";
in love with the river. It is a noble stream.
What river on this continent has lovlier
hanks, windings and rapids? Its grand
Falls, which form one of the numerous stirs '■
tions of the Pork, ought not disappoint one
who has cone across the ocean to sec them.
They are not to bn compared with Niagars.
of course, nor with F.ny other falls per
haps; they have a character of their owr.
Switzerland has nothing like them. The.
Yosemite is very different. Ti c Yellow
stone falls and canon combined present a
variety of attractions which arc difficult t
describe; indeed they transcend the powc
of human language. One finds here e.
unique combination of grandeur and beauty
The indiscribable coloring of rocks, and
banks, and crags, and slide-;, amazed us a
much as their height and depth and form.
I will say nothing of the Geysers except
that they did not disappoint us. The
National Park has not yet received the at
tention it deserves. The railroad will soon
introduce it to the world. Thousands upon
thousands will rush there to admire and
wonder. "Wonderland" is no misnomer.
There are some things in the manage
ment of the Park to find fault with; it does
not seem to be managed at all, rather. It
is left too much to the mercy of unthought
ful, or ignorant, or wicked visitors. The
springs and geysers are marred by an ap
parently unchecked vandalism. The wan
dering campers build fires which they do
not extinguish, which spread and do im
mense damage. Thousands of acres of
meadow and forest have been thus careless
ly or wantonly burned over this season.
This is an unspeakable shame. We heard
of placards warning visitors against leaving
fires unextinguished, but saw none; certain
ly they are of no avail. The superinten
dent lacks the power to act in this matter,
or he is aslsecp. The Park should have an
active police force. If things go on in this
way a few years longer, the Park will bo
half ruined
Another thing on this trip made us
ashamed— ashamed of opr count
this was the
government h
No wonder they
time, and tele
possible. Tb"
leaning and
telegraph po
no better onesl
large, strong
Union are now i
raiirosd track.
(poor I
I for
'afford
__contrast to the
'poles the Western

xml | txt