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The Billings gazette. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1896-1919, March 24, 1899, Semi-weekly, Image 1

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The Billings Gazette.
SE'I I=VWEEKLY. ;__
VOL. XIV. BILLINGS, YELLOWSTONE COUNTY, MONTANA, FRIDAY, MARCH 24. 1899 NO. 96
Watch for Our Spring .Shoes
See Our "Little Giant" Line of
Children's and Boys' Shoes
Misses' and Children's Rubber Boots
ALL SIZES
John D. sekamp
f'"Famous OutfitteP."
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
1 AS. A. GO88,
LAWYER.
Offioe First National Bank Building.
H. . ARMSTRONG,. H.,
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
Belknap Block, - Billings, Montana
DR J. H. RINEHART.
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
Offce in First National Bank building, Billings
Monte
ANDREW CLARK, M. D.
HARRIET FOXTON4CLARK. M. D., C. M
PHYSICIANS aad .SURGEONS.
Rooms 6 and 7. First National Bank Building
Night calls answered at feice.
O. F. GODDARD.
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Office over First National Bank.
FRED H. HATHHORN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Office--Room 4. First National Bank Building
Billings, Montana.
JOHNSTON & JOHNSTON.
LAWYERS.
Room 18. Belknap Block.
CHAARLES L. HARRIS.
LAWYER.
Room 12, Belknap Block. - Billings, Montanaa
A. FRASER,
Notary Public,
Justice of the Peace, U. S. Commissioner,
General Commission Merchant.
Boom 8, First National Bank Building. Billings.
FIRST NATIOPAh
BANK
-) OF (
BIItiI$GS, MONTANII
Paid Up Capital, - $150,000
Surplus and Profits, - 10,000
p. B. Moss, President.
H. W. ROWLEY, Vice-Pres.
S. F. MORSE, Cashier.
S. G. REYNOLDS, Asst. Cash.
DIRECTORS: ,
Chas. T. Babcock,
Jos. Zimmerman,
H. W. Rowley,
G. W. Woodson,
P. B Moss.
Transact a general banking busi
ness. Collections promptly
made and remitted for.
S1'53
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL
...BANK...
OF BILLINGS
CAPITAL, "- 85o0,000
SURPLUS, - - $20,000
-o
A. L. BABOOC~, Preeident.
iDA.ID FRATIT, Vice-Pres.
G. A. GRIGGB, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
A. L. BAlBOOcI, LDAVID FRATT,
G. A. ,IGtGG4, ED. CARDWELL,
PM.EmR :ARSON.
-0-
Regular Bact'I in all its Branches.
Safe Dqpes.t Boxes Rented.
Special Attention ('iven to Collections.
--,-
Dealers in Foreign and -Domestic Exchange
The $ew Store
4 OF THE
D1illings Frnita ;C
East of Helena.
Furniture,
Carpets and
House Furnishings i
of all kinds are our specialties,
but we carry practically
everything to
Beautify the lome
Our store is 5oxIoo feet and
our stock fills it up, so you
have a great assort
ment to select
from.
COME AND SEE US.
Twenty-Eighth Street, rear
of Wardwell Block.
BILLINGS
Fwrniture & Carpet
_COMPZHNY
THoS. CnAPPLR. CNAs. J. CNHALE.
WWI ..rt...
iLLUOSTRATED HISTORICAL EDITION
About July 15, The Gazette Will Issue the Finest
One Ever Published in
Montana.
BILLINGS AND ITS RESOURCES
To Be Thoroughly Presented-Not a Boom EditIon,
but a Presentation of the
City's Growth.
The Midsummer Number of The Gazette, issued in 1894, probably did as
much to advertise Billing as has ever been accomplished. Ten thousand copies
of the edition were published, which were circulated from Maine to California
and from Montana to the Gulf of Mexico, and there are still frequent demands
for the publication supplied by this office.
Since 1894, however, Billings has doubled in population; it is a conceded fact
that it is now the best city in Montana outside of Butte. It is time, therefore,
that this material growth and prosperity should again be presented to the world
and The Gasette, which has always endeavored to keep pace with the advance
ment of the Magic 'Oitty, is equal to the occasion.
This newspaper has decided to issue, about the first or second week in July, a
mammoth lleastsated Historical Edition. It will be twice as large as the Mid
summer Namnber., nmuch more exhaustive in every detail and the finest publica
tion of the kind ever dssued in the state. The best is none too good for Billings,
and when eao daizens .are shown a sample of what the publication is to be we
are sure they will loyally support it, as tleV hIave always supported every enter
prise catlcated o. advance the interests of this ,cait, county and eastern Mon
tana.
It will take tally eour months' time to complete the publication, which will
contain a complete history of the city, county and contiguous towns, with the
handsomest illustrations that can be made of public buildings, street scenes,
business blocks, private residences, farm :scenes and portraits of our prominent
people. Special writers 'will be employed to present to the world the progress
that this city and coeunty have made in fire years, the advantages they offer to
those seeking homes ,and the actual conditions as the really exist today.
But the edition, we desire it to be distinctly understood, is in no sense to be a
boom editoen. Billings does not need a boom, but the steady progress the city
has made and is still :making fully justify the issuance ,of an Illustrated Histori
cal Edition.
Mr. F. L. Calder, an experienced newspaper man of San Francisco, has been
engaged by The Gazette to -do the soliciting for this special edition and will have
full charge of that branch ,of the enterprise. He is an expert in enterprises of
this character and will fulnly explain every detail to eur people. The edition,
'however, is to be issued by and under the full authority of The Gazette, which
will be responsible for every statement it contains. This should be a guarantee
that it will in every sense be representative of this city and county and that no
expense will be spared to present the magnificent advantages they offer to capital
ists and homeseekers.
Mr. Carder is now callhng upon our citizens and presenting to them the plans'
for the enterprise. He will be constantly engaged on this work for the 'next
three or four months, further details of which will be given in The Gazette from
time to time. Give him a cordial welcome and respectful hearing and this
newspaper insures to the people of Billings and Yellowstone county a publica
tion of which every one of them will be proud.
4OLUMBUS SANDSTONE
Will Probably Be Decided Upon by the
Capitol Commission.
The state capitol commission visited
Columbus, in this county, yesterday,
for the purpose of making a more com
plete investigation of the sandstone at
that place with a view to using the
same in the new state capitol building.
There remains no doubt but what Bill
ings is out of the race. The Columbus
sandstone has proven of better quality
than that of Billings, after samples
from the two quarries had been ex
amined by experts. The Billings stone
has about 90 per cent silesia and con
tains a soily substance, while that of
Columbus has 94 per-cent silesia and
stood a better test.
The commission has not let the con
tract for the stone, but it seems to be
the opinion of those interested in the
matter that the Columbus quarry will
get it. Mr. Hager, one of the owners
of the quarry, has been at work for a
month past with a force of men opening
the quarry up.
COMMITTED SUICIDE.
Charley Seaman, Formerly of This County,
Klleld by His Own Hand.
Word was received here yesterday to
the effect that Charles J. Seaman,
formerly of this county, committed
suicide in Oollins, this state, Tuesday,
by shooting himself with a pistol whose
muzzle he had placed in his mouth.
Seaman is well known here, having
worked for David Pratt until a year
ago, when he went into Teton couant,
where he bought a ranch and about
8,000 head of sheep. He was a man
of about 40 years of age.
No adequate cause for the suicide is
given, although it is said that he had
been worrying a. great deal of late
about a survey for a county road whichl
would divide his ranohl badly; also
abuts the less of some sheep and the
ooIfRilPed cold weather.
WHEN TO REGISTER.
Now Is the Time and You Should Not
Neglect It.
For the information of those una
ware of the fact, it is stated that regis
tration is imperative if it is desired to
vote at the coming municipal election.
The same laws that apply to county
elections are likewise applicable to a
municipal election and you must regis
ter if you wish to vote. Present regis
tration, however, is good for eight years
and one need not register again within
that tinge if a continuous resident of
the city.
Registration began last Tuesday in
Room 4 of the Belknap block and will
continue until Thursday of next week.
W. H. Pethybridge is the gentlemanly
registration agent and be you republi
can, democrat, populist, prohibitionist,
mugwump or anything else, he will at
tend to your wants and ask no ques
tions beyond those appertaining to your
qualifications as an elector.
The total registration to the time of
going to press is 198, against a total
registration last April of 210. There
are five days left and the number will
be greatly increased.
THE GEBO C(AL MLNE.
The New Electric Maehinery Set in Mo
tion Last Tuesday.
The electrio mining machinery in the
seal mine at Gebo was started Tuesday.
Mrs. S. W. Gebo, wife of the original
developer of the mine, turned on the
sleotrio current, and Mrs. Jas. A. John
son, wife of the president of the Clark's
Pork Coal & Mining company, started
the first mining machinery, cutting in
onder the coal five feet by three'feet in
three and one-half minutes, and backing
mt the machine in half a minute.
Everything moved sati.actorily, and
within three weeks the'mines and ma
sainery will be in condition to meet
ay_ demand. .
ATTEMPTED SUICIDE.
.rrs. Geo. Treischman Cuts Her Throat
with a Butcher-Knife.
Tuesday evening at about 6 o'clock,
Mrs. Geo. Triesohman, living on North
Twenty-sixth street, north of the Bur
lington tracks, was found lying in her
barn with a horrible knife wound in
her throat. She was discovered by her
son: a boy about 11 years of age, who
had gone to the barn to take the milk
bucket to his mother. The little fel
low at once ran to H. S. Hammond's
and told the gentleman that his mam
ma had been hurt. A few minutes
later W. E. Hassler, who is 'also a
neighbor, was at the scene and assisted
Mr. Hammond in carrying Mrs.
Treisehman into the house, placing her
on the bed. Dr. Rinehart arrived al
most simultaneously, having been sum
moned meanwhile. He at once pro
ceeded to examine the wound, finding
that although the jugular vein had not
been severed, two small arteries had.
These were tied up and the wound,
about five inches in length, was then
sewed.
While doing the surgical work, Dr.
ainehart, who was of the opinion that
the woman was in a precarious condi
tion, talked to her,asking if she had at
tempted her life or if some other person
had done so. Although in a semi-un
conscious state from the loss of much
blood, Mrs. Trieschman said that she
had been dragged into the barn by a
man and her throat cut. An examina
tion of the barn showed no evidence of
there having been a struggle of any
kind and the fact that the young son
had found the bloody butcher knife on
the floor near where his mother had
laid, was enough to convince one that
Mrs. Trieschman, while mentally un
balanced, had attempted to end her
life. This developed later, for
Wednesday forenoon, when Dr. Rine
hart called to dress the round, Mrs.
Treischman acknowledged having com
mitted the deed, saying that she was
angry with herself. She has success
fully passed the crisis and is now on
the road to recovery.
Mr. Treischman, who is master
mechanic at Fort Yellowstone, in the
Yellowstone National park, was
notified and arrived here today.
HURST FOUND GUILTY.
Judge Loud Sentenced Him to 13e
Hanged May 19.
After considering the case twenty
four hours the jury in the case of the
state vs. Joseph C. Hurst, charged with
the murder of Dominick Cavanaugh,
sheriff of Dawson county, December 28
last, agreed upon a verdict of murder
in the first degree. The jury reported
to the court at Glendive at 4 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon that it had agreed
upon a verdict. Unless a new trial
can be secured Hurst will have to pay
the extreme penalty upon the gallows.
His attorneys are very certain that they
will obtain another trial for him, and
have made the usual motion to that
affect. This has been one of the most
bitterly contested murder trials in the
-atern part of the state since the fa
mous Geddes trial.
It is said that very few persons ex
pected a verdict of this kind, as the
pinion was held that no person could
be convicted of murder in the first de
;ree in Dawson county. The Verdict
:as, therefore, a surprise, but from the
tvidence produced the jury could not do
therwise.
The case was closely followed by
.rowded court rooms every session and
he attorneys for the defense, Messrs.
R. H. Middleton, H. J. Haskell and
seorge pMyers, left no stone unturned
o clear Hurst, while the state's attor
teys, Thomas C. Holmes and Strevell
& Porter, did their utmosst for convic
tion. Two days were consumed by the,`;.;
attorneys in addressing the jury.
Wednesday Judge C. H. Loud sent
enced Hurst to be hanged on the -gal
lows May 19.
Conductor Anderson of the Northern
Pacific, who was in Billings yesterday,
says that 90 per cent of the people in'
Olendive believe Hurst guilty of the
crime.
ROUNDING UP THE VAGRANTS.,
Pollce After Them Rough Shod-Womeb
Frightened by a Man.
ng the past few days the police
have been rounding up the vagrants
and bums with a view to clearing the.,.:
city of such pests. Yesterday. twenty
men, of all ages, color and nationality";;
imaginable, were caught in two haulb i
and lined up before Police Judge Mann.
Some gave a good account of them
selves, while the others acknowledged
they were "strictly on de bum.'" All
were turned loose on the promise of
either getting work or making the "hot
foot" out of town.
During the past few nights a iuqJber
of prominent ladies hav be i. ght
ened while passing alopi. "e mainl
streets, by being accosted either ai
.fiend in the form of a ma..' br a craszy
person, who will receive harsh treat
ment if he should be captured. The
police are vigilant and feel certain that
they will soon run the man to "coveo
and then discover what he is. Monday
Policeman Sawyer arrested a sheep,-.
herder who has been employed by John.
Stanley, as the man was acting strang-.
ely and had all the appearance of one,
demented. It.is thought he may be the,
man who has been frightening the
ladies.
814TER WRITES FROM TEXAS.
"Private Albert S. Hicks Has Five 9",Ja
in That State.
Albert S. Hicks, of Company C.
First Montana infantry, who was~
wounded in one of the recent engage
ments before Manila, is a brother to J3
D. Hicks of Billings; the well 'kamwn,
stock inspector and detective., F s e o
F. Ellis of Helena, who secredi
ination from the department throug
Senator Carter, that Hicks was impro
ing and that he was receiving the beStw
of attention, has received 'a letter fromn
the soldier's sister, Miss Addie Hicks of
Yoaknum, Tex., to whom he wrote g.
soon as he received notice of her b h
er's condition. At that time Mr'.lI
did not know that Hicks hac a)re tiete;
in this state. Miss Hicks wrote in spar.
"We had a message from ocqr: bothei,
J. D. Hicks of Billings that Alber
was receiving the best of attention. -'
certainly appreciate your kindness.
being so thoughtful as to let me ki...li
You have the gratefu; thanks of hitsElvei
loving sisters, who, of course,, ha.. ;
been very .ineasy about him.. I
brother a t, H lipgs went over to Helen.s
to see it ient off. Albert enlisted
frOm lft.;on, where he has lived
fr: years, as hbead dry goods clerk for
L. Eisenberg & Co."
TO CHANGE RANGE.
Cruse Cattle Golng from Gallatln Valley
to the Musselshell. .
Winm. Cruse of Helen interested iplp,
the Cruse Cattle compa , was in Bl.l..
ings the flst of the w making pre f'
aration for the' recepti and handlfiag
i 9,000 he of cattl which 'are td a-y(
rive here in fS days. The cattle,'
have been win . ring in the Gal stii
valley, but will be taken to the Muo -
shell country and run on the N
range, which is a part of the Thie'
Cruse outfit. The N-Bar outfit of
boys are expected here today to beoi# :
readiness to take charge of the cattle. ;
Linton Clothing Co.
~..OTHING AND
FtiRNISHINGS '
Everything of the Latest and Nobbiest for
Men's Wear.
HATS AND CAPS
BOOTS MND SH.Es
The Best Selected Stock in all Eastern
Montana.
The Linton ClothI.

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