OCR Interpretation


The Billings gazette. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1896-1919, April 11, 1899, Semi-weekly, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036008/1899-04-11/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

nhe Billings Gazette.
SEMN'I=\WVEEKLY.
VOL. XIV. BILLINGS, YELLOWSTONE COUNTY, MONTANA, TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 1899 NO. 10)
Watch for Our Spring Shoes
See Our "Little Giant" Line of
Children's and Boys' Shoes
Misses' and .Children's Rubber Boots
ALL SIZES
* John D. [ jamp
"Famous Oatfitter."
PROFESSIONAL CARDS.
J AS. R. LGO88,
LAW YER.
Office First National Bank Building.
H. E. ARMSTRONG, M. II.,
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
Belknan Block, - Billings, Montana
DR. J. H. RINEHART.
PHYSICIAN and SURGEON.
Office in First National Bank building, Billings
Monte
ANDREW CLARK, M. D.
HARRIET FOXTON-CLARK, M. D., C. M
PHYSICIANS and SURGEONS.
Rooms 6 and 7. First National Bank Building
Night calls answered at office.
O. F. GODDARD.
A TTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Offioe over First National Bank.
B. HERFORD,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Room 9, Belknap Block, - Billings, Montana
F RED H. HATHHORN,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW.
Office-Room 4, First National Bank Building
Billings, Montana.
,JOHNSTON & JOHNSTON.
LAWYERS.
Roonj 18. Belknap Block.
CHARLES L. HARRIS,
LAWYER.
Room 12, Belknap Block, - Billings, Montana
A. FRASER
Notary Public,
Justice of the Peace, U. S. Commissioner,
General Commission Merchant.
Room 8, First National Bank Building, Billings.
FIRST NATIOPAL
BANK
-) OF -
BIhIll$S, MIONTRAIA
Paid Up Capital, - $150,000
Surplus and Profits, - 10,000
P. B. Moss, President.
H. W. ROWLEY, Vice-Pres.
S. F. MORSE, Cashier.
S. G. REYNOLDS, Asst. Cash.
DIRECTORS:
Chas. T. Babcock,
Jos. Zizbmerman,
H. W. Rowley,
G. W. Woodson,
, P. B Moss.
Transact a general banking busi
ness. Collections promptly
made and remitted for.
4593
YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL
...BANK...
OF BILLINGS
-0
CAPITAL, - $50,400
SURPLUS,- - $20,000
-0
A. L. BABCOCK, President.
DAVID FRATT, Vice-Pres.
G. A. GRIGGS, Cashier.
E. H. HOLLIhTER. Ass't ('ash.
DIRECTORS.
A. L. BABICOCK, DAVID FRATT,
G. A. GRIGGS, ED. CARDWEL.L,
PETER LARSON.
-o
Regular Banking in all its Branches.
Safe Deposit Boxes Rented.
Special Attention Given to Collections.
-o
Dealers in Foreign and Domestic Exchange
The New Store
OF THE
Sllin s fur niture
Is the Most Complete
East of Helena.
Furniture, I
Carpets and
fouse Furnishings i
4 of all kinds are our specialties, j
but we carry practically
everything to
Beautify the Home
Our store is 5oxIoo feet and
our stock fills it up, so you "
have a great assort- I'
ment to select
from.
C COME AND SEE US.
4 Twenty-Eighth Street, rear
of Wardwell Block.
BILLINGS
Furniture & carpet
COI7PNY
THOS. CMAPPL. CHAS. J. CHAPPLE.
L OC. oETLR.
IIAVERICKS' BANQUET
The Firemen Pleasantly Entertain
Their Friends and Have
a Good Time.
THEIR NINTH ANNUAL
A Feast of Reason and a Flow of
Soul--Wit. Humor. Pathos
and Eloquence.
'ke uinth annual banquet of May
rck Hose company No. 1 was held on
Saturday evening at the fire hall. The
hall was appropriately decorated for the
occasion with the stars and stripes and
presented a very brilliant appearance.
The tables occupied three sides of the
room and were laden with the bounti
ful fare which it is the delight of the
Mavericks to serve to their guests.
The menu consisted of Blue Point
oysters, turkey with cranberry sauce,
chicken, baked beans. sglads, olives,
pickles, pies, cakes, etc. "
.The hospitality of the firemen is only
limited by the capacity of their hall,
and the only invited guests outside of
the active and honorary memnership
were the city officials and representat
ives of the press. The following is a
list of those participating in the ban
quet:
G. M. Hays. H. Chapple, F. B. Con
nelly, J. D. Matheson, M. C. Morris,
F. H. Foster, F. F. Damsel, H. M.
Allen, P. H. Smith, Chas. Spear, Lee
Eisenberg, G. W. Robbins, Lee Mains,
O. W. Nickey, John Powers.. Robert
Leavens, W. E. Henry, C. F. Barton.
W. M. Johnston, T. B. Hill, W. J.
Youmans, W. Jeffrey, O. Whitney, W.
B. Calhoun, Gust. Eastman, W. Hamp
ton, Fred Tews. W. H. Schreiber, H.
S. Evans, J. C. Bond, W. E. Baker, O.
L. Sawyer, Frank Golish, N. G. Car
wile, F. L. Mann, A. B. Newman,
John Staffek. Frank Purcell, W. H.
Pethybridge, J. B. Herford, Geo. Soule,
C. R. Stoll, Frank Beeman, Will
Schneider, F. H. Hathhorn, U. E.
Frizelle, Chas. Retallick F. X. N.
Rademaker, H. F. McFarlin, J. E.
Hughes, M. B. Rademaker, W. B.
George, A. Airth, F. L. Mann.
After all had partaken of the feast,
George M. Hays, deputy state treas
urer, who had come especially from
Helena to take his old position of toast
master, in a few appropriate remarks,
called on County Attorney Johnston to
make the address of welcome. It may
be remarked in passing that Mr. Hays
has filled this position at every banquet
given by the Mavericks, and his
geniality and ready flow of wit emi
nently qualify him to make such an oc
casion pass off with a vim.
Mr. Johnston's speech was a remark
ably felicitous one and for a man
whose occupation is to hold up the
darker side of affairs in his talks to
juries in the prosecution of criminals,
the brilliant and sparkling humorism
he indulged in were the more highly
appreciated. He referred to the patri
otic fervor with which the Mavericks
responded a year ago to the president's
call for men to defend the honor of the
flag. He asserted that no organization
in the United States had given so large
a percentage of its membership to the
service of its country as the Maverick
Hose company, certainly no better ma
terial was sent from any community.
He wound up with an allusion to the
fact that the boys had gone forth brave
ly with the expectation of fighting the
Spaniards, but never anticipated "go
ing up against" the commissariat de
partment, and sprung the following re
vised edition of "The Battle of Blen
heim:''
"Tell my brothers and companions,
When they meet and crowd around
To hear my mournful story
In that pleasant vineyard ground,
That we chewed the tough steak bravely,
And when the meal was o'er,
Full many a corpse lay ghastly
Upon the mess tent floor.
And 'mid the dead and dying
Were some with brcken teeth;
The death rattle in their throats,
The marks of Alger's beef."
At this stage of the proceedings the
presentation of an appropriate emblem
was made to Sergeant Calheun of the
Red Cross corps, for his distinguished
services at Chickamauga, which "Little
Willie" acknowledged gracefully.
Letters were read from Judge Mil
burn of Miles City and M. G. Mains of
Spokane. Wash., regretting their ina
bility to accept their invitations.
The toasts mentioned below were
then honored and responded to by the
gentlemen mentioned. The responses
were witty and excited much merri
ment. As there were frequent allusions
to matters which concern only the
members of the companiy or of Troop M
of the Rough Hiders, whioh would not
be intelligible to the most of the read
ers of this paper, they are not repro
duced here. The following is a list of
the toasts:
"Our City Fathers," responded to b3
Alderman Spear.
"My'Pull in the Fourth," responded
to by that Warwick in politics, W.
Braxton George.
"The Moral and Sanitary Conditior
j of the Maverick Hose company," T. B.
Hill.
"The City of Billings," Mayo,
Smith.
"The Press," J. D. Matheson foi
The Gazette and M. C. Morris for the
Times.
"The Fire Department,' Capt. J. C.
Bond.
"Departed and Absent Members,'
most eloquently responded to by Hon.
Fred H. Foster.
"Thirty Days of Grace," responded
to by H. F. McFarlin, who has recentl3
joined the ranks of the Benedicts, in F
neat speech.
"The Maverick Calf." by W. E.
Henry, the latest acquisition of the
company. It is understood that Mr.
Henry's speech will be issued it
pamphlet form.
"Branding Mavericks,'" responded t(
by Sergeant Hughes.
"The Bar," illustrated by Counselloi
Hathhorn.
"The Prodigal's Return, and How
They Killed the Fatted Calf." Thih
was an allusion to the calf that war
presented o the Mavericks of Troop M
before they went to Chickamauga, witl
the promise that it was to be fattenei
at Parque's ranch and barbecued or
their return for the benefit of the sur
vivors. The calf was so mortified b3
the "beef scandal" that it overate itsell
and expired. Joe Parque neglected t(
have it embalmed and the barbecus
failed to materialize.
Mr. Herford made a reply whicl
fairly bubbled over with good things.
and wound up with the following
"pome," which he creoited to the
Kansas Eagle:
"Not a toast was drunk, not a tablh
spread,
When that calf from this world ¢wa
hurried ;
Not a trooper upon his carcass has fed,
And we don't even know where he's
buried.
We are told, and their wprk seems
'dog-gon' coarse,
'Twas too much alfalfa that 'keeleld
him ;
But more likely it seems that some
'hog' on a horse
To Parque's pasture went and 'veeled
him;
Or drove him off in the dead of night,
While Troop M in the south was so.
journing,
And wondering if it would get to fight
Aught but flies before returning.
Many and strong were the swears we
said,
And even the chaplain said 'damn,'
When told that the fatted calf was dead,
And we'd have to eat barbecued ham.
For even although of alfalfa he died,
For our banquet that would not have
harmed him;
'Twas easy to save him for us if they'd
tried
To have done some 'Swift' work,
and embalmed him."
Dt. Chapple, who was making his
first public appearance after nearly a
year's illness, was the recipient of
many compliments, and was prevailed
upon to make a few remarks, which he
did in his old-time genial manner.
This ended the regular programme,
when, after a short recess, Judge
Mann took comrimand of the "upper
deck," and a sociable, free end easy
time was had. Songs were sung by G.
M. Hays, H. M. Allen, C. F. Burton,
W. H. Pethybridge, W. L. Mains, W.
B. Calhoun, Adam Airth, F. F. Dam
sell and G. W. Robbins. Wm. Schneider
also favored the company with a trom
bone solo.
After each song the judge called on
some member for a "talk," and mirth
was unrestrained.
The occasion was a great success, as
were all its pardecessors. and those who
attended thoroughly enjoyed it.
A SERIOUS STABBING AFFRAY.
Two Cowboys at the Tlos. Cruse Ranch
Have a Quarrel.
Clarence Settles came in from the
Cruse ranch early Tuesday for a physi
cian and the sheriff to attend to the
principals in a serious stabbing affray
which occurred near the Cruse ranch
about midnight the previous day, says
the Fergus County Argus. It appears
that two men named Wilson and Rodg
ers had Monday evening filled up on
fighting whisky and on their way to
the ranch had quarreled over some trifle
as a result of which Wilson was very
severely and possibly fatally cut by
Rodgers. A pooket 'knife was the
weapon used and Wilson was cut about
the stomach and lungs, given a three
inch cut in the neck near the juggler
vein and also about the head and
shoulders; the coat worn by Wilson
'showed seventeen holes. When Mr.
Settles left for the surgeon and officer
the injured man was spitting blood and
in a vey precarious condition. Rodg
ers expressed great reget for the affair
and was unable to explail the cause.
Dr. Lindsey and Sheriff Shaw respond
,d and ate expected back today, when
the full patticulars said resualts will be
known.
DRIWNEU LIKE RKAT
High Water Causes Death and
Destruction Near the City
of Glendive.
TWELVE LIVES LOST
Ice Gorge in River Causes Overflow
Hiailroad Tracks and Bridges
1Washed Out.
u ice gorge forming in the Yellow
stone river near Glendive caused una
usual high water in that vicinity and
death and destructio.n to life and prop
erty. The river gorged Friday night
as the ice in the river began to move.
When the gorge broke the rushing iof
carried away a span of the large wagon
bridge across the river at Glendive.
The bridge is wrecked except for the
draw, which is said to be intact. Dur
ing the rush of the high water twelve
persons are known to have lost theim
lives and subsequent investigation may
increase the list. It is the worst horror
that ever orcurred in Dawson county.
The persons who lost their lives sc
far as known were Mrs. R. W. Snyder,
her brother, Eugene F. O'Connor; he,
niece, Miss Nellie Reagan, and a vis
itor. Miss Rose Wybrecht, who lost
their lives trying to reach the Northerr
Pacific railway track, a block fron
their ranch, half a mile above Glen
dive, during the overflow of water anm
ice. A fifth member of the party,
Joseph Meyers, was rescued from
tree Saturday morning at .5 o'clock by
several daring men, who risked their
own lives to save him. The party of five
left the ranch to reach the track, but
before they covered half the distance
the water was waist deep and they
were assisted to a tree by Meyers get.
ting up first and O'Connor assisting
from below. O'Connor was the first to be
washed from the tree, Mrs. Snyder thl
second and Miss Wybrecht third. A
huge piece of ice struck the tree and
broke it in two, carrying off Miss
Reagan.
The entire family of James Sullivan,
consisting of himself, wifa and six
children, were also lost. Sheriff Aiken
and a companion crossed the Yellow
stone river Sunday morning to ascertain
if there were any more victims. They
found the residence of Sullivan, located
about 200 feet from the Yellowstone
river, a picture of desolation. The
doors and windows had been torn away
by the rushing waters, while the entire
family had been drowned in the room
as they slept.
The wife and children were un
dressed, but the father was fully
dressed, with his overshoes on. All
were lying on their beds except the old
est daughter and one of the younger
sons, who were lying on the floor.
From appearances the overflow caught
them while they were asleep, but the
position of the father, who was sitting
upright on the bed, indicates that he
must have been awakened by the rush
of waters, for he did not drown, as his
face and hair show no signs of water,
nor could the water have reached the
height of his position. The thought of
seeing his family drowned undoubtedly
was the cause of death.
Seven horses in Sullivan's stable,
within 100 feet of the house, were
drowned. Sullivan's ground around
E-THiE -
SLinton Clothing Co.
CLOTHING AND
FURNISHINGS
Everything of the Latest and Nobbiest for
Men's Wear. ,
HATS .ND CAPS
BOOTS AND SHOES
The ,Best Selected Stock in all Eastern
*1 Montana.
. The Linton Clothing C,.
the house is at least thirty feet above
low water mark and no one, Sullivat
more than any one, believed his family
was in danger. Two men who worked
for Sullivan left the ranch for town the
afternoon before the ice broke and had
to wade through water .two feet deej
on the low land.
The bodies of Eugene O'Connor an(
Miss Nellie Reagan were recovered
Sunday and buried Monday. The
bodies of Mrs. R. W. Snyder and Mksi
Rose Wybrecht have not yet been re
covered, but friends are anxiousl3
searching for them near the place whert
they were torn from the tree in whicl
they all took refuge.
From reports up and down the rivet
from Glendive no more persons are
known to have been drowned, but mans
houses have been washed away and
ruined. Several families below towr
were compelled to pass the night it
trees or they would have met the fat:
of the Sullivans. The water is stilt
ronning high, with considerable ice go
ing down, but the worst is over. Old
timers say the ice break of 1881 wai
equal in thickness but did not have thi
volume of water to carry it that thin
breakup did, the highest water thin
time being thirty-five feet.
The citizens of Glendive met in the
Glendive club rooms and appointed sev
eral committees to begin investigating
the advisability of rebuilding th
bridge, two main spans and the comnbi
nation span of which was washed out,
leaving the draw span, 326 feet long,
by itself in the river, and one span,
No. 4, 306 feet long, standing on th
shore.
DELAYS ON RAILROADS.
High Water Washes Tracks and Bridges
Away and Wires Are Down.
The sudden rise in the waters of sev
eral Montana rivers has played havoi
with railway transportation. On th:
Burlington there is a wash at between
Crow Agency and Fort nster and n,
trains have left thi ity on that roau
since Su ay. this writing thb
train due .I last night had not lefi
Sheridan and as the wires are down
nothing definite can be learned.
On the Northern Pacific there hat
been no through train since Friday
night. Yesterday the passengers and
mails were transferred at Miles Cit3
and the train which left here in thE
morning, came back in reversed order
last evening. An extensive washout
east of the depot at Miles prevents the
passage of trains. The express train
from the west this morning is tied ui
here and no assurance is given of an
early movement of either it or the Bar.
lington train.
SCHOOL MONEYS.
Last Apportionment as Certified to County
Superintendent Burla.
Gwen F. Burla, superintendent of
schools of Yellowstone county, gives
the following apportionment of moneys
in the general school fund, as certifieh
to him by County Treasurer W. L.
Ramsey on April 1:
No. 1, Junction ............ $ 26 17
No. 2, Billings .............. 464 06
No. 3, Newman ............. 27 05
No. 4, Canyon Creek ........ 22 68
No. 5, Park City ........... 47 98
No. 6, Columbus ........... 51 46
No. 7, Laurel ............... 47 98
No. 8, Elder Grove ......... 20 06
No. 9, Musselshell .......... 12 21
No. 10, Tilden .............. 9 60
No. 11, Trewin . ........... 21 80
No. 12, Roundup ............. 9 60
No. 14, Rapids .............. 15 71
No. 22, Allendale ........... 34 02
No. 25, Shiloh .............. 20 06
No. 26, Sullivan ............ 13 95
Total .... ................ $844 39

xml | txt