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The Billings gazette. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1896-1919, November 23, 1900, Image 6

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IN SESSION
4 INVENTION OF NATIONAL IR
i IGATION CONGRESS.
MANY DELEGATES PRESENT
Prominent Visitors from All Over
the West Will' Be in
Attendance.
Chicago, Nov. 20-Arrivals here to
day of delegates to the ninth annual
session of the National Irrigation
congress indicate, according to the
promoters of the gathering, that when
the session is called to order tomor
row morning there will be a represen
tation of nearly 1,000.
Among those who have expressed
their intention to attend are Gover
nors Pointer, of Nebraska; Stanley, of
Kansas; Thomas, of Colorado, and
Smith, of Montana. While the execu
tives of the western states and terri
tories have been appointed delegates,
some of them, notably Governor Mur
phy of New Mexico, will not be pres
ent, as they favor ceding the arid
lands to the states and territories for
reclamation by them and oppose the
idea of federal reclamation, which is
championed by the national irrigation
congress.
The congress will open its delibera
tions by listening to an address of
welcome by Mayor 'Harrison, which
will be responded to by Elwood Mead,
president of the organization and ex
pert in charge of the irrigation in
vestigations of the United States de
partment of agriculture, and General
M. H. Maxwell, chairman of the exec
ative committee. One direct result
of the congress will be a memorial to
congress asking for a $250,000 ap
propriation for surveys of arid lands
and praying that the work be taken
up immediately by congress along the
lines suggested by the representatives
of the government engineers now in
the field.
ANOTHER RAPE FIEND.
Chicago Negro Narrowly Escapes Lynch
ing for Assault.
Chicago, Nov. 20-A mob composed
of men and women defied drawn re
volvers and fought with 20 policemen
tonight in an attempt to lynch Harry
- Evans, a colored man, arrested on the
charge of attacking 7 year old Freda
Guendal. The hundreds of persons
who had gathered around the home of
the little girl, whose death was feared.
were greatly excited when Evans, who
had been captured an hour before,
was brought before his victim for
identification. "Hang the blackr
scoundrel. Lynch him," shouted the
spectators, as the prisoner was brought
to the doorway of the Guendal home.
The two officers, who had charge of
the negro, after a free use of their
clubs on the maddened crowd, finally
managed to shove Evans into the
house where the little girl identified
him as her assailant.
When the mob outside learned that
Evans had been identified by his vic
tim they became frenzied and made
another rush for the prisoner. A riot
eall had been sent in and a wagon load
of officers arrived in time to prevent
the crowd from overpowering the offi
sers and securing the negro. After,a
Serce struggle, in which a score of
people were more or less injured, the
police dispersed the mob and took
Evans to jail.
TWO FATAL WRECKS.
Several Men Killed on Denver & Rio
Grande Road.
Denver, Colo., Nov. 20-There were
two fatal wrecks on the Denver &
Rio Grande this morning; freight
train No. 70, west bound, on the nar
row guage, became unmanageable on
a steep grade near Gray's station. The
engine jumped the track and 12 cars
piled on top of it. Brakeman Chas.
Shaw was instantly killed; Fireman
Albert Brasswell is still under the
wreckage and is supposed to be dead;
Engineer John ,Ryan and Brakemen
J. J. Dow abd Louis Bean are serious
ly injured.
The other wreck was a short dis
tance east of Bellen, on the standard
guage. Freight train No. 7, east
bound, broke in two and the rear por
tion ran into the forward part, de
-railing eight cars. Two tramps were
riding in one and one of them, name
unknown, was killed. The other giving
the name of J. Weaver was badly
.hurt.
QUICK TIME TO DAWSON.
hat Transportation Companies Promise
for Next Summer.
SOhiaago, Nov. 20-Chicago to Daw
City in eight and one-half days.
is what the transportation com
s promise the public by the mid
next summer. The route will
Chiago to St. Paul on fastest
- Paul to Seattle on Northern
and Great Northern flyers; Se
y on fast steamship;
to White 'Horse rapids over
ded White Pass & Yukon
White Horse i-pids to the
Big Klondike camp on Yukon river by
steamers.
First class -and. secord. class fares
from., this city to, Dawson City will be
about the sa.ie a' .ose iffered last
year, Nvioon the trip was made in
about 12. days. By the shortest route
the distance from Chicago to Dawsonl
City is 3, 704 miles.
.RAVAGED BY STORM.
Nashville, Tenn:, Nov. 20-The
Nashville & Chattanooga depot and 18
other houses 'were demolished by a
tornado tonight at LaVergee station,
on the Nashville & Chattanooga road,
96 miles south of here. More than a
mile of telephonie and telegraph wires
were destroyed and details are meagre:
but it is known that a man of the
name of Robertson and his child were
killed and a section boss injured.
LARGE MINING CONCESSION.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 20-An Eng
lish syndicate with a capital of 10,
000,000 pounds has just received a
commission to exploit tlfe Perhenna
gold fields, which are 12,000 acres in
extent in the Amur region. The syn
dicate will also be allowed to dredge
and excavate the stream. The Mar
quis of Queensberry and Professor
Holloway are the heads of the syndi
cate.
COMMITTEE AT WORK.
Washington, Nov. 20-The house
ways and means committee today met
to consider a measure for a reduction
of the war revenue tax. It was de
cided not to remove the 10 cent a
pound on tea. The committee won't
touch the tariff on imports, as that
would open the entire subject of tariff
revision. No hearings will be grant
ed. Those interested may file briefs.
MINISTERS MANAGE AFFAIRS.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 20--The min
isters have been entrusted with the
conduct of current business during the
present phase of the czar's illness,
each of them carrying on his depart
ment according to his personal judg
ment, decisions on important matters
being postponed for the time being.
t DESIRES TO LEAVE A SON
S CZAR ANXIOUS FOR DIRECT HEIR
TO THRONE.
Russian Jurist's Views on Law of Suc
cession anda Primogeniture as
Applicable to Case.
St. Petersburg, Nov. 20 - The
bourse, which is chronically weak,
was slightly affected when the czar's
illness was first made known, but a
few bankers asserted this morning that
it was fully recovered.
Conditions are at this time peculiar
ly bitter to Emperor Nicholas because
he is hoping for the birth of a son
within a few months. It is an open
secret that the czarevitch, Grand
Duke Michael, now about 22 years of
age, is not a favorite of the emperor,
whose supreme desire is to leave a son
as heir to the throne.
A St. Petersburg jurist, who was
asked today whether a posthumous
son would inherit the throne, consult
ed the works of the best authorities,
among them Professor Kourkooff of
the University of S. Petersburg, and
Professors Glodosky and Alexieff of
the University of Moscow, and gave
reply as follows:
"Existing laws do not answer the
question. The manifesto of August
22, 1826, affords a precendent in the
affirmative sense, but does not lay
down a general rule, confining itself
to dealing with the particular case
then existing. Nicholas I. In a mani
festQ declared that if he should die be
fore the czarina who was enciente,
the heir apparent then living must
wait until after the child's birth be
fore assuming the powers and dig
nities of czar and that if the child
were a son, the latter should inherit
the throne. The present czar is
equally competent to regulate the case
if necessary.
"The present law of succession de
creeing primogeniture, with the pref
erence to the male lines and to males
of the female lines before any woman
could succeed, was intorduced by
Paul I., whose mother, Catherine II.,
who reigned from 1762 to 1796, did
not respect his rights and prepared a
will by which he would have been
disinherited had it not been destroyed
immediately upon her death. Paul
I., attempted to give this law a par
ticularly holy character, declaring
that all his successors at the corona
tion should swear to keep it inviolate.
Nevertheless. his successors enjoy the
same unlimited powers as he himself
did and several minor changes have
been introduced. If Emperor Nicholas
should decree the succession of a
daughter his will would be the law of
the land, although it is not believed
he would undertake it. The sacred
features of the law of succession
which are considered absolutely bind
ing ante-date Paul I. They are the
requirements that the czar shall be of
orthodox religion and that he shall
not occupy any foreign throne."
Six Frizhtful Failures.
Six terrible failures of six different
doctors nearly sent Wm. H. Mullbon of
Lockland, O., to an early grave. All I
said he must soon die. - But he was a
urged to try Dr. King's New Discovery t
for Consumption. After taking five s
bottles he was entirely cured. It is po
sitively guaranteed to cure all diseases
of Throat, Chests and Lungs, including c
Coughs, Colds, La Grippe, Pneumonia,
Bronchitis, Asthma, Hay Fever, Croup, i'
Whooping Cough. 50c and 81.00. Trial
bottle free at Chapples drug store. b
WEST ALSO
TOUCHED UP
SEVERAL MOUNTAIN STATES
VISITED BY STORM.
NO FATALITIES REPORTED
Colorado Springs Sustains Heaviest
Damage-Snow and Wind
at Salt Make.
Denver, Nov. 21-While Denver is
basking in warm sunshine today, some
portions of Colorado experienced the
worst storm of the year. At Colorado
Springs and Pueblo a heavy gale blew.
Many wires are down. Below Pueblo
some houses were unroofed. Betweec
Alamosa and Durango the Deuver &
tRio Grande railroad was blocked by
drifting snow. In the southern por
tion of San Luis valley the snow fall
was heavy.
AT COLORADO SPRINGS.
Colorado Springs, Nov. 21-A hur
ricane has swept over this city since
12 o'clock today. Signs have been
torn from building, light, telephone
and telegraph wires are down and
chimneys have been blown from the
roofs. People are afraid to venture in
the streets and business is practically
suspended.
The velocity of the wind was the
greatest ever attained here, 70 miles
per hour. The storm started at 10
o'clock, but did not become severe
until 12 p. m. The plant of the Col
orado Springs Electric company was
badly damaged and the high school
building was damaged also. The
high roof of the Temple threatre was
ripped off in large sections and many
other business blocks were damaged
by roofs and cornices being torn off.
SNOW AT SALT LAKE.
Salt Lake, Nov. 21-A heavy wind
and snow storm prevailed here all
day yesterday and last night and ap
pears to have been general through
out the inter-mountain region. Rail
way trains are generally behind time
and interruption to telephone and tel
egraph wires is reported throughout
the west. Extremely cold weather is
reported from central Montana points.
IN NORTHERN CALIFORNIA.
San Francisco, Nov. 21-A severe
snow storm prevails over northern
California and snow plows are neces
sary for the first time in 10 years for
November.
NO RIGHT TO EXIST.
s Nebraska's State Board of Transportation
Declared Unconstitutional.
Lincoln, Nov. 21-The supreme
f court of Nebraska in an opinion ren
I dered this evening declared the act
f establishing a state board of transpor
e tation unconstitutional and the board
inoperative. The case in point was
a that wherein Attorney General
t Smythe, on behalf of the. state board
a of transportation, brought suits against
l the Burlington and Northwestern
f Railroad companies to enforce a re
B duction in live stock rates.
The defendant roads, for the first
time in the 13 years existence of the
board, questioned its authority on the
t ground that it was illegally created
- and the court sustained the demurrer
and dismissed the case.
DELAGOA BAY AWARD.
Final Payment Is Made by Portuguese
Government.
London, Nov. 21-The Delagoa bay
I award was paid today. The Ameri
cans received their share through the
Seligmans. The Delagoa award of
S$83,862,800 with interest at 5 per cent
I from June 25, 1889, is the result of
I the seizure of the Delagoa bay rail
1 road by Portugal. The facts in the
I case have been told many times during
the past few years. Besides the princi
t ple of the award and interest, totalling
about $5,000,000, Portugal paid on ac
count $140,000 in 1890. The Ameri
cans interested are the heirs of Col
onel McMurdo, who, with a number
of English capitalists, built the road
and ran it until seized by Portuguese
officials.
SECURED BUT LITTLE.
Robbers Hold Up a Train With
Poor Success.
Little Rock, Ark., Nov. 21-The
north bound passenger train, on the
St. Louis, Iron Mountain & Southern
railway, was held up tonight near
Gifford, 40 miles south of Little Rock,
by five masked robbers. A lot of ties
piled on the track and surmounted by
a red light caused the engineer to slow
up and before the train had came to
stop the bandits were at work with
dynamite. The door of the express
car was blown open and Express Mes
senger L. D. Avery of St. Louis ser
iously injured by flying timbers.
Four vain attempts were made to
blow open the through safe. Their
supply of dynamite being exhausted,
the robbers left with only the con
tents of the way .safe, about $300. A
posse is in pursuit.
*A VANDERBILT DISINHERITED.
Cincinniiti, Nov. 21-A decision
was rendered today by -Judge Jelke
which disinherits Cornelius Vander
bilt and W. Fering Gill under the will
of Abram Gwyue., father of. Mrs.
Vanderiblt and of Mrs. Gill. The
will provided that the property left to
his daughters should, not be given to
their husbands, unless their mother
gave her consent in writing. Mrs.
G*ynne died without having given
her consent and after long litigation
the will was today construed by the
court to cut off both Gill and Vander
hilt from their wives' estates derived
from their father.
A TWISTER'S WORK.
LaGrange, Tenn., Nov. 20- A tor
nado struck this town today, causing
much damage and killing three per
sons. The dead are, W. C. Moody,
two negro women. Injured: Ed
ward Smith, Southern railway agent,
seriously. The storm made its ap
pearance shortly after midday and
swept everything in its path. Eight
residences and three churches were
destroyed. The damage to cotton in
the bale will be great.
STUDENT BECOMES INSANE.
New York, Niv. 21-Henry Hohl,
a student at Drew theological semi
nary, Madison, N. J., was sent to his
home in St. Louis today under guard.
Hohl had written to President Butts
of Drew seminary and to several of
his fellow students of his intention to
commit suicide and it was decided to
send him home. In one of his letters
Rohl enclosed a will leaving all his
personal property to his roommate.
WANT CULLOM BILL..,
St. Louis, Nov. 20-The delegates
representing 37 conmmeroial and indus
trial organizations, national and local,
called together to take action looking
to the passage of senate bill number
1,439, better known as Cullom's bill,
to amend the interstate commerce law,
today adopted a memorial to congress
urging its adoption:
DEATH IS NIGH.
St. Paul, Nov. 21-Senator Daivs'
physicians report his condition ma
terially unchanged. Although the
doctors do not say so, it is intimated
by those having knowledge of the
facts that the senator's death is now
only a question of a few days, or per
haps of hours.
WAS BRESCI'S FRIEND.
Stockholm, Nov. 21-Bagiard, the
Italian anarchist, recently arrested in
Sweden and transported to the Italian
frontier, where he was delivered to
the Italian police, turns out to have
been at one time intimate with
Bresci, the assassin of King Humbert.
MOVING AGAINST JUNTA.
London, Nov. 21 - Ambassador
Choate has made representations to
the British foreign office on the sub
ject of the Filipino junta at Hong Kong.
The foreign office is investigating the
matter and will reply as soon as the
reports of the authorities as Hong
Kong are received.
DECIDE ON REDUCTION.
Washington, Nov. 21-The republi
can members of the ways and means
committee today decided to make a
$30,00'0,000 reduction in revenues, as
suggested by Secretary Gage. The
day was spent almost entirely in go
ing over the war revenue bill.
EPIDEMIC OF TYPHUS.
Copenhagen, Nov. 21-The tpyhus
epidemic here is assuming serious
proportions. Twenty new and serious
cases were officially reported today.
DIFFERENT HERE.
Pittsburg, Nov. 20-The heat of the
past three days has caused much
suffering among the mill men.
For Sale or Trade
The Columbus restaurant.' Rents the
year around. Clear title. Address
Daniel Nice, Columbus, or Ed Canty,
Billings, Montana. 57-9
St. John's Cough Cure willo cure
cough. Sold by Chapple Drug Co.
DR. SELBREDE,
Z yuant itr
Par ors overBillin s Mont
Chaple Dru C illCno nt
IF YOU WANT A
HAND-ME-DOWN OUTFIT.
Peters, the Tailor
Says he is not in it
I But if you want a suit or an
overcoat that will fit you
Because it is made for you- I
He is ready +to trot out his
He has some very dashing
patterns in Fall and Winter
Room iS, Belknap Block.
0- 0s I
SIi T. PAUL. VESTIBULED TRAINS-DINING CARS.
MINNEAPOLIS TIME CARD-BILLINGS.
DULUTH E.ST4[ 4 D V OEPART
AND POINTS No. 12, lntic Ml..... 8a 0 a. . 8:10 a. m.
SEAST& SOUTH No.4, St. LoisExpres. lU:i p.4. I
T WST-BOUND.
To No. 11, Pacific .Mail..... 12:01 p.m. 2:10 p. m.
BUTTE No. , -Portland Express. I I 1:35 p. m.
HELENA
SPOKANE GET PERMIT AT TIOKET OFFIOE FOR FFREIGHTH.
SEATTLE DAILY EXCEPT .0N.lA
TACOMA Red LodgeAccom....... 510p.m. 6:80 a. M.
RCALIFOF 'IA Fromberg& Bridger Ace. l 0:4 p.m. . 8:10 a. m.
? . AN Through Tickete to all points in the United
CHINA NStae. Canada, Alaska, China and Japan. Maps
ALASKA and ý'olders on applioation. Exp rees Mone:,
KLONDIKE Ordere for saleat alloes oft theN. P. Expre
(o. Bankable everywhere.
H. N. Kennedy, Agent;-- Chas. S. Fee, G. P. A
SN KLLeNs, xoAr.I NT. PA.,, mr. Pullman First-Class # Tourist Sleeping Cars
== ILLI=== N====. MONT. ST.=================
DO YOU
KNOW
THAT.
The Gazette
Job Department
Turns out a better class of
work than any other printing
establishment in the Yellow
stone valley ...............
We are prepared to do any
class of printing on short
notice ...................
We employ only first-class
workmen, and consequently
can guarantee ..............
FIRST=-CLASS
I IWORK
V.U 1&IV ZA A oM
On Time all the Time.
The Burlington Route is in a class by itself as
far as running on time is concerned.
No railroad in the Western states, NO RAIL
ROAD IN AMERICA, approaches it in this im
portant respect.
Make an engagement for a certain time and
place in Omaha, Chicago, Kansas City, or St.
Louis--go East on the Burlington-you will be
there all right.
Ticket. at Offices of Connecting Liees.
H. B. SEGUR,
GENERAL AGENT BURLINGTON ROUTE.
BILLINGS, MONTANA.

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