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The Billings gazette. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1896-1919, March 27, 1903, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036008/1903-03-27/ed-1/seq-3/

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KILLiD BY HOLDIUPS
Battle Between Trolley Car Passen
gers and Robbers.
Los Angeles, Cal., March 23.-Three
masked robbers attempted to hold up
a car on the Los Angeles-Pacific elec
tric line, running between Los Angeles
and Santa Monica, about a mile west
of the city limits last night, and after
a pistol duel between C. W. Hender
son, one of the passengers, and one
of the robbers, the other two highway
.men began shooting right and left
through the crowded car. One passen.
ger was killed and three wounded.
The dead:
H. A. GRISWOLD of Manson, Iowa.
The wounded: J. C. Cunningham of
Los Angeles, a prominent trunk man
ufacturer; shot through the left thigh;
thigh bone broken; wound considered'
very serious. Ellis Pearson of Saw
telle, the soldiers' home station on
the electric line; shot through left
leg, a flesh wound. Dr. C. H. Bowles
of Los Angeles, shot through left
hand; several bones in his hand brok
en.
It is believed that one of the robbers
was badly wounded, because he was
heard 'to cry out and was seen to half
fall off the car.Jmmediately after Hen
derson began shooting at him.
Mr. Griswold was a wealthy citizen
of Manson, Iowa. He came here sev
eral months ago for the benefit of his
mother's health, and had been living
at the Hotel Corona. He also had a
cottage on the beach at Santa Monica,
and was en route thither when he met
his death. His body was .brought to
this city.
The hold-up occurred at the hea& of
as deep cut near the junction of the
Ocean park electric line. The robbers
had placed a steel rail, a large bench
and a cement barrel on the track at a
point near where it runs through a
large vineyard.
Charles Currin, the motorman, saw
the obstruction when the car was sev
eral hundred yar.ds from it, because
the car was equipped with a powerful
searchlight. He at once turned off
the current and; ran slowly to the
place. The car struck the obstruction
at greatly reduced speed.
The moment the car struck, three
men wearing white masks or handker
chiefs over their faces sprang from the
weeds alongside the track. One of
them boardedi the front end of the car,
and the other two the rear end. The
man who boarded the front end com
manded the passengers who were oc
cupying the open seats at the end to
put up their hands, and when one of
them did+ not comply he fired a shot.
Henderson was seated within six
feet of the point where the robber,
boarded the car, and having seen the
obstruction he drew his revolver. The
instant the robber fired at the other
man Henderson opened fire on him,
shooting as fast as he could pull the
trigger. The robber then turned his
gun upon Hendlerson, but as he did so
he was seen to bend over and then
cried out as if in pain. Then, straight
enihg up, he began shooting at the
bunch of passengers who were hud
dled in the front seat. One of the
bullets struck Ellis Pearson in the left
leg. Henderson continued firing and
the robber was seen to fall.
While this was going on on the out
side of the car, a tragedy was being
enacted in the inside. The two rob
bers who had entered the rear door
commanded the passengers to raise
their hands, and most of them did so.
Before any attempt could be made by
the robbers to search the passengers
for their valuables the shooting began
on the outside of the car. Then the
other two robbers began shooting
right and left, into the crowd of pas
sengers.
Griswold was seated about the mid
dle of the car with his back turned
toward the robbers. At the command,
"Hands up!" he tried to secrete his
watch under his legs ands one of the
robbers, thinking he was about to
draw a gun, fired point blank at him.
The bullet struck Ahim in the back of
the neck and he fell over into the lap
of his aged mother, who was seated at
his side.
Dr. C. H. Bowles was near the front
door and at the command of the rob
bers he raised his hands. When he
had them in the air one of the bullets
from a robber's 'revolver struck is
left hand and shattered the bones.
After emptying their revolvers the
robbers backed out of the. rear dogr
and sprang off the car and disappear
ed. Which way they went none of the
passengers know.
The car proceeded with all possible
speed to Sawtelle, the nearest point
where medical aid could be secured.
Griswold expired before the car had
gone a mile. He never spoke after he
was shot, and when his body was lift
ed from the car his watch was found
lender him on the seat. His mother
was covered with his blood and was
almost insane from grief and fright.
The bullet which killed' him grazed the
cheek of Miss Anna Funk, who was
traveling with him. At Sawtelle
Pearson was taken off the car and
conveyed to his home. The other
wounded persons were taken to Santa
Monica and given surgical attention.
As soon as the shooting was over
Henderson, who had fired at the rob
ber, sprang from the car. He had fir
ed all his cartridges and feared- they
would kill him if 'he remained. He
ran across the vineyard and struck
a wire fence and was knocked down.
While in that position he saw two of
the robbers run to a roadway near by
and climb into a buggy and drive to
ward this city.
Every available officer was sent to
the scene as soon as the news of the
robbery reached the city, but no trace
of the robbers was found. Owing to
the confusion incident to the shoot
ing, practically no description of the
men was secured except that one was
an unusually tall man and the other
two of lower stature.
The general manager of the com
pany stated tonight that the company
will offer a reward of $1,000 for the
capture of each of the robbers. The
hlihwaymen secured nothing what
ever from the passengers.
That many more were not killed or
wounded is little short of miraculous.
Inside the car were 30 or more passen
gers and ,there were more than 10
shots fired. Bullets were found im
bedded in the woodwork in many
places when the car reached this city.
Mrs. Griswold is prostrated with
grief and today required the attend
ance of a physician.
C. A. Henderson, whose resistance
precipitated the fatal shooting by the
robbers ,is sure he hit one of them.
George A. Griswold, the man killed
by the bandits, was a resident of Man
son, Iowa, and the only child of Mrs.
H. J. Griswold. He conducted a bank
ing business there and was the owner
cf extensive realty in that section.
A $50,000 Fire.
Jennison, Mich., March 23.-The en
tire plant of the Jennison Iron & En
gine works was burned last night.
COAL COMPANIES
Wilkesbarre, Pa., March 23.-Local
mine officials in and about Wilkes
barre were seen today in reference to
the mine commission award, but near
ly all declined to make any comment.
The manner in which they express
themselves, however, would indicate
that they are satisfied, or at least
willing to abide by the findings and
carry out the provisions.
An official of the largest corpora
tion said the award was a practical
vindication of the coal companies;
that the 10 per cent increase and re
duction of hours to the firemen were
practically conceded. He said that
the report and the review of the coal
mining conditions will be of great
ultimate godd; that violence and boy
cotts have been denounced in no un
mistakable language, and that peace
and normal conditions will prevail In
BLOOD IN THEIR EYES.
Cubans Pursue General Bragg to His
Home.
Chicago. March 23.-A dispatch to
the Inter-Ocean from Frond Du Lac,
Wis., says: Two Cubans registered
at a local hotel yesterday as L. Al
vares and B. Rodrigues and announc
ed they had come from Cuba to find
General E. S. Bragg who was former
ly consul general at Havana and who
was removed and sentenced to Hong
Kong for alleged remarks expressing
doubt as to the intelligence of the
Cubans. They did not appear to be.
bent on a peaceful motive and the
police officials were notified.
It is said that it escaped the notice
of'the Cubans that General Bragg had
already departed for the Orient.
When the Cubans went to find Gen
eral Bragg's residence with the police
on their track, a detective searched
their room. He found copies of news
papers which contained Bragg's refer
ences to Cubans and two old revolvers
were hidden under the mattresses.
A heavy dagger was lying on the
dresser. Both men, while the room
was being searched, went to the home
of General Bragg and began trying
the doors and windows, but soon
found that the residence was unoccu
pied. The police ordered the men to
leave town unless they could give a
reasonable excuse for their visiting
Fond Du Lac. The men at once left
the city.
ONE BULLET HIT TWO.
Angry Man Shoots Through Saloon
Door.
Shelby Junction, March 23-A shoot
ang affray tock place at the saloon
of Phippen de Nacey today about 2
o'clock. George Whitcar shot through
the door uf the saloon, slightly wound
irg William Duringe, the bullet pass
ing througi. the muscle of his left
arm and atiliing F. M. Nacey in the
neck. The bullet passed downward
and is supposed to be lodged in Na
cey's right shoulder. While Nacey is
resting easy his chances for recovery
are somewhat doubtful.
It is said the trouble was brought
on by George Whitcar trying to in
duce a crowd to leave the saloon when
he was asked by Mr. Nacey not to
disturb the patrons of his house. Whit
car became very angry and went away
but later returned with a gun and fir
ed through the glass door at Mr.
Nacey with the above result.
Nacey and Duringe were engaged
in a friendly boxing match when the
shooting took place. At first Whitcar
denied doing the shooting, but it is
claimed that several parties saw him
fire the shot. He was caught and the
gun taken away from him. Later he
was locked up in jail.
ON IRISH LAND BILL.
Measure Is to Be Introduced in House
of Commons.
London, March 23.-It is rumored
that the Irish land bill will propose
a grant of £10,000,000 from the im
perial exchequer to help bridge the
difference between what the tenant
thinks he can afford to pay and what
the landlord deems himself entitled
to obtain as purchase money. There
is a tremendous demand for tickets
to hear the introduction of the bill
in the house of commons Wednesday.
ANOTHER TRAIN WRECK.
This Time It Was the Burlington
Near Missoula.
The Burlington eastbound passen
ger train, due to arrive here at 9
o'clock this morning was six hours
late. The train was in a wreck near
Missoula. At De Smett siding a light
engine ran into the rear coach, caus
ing quite a smashup, but fortunately
no lives were lost.
Killed Instantly.
Butte, March 24.-John Jewel, an
employe of the Burns smelter at
Walkerville, was caught in the shaft
ing at the works today and instantly
killed. He was about 30 years old
and leaves a young wife.
ACCEPT AWARD
this region for the next three years
at least.
All the local company officials will
put their clerks at work tomorrow to
figure up the bonus coming .to each
employe under the award granting 10
per cent increase of wages earned
since November 1.
The Lehigh Velley company has
in its employ 35,000 men, and a major
ity of them will receive from $25 to
$50 each. The miners have also made
good wages since the strike ended,
and will profit by the award to the
extent of from - $40 to $60 each on
percentage. The Susquehanna Coal
company was the only *corporation
that was not represented before the
commission, but it has agreed to abide
by the result of the award. It will pay
its employes the same rate and in the
same manner as all the other compan
I ies.
LADRONES MURDER AMERICANS.
Capture Suriago from Constabulary
Troops on the Move.
Manila," March 23.-The town of
Suriago, in the northwestern part of
the Island of Mindanao, was captured
yesterday by Ladrones, who killed
Constabulary Inspector Clark and sev
erai others.
A detachment of 30 men, belonging
tc the Tenth infantry, under command
of Liutenants Patterson and Brown,
is hurrying from Ilogan, on the north
west coast of Mindanao, to Suriago,
on the transport Reilly, with orders
to recapture that place.
Danger of Coldb and Grip.
The greatest danger from colds and
grip is their resulting in pneumonia.
If reasonable care is used, however,
and Chamberlain's Cough Remedy
taken, all danger will be avoided.
Among the tens of thousands who
have used this remedy for these dis
eases we have yet to learn of a sin
gle case having resulted in pneumonia,
which shows conclusively that it is
a certain preventive of that dangerous
disease. It will cure a cold or an at
tack of the grip in less time than
any other treatment. It is pleasant
and safe to take. For sale by all
druggists.
See shoemaker under Yegen 'Bros.'
Savings bank. "-Good work; prices
Iright. 65-tf
CASTRO MAY REMAiN
Venezuelan Congress Urges Him to
Reconsider His Action.
Caracas, March 2&3-The Vene-,
zuelan congress, by a unanimous
vote, has declined to accept President
Castro's resignation and has passed
a resolution to request him to rec9n
sider his action.
The delegation appointed by con
gress called at noon today at the pres
ident's residence, Mirafliores ,::.ace,
and transmitted to C.,Ca castro
the resolution unanimously adopted
regarding his resignation, and, request
ing him to reconsider his declaration.
President Castro, in reply, declined
to change his, mind, but after peing
urged by his personal friends he of
fered to present another message to
congress which he will meet on Thurs
day to suggest a solution to the situa
tion.
The French warship Troude has
left La Guayra. Her departure is
taken as indicating that there is no
reason to fear international complica
tions as a result of President Castro's
resignation.
The congressional hall was crowded
yesterday and all the members of
the diplomatic corps were present
when President Castro read his mes
sage to congress. President Castro
first passed in review the terrible
conditions which prevailed in the
country and denounced the errors of
his countrymen.
"But," he continued, "if it is pain
ful to consider how much blood has
been shed and how many tears, it is
a consolation to think their bitter
stream by the law of compensation
will fecundate something that should
correspond to present day aspirations,
since every struggle begets an idea
and every victorious idea justifies th%
supposition that an onward step has
been taken on the road to human per
fection.'
Touching then on the question of
the recent foreign intervention, Pres
ident Castro said it had been brought
about by a league of people who,
unable to submit their claims to the
impartiality of the tribunals, had em
ployed force, and that because he re
fused to submit to the Anglo-German
exactions they, acting in collusion
with the revolutioniary general, Matos,
endeavored to get rid of him. In con
firmation of this statement President
Castro cited a letter written by the
commander of the German warship
Stosch. President Castro pointed out
that the sovereignty of the pation
had been safeguarded, and saidi:
"I now deliver my abdication, in
order that you may proceed legally to
call on him who should take my place
so that there may remain to no Ven
ezuelan the slightest pretext for any
hostility to his country or for conniv
ance with the foreigners who, without
any grounds that have force, have
fallen upon unfortunate `Venezuela
treading under foot reason and; jus
tice to the detriment of civilization
and right. With head uplifted and
with a tranquil conscience, I return
to the efforts of toil with honor and
dignity. All the possibilities of my
life are at your service, should it be
come necessary to arise and defend
our country against the attacks of
the foreigner. All the glory I ask is
to contemplate Venezuela respected,
prosperous and happy."
The president of congress then re
ceived President Castro's resignation
and a committee was immediately ap
pointed to draw up a reply to the ten
dared resignation.
The news of the president's resig
nation caused intense excitement in
political circles; but the city remain
WILL NOT
Fort Yellowstone, National Park,
March 23.-Over the length and
breadth of the National park there
swept a terrific snowstorm yesterday
and last night. It deepened the snow
that already lay on the ground, filled
up the gulches and made travel, even
for the ski-runners of the army, who
travel from snow station to snow sta
tion on patrol daily, well nigh impos
sible. Altogether the prospect of pas
sable trails and pleasant traveling
when the president comes to visit the
park two weeks hence is not at all
good.
But hbre the general impression is
that the harder the traveling, the,
wilder the weather, the better pleased
will be the president, who comes to
the park to get away from the curious,
the office-seekers and all that host
of people who make the lot of the na-.
tion's chief executive anything but
happy. He can stand hard travel and
wild weather; those who would like
ed quiet. Later in the night a special
session of congress was called and a
resolution was adopted requesting
President Castro to reconsider his
resignation, in view of the critical
condition of the republic and a vote of
confidence in his policy was passed
unanimously.
A committee was appointed to
transmit this resolution to the presi
dent today. In view of the reasons
for the resignation given in the presi
dential message, it is believed in pub
lic circles President Castro will retain
the office.
England ,Surprised.
London, March 23.-News of Pres
ident Castro's resignation came as a
complete surprise to the people here,
but London is deserted today by dip
lomats and the event is little discuss
ed. Until last Saturday afternoon
President Castro's tenure of office
was taken as a matter of course. In
fact the reported hitch in negotiations
with the powers were privately at
tributed here to President Castro's
endeavor to make another bid for
popular favor.
Some months ago the possible resig
nation of the Venezuelan president
was discussed in foreign offices as a
serious objection to making terms
with Venetuela with nothing but Pres
ident Castro's signature as a guar
antee; but since then the officials
here have been inclined to believe
that his position was well established.
Germany Not Notified.
Berlin, March 23.-The German gov
ernment has no warning of President
Castro's retirement nor has the press
announcement of the fact. been supple
mented yet by any explanation from
the German legation at Caracas. The
feeling in official quarters is rather
one of regret than otherwise, because
President Castro's resignation creates
uncertainy regarding the conditions
that were understood during the un
finished negotiations at Washington.
A declaratiL., from his successor that
the terms of settlement already
reached will be fulfilled is expected.
The officiai mind refuses to consid
er the contingency that the payments
under the protocols may be defaulted
or the settlement repudiated. On the
contrary, it assumes that the new
Venezuelan executive will stand by
President Castro's engagements
abroad in order to have a free hand
in quieting the internal disorders.
The news reached Berlin about 3
o'clock Sunday morning, too late for
Trublication, so the country has not
yet heard the news nor, indeed, are
most of the editors aware of it, for
VENEZUELAN SHIP
New York, March 23.-The British
cruiser Pallas leas seized the Ven
ezuelan warship Restaurador on the
ground that she is a pirate, cables the
Herald's representative at Port of
Spain, Trinidad.
The case against the Restaurador
cites that soon after she was handed
over to the Veneuelan authorities by
the German commodore she began
again acts of piracy and robbery on
the high seas. It is charged that she
seized the cargoes of vessels and dis
mantled and abandoned the craft. A
Port of Spain newspaper says editor
ially of the Restaurador's case:
"Such piratical acts prove the un
wisdom of generosity of the allied
powers."
HUNT IN
to follow him cannot.
Major Pitcher, superintendent of
the park and commandant of this post,
has not received full reports of yes
terday's storm, but it is known the
storm was general over the entire
park. The snow is heavy and damp,
making patrol work especially ardu
ous.
There is a good deal of fun here
over. the stories that are being print
ed in the eastern newspapers that the
president is coming to the National
park to hunt big game. Of course this
is a mistake-the National park is
the nation's great game preserve, and
President Roosevelt is too- good a
sportsman, even if he were permitted
to violate the regulations, to attempt
to shoot the protected game within
the boundaries of the park reservation.
It might be pointed out that not even
the president has any privilege to go
contrary to the law in regard to game.
He is no more than an ordinary cit
izen when it comes to the laws of the
land. Moreover, he is not the kind of
Berlin has only two Moi iad .}°
IpDapers.
The News at Rome.
Rome, March 238--Considerable i-fm, :
pression was made, especially at toie
foreign office, by. the news firt .,..
ceived through the press of President p
Castro's resignation, which is re - '4 .
ed as a sign that the internation l''
situation of Venezuela is much wor.e .. .
than was apparent.
It is hoped here that President. Cas
tro's resignation will lead to the pacill
cation of the country and the reestab.
lishment of order, and! the belief pre
vails that his disappearance and the
coming power of any other man can
not change either the attitude of the
powers toward Venezuela or the en- °
gagements entered into by Venezuela
through Mr. Bowen.
When the pope was informea of the
resignation of President Castro by
Cardinal Rampolla this morning he
exclaimed: "Let us pray God that
this may end the tribulations of our
beloved children there."
SEVERE ATTACK OF GRIP
Cured by One Bottle of Chamberlain's
Cough Remedy.
"When I had an attack of the grip
last winter (the second one) I ac
tually cured myself with one bottle'
of Chamberlain's Cough Remedy,"
says Frank W. Perry, editor of the
Enterprise, Shortsville, N. Y. "This
is the honest truth. I at times kept
from coughing myself to pieces by
taking a teaspoonful of this remedy,
and when the coughing spell would
come on at night I would take a
dose and it seemed that in the brief
est interval the cough would pass
off and I would go to sleep perfectly
from cough and its accompanying
pains. To say that the remedy acted
as a most agreeable surprise is put
ting it very mildly. I had no idea
that it would or could knock out the
grip, simply because I never
tried it for such a purpose, but it did,
and it seemed with the second at
tack of coughing the remedy caused
it to not only be of less duration, but
the pains were far less severe, and
I had not used the contents of one
bottle before Mr. Grip had bid me
adieu." For sale by all druggists.
Shoving the Queer.
Dillon, March 23.-"Shovers of the
queer" have evidently been plying
their calling in this vicinity in the
past few days. A number of spurious
silver dollars are in circulation. They
are very crude affairs and are only
taken along with other silver dollars.
The federal authorities have been.
notified.
Sheep for Sale:
Two thousand six hundred high
grade Merino ewes, bred to fine large
Delaine Ohio rams, long soft wool and'
good shearers. Also 700 older ewes,
bred to thoroughbred Merino rams.
All ewes in fine condition, sold in lots
to suit purchaser. Edgar B. Camp,
Real Estate and Live Stock Broker,
Billings, Mont. 154-2-89-4
;EIZED FOR PIRACY
The paper expresses the hope that
retributive justice will be swifter and
more effective than on the last oc
casion.
The Restaurador was formerly 'the
American yacht Atlanta. She was
built for Jay Gould.
Has No Confirmation.
London, March 23.-The foreign of
fice, as this dispatch is filed, has no
confirmation of the reported seizure
of the Venezuelan gunboat Restaura
dor by the British cruiser Pallas on
the ground that the former had acted
in a piratical manner. The foreign
office has heard nothing direct• from
Caracas regarding President Castro's
resignation.
THE PARK
a man to shoot the wild animals of
the park, who have come to regar4
man as their friend and who have no
fear of humanit;.
Major Pitcher lauighed when his at
tention was called to these eastern
stories.
"No," said he, "you can set it dowi
as a fact that the president will do no,
shooting in the park. He will not
come here for that purpose."
It is understood the information re
ceived by Major Pitcher from Wash
ington is that one of the chief purT
poses of the president's visit to the
park is to examine the precautions
that are being taken for the protec-l:
tion of game and to see what stelo. ii_
are necessary to make the protecttop.
still more effective.
The tameness of park gameis:WPn.
known. Any day during the paa~ t;w
ter elk and deer could be seen bl
ing through the snow for [email protected]
that lies underneath. They forb~.
attractive featur6 of the post
scape.
,

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