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The Billings gazette. [volume] (Billings, Mont.) 1896-1919, August 18, 1908, Image 1

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VOLr;.xxvf :):·. NTANh~ :~ ~ i c ·~
BILLINGS A ANA U UST ::ý y g..;..~,.. ~;~
LEA E:S Tit ,,ý 'REAT
MOB D 1
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,.·: 2:.1 ; ·- · ·'. I: '
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CITIZENS APPEALED TO
TO AID THE AUTIORITIES
Men Who Could Give Information Have
Been Warned Ntot to do so.
·~:·., ..
Springfield, Aug. 17.-One more vic
tim was added to the death list of the
Springfield mob tonight when G. W.
Scott succumbed to a gunshot wound
in the lungs received Filday night.
Scott's death brings the total to six
and is the fourth chargeable to the
disor.ler: in the' ' blaok belt" near
Twelfth and Madison street. It was
herie tlhat the' huited' negroes masi
their stand, firing upon.the heads of
the mob from windows and roofs. Am
other death is expected momentarily.
W. H. Bowe, chief clerk in the coun
ty, treasurer's office and one of the
most popular citizens of Springfield,
is slowly sinking from the effects of
the bullet wounds and the beating
which he ieceived from a crowd of
negroes. 'riday night. Bowe's friends
have warned the authorities that 'Bil
ly" will be avenged' and his death will
cause a' redo.ibling bf vigilance by the
troops; .
"'Wdit iintil the troops go," is 'the
word that has been passed' around'
toAnd' recognizing the strength of
the undefcurrent, the state, city and
conty offi~cials are taxing every ef
fort to titrn public opinion toward law
and oirder. To that end Govetriior De
aeen ha ' been in conference with offi
SPECI FORS
EXCURSION
BURLINGTON WILL RUN TRAIN TO
BASIN FOR BILLINGS
BUSINESS MEN.
ROUND TRIP RATE
Sugar City Will Not .Be Outdone " by
Denver, Omaha, Iincoln and Other
Trade Centerq-. are WIll Be $1iO
Only One Day Will be Lost by
Trip-Big Delegation Assured.
An answer was received. yeterday
afternoon from General Passpnger
Agent Wakely to the request of the
Chamber of Commetce, for a specIal
train, to Basin, Wyo., on account of
the proposed trade excursion.' To run
the train will cost $682, which in
eludes two sleeping cars and up to
three, baggage' cars. This arrange
menlt will permit the carrying of as
many persons as it is desired to take
along. As something like 60 firmns
have signified their intention to partic
ipate in the eexcursion, it is regarded
as reasonably certain that the train
will be chartered, as several business
houses have' announced that they
would send two or more representa
tives.
Today a committee of the Chamber
of Conmmerce will make a canvass of
the city for the purpose of selling
tickets. At the rate made for the
train, it; will mean 410 for the round
trip, including berth for each person,
any deficit remaining to be made up
by the larger firms., Those who have
interested themselves thus far in the
matter are hopeful of success of the
movement, saying that Billings 'de
-rives an immense trade, both whole
:sale and etail- from the ,Big Horn bas
in, iand that the opportunity . affoErd.
ed to show, 'ilings appreilatioh of
that :trade should not be ; neglected.
Denver, Omnaha, 6louz 'City .a Lian -
coln, each will send a d.elgation to
the fair, _bJng trong .bidders for the
'business thai .nai raly bloup t,
Billings and which is to lbe p4
retained it only th p oper nethqts
are pursued.
"'The fjndJyteelin .tartai t
-ward ti Cl p4 ;t<< Co of,
(6~u.PP~d em J~iJ L0
"'i-·-··- `; :I -5·; C·r~· i!~
cials of various civic bodies includ
ing the chamber of commerce, the
Springfleld b r, association and the
evangelic ministers' association. Evi
dence is not.lacking that. many citi
zena who were known to have import
ant. testimony regarding the mob and
its leaders, have been deterred from
offering this to the state's attorney be
cause of threats of violence made
aaginst them anonymously.
"The riot could scarcely have been
avoided and -is in itself a disgrace to
the city. The real disgrace will come
if the guilty are allowed to escape,"
are the slogans of the authoritfes now.
Five of the arrests made today are
obnsidered important by police. It
was in the homes of these men that
most of the loot was found. A slithi
person is being sought' by the police
who aver that when lie is arrested
practically all of the ring leaders of
the mob will be in custody.
"We have the thugs on the run,"
said Eva.s Jones, chief of detectives,
and,'he added that many .sspects qre
leaving town to avoid arrest.
Roy Young, one of the prisoners `tak
en yesterday, has confessed to. start
(Continued on Fifth Page.)
BURKE.- TALKS
FoRW.ITAFT.
CONGRESSMAN CONTRASTS THE
TWO LEADING PRESIDENTIAL'
CANDIDATES.
RECORDS HELD UP
Republican Candidate Has Had Sue
cessful Career in Public life, While
the Other is Known Only for the
Doctrines He Advocates, Some of
Which Are Untried.
New Salem, Ill:, Aug. 17.-Congress
man James Francis Burke, of Pitts
burg, delivered an address at a "Re
publican day" celebration here today
oun"the powers of the president." He
said in part:
"The American people cap make no
greateri mistake than elect Bryan on
the assumption that he can do no
harm in the face of an adverse sen
ate.
"Mr. Taft and Bryan are wholly dif
ferent types of men. Each possesses a
strong individual character which
would certainly assert itself in the
White House. Mr. Taft has proven
it on bench, in the Philippines, in Cu
ba, in Panama andi in the general coun
sels of the cabinet.
Mr. Bryan has proven it in the pos
session of a political pertinacity and
partisan persistency rarely if ever
equalled in history.
'What either of these men would do
during a four year's term in the White
House in emmlug a t.
".One president established a protec
torate and raised flag over Hawaii. An
other pulled down the flag. and with
drew the military forces:
"What Mr. Bryan would do with the
Philippines under-4imilar circumstan
oes Ii difricult to 4etfrmine
"The president's power. exercised
through th. tresasury depatmeqt in
the interpretation and .enfreement of'
eustems laIs M lar reaching. He is
the .wild'.s reat1 et baiker.
e' ha.e.s "Interstate commerce
by a systep of jeapoina . pwhich nohe
oimcernwhether~anlty Arpot can saru
A. W.- Inerlieda coinmerpial tray
el- of Deny'ei lit the :ty for a *few
`days Mr. inderned Is poie ofo the beat
known coisinetletl me on the road.
A HEAVY H . ;AP.
ii
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'" .. .. "...:. '', " Wallace'i-8n ;a -ralncis--'Chi.ti.nF r~ o nic;
. F,WELL KNO/W C F1
-WllcSTATE DIE an. f i C aN 1...n ;.
II.~ ~ ~ ~ ~~~··!· L. FRNWL NW·IE FTI
STATE DIES siJ ~NLY N CININNT
(gpecial to The Gazett4.)
iUelena, Aug. 17.-Advices received
ih .this city .this. evening from (acnia
nati, ,tell of the death in that city of
HI. L. Frank, a millionaire mine own
dr of Montane and a forme mayor Qf
Butte:
1.ienry L. Frank, one of Montana-'
and ,Butte's most enterprising and suc
cessful business men, was born in Iron
ton, Ohio, July 5, 1851. His ancestors
in the old country were wine growers
inrAlsace, ,then' in Frahce, but now a
part of Germany. His father, Moses
Frank, a native of that place, came to
America when a boy, settling in Cin
cinnati and engaging in the wholesale
mercantile business. He was.married
in that city to Miss Esther *Lupliu
and had eight children. Henry, the
oldest, was educated in 'the public
schools and obtained his mercantile
knowledge in his father's store. After
leaving home, he spent two years in
Colorado and NTew 'Mexico, and came
to Butte in 1877, engaging in the
LIQUOR ISrSOLD I
TO THE INDIANS
CHARGES AGAINST PROMINENT
MEN IN CITY OF MISSOULA.
ARRESTS ARE MADE
Sensational Allegations Made in the
Charges Preferred Yesterday-Fif
teen Have Already Been Arrested
More Warrants Are to .Be Served.
(Special to the Gazette.)
Missoula, Mont., Aug. 17.-Sam'
Cone, officer of the United States
secret service, has completed a raid
on the Flathead Indian reservation and
lana. The men arrested will 'be gLs
to the Indians and for having intoi
icants in their possession on the res
ervation.
Among those arrested are several
prominent business'n.en oc Missoula,
who ' ere n 'a :fishing trip on the
reserilon with a utpply of bottled
beer.
Tonight two, bArtenders, August
Schmidt and Fred Anderson were ar
rested for a'eing liquor to the lad
has arresed 1 men for selling liqor
en a hearing beore 'United Sates
Commnssionewr W. P. Smit'h in Mis
soula and If bound over, will face
Jaudge Hat in the federal court at
Helena.
WILL PURCHASE . IA SHI'P.
Washington, Aug: -The lz'my air
ship board toda 4d l tit Cap
tain 'Baldwin's dirgibte balloon .ae.
met all conditiones eUt4tf , Ihi t. p the
amount agreed upon'tor its :PA e.
' ' : ' - : " '"' :" . ."_"
wholesale liquor ,bu.inqs in w lch -qe
was vgry succegssul. iis tre,~ was
small at. f1rst conducte.e.in a g pcabi
o pesro olis `restaurant, and, lpod opi
the ground where the ButtieHardware
company, ,pow. has its fine brick build
iig on Main street. , Mr. Frank re
hained there three, years and then
ioaed to the .corner of Broadway and
Main streets. He was located here four.
years and then moved to the corner
of Utah street and Broadway where
he remained six years before moving
to his present location on East Broad
way. His store there is 42xi00 feet in
dimensions, two, stories high. Besides
this he has a building 40x100 feet at
the depot and a refrigerator and .bot
tling house. These facilities for, do.
ing business give some conception.of
the growth of his trade siune he, start
ed in it. He had a consldeeabletrade
Wi other cities besides Butte.,
'Mr. Frank was also interested in'
the mines atBatte and differant; parts
of Montana.-' Outside of tb atee
WOND RFUL N:ll
S1W0 .,BY:AIt
HAS ARM TORN PROM BODY BY
PA88ING RAILROAD: TRAIN.
WALKED TWO BLOCKS
Carried the Mangled Member that
Distance, UxiIalned Cause of. "Acci
dent to POliceman and Tlin Falnt
ed In His Tracks.
Chicago, Aug. 17.-A remarkable ex
hibition of grit and nerve iwasC-wit
nessed today when George Nagle, 22
yearsa old, carrying his left agm, which
had been severed by a railwPý ,trai
staggered up to a pollcemap and faint
ed after telling his story, :
Nagle had 'carried the gresome
bundle of mUangle flesh .or two.
bkncks in ai' aftrt to rlnd tlolieeman.
Ie ;had atteimpted to ua rda pas
szingitraita bu. hsalipped oa the wet
rungs ot the ladder and :tlbeneath
the tricks. Ie was takoe a has
KERN'S NOTIFICATION.
Indianapolis, Aug. 17.-The wok 69,
deconating ;tbe: coliseum at'the stage
fair ground began today priminary
to the 1oiamai sotleatian at John W.
xer .of o , omi.~ation tor vice pres
ident on thei Democratle ticket which
will take plae August 25.
Mrtin Gates and family together
wiaSth. a pst of friends are spendling
a few days on the Rosebud.
had qlre .oZpe'rties n. Idaio anad
British Columbia and was one of the
organisers of the'"ilver Bow Elec
,trA comnpasly.. , .For several. years ithe
was.preild~tof thd'fhtte Wate. com
pany.. I;e erected aunumber of, buld-h
ings in, iButte; this showing him .to
have been an active factor in the ma-.
t.erial interests of the place, and the
upbuilding of his home city.
Mr. Frank was liberal .and enter
prising. He had many friends through
out the country and was a favorite
with a large portion of his home'state.
He had passed through all the degrees
of freemasonry, reaching the 83rd de
gree of the Scottish Rite, He was al
so a member of the Order of Bilks
and the •Knights of Pythias.
Politically he was a Democrat and
several times was honored by the par.
ty in Montana. At one time he lack
ed but a few votes of being elected
.United States. senator. He was twice
elected mayor of- Butte and was also
a member of the first and second leg
islatures, of- the state. .
EERAL INJRE
I T HOTIR Fl
WOMEN FIGHT FLAMES AT KAAT
.SKILL rAY TO SAVE HOUSE.
SEVERAL ARE INJURED,
Many Recieve Minor Cuts and Bruis
es While Battling to lsve the Prop.
erty-Loss Will Amount. to $100,000
-Hotel Had 125 Guests.
(Special to the Gatette.;
Glens Falls, N. Y., Aug. 17.-Fire
'today destroyed the Kaatskill house
la the Shkaatskill bay district of Lake
George and three cottages.
Many women were in the fire bri
gademand some of them received min
or: outs and .uma.
Several men were also slightly in
The loss will appozsmte 31009000.
The hotel was owned by P A.P. S.o
ville and was entertaining 'about 1t6
guests.
-:
ROBBERY AT H4UNTLEY
Till Tapped for Cash to.the Aount
Huntley, Aug: 17.-A robbery
goaurred hers- Saturdaiy about
.C10.0 o'oloolk-:I the evening. Mr.
PlIekenE left ble stre and was gone
About an hour.; On his return he
foimdthata~~ : tore had been opened
and, 9 e itaken from the till.
l Athiu s e was missing egeep% a
Iii'Bnrtou Ia-3 visiting friendle I`
Butte`.pia4 Thetsgsl~z 5 '
TRARINBIlAKS RECORDS X
TO5AVA BOY'$ ti*E
Eighty Miles Traveled in as Many Minutes
ina RI e Against Time.
.Believing that the life of 13-year
old George Selvidge, who was acci
dentally shot near Sanders Sunday
depended on his efforts and that death
stalked in the wake of. every lost min
ute, Engineer ,p. E. Dennis of the
Northern Pacifc broke all records on
the Nortlirru Pacific in this section,
Sunday, when with a special train con
sisting of a locomotive and passenger
coach, he made the 80 miles In 8o
minutes.
There were but three occupants of
the coaaoh Mrs..and .Mrs. W. A. Sel
vidge, parents of the bo,, and Dr.
Cliff ,IAndsay of this city and like En
gineer Dennis they' believed that they
were in a race against death.
Mr. ýSelvidge received a: telegram
just before noon from .Sanders saying
that his son was seriously injured and
aski g. him to come. at once with a
doctor. He, hastened to the Northern
Pacific o:ces and asked for a special
train to 8and rs. Dr. Lindsay was
hurrie4ly. #ummoned and fitteen'min
utes a4 1r. Selvidge received word
of the prerus conditdnof his-boy,
there `wis :.iNorthern; "'acific ,e line
ana.,4 coach i froernt the . depot
awaitin ;his order .
IN SESSION
MONTANA STATE FEDERATION
OF 'LAIBOR IN 'FIFTEENTH
ANNUAL. MEETING.
FOR CONVENTION
Two Hundred Delegates and Alter
nates Gather in Coliseum Hall to
Consider Questions of Import to
Workers of Treasure State-Presl.
dent Fairgieves Sick.
The fifteenth annual convention of
the Montana State Federation of La
bor, wichi will be held in Billings this
week, began its sessions yesterday in
.the Coliser º 'r!nk with nearly 200
delegates alternate delegates in
attendance
The convention was called to order
at 12 o'clock by M. M. Donoghue of
Butte, first vice president, who will
preside throughout the week, owing to
the absence of President Fairgrieves,
who is confined to his home in Helena
with typhoid fever. All the other of*
icers of the federation were in attend
ance. After the opening prayer, which
was made by Rev. Samuel Fritche of
the First Congregational church, Act
ing President Donoghue appointed as
a committee on credentials, E. I. Tor
rey of the Butte Building Trades Coun'
cil, D. F. Staten of the Miles City Car
penter's Union, A. Grenier of the Liv
ingston Trades Assembly, L. G. Brae
den of the Helena Electrical Workers'
union and H. A. Putnam of the Bill
ings Bartenders. A recess was then
taken -ntil 2 o'clockLin orderaSto per
Pit. the committee on c:ede~jtials to
formulate, a roll call for .the conven
;tion. No contests appeared before the
committee and at . o'clock-its report
was made and adopted.
Welcomed- by W. 3. George.
The formal opening of the conven
tion took place at 2 o'clock when W.
B,. George, president -of the Montana
State Fair assocbation, welcomed the
delegates to,Billings on behalf of the
citisens.. Mi. George made an addre
which was frequently interrupted.
applause,'in which he comme
work of the Montana Stat
of Labor and praised t
of Montaria. He aa o
liows.
The's pecial left precisely at noono
and arrived at Sanders, 80 lies .qm.fr
Billings, at exactly 1:20 o'clocki
Engineer Dennis started iaking:i
time soon after he left the depot a.'n.
at the east bridge across the Yeil6ow
stone was traveling at a' ratet
miiles an hqur. Past Lockwod' the
engine, and coach whizzed at ~t
mile a minute clip. The :14i mIisie
tween Billing and Huntley & w9, `eat
en up in something like- i
Soo the gage on the en i W
ed the effects of ast travelin
of persration standing o hi
face and forehead," the -fre ket
"Right over 'all trains was give'
special mndas: the operators am
they eturled t tot heir tey in Voder
ment. and reporte4 'the .ptogre rp en
gins id ;ooh .
Engieer -Dennis ekeqing-,, mind.
the mile a minute pc ho: had aet,
started to making t: p : tie . rom
Pompey.S.Pillar and this tte
even a talfter gate, eausta
'(Continued o' "ýr._o K.,
HUNSTON-BAUER ROMA NC ENDS
IN M ARRIAGE AND: BLESfeN
OF P NRHerTS.'
HiOWARD ,GET A JO
Couple Discoverid at Park CI*-Af_,
ter Languishing tn Jail tor Short
Time, Both Are FPorgiven 'ti *
Parente-Wac Simply a cp ro*Ia:
and Unusuaul EloQement. '
SLke the last ddene l :in::e
drama is.'the en .ing of the'' Huinstn
Bauer-Howard abduction case, .;:-he
two principal characters, Ernest. iun.
ston and Freda Bauer, were captured
by the officers near Pa..k 4ei
day and were brought to t1is. caity.
The irate parents forgave theirs liugh
ter and her abductor and yesterday at
ternoon when Rev. RoughU pronouned
the words that made them man and
wife, they gave their blessing. Jack
Howard, who played second s:an to
Hunston's Young Lochinar;, has been
released from the county ja.,:il lp t
secured a job breaking horses *oa a'
ranch near this city.
Hunston and the girl were' seen
near Park City- Sunday afteroon or
the first time since the afir of iTurs
day night. Chief of Police Talg was
notified and later received ^ ord that
the couple were in custody. ~,''he
chief notified the sheriffs office and
the girl and "her saductor were then
brought to Billings and lodged in the
coustr jail.
Both Hunston and Howard:
topmake any statement, "bu
told the officers the det :
fair and solved tiW
lem .of whether she
untarily or not.
it seems,
story, that
in co t eiid
en .H . funsten a ar
W Wrs

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