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The Anaconda standard. [volume] (Anaconda, Mont.) 1889-1970, February 12, 1898, Morning, Image 9

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036012/1898-02-12/ed-1/seq-9/

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INANA
A Zarge.Lel Vwoma the Di.e.
on the Rinse&
S º TO BE INCREASING
it » st *pesared in Most~an in i5n.
t4 eduesd by (tie Promx the
lag Ssmtodb This YTsr.
Grat Falls, Feb. 11.-The following
account of the disease called blackleg
and the best method of treatment, Is of
value to the stockmen of Northern
Montana:
Recent advices from the range report
the prevalence of blackleg among set
eral herde. the loss from this cause be
ing much heavier than for several years
past. . The disease is said to have first
appeared in Montana, in 18Th. and its
introduction at that time was attribut
ed to a cattle importation from the
East. It spread through Central and
Northern Montana, and eventually
reached herds then grasing on the west
side ranges.. A large loss was experi
enced that year, and while isolated
cases of the disease have been noted
nearly every year, the 'epidemic has
become so serious the present season as
to cause alarm.
We are informed that the prominent
symptom of the disease is 'a large
swelling gqnerally appearing on the left
shoulder, while in other cases it ap
pears in the back. It is said that death
invariably follows within 24 hours of
the appearance of this swelling, and
that no remedy has yet been found by
which the fatal consequences can be
averted. A post mortem examination
of the animals shows a large patch of
coagulated blood where the swelling
occurs.
Nearly every animal attacked by
blackleg is in a thrifty condition; in
fact, the disease appears to be confined
to the youngest and most healthy look
ing portion of the- herds. Some old
time stockmen venture the opinion that
the disease is encouraged by too liberal
feeding and too warm housing of cattle;
in support of this theory they contend
that cattle in poorer flesh, stock that
has been made to rustle for feed and
takes plenty of exercise, escapes from
the disease which is now causing so
much loss among cattle that have re
ceived care 'and attention.
Inoculation is said to be the only sure
preventive of blackleg, its efficacy hav
ing been demonstrated in sections
where the disease used to cause consid
erable trouble. Several Northern Mon
tana stockmen have about decided to
adopts this method of protection, and
during the branding season of the com
ing spring they will have their calves
properly treated during the progress of
branding operatiofis.
PROUD OF THEIR SCHOOL.
The New Building Just Completed at a
Cost of S12,000.
Great Falls, Feb. 11.-Belt citizens
are very proud of their new school
building, whichhas justbeencompleted.
It is of brick, two stories high with a
large basement and cost $12,000. There
are six rooms in the building, accom
modating 350 pupils, and if necessary
the basement can be pressed into serv
ice and will hold about 100 more. As
it Ip it will suffice for the needs of the
town for some years, and being a sub
stantial building will last as long as
there is any need of it. There is a
room for trustees' meetings, plenty of
ample cloak rooms, a wide hallway and
a tower 55 feet high surmounted by a
flagstaff. The rooms are finished in
tamarack and present a very cheerful
appearance. Heat is supplied by two
hot air furnaces and there are all of
the latest appliances for regulating the
temperature of the rooms and venti
lating the building.
While the building cost considerably
more than was anticipated and more
than the contract bid on it, yet the
taxpayers of the district are very well
satisfied. After the contractor threw
up the job, knowing that he could not
put up the building at the price he had
bid, the trustees continued the work,
placing Joseph Wegner in charge as
superintendent, and the result is a
building in which they know there is
not a piece of bad, work.
"
It is not often that a physician rec
ommends a patent medicine; when he
does, you may know that it is a good
one. Dr. J. P. Cleveland, Glasgow, Va.,
writes: "I have used Chamberlain's
Colic, Cholera and Diarrhoea Remedy
in my ,ractice and it has proven to be
an excellent remedy, where a thorough
course =of medicine had failed with me.
I recommend it to my patients every
time for colic and diarrhoea." Many
other progressive physicians recom
niend and use this remedy, because it
always cures and cures quickly. Get
a bottle and you will have an excellent
doctor in the house, for all bowel com
plaints, both for children and adults.
For sale by druggists.
MISSOURI RIVER DRY.
Caused By an Ice Gorge and the Co~lasg
of Canyon Ferry.
Great Falls, Feb. 11.-The Missouri
river below the Black Eagle fails, was
nearly dry this morning not a drop of
water passing over the dam. There was
water enough however, for the power
house, although the power has been
considerably lighter than usual all day.
A visitor to the scene this morning
found quite a number of other sight
seers there. Below the dam the water
stood in small pools and men were
clambering over the rocks and wading
through the water. Superintendent
Dickinson was on hand with his cam
era and took a large number of pic
tures, not forgetting this time to open
the slide.
The water commenced to lower last
night, and early this morning stopped
running over the dam entirely. How
long this state of affairs will last is
unknown, but probably only for to-day
as the trouble is partially caused by an
ice gorge which will soon break away,
and partially by the closing of the
Canyon ferry a few days ago, wRfich
caused the river to run dry there until
the space back of the dam was filled up
and the water could not run over the
top. This same thing has occurred sev
eral times before but only once did the
lack of water cause any trouble. Then
it was necessary to blast out an Ice
gorge to let the water down.
Death ef an Old Timer.
Great Falls. Feb. 1L-This afternoon
old timers were startled by the report
that Herman Wildekopf had died at his
residence. He hAd been n resident tf
tbhi city buss eatly times and is weli
k1-wn ba tile Gaer seastel n wr
rar. Byt e 1t wl s a ýastter amt
e .e mt hielnat contradts har
11Ab = d" e Coneattl High Scoole
H let a bean more or less at
fr the past two yars, bet no special
alarn was felt at this. He leaves a
wife sad hree ebildren. He was a
member of the A. 0. IT. W. and of the
Sons of Herman. He owned consder
able real estate and was thoroughly re.
spected throeghout the community.
A Ihll Ssonus Not as Nuena cre,.
rmdsy sad giwe IM aiata sis wAvoid isie
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
segseertag Agense sed Jadges et Sleetles
App Inted.
Great Falls. Feb. 11.-At their see
,ulon to-day the county commissioners
appointed W. H. Saftord and IR W.
Hanson as registery agents for dis
tricts one and two respectively. The
first will have his oficee with George
McFarland. In the opera house, and
Hanson will have his office with the
Great Fails Iron works. The election
of school trustees will occur on April
2, but voters must register on March 24
to 27 inclusive,
The' commissioners also appointed as
Judges of election in district No. 1 0.
S. Warden, W. H. Safford, J. J. Me
Donnell; district No. 2. J. P. Lewis, R.
W. Hanson. A. E. Caufleld. These
steps are in line with their declaring
the district to be one of the first class.
This action was taken in reply to ef
forts that had been made by several
persons to induce the commissioners
to declare the district of the second
claps. A. E. Caufield filed an affidavit,
the purpose of which was apparently
to the effect that the district might be
considered of the second class, but the
commissioners did not act upon it, evi
dently deeming it too ridiculous to con
sider. and adopted the order fixing the
district in the first class, having a pop
ulation of over 12,000. If the district
had been declared to be of the second
class, the election would have been
conducted in the wide open, free and
easy manner of a few years ago, when
aliens, paupers, school girls, tran
sients and all other comers voted early
and often.
A DISASTROUS FIRE.
Guests Driven Out of the Windsor, Which
Is Burned to the Ground.
Great FaIls. Feb. 11.-A disastrous fire
is reported from Havre, having oc
curred yesterday. Through it the
Windsor hotel and the other frame
buildings in that range, the one near
est to the Great Northern station, were
burned to the ground. The fire caught
in the kitchen of the Windsor hotel,
owned by Arthur Decker, and at pres
ent leased by Thaddeus T. Raymond,
and spread rapidly through the build
ing by means of a ventilator shaft.
By the time the alarm was sent out
the guests had been driven out of the
building, many of them losing their
baggage. For a time all was confusion.
but soon order was restored and guests,
trainmen and citizens of Havre soon
organized a bucket brigade and all did
good work. At first it was thought the
whole town was doomed, but the stren
uous efforts of the hastily organizes
brigade, assisted by the fact that the
wind was in the right direction, result
ed in the salvation of the balance of
the town.
The building was a two-story frame
structure and was only recently rented
by the present proprietor, Thaddeus T.
Raymond, who had signed a lease for
one year. The owner, Mr. Decker, is
at present living at Spokane. The hotel
and fixtures are a total loss, but are re
ported to have been fully insured.
Tiger Mine Leased.
Great Falls. Feb. 11.-Parties in the
city from Baker state that Steve Peirse
of Neihart has secured a lease on the
Tiger mine at that place and will soon
start the wheels of progress rolling and
commence the shipment of ore. The
mine at one time was a good producer,
but for the last few years, on account
of the low price of silver and lead, has
not been worked. It is owned by a
number of Milwaukee business men
and contains a large body of high
grade lead ore, which also runs high in
silver. In the hands of Mr. Peirse, who
is a practical miner, the mine will, no
doubt, prove equal to its former repu
tation.
The City Mued.
Great Falls, Feb. 11.-Michael Oswald
has brought suit in the district court
against the city of Great Falls and H.
B. Palmer to recover the sum of $222
and costs. This is another tangle in
the Central avenue paving mix-up and
the object of the suit is evidently to
obtain judgment which will shut off
the assignment by Vogel, the contrac
tor, to Palmer. The city council has
been allowing a portion of all claims
verified by Vogel and a portion of this
claim has been paid, but it ii evident
that the plaintiff is not satisfied with
the progress made.
For Petty Larceny.
Great Palls. Feb. 11.-This evening
Officer Anderson arrested James Ken
nedy for petit larceny. He went into
the Stockholm restaurant and asked
for a meal. They refused to give it
to him. Later he waited his chances
and took a leg of veal from the ice box.
When arrested he said that he was a
working man and when he had any
money he blew it in and thereforb he
ought to be supported when he had no
money. _
GREAT FALLS NOTES.
J. E. Erickson, attorney for Teton
county, is in the city for a few days
attending to legal business.
Marriage licenses have been issued
to Gilbert Trudell and Elizabeth Dyer:
to Nels Severen and Luella Lefler, all
of this city.
Mrs. William Thomas. who recently
died at Highwood, was the first school
teacher on Belt creek, having taught
a school there 12 years ago.
B. F. Bailey of Choteau, who was
bitten by a horse some time ago and in
consequence has been suffering from
lockjaw, is at the Columbus hospital
receiving medical treatment. He has
recovered suffelently to return to his
home on Monday provided no alarm
ing symptoms develop.
Paris Gibson has been seeding his
ranch on the Sand Coulee road to
wheat, following his oft-declared the
ory that the earlier the ground is pre
pared and seeded the less water is
needed to assure a good crop. His be
lief is that the ground so prepared
catches and retains all of the moisture
which falls. Whether the theory is or
is not correct. It is a fact that he has
never failed of obtaining a heavy yield
at his ranch even in the dryest years.
Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup
Has been used for over FIFTY YEARS by MIL
IONS of MOTHERS for their H HfLvtEN
WRILS TSETHIN(I with PERFECT SUCCESS.
It SOOTHESa the 4'HILID. SOFTENM the GLUMS.
ALLAYS all PAIN: CUJ(ES WIND COLIC. and
is the best remedy for DIARUH(EA. Sold by
Druggists is every part of thue word. So sure
ead ask for -1lrs. WInsow's Soothin Syrup."
M~Sk55516 disl bsa111r-AremDISi"ý
UEWIlLIS MAHKE1
DiniiR. eood of Oomm rolal inad
anea Is Proo**atase
NEW YORK STOCK REPORT
lime ted Quo" - wool PsMe" ad
Movemamw-Ggmu dad Pro
duce-Beview of Trade.
New York, Feb. IL-There was profit
taking on quite a heavy scale to-day in
stocks, said to be for the account of one
of the principal bull operators. The Inter
val of two days before trading will be re
susued on the exchange was the motive
for closing up accounts, as is always the
case on the eve of a double holiday.
The sharp advances in some stocks at
the opening afforded more favorable op
portunity for realising profits. The spring
rise was largely influenced by the higher
quotations for Americans sent from Lon
don, and was also helped by the marked
strength of one or two specialties, notably
Metropolitan Street Railway and Peo
ple's Gas, the latter on the published re
port of the company's finances.
London bought here on a considerable
scale and helped to strain prices to some
extent. The offerings were not well ab
sorbed and support was largely with
drawn. The weakness of stocks encouraged
the putting out of short lines. The cov
ering of some of these before the close
brought them to a level materially above
the low point, but the bulk still left net
losses as a general rule. There were some
very striking movements of stocks In
special cases.
Metropolitan Street Railway continued
its remarkable advance, rising at one
time six points, and closing two points be
low the highest. Third Avenue was up
at one time 6% points on the acquisition
of a large connecting system. The stock,
however, reacted three points before the
close.
Some of the notable recent advances
were due to the rumored pendency of
plans for the distribution of the surplum
reserves to the credit of some of the gilt.
edged properties. The prevailing abun
dance of money is said to make the case
of these surplus funds increasingly bur
densome. Such a property as Pullman,
which advanced an additional point to
day, but reacted two points in the clos
ing dealings. Adamm Express was ex
dividend of 2 per cent. to-day and ex-100
per cent. in bonds, to be exchanged for
stocks of the company. The closing bid
yesterday on the stock was 187 and to
day's closing bid was 100 and 140 asked.
The day's dealings in bonds continued
on a remarkably large scale, single lots
of a par value of from $60.000 tap to 5150,000
changing hands frequently. The par value
of sales for the day of Atchison adjust
ment 4's alone was $120,000. Some of the
speculative bonds reacted sharply in sym
pathy with stocks, but the general ten
dency was upward. There has been a
strong tendency to reaction In the stock
market at times during the week, prin
cipally due to apprehensions regarding
the Cuban question. Early in the week
the market was sold aggressively by
houses with Washington connections. and
this was interpreted as being induced by
a belief that affairs with Spain were
reaching a critical stage. The critical out
come of the incident was accepted In Wall
street, and induced large covering of
short contracts by these same Washing
ton sellers and the market rallied strong
ly on Thursday. But this rise was attrib
uted by some persons to manipulation.
The resumption of realizing which fol
lowed to-day's advance gave color to this
supposition. The market seemed to be in
the hands of giants in speculation, and
they refused to offer theif holdings on a
declining market so long as it is capable
of being checked by support. That the
market is heavily overbought for great
speculative accounts looking to be ulti
mately sold for profits is generally be
lieved. That the general public has not
thus far been induced to come into the
market and absorb these lines in any
volume is indicated by the disregard of
current news manifested by the market.
The enormous demand for all grades of
interpaying securities not already ad
vanced to prohibitive figures shows the
large amount of money seeking invest
ment and affords great material sup
port to the more purely speculative de
velopment of the market. The plethoric
condition of the money market and the
cheapness of rates tends to lessen the re
turn on investment securities, thereby
raising the prices. Increase in railroad
earnings and promises of added profits
by consolidations and refundings are
discounted in proportionate rises in the
prices soon after being announced. The
buying of stocks on the New York ex
change for London account has been
heavy during the week, the demand for
Americans having been quite active at
London and other foreign centers.
Besides the record transactions there
are reports of very heavy blocks of se
curities having passed to the hands of
European holders at private sales from
the hands of reorganization interests. In
view of this absorption of American se
curities abroad the upward tendency of
the foreign exchange market during the
week is somewhat contradictory. But the
easier rates for money here have been
attended by a stiffening of discount rates
abroad, and this has naturally induced
the withholding of exchange In order to
draw the higher interest rates abroad.
Dealings In the bond department of the
market have continued on an unprece
dented scale during the week. The specu
lative Issues have moved at times In
sympathy with the reaction in stocks, but
prices are materially higher all around.
U. S. new 4's registered and the old 4's
registered are % lower bid, and the 5's
% higher bid on the week.
New York Closiag Stocks.
Hawaiian Sugar .......... ............. ':t
Reading, 1st preferred ................ '15
Atchison .......... ............ .......... 13%
do preferred ............. ............. 31%
Baltimore & Ohio ....................... 1I.
Canada Pacific .....................97%
Canada Southern ...... .. ...........:ft
Central Pacific ........... .............. 14
Chesapeake & Ohio ................... 23
Chicago & Alton .......... ..............164
C.. B. & Q ................................ IJ rS
C. & E. Iii........ ................. .
t'.. C'.. C. & St. L ............:t
do preferred ........... ............
Del. & Hudson ......................1121,
Dcl.. L. & W ...................... l
D. & B. G...... .......... 1 1
do preferred ..............
Erie. new ............. .... 1ST
do 1st preferred ............. ..... . 42,y
Fort Wayne ............... 170
Oteat Northern preferred .............134
ti cking Valley .......... ............ 1
Illinois Central ............. .......... 1c:,
L. E. & W .............. .................. 17%
do preferred ............... ...::,
Lake Shore .. ......................14114
Louisville & Nashville .
Manhattan L........ .......... .........116%
Met. St. Ry.......... .....................4
Michigan Central .......... .............1"
Minn. & St. L........... ............... . '6
do 1st preferred ....................... M
Missouri Pacific ............ ........... :54
Mobile & Ohio ........... .............. 1%I
M.. K. & T........................ 13%
do preferred .........., ... W
C., t L... ........ ...... 9%
do New J 4 *................ 9
New Terk Ogm *-a ..138
N. ~ -J. C.i*****-----...ft
do lst p **.******.***---..... 74
de 8d prefes .4.....***.****-........ 37%
Norafok A w eern ........... ........ 18%
North AnNerloaa Company .... ..... 6%
Northern Paeis . .... 27
do preferred .... 66%
0. t W......... ..... .................... 17%
O R R. & N.. .. . .... 61%
Oregon Short Ine. 24%
Pittsburg .......... .......... ..........1w%
Reading ... ........ 21%
Rock Island ............ ................ 2
St. L. '& R. ............................. 7%
do lst preferred ....................... 57%
do 3d preferred .......................
St. Paul ........... ....................... 96%
do preferred .......... ................146
St P. & O . ......... 7o %
do preferred ........ ................148
St. P., M. a Mm............................131
Southern Pacian ........................... 30
Southern Railway ........... .......... 9%
do preferred ........... ............... 32
Texas & Pacific ............ ........... 12%
Union Pacific ............. ............. 34
U. P.. D. ............ ................:M
Wabash .......... ........................ 7%
do preferred ........... ................ 15%
W. & L. E. ......... ................ 2%
do preferred .......... ................. 1n%
Adams Express, discount of 2 per
cent. and 100 per cent. payable in
bonds .......... .......... ...........100
American Express ......................1>
United States .......... .................. 42
Wells-Fargo ......... ...................116
Western Union ........... .............. a
Chicago & Northwestern ...............129
do preferred ............ ..............173
R. G. & WW .............. . .............34
do preferred ..... ............... %
Chicago & Great Western ........... 13%
St. L. & S. W ............ ............ 4
do preferred ......... .................. 9%
BONDS.
P. 8. new 4's registered ................128%
do coupon ......... ..............129%
U. S. 4' ............ ......................112%
do coupon .......... ...................114%
do, ds ..... .....................180
U. S. 5's registered .....................113%
do coupon ............. ................113%
New York Miiang Stocks.
Chollar ...... .......... ................ .34
Crown Point ..... .................. ..1
Con. Cal. & Va.......................... ..8
Deadwood .................. ........ .90
Gould & Curry ..........................25
Hale & Norcross ................... 1.40
Homestake ........ ........ ........... 40.00
Iron Sliver ...... .................. ..
Mexican .................... ........ .2
Ontario .............. ................... 2.5
Ophir .......... .......... .............. .25
Plymouth .............................CS
Quicksilver .......... ........ ........ 1.00
do preferred ......................... 2.5
Sierra Nevada......................... ..5
Standard ..... ...................... 1.50
Union Con.... .................... .34
Yellow Jacket.......... ................. ..3
Money Market.
New York, Feb. 11.-Money on call
closed easy at 161% per cent. Last loan,
1% per cent. Prime mercantile paper, 3t4
per cent. Sterling exchange easier, with
actual business in bankers' bills at $4.851
for demand and at [email protected]%4 for 60 days.
Posted rates, $4.8404.86%. Commercial bills
$4.62. Silver certificates, 56%4157%c. Mexi
can dollars, 46%e. Government bonds
weak, state bonds dull, railroad bonds
irregular.
Metal Market.
New York. Feb. 11.-The market in a
general way shows rather a better tem
per. The New York metal exchange
makes the closing as follows: Pig iron
warrants very quiet, with 8650 bid and
$6.70 asked. Lake copper strong and high
er at 12.90c bid and 12.50c asked. Tin
steady at 13.95c bid and 14c asked. Spelter
firm at 4.07%c bid and 4.15c asked. Lead
very firm at 3.75 bid and 3.$0c asked. The
firm that fixes the settling prices for
miners and smelters quotes lead at 3.55c.
Bar silver, 56%c.
Financial Cablegram.
New York. Feb. 11.-The Evening Postis
London financial cablegram says: The
stock markets here were quiet. but gen
erally good to-day, the feature being a
sharp rise despite dearer money. The
buying was good and significant. Ameri
cans were active, although dealings were
professional. The close was quiet. It Is
noticed that however good New York
prices are there is a tendency to sell from
there. Argentines and Brasil stocks were
good, as also were Italians and Turks, on
the better tone in Paris.
Mines were lifeless. There is some rea
son for doubt as to whether the Chinese
loan negotiations have been finally sus
pended, although nothing In that line Is
expected at present.
There is a probability of a further issue
of Japanese international bonds here
soon, similar to the operation of last year.
The Grand Trunk statement showing
that the entire deficit had been wiped out
and that a balance of £1,000,000 remained,
exceeded the most sanguine expectations.
Lincoln's Btirthday.
Ncw York, Feb. 11.-To-morrow being
Lincoln's birthday, all exchange here
will be closed.
CHICAGO MARKETM.
Produce.
Chicago. Feb. 11.-There was a big de
mand for wheat right from the start.
May, which closed yesterday at 96%c.
opened to-day at 97%@97%c. There was
considerable selling by Interests which
have been putting wheat on the market
for some time past, but the demand was
so great the price advanced steadily, not
stopping until 98c had been reached.
There were two big factors in the ad
vance-the Letter shipments abroad and
the Liverpool strength. The former was
given the most attention. It was stated
on the floor and not denied by the Letter
Interests, that arrangements are being
made for the shipment of 4,000.069 bushels
of their wheat from here to the seaboard.
Contracts have already been let for 2,000.
000 bushels of this, It is said, and the
moving of so much cash wheat had a
marked effect on shorts.
Liverpool was very strong. early cables
showing %d advance and later advices
showed that market tIQd up from yes
terday. Private cables said the strength
was on consumption demand and light
supply. Liverpool has received but 272,00
bushels in six days, not much over the
weekly consumptive demand.
Argentine shipments for the week were
712,000 bushels, much less than generally
expected. After advancing to Sie the mar
ket eased off somewhat. There was a let
up in the urgent demand, with the usual
selling by people who have been playing
for a break, and May reacted to 971,c.
Then for an hour the price moved be
tween 97%c and 98c, most of the time be
It at about 97%c. After that the mar
ket again became active and very strong.
Late cablegrams brought liberal buying
orders to the seaboard, and about an hour
from the close here it was stated that 70
boat loads had been taken for export. A
considerable portion was from Philadel
phia and Baltimore. Three steamers were
chartered, supposed to be for Letter's
grain. Closing cables were all firm and
higher.
The announcement of the export busi
ness gave a touch of genuine excitement
to the market, sending the shorts to cover
in a burry, and the price was sent up to
9Sic. the top figure of the day. Then the
market quieted down. May bringing 97v.ID
97%e at the close.
Thre was a greatly increased aaem
GOVERNOR OF VR
Josiah Grout Sends an Open Letter to Propriqtori
PAINE'S CELERY COMPOUNI
i/
ý'rr' - ". I
eg"g :: ":I"
.DD.,AA
The present governor of the Green
Mountain state, though born in Cana
da, has lived in Vermont since he was
6 years old. His course at the St.
Johnsbury Academy was Interrupted in
1861 by his enlisting in Co. 1., 1st Ver
mont cavalry. He was mustered in as
second lieutenant, promoted to captain
the following year. and in 1864 made
major of the 26th New York cavalry.
Major Grout participated in 17 en
gagements, and was badly wounded in
a skirmish with the celebrated confed
erate leader, Mosby.
At the close of the war he entered
the law office of his brother, General
Grout, and was admitted to the bar.
His service in the Vermont legislature
embraced the years 1872, '83, '86 and
'88. He was speaker of the house for
three years and senator in 1892.
Governor Grout is deeply indebted to
Paine's celery compound for the good
health which he to-day enjoys. He ex
presses his conviction of the value of
the great remedy in the following few
words:
State of Vermont.
Executive Department.
July 5, 1897.
Wells, Richardson & Co., Burlington,
Vt.
Gentlemen-Having realized a benefit
tive trade in corn and the market was
very strong. Nearly all the big bulls
"doubled up" on their lines and the price
went above S0c after a hard fight. Com
mission houses sold freely and every
thing was taken. The strength in wheat
and the unfavorable weather were influ
ences. A good export demand was re
ported. May ranged from 30%e to 29%e,
and closed lc higher at 30630%c.
Oats were strong and prices got to the
highest point for the crop. May closed
%@%c higher at 25%Ak2&.
There was a strong market for provi
sions, with trade as a whole unimportant,
closing steady. The strength of the grain
markets and moderate stocks were influ
ences. May pork closed 7%c higher, May
lard 24c higher and May ribs 2%c higher.
Cask Quoetatiens.
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour,
strong. Winter patents. $4.90(84.80:
straights. $4.30(14.60; spring specials. 5.35
45.45; spring patents. =4.5045.30; baker's,
$3.54W3.80. No. 2 spring wheat, 9SI9Oc; No.
3 spring wheat, 914193c; No. 2 red, 95%4W
$1; No. f corn, 28% s34c; No. 2 oats. 25%c;
No. 2 white, f. o. b.. 2K6%321se: No. :t
white, 48%c: No. 2 barley, 334239c; No. L
flax seed, $1.23%411.2b: prime timothy seed.
$3.80; mess pork. per barrel, S1o.AotIe.65.;
lard, per 100 pounds. $5.02+_; short ribs
sides, loose, $045.30; dry salted shoulders.
4%@6c; short clear sides. boxed. 35.301
5.40; whiskey. distillers' finished goods,
per gallon, $1.18'.
Articles. Receipts. Shipments.
Flour. barrels ........... 12.051 17.05)
Wheat, bushels ......... 44,060 10,000
Corn. bushels ............477,000 1P4.140
Oats, bushels ............304,000 273,000
Rye. bushels ........,. 9.000 2.000
Barley, bushels ......... 23,000 16,.0)
Live Meek.
Chicago, Feb. 1L-There was a fair de
mand for cattle and prices were generally
unchanged. Choice fat cattle were scarce
and sales were mostly well under $3. Sales
were at an extreme range of $3.8545.70,
the bulk of the cattle bringing 34.35115.10,
with fair sales at $5.1545.30. Prime cattle
continued to sell at the highest prices
paid in a long time, while inferior and me
dium grades sold very unsatisfactortly.
Good feeders were much sought after.
sales being mostly at $804.30. with one lot
at $4.77%. A few prime bulls sold for 36.1)
and prime calves brought $4.754$7.
Hogs-Early sales of hogs were at
steady prices, but the market a little later
became firm. The bulk of the hogs cross
ed the scales at 33.9044, the extreme range
for the poorest to the beast being 33.60b
4.05. The late market was dull and lower.
Sheep-Prices for sheep and lambs rul'd
weak. particularly for heavy grad(..
Lambs sold slowly at $4.SecS .. Wester!,a
l re~amMILnaa and Oc taguw f+.ci
from the use of Paile s celery com
pound I hereby endorse the prepa-s.
tion as a reliable remedy that fully
meets the claims made for It.
It is a pleasure also to endorse the
proprietors of it as one of Vermoant's
oldest houses whose businese reputa
tion is above reproach.
Josiah Grout.
Life is too short to waste one day of
it sick abed, grumpy or ailing.
Indigestion, nervousness and rheu
matism make one old before one's time.
take the heart out of work and make
one a burden at home and a bore to
one's friends. Every one owes it to his
family, to his friends, to his success
and happiness to get strong and stay
so.
Worn-out nerves bring on more ill
health and disease than all other
causes put together. In their Impov
erished condition they cause the blood
to become thin, weaken the digestion
and make the heart work with dificul
ty. The main factor in eradicating
neuralgia, rheumatism, nervousness,
headaches and sleeplessness from the
system consists in making the nerves
stronger. Paine's celery compound is
the nerve-invigorator par-excellence.
Better nerve nutrition plays the princi
yearlings brought [email protected] and sheep 1.3O0
5.00, rams selling at 63.2033.50 and ewes
at 13.5004.30. Heavy export sheep were
saleable around $4.3 and fed Western
sheep sold at 13.1004.15.
Receipts-Cattle, 3.000; hogs, 2$.600;
sheep, 6.000.
Doeme Steets.
Boston. Feb. 11.-Oregon Short Line,
24%: Boston & Montana. 17$; Butte &
Boston, 32%.
as. Yraselsee West.
San Francisco, Feb. 3?.-Spring wools
Nevada, 11013c; Oregon. 125140. Fal
wools-Southern coast lambs. 70$c; San
Joaquin lambs. 70ce: northern lambs. U
0v12c; mountain lambs. 1301k;: ea Jea.
quin plains, 704c; Humboldt sad Mde.s
cino, 14015c.
Trassury S-aemeat.
Washington, Feb. 11.-To-day's state
ment of the condition of the treasury
shows: Available cash balance, $217,32,
241; gold reserve, $16,77.3153.
Bask Clearisgs.
New York, Feb. 11.-The following ta
ble. compiled by Bradstreet. shows the
bank clearings at the following cities for
the week ended Feb. 11, with the per
centage of increase and decrease as com
pared with the corresponding week last
year:
Inc. Dec.
New York .... ......4 905.908.278 42.2 .
Boston .... ...... .... 110.114.057 8. ..
Chicago .... .... .... 117.160.171 67.8 ..
Philadelphia .. .. .... 70.421.921 24.9 ..
St. Louis .... ...... 28.131.1 12.7 ..
Pittaburg .... .. ..... .0.856.042 47.5 ..
Baltimore .... .. ..... I614S.8 14.2 ..
San Francisco .... .. 14.28.~310 21.3 ..
Cincinnati .... .. .... 12.648.700 6.5 ...
Kansas City .... .... 1.1.471.991 3.4 ...
New Orleans .... .... 10.7.l7.53 14.6 ....
Minneapolis .... .. .. 7.381.9008.8 .6
St. Paul .... .... .... :1.519.52 20.5 ....
Omaha .... ...... .... 5.253.910 20. ....
Denver .... ..... .... .2.73.1ST .... 13.4
Salt Lake City 1.40,02 .... 1.5
Portland, Ore.. .. .. 1.313.017 18.3 ...
Los Angeles .... .... 911.,09 4.6 ....
Seattle .... .... . 1.436,013 Z7.3 ...
Spokane .... - .. 7,4 25.3 .-
Fargo. N. D..... .... 314.035 48.0 ...
Totals. V. 5.... . ..21,434.$13.904 53.3 ..0
Totals outside N. T.. 51.000,761 23.3 .
DOMINION OF CANADA.
Montreal ........ ....$ 1:.811.908 ....
Toronto .... .... .... ...06.341 21.5 ..,
Winnipeg ...... ...... 1.453.53 41.8 ...
Halifax ............ 1.258.741 17.2 ....
Hamilton ... ...... 70 38.4
at. John, N. B........ B1..311 .... ...
*,Tis...e m.;- 14.0.43f 2I. 3.? .
pal part in the aueceastul treatim1e
M.er kidney and heart dseme ..a
as UeIrons diseases.
Every -ce kunwe that the
the work at peap . Plssm
of lit. till death it aever eaises
lar blood into the artaries
heart-beat results treoe a
pulsa Whea the nerve cetensa
reduced there ftlows a r
creasing feeblenes.. the hart
reagularly, there is a e at
and muscular togse. the lhate
their support, appette dtl sa
becomes unattafiable. The
towards a heartier appetR
sleep, firmer pishe. ths
Invigorating etect at
compound upon the nerve
over the body.
Progress toward health intet
uniform when Pain"'s
is employed. It stops
that sure Indleston atgrwn
there is a noticeable
those nervous twitig
Glee and numbaeesa t
are precursors of peis bi
chores, so commos
worried people who are 1W
down with some tom at -
Ity.
maee lM.b N ses.
Great Falls. Feb. UL-This
the county commeslm.a tenayt
action recently iuagrate4 Uthe
council and erred 30tl65 er khS
Mountai n D agba aa
these te a ey ehe
atmiments weas be ae
county at the 0Smpaag's 4
a"ssuseens .sse
Great Fa!4 bbd IL-Pb.
Wgasted A. S. Peal a fat
resident agent see the st a
tean i ad bee does as as .Ib
effect with the eluet and
here___
From the washG tms" als. WW r
"of courue." ashs the end
soothingly" "we don't mesmet 11
everbody. You doent exaer
this world. do you?"
"No. I don't expect
expect a tull ton of cost wham
it...
"-rhat's human astove dor
slat on referring to eas
iag and fail to al e
scrupulous beeady r -
While there ya hee heat
short on the ues, Sea
that every pead we
weight. And you amst
age of decepateon mat is
-i ai~ag
hobs Me
sad a FlU " a
fad.
*e-esetWIfelsa itý
sn femýe mesef

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