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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, November 18, 1880, Image 8

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036143/1880-11-18/ed-1/seq-8/

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LOCAL i NEWS.
From the Daily Herald of November 11.
ACROSS THE BORDER.
The Connecting Rails of the
N. P. R. R. Silver Spiked.
An Important Event Suitably Cele
brated.
[special to the herald.]
Little Missouri. Nov. 10, via Bismarck,
November 11.—The extension of the North
Pacific to-day entered Montana at 2 o'clock.
The occasion was celebrated by the driving
of siver spikes presented by the citizens of
Montana. About fifty invitations were given
by General Manager Sergeant to members of
the press and others. The w eather was fair
and the whole proceedings a success. Appro
priate speeches were made and a grand din
ner given. There being no one present trom
Montana, Geo. P. Flanney, a lawyer of Bis
marck, was chosen to represent the Terri ton - .
He hit the spike the first tap, and said : "'The
Territoiy of Montana welcomes to her bor
ders the great modern agents of civilization
—the locomotive and the railroad. Espe
cially does she welcome the North Pac ific Rail
road, and to-day sends greeting t o the Terri
tory of Dakota and rejoices with her in
forming the links in a part of the great trans
continental railroad which in a few years
will unite the North Pacific oceau with the
unsalted seas, and bind together and cement
more closely the common interest of the two
great Territories of the Northwest—Dakota
and Montana."
Col. Thompson, of Bismarck, represented
Dakota, and in a neat speech turned the
building of the road over to Montana, hop
ing she would encourage and advance it as
Dakota had done.
This completes the road 168 miles west of
the Missouri river. The grading is nearly
done to Glendive, and if the weather contin
ues fair trains will run to that point this
winter. One of the spikes will be sent back
to Helena and the other to President Billings.
The party returned and are now en route
Last.
Mining and Milling.
BONANZA CHIEF.
The new hoisting works on the Bonanza
Chief are nearly* completed and sinking on
the extensive ore body will shortly com
mence. The vein is fifty-six feet wide—all
pay* ore. The last clean-up of $3,600 is now
at the U. 8. Assay office. The company
should pay dividends before long, From the
ore now in sight bullion production should
l>e maintained for years to come.
STAB OK HUKE.
The new gold mine bearing this name, re
cently discovered near the Bonanza Chief, is
attracting much attention from the average
richnass of the ore. An interest has been
purchased by New York capitalists and a
mill is expected soon to be erected. The
vein is six feet wide and an average of the
entire body is said to show fifty-five dollars
in gold to the ton.
ALTA MONTANA
The smelter Is running steadily, producing
6,000 pounds of crude bullion daily. There
is now on hand awaiting transportation 10,
000 pounds of bullion. The Alta and Comet
mines are deing vigorously worked. produc
ing 50 tous of ore daily. The country* sur
rounding Wiekes Is alive with prospectors
and some promising prospects have been re
cently discovered. On the Alta Montana
Company's pay roll are 350 men. The steady
running and successful operation of the Re
duction Works give new life to the mining
interests of the locality now that a home
market is created for ores.
LEGAL TENDER.
Negotiations, we learn, are pending with
Boston capitalists to form a company and
start operations on this welll-kuown mine.
In 1871-2 the Legal Tender produced $350,
000, the ores being shipped to Europe for re
duction. Mining was suspended owing to
high freights and the want of capital to
equip and economically work the mine.
GREGORY CONSOLIDATED
lioston people have recently purchased the
different claims on the Gregory and formed
a stock company. Hoisting works are being
erected at the mine, as also a concentrating
mill to treat the large damp of second class
ores which have accumulated for the past
five years.
j
1
lic
if
Suffered for Twenty Yean*.
Hon. Joshua Tuthill, of East Saginaw, Mich.,
says : Count me among the enthusiastic friends of
Hunt's Remedy. It has proven in my case all you
claim for it. Having suffered for about twenty
years wifh severe disease of the kidneys (which
our local physicians pronounced Bright's disease)
I made a journey East to consult the eminent Dr.
Haven, of Hamilton. New York, of whose fame in
this specialty I had heard much. Dr. Haven ex
amined me carefully and simply said, 'go and get a
bottle of Hunt's Remedy and take according to di
rections.' After having traveled so far for treat
ment, it struck me as rather funny to be directed
to take a médecine which I might have bought
within a stone's throw of my own door, but I was
in tho doctor's hands, and of course I followed his
advice, and before I had taken Hunt's Remedy half
a dozen times I found immense benefit from it and
by continuing the use of it for a limited time I re
covered from by trouble entirely, and am to-day, I
think, one of the most rugged of rugged Michi
ganders. The world is indebted to you, sir, for the
promulgation of such a medicine, and I hope you
may not go without your reward."
f ort Camming Reservation.
^ ASHING TUN, November 11.—The l^resi
dent has Issued an executive order enlarging
the Fort Camming military reservation to
embrace 36 square miles.
From the Daily Herald of November 12.
Assessment ofLewisand Clarke County
We are indebted to Thos. L. Gorham, the
efficient Assessor of Lewis-and Clarke County,
for the following tabulated statement of the I
assessment in Lewis and Clarke County for I
1880. Notwithstanding a large amount of J
money has left the county to be invested
in stock, the assessment has been increased
over $300,000.
45,218 acres of land claimed........................$ 387,485
2,400 town lots........................................... 844,400
4.359 horses................................................ 174,605
430 mules................................................ 25,660
I
25,310 sheep................................................ 68,490 I
merchandise...................................... 597,670
manufactures.................................... 22,175
27,837 cattle of all ages................................ 405,860
1,086 hogs................................................... 6,600
1 goat................................................. 5
998 wagons............................................. 68.590
moneys and credits........................... 482,590
360 watches............................................. 14,010
286 clocks................................................ 2.005
136 pieces of jewelry.............................. 8,960
23 pieoes of gold and silver plate........... 2,070 j
111 musical instruments.......................... 15,290
household furniture........................_ 20,800
1.614 shares of stock.................................. 101,025
all other property............................. 94,240
Total amount..............................$3,342,530
Increase over 1879, $302,295.
The Mineral Wealth of Montana.
The New York J indicator says : " The gold
placers of Montana were second only to those
of California in extent and richness. In fact,
the wealth of Alder Gulch has probably not
been surpassed any where the wide world
over. Fifty* millions are said to have been
washed from this famous locality w ithin a
few short years, and fortunes fell to the
lucky ones with most gratifying rapidity.
There were other diggings which rolled out
their millions in yellow dust, but gradually
became exhausted. But by* the time that a
hundred millious had been sent to the mints
many men had turned their attention to lode
mining, for the territory abounds in numer
ous veins rich in gold, silver or copper, or all
combined. At present the yield of the placers
and gulches Is small compared with former
years, but the ever-increasing output of the
lode veins and the successful work of numer
ous mills and smelters are assurances of I
Montana's future greatness."
Democratic Philosophy.
A Meagher county Democrat, who for
eight years has been a reader of the Her
ald, remits $5 in renewal of his subscrip
tion, and remarks : "'The pictorial num
ber was good—eagle, roosters, goddesses of ]
liberty, and all. You Rads have got away
with it again fairly* and squarely. Demo
crats can stand it ; they are used to it ;
twenty years have inured them to it. Had
it gone the other way your side would have
suffered keenly ; you don't know what de
feat means and couldn't be resigned to it.
Old Democratic stagers, with plenty of ex
perience, don't mind it ; they take to it
kindlv, easily, and make no fuss about it.
' I prefer the Her ald now as before,
the best paper."
It i>
Painful Accident.
While (.'apt. W. D. O'Toole was on his
way to Glendive last week, he unfortunately
fell through a trap door at one of the shacks
on his way, resulting in breaking one of his
ribs and otherwise bruising him about the
body. He immediately telegraphed to Keogh,
where an ambulance was sent him and he
arrived here the day of election. Dr. Girard
rendered medical assistance, and in a short
time the Captain may be expected to be
about as usual.— Yellowstone Journal, f >th in*t.
From the Dailv Herald of November 13.
Called to a New Post.
The liberal overtures made by its publish
ers to Mr. Z. L. White, have induced that
accomplished journalist to accept the editor
ial charge of The Providence Press with its
morning issue, The Star, and its weekly, The
Rhode Island Press. Mr. White is one of the
ablest, widest known and most popular new s
paper men of the country. His series of let
ters descriptive of the mineral, stock-growing,
agricultural and other resources of Montana
and other Territories were the best, most in
teresting and reliable of their kind ever pre
pared and published, and the acquaintance
ship secured throngh them and his joumey
ings in Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, Montana,
Idaho and Dakota, was general, as the always
favorable impression made upon the people
will be lasting. The ten years he was in
charge of the Washington bnrean of the
Tribune familiarized him perfectly with pub
lic men and public affaire, and it is doubtful
if any newspaper man of the country has to
day the advantage of him in this respect. At
the National Capital his influence more than
any other journalist of the Row was for
good, and there is no estimating the weight
his daily telegraphic budgets to the Tribune
had upon public opinion and legislation
Mr. White has every qualification for the
duties he is called npon to perform, and
health permitting, he will discharge them
with an ability unsurpassed.
NOT A BEVERAGE.
* They are not a beverage, but a medecine, with
curative properties of the highest degree, contain
ing no poisonous drugs. They do not tear down
an already debilitated system, but build it up. One
bottle contains more bops, that is, more real hop
strength, thon a barrel o5 ordinary beer. Every
druggist in Rochester sells them, and the physi
cians prescribe them .,'—Rochester Evening Erpress
on Hop Bitters.
DR. COLE,
Of Helena, desires to announce that in con
nection with the general practice of Medicine
and Surgery, he is devoting especial atten
tion to the treatment of all forms of Hernia
and Rupture. The plan of procedure, while
Thoroughly Effective, is Simple in Character
and devoid of danger. wtf-oct21
Result in Meagher*
The Republicans ot Meagher did exceed
ingly well in the election of -most of their
county ticket. W ith two small precincts to
I report, (which cannot change the result) the
I following are the majorities credited to the
J several Republican candidates :
Powers, for Representative...................................24
Rader, for Sheriff and Assessor«.............. 50
IkrtyftL f° r Probate Judge, Clerk and Rwrder!!.«4
Stafford, for County Commissioner... 51
Folsom, for Coroner..............................
McClintock, (dem.) is elected by 116 ma
I jority. Kerley*, Toole and Ford (dems.) and
I Smith (rep.), for the Council, have majorities
Harrington (dem.) for Joint Representative,
leads Allen by 305 majority. Lowry (dem.),
for District Attorney, has 94 majority.
j
TOWN^TALK.
—John W. Tattan's majority at Benton
precinct, for Probate Judge of Choteau coun
ty, is 383.
—The Avant Courier has entered upon its
10th volume. We wish our contemporary
long life and unabated prosperity.
Court Sheriff, the Cavetown merchant,
has leased the Canyon Ferry hotel and ferry
and will take possession on the first of De
cember.
—Secretary Mills has leased the Sawtelle
Theatre and will immediately repair, reno
vate and fit it up for the use of the lower
house of the Legislative Assembly during
the 12th session. The Council chamber will
be in Auerbach's building, over Mark's sa
loon, a second story to lie added immediate
ly.
—Some Eastern Oregon stock men are
building a new kind of fence. There is first
a barbed wire three inches from the ground,
then three boards eight inches wide and
three inches above the wire and three inches
apart. Two more barbed wires six inches
apart above the boards complete the struct
ure. The fence, it is claimed, will keep out
dogs and coyotes, and the builders are confi
dent their valuable sheep will be safe inside
this enclosure.
PE RSON AL.
—Mr. James Martin, an old time tanner
of the Prickly Pear valley, has pulled up
stakes and removed to the Barker min ing
district, Meagher county, where he has locat
ed a ranch. Mr. Martin has oar best wishes
success in his new field of operations.
—Rev. J. T. Mason, formerly of Sterl ing ,
111., where he was pastor for over 20 years, is
now located in Helena. He comes here un
der the auspices of the Amarican Baptist
Missionary Society to look after the interests
of the Baptist denomination in Montana.
Canyon Ferry.
Court Sheriff has leased the Canyon Ferry Hotel
and property, and will take possession December
1st, 1880' dawtf-nov!3
A foil line of Colgate's Toilet Soaps retailed
Rl g £
IT. an. KAKCHEN & CO.'s.
IT. an. KAKCHEN & CO.'s.
FRED. H. ANDERSON,
AGENT,
HELENA, MONTANA.
w3m-novll
DR. P. F. MADDEN,
Helena ................................................Montana
Office—On Broadway, opposite Herai.d office.
Particular attention
paid to diseases of Women
wtf-eep9
VEBY EASILY MANAGED,
ECONOMICAL IN FUEL,
AKD GUARANTEED TO
Bin Perfect Sitisfactien Enjita
BUY
ACHÂRTEROAK
MADE ONLY BY
üicelsior Mffl'l Co,
ST. LOUIS, HO.
IMPORTEES AND DEALERS IN
TIN-PLATE, WIRE,
.VEST CLASS OF GOODS USED OB SOLO B1
TIN AND STOVE DEALERS.
SEND FOB PRICE LISTS
KINN A &. JACK, Hole Agents for Montana.
daw6m-sep22
A. M. ESLER.
ERNEST GRENIER, E. M.
ESLER A GRENIER,
Sample, by mail will receive prompt and careful
attention. Ores purchased for shipment. Exami
nation. and reports made upon mines and mill
properties and plans furnished for reduction works.
Office at Pioneer Beal Estate Agency, Helena, M.T.
<Mcw-myl4
^
THE PUZZLE SOLVED!
$1
WILL BUY
8 Pair Heavy
cotton half hose
«2
WILL BUY A
Fine Felt Hat.
s 3 !
WILL BUY A
Fair of all wool
Men's Fants.
$4
WILL BUY A
Boy's Suit.
*5
WILL BUY A
Pair Fine Calf
Boots.
$ 6
WILL BUY A
Large Zink Cov
ered Trank.
$7
WILL BUY
Six Fine White
Shirts.
_ 1
*8
WILL BUY A
Fair California
4-point Bla'kts
$9 $10
WILL BUY A j WILL BUY A No. 1
Good Business Fall or Winter
8nit. Overcoat.
1
$11
WILL BUT
Twelve Cheviot
Dress Shirts.
*12
WILL BUY A
Black Dress
Suit.
*13
WILL BUY A
Young Man's
Fine Diagonal
Suit dfc Hat.
$14
WILL BUY A
Dress Snit«Hat,
Heck-Tie and
Suspenders.
*15
WILL BUY A
Custom Made
Soit.
_
AT
Mood, Sobs
& Co, 's,
MAIN ST., HELENA.
The Above is the Most
Correct Solution Thus Par Given.
d&w-m25
TWO DOORS BELOW THE POST OFFICE,
Helena. - - - Montana.
FRANKLIN * HUMBERT,
GENTS FURNISHING GOODS, HATS AND CAPS.
New Fall Styles of Neck Wear—the Brompton, the Criterion,
the Albion and De Joinville (to wear with a ring) and other
styles in elegant patterns and colors. Linen Collars and
Cuffs. The F. & C. and other makes of Cloves, Underwear
and Hosiery, etc., etc., in great variety.
PLEASE CALL AND EXAMINE.
djtwly-octl9
p lAisros
1869--1Q80.
AND
GEORGE P. REEVES L CO.
NOTIONS.
WATCHMAKERS
And Dealers in
Sheet Music a Specialty
Watches and Ulocks.
DIAMONDS,
MAIN STREET,
FINE JEWELRY,
Helena, Montana.
Silver and Plated Ware.
Child & Jones,
We have largely increased our facilities for
DEALERS IN
Manufacturing Jewelry,
STATIONERY
And are now prepared to make to order Jewelry ut
AND
ANY DESIGN.
Jewelry made to order from Montana Gold and
Silver. All work guaranteed.
Fancy Goods.
.Wain Street. .... Helena.
J. SWITZER,
WHOLESALE DEALER IN
Wines, Liquors
CIGARS,
•AND
Bar Glassware,
HELENA, MONTANA.
wjl
A. J. DAVIDSON,
Wholesale and Retail Dealer in and Manufacturer 1
of •
HARNESS, SADDLES, Etc.
Canli Paid for Hides, Fora and Wool.
^ _Holler's Block, Main street. Helena.
Engraved and Frosted Window Glass at
H. M. PÄRCHEN A OO.'S
©d
SMITH & HAGY,
DEALERS IN
GROCERIES,
PROVISIONS,
dry goods.
Hats, Caps, Boots and Shoes,
Guns, Ammunition,
General Merchandise!
HUNTLEY, MONTANA.
C.ALH PAID FOIi
dry hides, robes,
And FURS.
w-jy!5
Fifty cans Moore's Noli
©d by H.
■"'.Si&Ä'or
PARC

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