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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, October 04, 1883, Image 2

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HELENA WEEKLY HERALD.
FISK BROS. - - - Publishers.
R. E. FISK,......Editor.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1883.
HE PUBLIC AN CON V EN TIONS.
A Convention to consist of 45 Delegates from the
Judicial Districts and Counties of the Territory
Montana is api>ointed by law to assemble at the
Capital of the Territory on the 14th day of'Janu
ary. A. D. 1884, to frame and adopt a Constitu
tion for the future State of Hontaua. The
election of these delegates is appointed to be held
on the Oth day of November, A. D. 1883. at the
various election precincts throughout the Terri
tory. Each judicial district is entitled to two Dele
gates. Delegates are apportioned to the various
counties of the Territory as follows, to wit :
To the county of Beaverhead...........
" '* Choteau.................
...2 Delegate:
...2 "
Custer....................
" " Dawson.................
...i
Gallatin..................
...5 44
Jefferson ................
2 44
Lewis and Ciarke..
...4
Madison.................
2 "
Missoula................
. 4
Meagher................
..3
silver Bow.............
...6
Yellowstone...........
.2
The Republican County Committees of theses*.
eral counties of the Territory are expected to call
their respective county conventions to nominate
candidates for Delegates from the counties, fix the
number of delegates thereto of which they shall
consist, and their alternates, and apportion the
same among the several precincts of their counties
in such manner as will enable the Republicans of
their county to fairly express their preference for
delegates to such county convention at the pri
mary meetings, and generally to have charge of
the affairs of the party in their county so far as it
is necessary to facilitate a fair expression of the
desires of the Republicans at these assemblages,
and to take charge of the distribution of tickets at
the election. It will be the duty of the several
county conventions to select delegates and alter
nate delegates as hereinafter apportioned to attend
the conventions in the judical districts hereby
called. In the absence of Republican Judicial Dis
trict Committees, to whom, if they existed, this
duty would appertain, the Republican Territorial
Committee hereby invites the Republicans of
each of the three judicial districts of the Territory
to assemble in each of their respective districts
in a
Republican District Convention
on the 17th day of October. 1883, at twelve o'clock
meridian, then and there to select one candidate
for Delegate to the said Constitutional Convention
to be supported by the Republican electors, and all
others acting with them in such district, at the
ensuing election. While two delegates are to be
elected in each of said judicial districts, it is pro
vided by law that no elector shall vote for more
than one of such Judicial District Delegates,Jit
having been the evident intention of the Legisla
tive Assembly thereby to divide the six district
Delegates equally between the two political
parties.
The Republican Convention
of the First Judicial District will assemble at Boze
man, and delegates to the same are hereby ap
portioned as follows :
Custer County....................................3 delegates.
Dawson...............................................2 "
Gallatin..................................... 4 "
Madison..............................................3 *•
Yellowstone.......................................2 "
The Republican Convention
of the Second Judicial District will meet at Butte,
and the delegates to the same are hereby appor
tioned as follows:
Beaverhead county.............................2 delegates.
Deer Lodge......................................4 "
Missoula.............................................3 ,l
Silver Bow..........................................5 *'
The Republican Convention
of the Third Judicial District will meet at Helena,
and delegates to the same are hereby apportioned
as follows :
Choteau county...................................2 delegates.
Jefferson.............................................2 "
Lewis and Clarke................................4 "
Meagher.............................................3 "
The chairman of the County Republican Com
mittee of thecountv in which the District Conven
tion shall meet is requested to call the convention
to order.
While it does not appearthat any mere partisan
question can arise in the framingof the Constitu
tion to be submitted to the electors of Montana for
their adoption, there seems to exist no machinery
through which tlie peoplecanaetsoappropriately
and effectually as through their respective politi
cal organizations, and the Republicansof Montana
coining to an occasion of greater gravity than has
hitherto confronted them, have vindicated their
right and capacity to aid in the formation of an
organic law under which Liberty shall be secured
to our people and they be emancipated from that
galling thraldom of territorial existence so humil
iating to the pride and harmful to every cherished
interest of enterprising and public spirited citi
zens. By order of the committee.
W. F. SANDERS, Chairman.
M. A. Meyexdorf, Secretary.
Republican County Convention.
The Republican electorsof the County of Lewis
and Clarke, and all others whose bona fide purpose
it is to act with them at the ensuing election and
vote for their nominees, are requested to meet in
their several precincts herein designated on Satur
day. October 6tli, 1883, at 4 p.m.. to nominate dele
gates and alternate delegates to attend a
REPVBMCAX COUNTY CONVENTION,
which is hereby called to meet at me Court House,
Helena,Jon Saturday, October 13th, 1883, at twelve
o'clock noon, to nominate candidate» for Dele
gates to the Constitutional Convention to be voted
for by the electors of said county at the ensuing
election.
It will also be the duty of the County Conven
tion to select four delegates to the District Con
vention to be held at Helena October 17th.
The primary meetings will l>e held at the fol
lowing places, and the number of delegates to
which each is entitled is as follows:
Helena...............................................................36
Unionville..........................................................2
Park............ 2
Nelson Gulch..................................................... 2
Clarkston........................................................... 1
Red and Lee Mountains.................................... 2
Greenhorn and St. Louis.................................... 1
Mullan Tunnel...,.............................................. 4
Silver City......................................................... 2
Canyon Creek.................................................... 1
Whipporwil and Mount Pleasant...................... 1
Gloster...............................................................2
Marysville and Belmont.................... 3
Virginia Creek................................................... 1
Wm. Johns'........................................................ 1
Wolf and Rock Creek....................................... 2
Moore's Station.................................................. 1
Dearlxmi............................................................ 1
Eagle Rook........................................................ 1
New Misson............... 1
Sun River Crossing............................................ 3
South Fork Sun River....................................... 3
Kessler's Brewery and Cody's Crossing............ 1
Goodwin School House...................................... 2
Harmony School House..................................... 2
Grange Hall....................................................... 2
Spokane....................... 2
French and Spokane Bars................................. 1
Tucker and Dry Gulch..................................... 1
Total............................................................84
The committee recommend that none but dele
gates and their alternates lie admitted to the con
vention.
B. H. TATEM, Chairman.
M. A. Meyendorff, Secretary.
Hon. J. B. Raymond, delegate elect
from Dakota, was interviewed on the
occasion of a recent visit to Washington.
He did not speak very hopefully of the
prospect of the admission of that Terri
tory during the coming session, but
hinted that it might be admitted if it
could be offset with Montana. His mis
givings on that point arose from Jhis
doubt as to whether the Democrats would
rely confidently upon carrying Montana.
On the whole, the most that he expected
of Congress this winter was a division of
Dakota as desired by the people of the
southern portion who were represented
at the recent constitutional convention. ■
NAME YOUR BEST MEN.
In the choice of members for the Con
stitutional Convention we urge both par
ties to forward their very best men, so
that when the Convention meets the
people will have assurance that good
work will be done. In such a matter as
this no one has a right to claim exemp
tion. It is work of the most important
character that men are ever called upon
to do, and every member will be needed
as a working member to serve on some
one of the several committees into which
the whole membership will be subdi
vided and the work apportioned. It is
not like an ordinary legislative assembly,
in which it is better to. have but few
talking, debating and working members.
It wants in legislative bodies especially
men of sound judgment and good sense
to pass their verdict on the general char
acter and effect of a law. If no new laws
are enacted it is generally full as well.
But a Constitutional -Convention has
everything to make and create. Every
single member of the Convention ought
to be able to draw a complete constitu
tion that it ttotild be a credit to live un
der.
The members draw no per diem, cnly
traveling expenses, and the necessary
clerks will be paid for their services. It
will not therefore be an office that any
body would seek for pecuniary consider
ations. If any volunteer to become can
didates therefore it will be such only as
feel themselves competent and willing to
do the w^rk. But it must not be left to
those only who are willing to come for
ward as candidates. For such business
the people arc entitled to the best ser
vices of the best men, and such should
be nominated and elected without much
regard to personal inclination or con
venience. It is like jury duty, or serving
on a Sheriff's posse, or being drafted into
the army for national defense—a common
duty that every one is liable to perform
and should feel it a duty to perform
when the necessity arises. We have seen
recently that Samuel J. Randall, of Phil
adelphia, who has held the third highest
office in the country and is very likely to
be elected to the position again,
was summoned on a petit jury in some
little case, and instead of pleading privi
lege and asking to be excused, he took
his place in the box and did his duty
as a citizen. We have had ex-Presidents
who did not deem it beneath their dig
nity and duty to serve as officers of their
place of residence or on a school board.
When Constitutional Conventions
have been held in the older States,
especial pains have been taken to have
all the ablest statesmen and men of ex
perience and learning, with but little re
gard for politics. At the last Constitu
tional Convention in Massachusetts, in
order to give a greater latitude of choice,
the custom was followed that prevails in
England, of allowing a constituency to
elect a representative without confining
their choice to residents of any particular
district. It would not have been a bad
precedent fur our own legislature to have
followed, as there is no contingency in
volved that would require local repre
sentation. But that is not now a prac
tical question. As the law stands each
county and district must select from
their own residents, and there are plenty
in each county who are competent to dis
charge this trust creditably. If the
nominating conventions do their duty
well the people will endorse their action
at the polls, otherwise they will choose
others that will suit them better.
When an American becomes wealthy
to a surfeit nowadays, there are several
courses open for him to pursue. Of
course he can endow an orphan asylum
or some other great charity, but, almost
always, he doesn't. Then he has to
choose between buying a seat in the
United States »Senate or a fast horse.
The latter is very much the more to be
commended. A Senator with no other
qualifications than a bank account is
apt to be a national disgrace ; the same
figure behind a fiver shares in the glory
of the quadruped without detriment to
any one. He actually becomes a factor
of good. A recent writer in a very well
considered article shows that the taste
which wealthy men are ,exhibiting
in th' < direction is exerting a notable in
fluence in the development of the Amer
ican horse. These observations are sug
gested by the victory of Jay Eye See
over the famous St. Julien, which was
recorded in the dispatches last evening.
The time was not remarkable, the best
heat being 2:181, whereas the winner re 1
cently made a showing of 2:10^ ; but the
difference is explained by the Jfaet that
the track was heavy. Jay Eye See, who
now accedes to the scepter of the turf, is
the property of J. I. Case. A good many
years ago, Mr. Case established at Ra
cine, Wis., a small manufactory of thresh
ing machines. He made a machine that
the world wanted, and it followed as the
day the ni fe ht that the world found
him out and made him very
rich. Some years ago he became
interested in horse-flesh, and draw
ing checks with no stinted hand,
he has won the distinction of owning
the greatest American trotting horse.
Mr. Case is a gentleman of superior in
telligence and high character, w*hose in
terest in the turf cannot fail to have a
beneficial influence.
The value of finished goods manu
factured in the United States is esti
mated at 1948,000,000, or about 18 per
cent of the w hole value of the goods.
CONFLICTING COURTS
The man must think that the United
States is synonymous with Utopia who
imagines that our courts are free from
the bias of partisanship, local preju
dices and the other influences that disturb
the balance of the human mind. The
folly of such a confidence has a very re
cent illustration in two diametrically
opposite decisions from the same prem
ises.
The city of Hong Kong, though it is
situated in China, is not under the au
thority of the Chinese Emperior, being
a dependency of Great Britain. The
question has thus arisen whether the pro
vision of the law passed by the last Con
gress which excludes "Chinese laborers"
can be enforced against natives of that
city. A few* weeks ago the United States
Circuit Court for Massachusetts, Judges
Lowell and Nelson presiding, held on
this issue that the law must be construed
in the light of our treaty with China in
pursuance of which it was enacted ; and
that as Great Britain was not a party to
that convention, it could not be applied
to subjects of the latter power. The
effect of this would be, it will be seen, to
admit to our shores Chinamen who hap
pened to have been born in Hong Kong,
which, in practice, would probably be
found to defeat the purpose of the act.
In that decision was voiced the senti
ment of the East, which is generally op
posed to the legislation on this subject.
A little later the same question came
before Hon. Samuel J. Field, Associate
Justice of the Supreme Court, and Judge
Sawyer, sitting as the United States
Circuit Court for the district of Cali
fornia. Both of these gentlemen reside
on the Pacific coast, and supposably
share in the intense public opinion
against Mongolian immigration that
prevails there. They hold that the term
"Chinese laborers" in the law* means
laborers of Chinese descent, and that
whether they are or are not British sub
jects cuts no figure in the application of
the prohibitory clause. The present
situation therefore is that w'hile China
men from Hong Kong may not be landed
at Sau Francisco, they will be received
with hearty w*elcome at Boston. Of
course it remains for the Supreme Court
to decide finally which construction shall
obtain.
REIGN OF CHEAP POSTAGE.
The new reduced letter rate of two
cents comes into effect to-day, and here
after two cents will carry a letter of the
same weight just as far as three cents
have done heretofore. Everybody who
writes a hundred letters will be saved a
dollar in postage. To the person who
only writes a letter once a month the
saving will not be great enough to en
able him to lay up a fortune in any
single year. The great motive in re
ducing the letter postal rate was not to
save the people any money, but to in
duce them to write more letters. It is
not likely that anybody's postage bill in
the county will be any less at the end of
the year than for the year just closed,
but it is likely that every one who can
write at all will send a least a third more
letters, and very likely the average will
be increased beyond this total. Unless
this is true there will be a loss of total
receipts of the office and a deficiency in
the revenues, for it will cost some more
to carry the increased bulk of letters.
Very likely there will be some tailing
off in the sale of postal cards. It is re
ported that the Postmaster General an
ticipates a deficiency for the first year
under the new law of about two mil
lions. The surplus the past year has
been about two and a half millions, and
we do not think this will be overdrawn.
Railroad transportation has taken the
place of much of the more expensive
star routes, and the country is becoming
generally more densely settled in every
part, so that the same amount of service
supplies a larger number each successive
year.
Judging from things at home, there is
no department of the Government that
is run so closely as the Postoffice Depart -
E very body employed in any part of the
service earns his money by hard w*ork,
and the people get the fullest benefit of
all their money. We suppose the fact
to be that every letter brought into and
carried out of Montana has cost the
Government at least ten cents, and the
people of the Eastern States pay enough
above the cost of their postage to offset
our deficiency. It is about the only
thing in which the people of the Terri
tories have any advantage.
Col. George Knapp, senior pro
prietor of the St. Louis Republican , died
a few days since on an ocean steamship,
upon which he was returning to thi3
country from Europe. He was one of
the oldest of American journalists, and
had built up a paper of great influence,
reaching |throughout the southwestern
part of the Union. He was seventy
years af age.
The Northern Pacific company is giv
ing hearty encouragement to tree plant
ing in Dakota. Climatic difficulties
abound on the line of the road in that
Territory, and if it is shown that they
may be overcome a public service will
be performed.
There were made in the United States
last year 17,000,000 barrels of beer. This
is an unpleasant item to read. It makes
a man feel that he didn't get his share.
THE POSTAL MACHINE.
It cannot be denied that our Govern
ment does some things rather clumsily—
somewhat as Jumbo might be expected
to play the piano if he should develop
a taste for music. This is due to unavoid
able conditions ; it is too vast a concern
to be adjusted readily to delicate func
tions. The wonder is that it does so
many things so well.
Every one of us is a daily witness of a
marvelous achievement that we would
all pronounce impossible, if we were to
reason a priori ; yet so accustomed have
we become to it that we look on without
amazement and with calm indifference.
We refer to the operation of that admir
able machinery by which the mails are
conveyed and distributed. A letter is
dropped into a postoffice at any point in
Montana. It may be directed to some
obscure place in Texas, or Florida, or
Maine, or to some narrow alley in the
worst precincts of a great city. The ad
dress may be written in the most wretch
ed penmanship, for even intelligent per
sons are slow to learn the importance of
legibility in writing proper names, where
the reader is not assisted by the context.
Nevertheless the sender relies with per
fect confidence upon that letter reaching
the party for whom it is intended ; and
the marvel is, that with very rare excep
tions his expectation is realized. And
this service the Government now per
forms for two cents.
Suppose that it were to withdraw its
machinery and leave the work to indi
vidual enterprise ; how vastly the diffi
culty and cost to the sender would be in
creased. Doubtless in the end means
would be found to bring every remote
little group of citizens into communica
tion with every other ; but the expense
would surely be greater and until the
new machine was perfected, there would
be an interval in which we would suffer
inconvenience beyond conception. These
observations are certainly far from new ;
but the recent reduction of postage af
fords an occasion to remind the people
of this country that they owe a duty of
appreciation to the Government for the
far-reaching beneficence of its postage
system.
Incidentally, it is due to consider what
part Republican administrations have
performed in perfecting this machine.
The system of postal cars, for the distri
bution of mails while in motion, the
free delivery in large cities, the money
orders, the recent provisions for the re
mittance of sums less than five dollars,
and the present reduction of letter post
age to two cents were all established by
laws passed by Republican Congresses,
and signed by Republican Presidents.
And these are not least among the many
achievements that are to be credited to
the Republican party during its manage
ment of the National Government.
The New York Herald is not favor
ably disposed toward judicial candidates
for the Presidency. It says : "Some
months ago Justice Field came before,
or was by unwise friends brought before,
the public as a Presidential candidate.
Field may be an excellent man and a
sound Democrat, but he is a Justice of
the Supreme Court of the United States.
As such he oug K t not to be a partisan
politician. If he has an itching for po
litical life and for the Presidency, let
him do as Davis did, who, when he be
came anxious for the Presidency, re
signed his seat in the Supreme Court.
Field's bad example has now, it is said,
demoralized another Supreme Court
Judge. Justice Miller is announced as
the Republican candidate for the Presi
dency. In our judgment, both these
gentlemen owe it to themselves and to
their countryman and to the good fame
and independent judicial character of
the Supreme Bench either to make a
prompt and public declaration that they
are not political candidates, or to resign
at once from the Bench. We will go
farther, and confess that we should pre
fer to see them resign, for the reason
that both of them actually have got the
Presidential maggot in their heads and
are thereby unfitted for the places they
now hold."
In his speech on taking the chair of
the Louisville Convention of colored
people, Fred. Douglass suggested Robert
T. Lincoln and Branch K. Bruce, the
present Register of the Treasury, as Re
publican nominees for President and
Vice President. If this programme
cannot be made to succeed, he would ex
act a pledge that a negro shall be ap
pointed to a place in the Cabinet. Nasby
has not yet been heard from in ratifica
tion of this scheme.
The impression prevails that the elec
tion in New York this fall will have a
double significance. If the Democrats
carry the State by a round majority it is
believed that Governor Cleveland will
go before the National Convention next
year a very strong candidate for the pre
idential nomination. Under these cir
cumstances it would be interesting to
learn what amount of enthusiasm and
other things a gentleman named Tilden
would throw into the campaign.
The "four hundred retired list" of the
army was filled by the recent retirement
of Lieut. Col. Evans, and several officers
who have been recommended for retire
ment will remain in active service until
vacancies occur.
Great Failures.
Among the failurers recently reported in
New York are four clothing firms, which
amount in the aggregate to $5,100,000. It
is difficut to account for such a wholesale
crash of clothing firms in this day of pros
perous business, except as a result of the
battle of the giants where the leading
houses iu New York iu their struggle for
the mastery brought ruin upon themselves
and then upon their associates engaged in
the sale of imported and domestic cloths.
The failures comprise the great firm of F.
Mayer & Co., for $2,000,000; Levy Bros. &
Co., $1,500,000; Bonner & Co., $900,000,
aud Sidenbach, Schwab & Co.. $700,000.
The struggle to be considered the leading
wholesale clothing house necessarily
brought with it vast expenditures in real
estate and fine blocks iu which to do busi
ness, as was the case with Levy Bros. &
Co., who built an immense establishment
on the ground occupied by Barnum's
museum. These things conspired together
to bring about the dire result to the row
of bricks when the top one was started.
Levy Bros. & Co. ouce had a store in Hel
ena, as will be remembered, under the
name of Karuack & Bro., Main street.
Pardon Refused.
Charles Herzog, who was sentenced from
Jefferson county last spring to twenty years
in the Deer Lodge penitentiary for the
murder of William Neubhers. had a peti
tion before the Governor of Montana, num
erously signed, for his pardon. The pardon
was refused. Charley will therefore have
to languish behind the prison bars till 1903
to satisfy the righteous judgment of the
court.
Died.
St. Paul, October 2.—J. P. Kidder,
delegate to the 48th Congress from Da
kota and xuember of the Supreme Bench of
that Territory, died this evening at the
Merchants Hotel.
Annual Meeting.
Detroit, October 2.—The seventy-fourth
annual meeting of the American Board of
Commissioners for Foreign Missions assem
bled in this city this afternoon, and was
called to order by ex-President Mark Hop
kins, of Williams College. The meeting
opened with singing, after which prayer
was offered by Rev. Dr. Ed. B. Walsh, of
Boston. Rev. Charles Terry Collins, of
Cleveland, was elected assistant recording
secretary. After the appointment of com
mittees, Dr. E. K. Allen, Home Secretary
of the Board, read his annual report of that
department, giving a general survey of the
work ; also embodying the renort of the
Prudential Committee touching the work
of their deputation sent to investigate the
affairs in connection with the missions in
Turkey. This was followed by the report
of the Foreign Secretary, Rev. N. Clark,
giving a comprehensive statement of the
work done during the year in the various
fields occupied by this veteran missionary
organization in foreign lands. The results
were highly encouraging. The Treasurer,
Langdon Ward, of Boston, presented his
annual report, showing that the receipts
for the year were $590,996 ; expended in
carrying on the direct work of the mis
sions, $557,245 ; cost of agencies, $9,007 ;
cost of publications, $3,323 ; cost of admin
istration. $20,691 ; leaving a balance in the
treasury at the close of the year of $1,222.
The appraised value of the securities per
taining to the Otis fund still remaining on
hand is $318,406 ; general permanent fund
for support of offices, $56,608. Each of the
last two funds received small additions
during the year. The auuual sermon be
fore the Board was preached this evening
in the presence of a large audience by Prof.
W. D. Barber, D. D.,of Yale College. There
are some 2.000 attendants at the meetings
of the Board in this city. The}* will con
tinue till Friday.
Baptist Convention.
Minneapolis, October 2. —The branches
of the Baptist Church favoring open com
munion, but differeng on minor points, are
represented by delegates from all parts of
Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and
the United States. After devotional exer
cises, Dr. Cheney made the address of wel
come. A committee on organization was
appointed and the convention adjourned
until 2 p. m.
At the afteri oon session the Committee
on Organization reported as follows : Presi
dent, P. B. Cheney, Maine; First Vice
President, W. B. Hale, Indiana ; Second
Vice-President, W. B. Allen, Illinois ; Secre
tary, S. P. Crawford, Illinois; Assistant
Secretary, C. D. Dudley, Minnesota. The
remainder of the afternoon session aud the
evening was devoted to the reading and
discussing of papers of interest to the
church.
Shot and Killed.
Omaha, October 2.— This evening at
York, Nebraska, W. H. Armstrong, an old
resident of York county, was fatally shot
by John and Walter Gilmour, near the fair
grounds. Gilmour two weeks ago married
Armstrong's daughter against her father's
wishes ond he swore vengeance. One week
afterwards Armstrong met his son-in-law
and shot at him twice without effect. Arm
strong was arrested and to-day he and his
two sons were brought into town and re
leased, upon giving bonds for their appear
ance next Thursday. As they were return
ing home, they met Walter Gilmour and
his brother John at the fair grounds, each
party being in his wagon. It is claimed
the wagons locked wheels and Armstrong
sprang into the other wagon and clinched
with Gilmour, when the shooting occurred.
Armstrong was shot twice, one ball passing
through the stomach and the other near
the heart. He lived long enough to make
a dying statement. The Gilmours surren
dered and are in jail. John says he did
the shooting. Walter Gilmour's wife and
Elias Gilmour, father of the boys, were
with them when the tragedy occurred.
Killed With a Stone.
Terre Haute, October 2.—A special to
the Express from Cloverdale, Ind., says:
Bill Grimes tried to quarrel with a farmer
named Will Smith. The latter drove into
the road when Grimes threw a rock strik'
ing Smith in the temple, killing him in
stantly. Grimes is still at large.
A Railroad Agreement.
rating Detween this city and St. Pai
day decided to make same rates and
Sions to San Francisco via St. Pau
Portland as those made with the
trank lines.
Sherwin's Arrest.
Denver, Col., October 1.— The arrest in
Chicago Saturday of Frank R. Sherwin, of
New Mexico, created considerable surprise
in this city. Sherwin is widely known i a
this section as one of the millionaires of
the West and head of one of the largest
stock raising companies on the continent
The circumstances which led to his arrest
as understood here, are as follows : In l» 7 i;'
Maxwell was sent to Florida by the Repub
lican National Committee in tlie interest
of Hayes, and beyond doubt the Republican
victory iu Florida was largely due to Shèr
win's efforts. He was soon thereafter ap
pointed pool commissioner of several rail
roads iu that State, one of which was on
the verge of bankruptcy. Sherwiu asso
ciated himself with a syndicate of New
York brokere, purchased the mortgage
bonds, foreclosed aud took possession of the
road. After the lapse of seven mouths the
original holders of the bonds made the dis
covery that included iu the original fran
chise of the road was a large tract of what
is known as Seminole Indian lauds, which
Sherwin's party subsequently sold, together
with the road, and pocketed the large
profits. It appears that the original owners
of the road have separately sought to re
cover, without success, the value of these
lands, upou what grounds does uot appear.
Sherwin's recent sale of his interest iu the
Maxwell land grant in southern Colorado
and northern New Mexico for three-quar
ters of a million dollars, has possibly fur
nished the incentive for the present pro
ceedings against him. Sherwin recently
married the daughter of ex-Governor (di
pin, of this city.
A Suicide Sensation.
Pittsburg, September 30. —Mrs. Fannie
Bryant Newton, the sensational suicide,
will lie buried to-morrow. The remarkable
circumstances of the case excited the deep
esr interest here, and the residence of the
deceased w*as visited by many ladies aud
gentlemen to-day. The methodical man
ner in which she managed her affairs ami
prepared everything for death is believed
to be without parallel in the history of
suicides. She was doubtless insane, but
there was a surprising degree of method in
her madness. The unfortunate woman was
well connected, being a niece of Alexander
Campbell, founder of the Campbellite
church. Her reputed husband, Dr. Oriu
Newton, who suicided two weeks ago, was
a descendant of Sir Isaac Newton.
Panic Amons Children.
New York, October 2. —Katie Kingston,
a pupil of the grammar school on Christie
street, to-day was taken ill with shrieking
fits. Her screams alarmed the children
and some one shouted "fire." By this time
everything w*as excitement. The fire de
partment was summoned and the alarm
communicated throughout the school. When
the engines arrived, the children were es
caping by many exits. These many exits
prevented any loss of life.
Masonic Convention.
Chicago, October 2. —The forty-fourth
annual convention of the Masonic Grand
Lodge of Illinois occurred to-day. The
lodges were represented by eighty dele
gates. The report of the Grand Secretary
shows the total membership of lodges rep
resented to be 94 627, an increase of about
1,000 during the year ; number raised to
Grand Lodge, 2,223. The sessions will
continue three days.
Clearing House Association.
New York, October 2.— The Clearing
House Association held its annual meeting
to-day. The Association consists of sixty
three members, including tlie Assistant
Secretary of the United States. The trans
actions for the past year were $42,362,138,
453 ; daily average transactions, $1:17,704,
402; total transactions since organization
in 1853, $725,201,540,330; average daily
transactions for the san.e period, $77,
615,755.
New York Markets.
New York, October 2. —Governments
strong. Another dull day in stock circles.
At opening the market was firm aud high
er, with a general advance in prices of to
l,s per cent, the latter on Western Union
on the favorable decision of the court ol'
appeals legalizing $15,526,590 worth of
stock issued at the time of its consolidation
with the American Union and Atlantic A*
Pacific Telegraph companies iu '81. After
11 o'clock the market was quiet and steady
and continued so until afternoon, when a
sharp attack on C. C. C. & D. carried stock
down from 61' to 55. This was followed
by attacks on the Grangers and Lacka
wana. Owing to the absence of support
ing orders the raids were generally success
ful, prices being forced down { to 2 per
cent. The Northwest preferred suffered
most. There was but little recovery at the
close of the market, and left off' weak as
compared with last night at the dose.
Prices are down to 2 per cent., except for
Wabash & Chicago, and Burlington &
Quincy, which is a fraction higher.
TELEGRAPH MARK ET REPORTS.
Chicago Produce Market.
Chicago, October 2.
FLOUR—Quiet, unchanged.
^ HEAT—Fair demand, lower: 05 October:
97 («97% November. No. 2 spring. 95; No. 3
spring 84%; No. 2 red winter 1.01!.,
CORN—Good demrnd, regular, lower; 68' l
cash and October; 67%<«6%% November.
OATS—Easier; 27%e<2:% cash; 27- „427% Octo
ber; 28% November.
RYE—Quiet at 55%.
BARLEY—Dull at 60.
PORK—Fair demand, lower; 10.50!« 10.55 cash;
10.65!? 10.67% October and November.
LARD—Fair demand, lower, closed steady:
'•<£@7.85 October; 7.504 7.60 November.
BULK »MEATS—Fair demand; shoulders 5.50;
short-ribs 6.15; short clear 6.15.
WHISKY—Steady and unchanged, at 16.
New Y'ork Produce Market.
. ...... „ —mwiur; y-iViyh ana options v
lower. Receipts, 232,000 bushels; ex-ports, 19.
bushels. Ungraded red, 90<al.l5 l 4; No. 4 r
w5(«95}4; No. 3 red, 1.04*4; elevator 1.05(11.66 •
'"'f/ed; No. 2 red 1.12%: elevator 1.144,1.15 affo
CORN—Cash %4. 1 and options %@1% low
closing steadier. Receipts, 339,OOObushels ; «
!}^000 bushels. Ungraded, 51461I
2, [email protected]%; elevator 6161%.
OATS.—Firm. Receipts, 69,000 bushels; <
ports, 15,000 bushels. Mixed western. 324
white, 37 («43.
PORK.—Quiet and steady; newmess, 11.75.
LARD.—Firm; prime steam 8.20.
PETRO LEUM!.—Q uiet at 14%,
New York Money Market.
New Y'obk, October 2.
MONEY—Money market 2%@3, closed at 2.
Prime mercantile paper 6^7; sterling exchange
bankers bills weak at 4.82%; sterling exchange
demand, 4.85.
Railroad Stocks.
New Y'ork, October 2.
Canadian Southern.,52,-?
Central Pacific ......... 66%
C. B. & Q.................24%
Del. L. & W............20%
Northern Pacific. ...33%
Northwestern........23;,.,
O. & M....................31
H. & St. Joe............30
Rock Island ............ 20%
St Paul ............. 1%
k.&t.................
Lake Shore..............99-%
L. it N ................... so
Union Pacific .......... 39
W.h..h Pacific.......21' .
Michigan Cen.........81#
Hew Jersey Cen......80%
N. Y. Central...........

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