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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, October 11, 1883, Image 4

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HELENA WEEKLY HERALD.
FISK BROS. - - - Publishers.
R. E. FISK, ......Editor.
THURSDAY. OCTOBER 11, 1883.
REPUBLICAN CONV EN TIONS.
A Convention to consist of 45 Delegates from the
J udicial Districts and Counties of the Territory of
Montana is appointed by law to assemble at the
Capital of the Territory on the 14th day of Janu
ary. A. D. 1884. to frame and adopt a Const it 11
tion for the future State of Montana. The
election of these delegates is appointed to be held
on the 6th day of November, A. D. 1883, at the
various election precincts throughout the Terri
tory. Each judicial district isentitled to two Dele
gates. Delegates are apportioned to the various
counties of the Territory as follows, to wit :
To the county of Beaverhead.............2 Delegates
" *' Clioteau....................2 "
Custer.......................3
Dawson....................1 "
Deer Dodge..............3 "
Gallatin....................5 "
Jefferson..................2 "
Lewis and Clarke.....4
Madison...................2 "
Missoula.................4 "
Meagher..................3 "
Silver Bow...............6
Yellowstone.............2
The Republican County Committees of the sev
eral counties of the Territory are expected to call
I heir respective county conventions to nominate
candidates for Delegates from the counties, fix the
number of delegates thereto of which they shall
consist, and their alternates, and apportion the
same among the several precincts of their counties
in such manner as will enable the Republicans of
their county to fairly express their preference for
delegates to such county convention at the pri
mary meetings, and generally to have charge of
the affairs of the party in their county so far as it
is necessary to facilitate a fair expression of the
desires of the Republicans at these assemblages,
and to take charge of the distribution of tickets at
the election. It will be the duty of the several
county conventions to select delegates and alter
nate delegatesas hereinafter apportioned to attend
the conventions in the judical districts hereby
called. In the absence of Republican Judicial Dis
trict Committees, to whom, if they existed, this
duty would appertain, the Republican Territorial
Committee hereby invites the Republicans of
each of the three judicial districts of the Territory
to assemble in each of their respective districts
in a
Republican District Convention
on the 17th day of October, 1883, at twelve o'clock
meridian, then and there to select one candidate
for Delegate tothe said Constitutional Convention
to lie supported by the Republican electors, and all
others acting with them in such district, at the
ensuing election. While two delegates are to be
elected in each of said judicial districts, it is pro
vided by law that no elector shall vote for more
than one of such Judicial District Delegates,lit
having been the evident intention of the Legisla
tive Assembly thereby to divide the six district
Delegates equally between the two political
parties.
The Republican Convention
of the First Judicial District will assemble at Boze
man, and delegates to the same are hereby ap
portioned as follows :
Custer County....................................3 delegates.
Dawson...............................................2 "
Gallatin...............................................4 "
Madison..............................................3 *•
Yellowstone.......................................2 "
The Republican Convention
•of the Second Judicial District will meet at Butte,
and the delegates to the same are hereby appor
tioned as follows :
Beaverhead county.............................2 delegates.
Deer Lodge......................................4 "
Missoula...................................... 3
Silver Bow..........................................5 **
The Republican Convention
of the Third Judicial District will meet at Helena,
and delegates to the same are hereby apportioned
as follows :
Clioteau county...................................2 delegates.
Jefferson.............................................2 "
Lewis and Clarke................................4 "
Meagher.............................................3 "
The chairman of the County Republican Coin
mitteeof thecounty in which the District Conven
tion shall meet is requested to call the convention
to order.
While it does not appear that any mere partisan
question can arise in the framingof the Constitu
tion to be submitted to the electors of Montana for
their adoption, there seems to exist no machinery
through which the people can act so appropriately
and effectually as through their respective politi
cal organizations, anti the Republicansof Montana
coming to an occasion of greater gravity than has
hitherto confronted them, have vindicated their
right and capacity to aid in the formation of an
organic law under which Liberty shall be secured
to our people and they be emancipated from that
galling thraldom ofterritorial existence so humil
iating to the pride and harmful to every cherished
interest of enterprising and public spirited citi
zens. By order of the committee.
W. F. SANDERS, Chairman.
M. A. Mkyendoef, Secretary.
Republican County Convention
Is hereby called to meet at the Court House,
Helena,"on Saturday. October 13th, 1883, at twelve
o'clock noon, to nominate candidate» for Dele
gates to the Constitutional Convention to be voted
for by the electors of said county at the ensuing
election.
It will also be the duty of the County Conven
tion to select four delegates to the District Con
vention to be held at Helena October 17th.
The primary meetings will beheld at the fol
lowing places, and the number of delegates to
which each is entitled is as follows:
Helena...............................................................36
Union ville .......................................................... 2
l'ark................................................................ 2
Nelson Gulch..................................................... 2
Clarkston........................................................... 1
Red and Lee Mountains.................................... 2
Greenhorn and St. Louis.................................... 1
Mullan Tunnel.................................................. 4
Silver City......................................................... 2
Canyon Creek.................................................... 1
Whipporwil and Mount Pleasant...................... 1
Gloster...............................................................2
Marysville and Belmont.................................... 3
Yirginia Creek................................................... 1
Win. Johns'........................................................ 1
Wolf and Rock Creek....................................... 2
Moore's Station.................................................. 1
Dearborn............................................................ 1
Eagle Rock........................................................ 1
New Misson.................................................. I
Sun River Crossing............................................ 3
South Fork Sun River....................................... 3
Kessler's Brewery and Cody's Crossing............ 1
Goodwin School House...................................... 2
Harmony School House.............. 2
Grange Hall....................................................... 2
Spokane............................................................. 2
French and Spokane Bars................................. 1
Tucker and Dry Gulch..................................... 1
Total............................................................84
The committee recommend that none but dele
gates and their alternates lie admitted to the con
vention.
B. H. TATEM, Chairman*
M. A. Mevexdorff, Secretary.
Mr. Villard is pleasantly conscious
and indifferent. In an interview in New
York he declared that he had not kept
the run of Wall street during his ab
sence, and intimated that he had hardly
taken the trouble to inform himself since
his return. However, he denies the
story that the Oregon Transcontinental
is selling Northern Pacific stock, dis
credits the theory that Gould is manipu
lating Northern Pacific stock, declares
that the Northern Pacific has no floating
debt, and expresses the belief that the
road wi.ll earn $15,000,000 next year.
He is satisfied with the San Francisco
arrangement, as all the Northern Pacific
officials seem to be.
Oscar Wilde has received many
thanks from Mary Anderson for writing
a play for her. They reach him in this
shape : "Declined with many thanks."
j
I
HARMONY, BUT
The pretense recently put forth that
all is lovely and serene among the
Democrats of New York since the recent
State Convention proves, on fuller infor
mation, to be the thinnest kind of a
fabrication. The breach between the
rival factions in New York City is as
wide as ever, and the Tammany crowd
is in a mood for anything except the
docile support of the State ticket. There
were three separate delegations claiming
seats in the convention, and their claims
having gone before the Committee on
Contested Seat», the matter was sett led
by giving the so-called County Demo
cracy thirty-eight members, Tammany
twenty-four, and Irving Hall twelve.
That Tammany should have had any
I recognition whatever made some of the
J "upper air and solar walk" Democrats,
i like ex-Congressman Roosevelt, so mad
J that they refused to sit in the con veil -
j tion. On the other hand, Mr. John
I Keliv's faithful following complain
. *
with great justice that, as Tammany
furnishes the major part of the Demo
cratic votes in the city, it was not fairly
used when allowed less than one
third of the representation. But
not content with snubbing the sachems
in this pointed maimer, the convention
proceeded to defeat their candidate for
the nomination for Secretary of State.
Thereupon Mr. John Kelly arose and
stalked out of the hall, and yesterday'»
dispatches announce the pregnant fact
that he has declined to act on the Dem
ocratic State Committee.
On the whole, the particular style of
harmony that was effected is fairly de
scribed by the New York Herald when
it says : "The old story of the parrot
and the monkey has had its day. Hence
forth the Buffalo convention and the
peace and harmony of New York city
Democrats will he the synonym of con
fusion and disorder."
Of course the gentlemen who make up
the dispatches for the Associated Press
know exactly what is good for the intel
ligent public to read, and we how in
meekness before their infallible judg
ment. When they send three-quarters
of a column from New York about a
prize fight between two biped brutes that
ninety-nine persons out of a hundred
never heard of before, we draw a pleas
ant mental picture of a family circle
gathered about the table while the father
reads to his wife and daughters how
Mitchell "landed on Sheriff's nose, tap
ping the claret," and Sheriff "did some
heavy work on Mitchell's head with both
hands." Up to this point our admira
tion is unqualified ; hut when the dis
patch, having worked us up to this high
pitch of interest, omits to mention which
whipped, we are led to utter a mild re
monstrance. We should he sorry to
seem too particular, hut we cannot afford
to devote the entire day to answering the
throng of persons who may be in breath
less suspense until they learn how that
prize fight came out.
I r may he her misfortune rather than
her fault, but Connecticut is making an
unenviable record for affording im
munity to the murderers of women.
While the men who slew Mary Stannard
and Jennie Cramer art, still at large, a
young woman named Rose Ambler was
killed in the most outrageous manner.
This was over three weeks ago; but,
though the coroner's jury has been at
work ever since, with the aid of detec
tives, a learned microscopist, etc., no
progress seems to have been made to
ward solving the mystery of the crime.
The statement may sound a little start
ling in the East, hut it is nevertheless
true that a murder is more certain to be
followed by the punishment of the per
petrator in Montana than in the old and
populous State of Connecticut, the boast
ed "land of steady habits."
The eastern public derives little ad
vantage from the mutual throatcutting
of the metropolitan press. The New
York newspapers are invariably- sold, a
few hours' journey from that city, at the
former and long prevailing price. The
city newsdealers, who handle a large
part of the local circulation, are kicking
lustily against the reduction that cuts
down their commissions, and insists on
selling at the old figures. If this move
ment is general and sustained, it will
soon be impossible to obtain the news
papers at the reduced price elsewhere
than at the offices of publication. A
rumor is in the air that the reduction is
to be carried farther. It is only a shade
less absurd now than the railroad war in
Chicago.
A ( omet, said to be the great comet
of 1812, is on the rampage again. As
trologers and weather prophets will now
make a diagnosis of the case, and soon
begin to tell what will come to pass, and
prophesying so many things likely to
transpire any year, comet or no comet,
they set themselves up as great beings.
The controlling power that has been
tending these harem scarem—particu
larly scarem—comets, has managed to
prevent any disasters to this earth thus
far, and it is safe enough to let him con
tinue. This comet will be visible about
Christmas. Just in time for Santa Claus.
A provision in the projected consti
tution for South Dakota adopted by the
recent convention at Sioux Falls abol
ishes the grand jury system. This is a
wise provision in the interest of both
a
|
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THE VACANT JUDGESHIP.
It is not probable that anything we
can say will expedite the appointment
of an Associate Justice of the Supreme
Court of Montana to fill the existing
vacancy ; hut tiie matter is so serious
that we cannot forbear to enter a remon
strance against the delay. It is now
seven months since Judge Conger, who
is assigned to the First District, was sus
pended. This action was resisted, and
after some time Judge Shannon was
sent here as a commissioner to take tes
timony pro and con. His labors occu
pied five or six weeks, aud his report
reached Washington about the middle
ot July. There is a well authenticated
rumor that this document removed all
doubt and made it certain that Judge
Conger will not he reinstated, but that a
new Judge will be appointed. Here the
matter rests.
In the meantime the business of the
courts is suffering seriously. It was in
the midst of the March term for Madi
son county that Judge Conger was sus
pended, and there has been no court
held there since, nor is there any proba
bility of another before next spring.
There were appeals to the Supreme
Court which should have been heard at
the August term, but Judges Wade and
Galbraith very properly refused to pass
on each other's decisions in the absence
of a third Judge, and the term practi
cally lapsed.
In the holding of terms in the several
counties, the two Judges named have
done all that could he asked. Judge
Galbraith relieved Judge Wade at the
spring term for Clioteau county, and the
latter has held terms in Custer, Gallatin
and Dawson counties, and next week
will hold a term in Yellowstone county.
Thence he must hasten to Boulder, in
Jefferson county, in his own district,
limiting that term to five days, to en
able him to sit at Bozeman on the 22nd
inst., one week later than the time for
which the term is appointed.
The experience of Gallatin county is
especially severe. The June term was
necessarily limited, so that the civil cal
endar was scarcely reached at all. For
the October term, there is considerable
United »States business and a large num
ber of criminal cases, including half a
dozen murders. Aside from these, there
is the civil business of two terms to be
disposed of. In short, there is work there
which would keep a court busily occu
pied for six weeks. Nevertheless, Judge
Wade can only remain there for two
weeks, as his court sits at Helena on
November 5th.
It seems improbable that any appoint
ment to fill the vacant Associate Justice
ship will be made before Congress
meets in December. This will afford no
relief so far as the Fall terms are con
cerned, and it is doubtfuf whether the
new appointee will find it convenient to
remove here in time to save the January
term of the Supreme Court.
In no censorious spirit, and in due
recognition of certain embarrassments
that the President has been obliged to
confront in the premises, we could still
wish that he had given more weight to
the grievous expense that the vacancy
has visited upon some of our counties,
and to the unjust delays that litigants
are suffering, and so have made an ap
pointment at an earlier day.
The newspaper compositors of Chi
cago have recently set an example that
does them credit. They wanted an in
crease of five cents per 1,000 ems, which
the publishers would not concede. In
stead of striking and giving themselves
up to idleness, while perhaps their fami
lies were suffering, they kept at work
and referred the matter to arbitrators for
settlement. The award was adverse to
the increase ; nevertheless the composi
tors are far better off than they would
have been if they had indulged in a
strike, which would necessarily have
failed to secure their end.
The coroner's jury in the Rose Clark
Ambler case returned a verdict that the
deceased "came to her death by being
choked to death by some person or per
sons unknown. But from William Lew
is's relations with "her in the past and
from his conduct since her death and
from other evidence, we think suspicion
points towards him." Singularly enough,
the dispatch advises us that this intelli
gent production isn't wholly satisfactory
to the people living in the vicinity of
the crime ! Even Mr. Lewis doesn't
like it.
We observe with satisfaction that the
Republican committees in most of the
counties have called conventions to
choose candidetes for delegates to the
Constitutional Convention. So far we
have not seen evidence of such action
for Jefferson or Meagher counties, and
we respectfully call the attention of the
gentlemen whose duty it is to move in
the matter to this omission. Perhaps *
there are other counties that need a re
minder. With two good tickets in the
field in every county, we will be sure of
an able and representative convention.
The cause of the death of Judge Kid
der was a painful surgical operation
which he recently suffered. The de
ceased was an Associate Justice of .the
Supreme Court of Dakota for a number
of years. He represented that Territory
in the Forty-fifth Congress, and was
afterward reappointed to the bench.
a
*
A GREAT SEAL.
The recent constitutional convention
in Southern Dakota, did not overlook
so important a matter as providing
great seal for the budding State. On
the contrary, it elaborated a device that
is in a high degree unique, emblematic
and sententious. An eagle holds in his
beak the Stars and Stripes which drapes
a shield. In the back-ground of this
a mountain range, presumably the Black
Hills, and the chimney of a smelting
furnace, vomiting smoke to show that
has not "shut down." Then there is
river bearing a steamboat upon its bosom,
while a train of cars runs along the bank,
thus affording wholesome competition
and ensuring reasonable rates for freight
and passengers. Next we see a field
grain; and in the fore-ground is a white
man at iiis plow in juxtaposition to an
Indian in the midst of some tepees.
All this is highly descriptive and pic
turesque ; but the most remarkable part
is the motto. Written upon the sky,
and attracting the intent gaze of the
white man—who will doubtless translate
it to the Indian—is the legend, "Fear
God, and take your own part." Could
anything be more appropriate? The
modem and practical Dakotiau was
above the folly and impiety of selecting
a motto written in the obsolescent tongue
of a heathen people. But even with this
restriction to the United States language,
there was a wide range of sentiments
from which to choose. "Trust in God,
but keep your powder dry," "Be sure
you are right, then go ahead," "When
in doubt, lead trumps"—any one of
these, and the list might he greatly
enlarged, could not fail to commend
itself for pertinency and propriety. But
the choice of the convention was wisely
made. The motto selected is pious, but
practical—reverent, but self-reliant.
There is a charming candor about it
withal ; for the average Dakotiau has a
well-earned reputation for taking his
own part and anybody else's part that he
can reach.
The brilliant success of the Dakota
body in this vital matter ought to excite
a spirit of emulation in the coming con
stitutional convention of Montana. The
great seal of the Territory is not all that
a refined taste and a soaring imagina
tion could desire. It depicts a miner's
pan and a battery of stamps, so repre
sented that some execrable wretch is said
to have mistaken them for a box of oint
ment and a fine tooth comb. Over these
are the words, Oro y Plato —though why
our motto should have been written in
the Spanish language, when Chinook
would have been so much more melodi
ous and intelligible, is an unsolved mys
tery. At all events it is clear that the
ripest statesmanship of Montana must
be enlisted in the task of devising a great
seal that will surpass the gorgeous con
ception of our neighbors on the East.
Hon. Schuyler Colfax, who i» now
added to the long list of eminent men
who have vi-ited Helena during the
present season, was Speaker of the House
during the most critical period of our
history—the war for the preservation of
the Union and the vital era of recon
struction that followed. It may not he
said of him, as was said of the course of
Hon. N. P. Banks in the same chair,
that "he stood so straight he leaned
backward" ; but he was strictly impar
tial and proved himself one of the ablest
parliamentarians that the country has
produced. From the Speakership he
stepped directly to the Vice-Presidency
and for four years presided over the Sen
ate. Having thus attained the second
highest honors of the Republic, lie re
tired to private life; and it can be said
of him, as it can be said of few of our
public men, that he knew how to retire.
He has since lived quietly with his fam
ily, and has steadfastly resisted the most
strenuous efforts to recall him to official
position. The complete answer to the
aspersions which venomous partisanship
has cast upon him is found in the fact
that after sixteen years of service in high
station, during which he practised great
frugality, he was comparatively a poor
man, being actually worth considerably
less than he would have been if he had
eschewed political honors and continued
to edit the weekly paper that he left to
go to Washington. But if lie was the
loser, the country was the gainer.
The debt statement for September
shows a reduction of $14,707,221» against
$6,671,851 for the previous month, mak
ing the aggregate surplus applied to this
object for three months of the fiscal year
$29,279,671. The decrease of debt for
the corresponding month of 1882 was
almost the same, being $14,815,948.
There is noticed a great discrepancy in
comparing the three-month period of
last year with this. Last year the sum
of the reduction for the months of July,
August and September was $44,794,237,
an excess over the same months of 1883
of $15,5.5,566. At this rate the excess
on the debt reduction for 1882 over the
entire fiscal year of 1883 will be some
$92,000,000, making the total reduction
for the current fiscal year only about
$75,000,000. There is reason to believe,
however, that an average of $7,500,000
in bonds per month will be redeemed for
the twelve months ending June 30, 1884,
although some of the best posted Treas
ury people put the monthly average at
$6,500,000._
The town elections in Connecticut on
the 1st inst. show very considerable Re
R. R. Circular.
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The following circular, an outgrowth
the receut San Francisco conference, and
signed by representatives of the Central
Pacific, Southern Pacific, Galveston. Harris
j burg and San Antonio, Union Pacific,
J Northern Pacific, Texas and Pacific, Den
! ver and Rio Grande, Burlington and Mis
souri River Railroad, Atchison, Topeka and
Santa Fe, aud Atlantic and Pacific, is hav
ing a wide distribution amoug merchants
First—Notice is hereby giveu that tarill
aud special contract rates between eastern
through points ol the L nited States aud
Canada, aud Portland, Oregon, shall, until
further notice, be the same as those
effect this day between eastern through
points and San Francisco.
Second—Through rates between eastern
through points in the United States and
Canada, aud San Francisco, shall Vie the
same via Portland as by direct all rail
lines, and in a like manner through rates
between said eastern through points and
Portland, Oregon, shall be the same via
San Francisco as via direct all rail lines.
Third—All rates and transportation
privileges affecting traffic between points
in the United States and Canada, east ot
the meridian of Omaha on one hand, and,
San Francisco and Portland, Oregon, on
the other hand, which are guaranteed upon
any consideration by either subscribing
carriers, jointly or severally to shippers,
freight or passengers passing between said
eastern points and San Francisco or Port
land, are hereby, upon the same terms and
conditions, extended to said shippers or
consignees, and such shippers or consignees
of freight which w'ere originally parties of
the guarantee are hereby relieved from so
much of the obligation upon which said
guarantee is conditioned as forbid the em
ployment or use of any of the subscribing
carriers in the transportation of said freights
or passengers.
The Railroad "Divy."
The result reached by the railroad man
agers recently in council at San Francisco,
is practically a division of Territory. The
agreement arrived at is interpreted by the
Pioneer Press to amount to this :
"The roads are to make the same rates to
their respective terminal points, so that
neither shall invite traffic which belongs
to the other by its geographical conditions.
This will confine the business of the North
ern Pacific to Oregon and Washington Ter
ritory, and keep the Union and Central Pa
cific. The Northern line makes a greater
concession than the other in consenting to
this arrangement, since it can invade the
territory of its rival more effectually
through its control of the Oregon and Cali
fornia road and steamship lines than the
Central road can retaliate. The Northern
Pacific is not spoiling for a fight just at
present, however, and would have little to
gain by competing for San Francisco busi
ness. When it enters seriously into this
competition, it will probably seek the busi
ness which passes through Sau Francisco
at its remoter points of origin, by steam
ship lines from Portland or Puget Sound to
China. Japan, Australia and the Hawaiian
Islands. The agreement seems to con
tain no provision for division of terri
tory at points on the line where the
branches of the Union and Central Pacific
approach the territory of the Northern
Pacific, in Montana and Eastern Oregon.
The conditions are already established for
a very sharp competition for business at
Helena. Deer Lodge, Butte, and other
places in the most populous aud richest
part of Montana. An agreement that
ignores these conditions seems to lack an
element of completeness and stability.
The loose agreement of comity that pre
vailed as to these localities before the San
Francisco meeting will hardly stand the
wear and tear of competition for the large
aud growing trade of this important region.
Chicago, Milwaukee A St. Paul Rail
way.
The "Rccounoisance of the Golden
Northwest," sent out from the passenger
department of the Chicago, Milwaukee &
St. Paul railway, is a beautiful illustrated
souvenir of this enterprising road, giving
a descriptive exploration of Iowa, Minne
sota. Wisconsin and Dakota, which it
terms the "Golden Northwest." The pic
ture would be complete if Montana was
only included as the crowning sheaf in the
great, aud growing West. The hook is
beautifully printed on tinted paper and
handsomely illustrated with views of
cities, lakes, water falls, and all manner of
artistic and romantic views, which should
give it front rank and the honored ad
vance guard in railroad advertising.
Mr. John C. Gault, who has been
chosen Commissioner of the Transcon
tinental Association, meaning the pool
entered into by the overland railroads,
was formerly General Superintendent of
the Chicago and Northwestern Railway.
Resigning that position in 1872, he en
tered the service of the rival company,
the Chicago, Milwaukee and »St. Paul,
as Assistant General Manager. In 1877
he assumed the management of Jay
Gould's Wabash system, but the failure
of his health recently forced him to re
tire. He is a railroad officer of great
skill and experience, and is perhaps
without an equal in this country in his
knowledge of the freight business in all
of its details. As to the effect of the ar
rangement made by the late meeting at
San Francisco upon the Northern Pa
cific, Mr. John Muir, Traffic Superin
tendent, says:
"We have obtained all wo asked for.
I don't want to boast, but look at it. Is
not the right to put down freight in San
Francisco a^the same rate as the Central
and Southern Pacific lay it down here
worth something ?"
"What have you conceded in return?"
"We let them put down freight in
Portland on the same basis, but remem
ber we take up their freight in our own
steamers, which increases our earnings
and rssures us a share of the pool no
matter which way Eastern freight gets
into Oregon. The only point in their
favor is that thev can carry canned sal
mon from Astoria at the same rate via
San Francisco as we can via the North
ern Pacific, subject of course to the same
restriction as shipments to San Francisco
via our steamers."
He farther says that one effect of the
pool will be to cause the Northern Pa
cific to put on a fast freight lifie, which
will run from St. Paul to Portland in
seven days and a half, thus competing
for California business.
OOP, HOME ON THE HILLSIDE.
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Ou the bights overlooking the town
Dausville, at the head of Genessee Yallef
in the western part of the State of
York, in a location as beautiful and charm
iug 'as we can boast of in our cherished
Montana,—the land oflofty mountains and
delightful valleys,—is an institution thm
has become justly famous throughout tl u
i length aud breadth of the land, it j s
health resort, where invalids suffering f rou
chronic complaints are treated without
medicine, by a system peculiarly its 0Wn
yet scientific in every respect ; and for suf
ferers whose complaints do not involve
organic changes of vital structures, there n
probably no other place in America whtrt
recovery can more certainly be hoped for
and assured. The institution was formed
twenty-five years ago by Dr. Jas. C. Jack
son, who, now a hale aud hearty old man
j in his seventies, is still on the consulter
! hoard of the medical faculty. Its l>egin
! niug was insignificant, but success soou
wafted its fame to the four winds, and it.
importance and usefulness grew even faster
than accommodations could be secured
On the night of the 26th of June, ls»2 tire
main building of the institution was de
stroyed by fire. There were over a hum
dred patients aud boarders in the house at
the time, yet so perfect had been the
me ms of escape provided by the care and
I forethought of the proprietors, that, al
though the building was destroyed, not au
accident occurred. The feeble and bed
ridden were quietly removed to adjoining
cottages, and in less than fifteen minutes
from the time when the alarm was first
given, the institution was entirely cleared
of its inmates. On the following day a
large majority of the guests, without
solicitation on the part of the proprietors,
signified their desire to remain on the hill
side, even at considerable temporary incon
venience. Bath rooms were accordingly
constructed in the largest cottage—Villula
—electrical and other apparatus were tele
graphed for, a rough kitchen was built,
the basément of Liberty Hall Was fitted
up as a dining-room, and by the 1st of July
over one hundred and fifty patients were
receiving every form of treatment, with
the single exception of the Molière hath,
administered before the fire.
A few weeks later the present board of
directors—James H. Jacksou, E. D. Lefiing
well, Albert Leffingwell, and William E.
Leflingwell, having purchased all the cap
ital stock of the Institution, became its
sole proprietors. The fire had left them
virtually free to locate their Institution in
any other part of the country, should such
a course seem best, for the cottages on the
hillside could easily be converted into very
desirable residences. While, however, it
was possible, perhaps, to find localities pos
sessing greater attractions for a purely
summer resort, it was the candid judgment
of all who investigated the subject that the
rare combination of essential sanitary re
quirements for both winter and summer
presented by the old situation on the east
ern heights above the village of Dausville,
offered advantages for a sanitarium no
where excelled. In deciding upon the kind
they would build, the proprietors received
from their friends many valuable sugges
tions. There were those who thought that
the wisest course would be to construct an
immense wooden edifice, containing all the
modern improvements, somewhat after the
plan of the large hotels at some of our wa
tering places. Had the Board oi Directors
possessed less faith in the vitality of the
principles they advocated, or less confidence
in the ultimate recognition by all classes of
the value of the measures of treatment
here desired, such a course might not have
seemed to them unwise. Theirs, however,
was to be no new aud untried experiment
whose future was uncertain, for at the time
of the fire nearly jjhree hundred people,
from all parts of the continent of America,
were under treatment at the old Iustitu
tion. With full confidence, therefore, in
an assured future, it was unanimously re
solved to erect the most perfect sanitary
establishment which architectural skill
could devise. The fruit of this resolution
is the present magnificent structure, which
was completed and occupied last week.
Our space will not admit of a description
of this building, but we will briefly say
that it is built mainly of stone, brick, and
iron, is 272 feet in length from north to
south, facing the village towards the set
ting sun, 45 feet deep in the main, aud •».>
deep in the pavilions. These pavilion» are
simply the north and south ends of the
main building, and only distinguished from
it by bay projections of 10 feet to the Iront
by 30 in width, and by being carried a
story above, the ballustrade on the tops
being 75 feet from the ground. The main
building is four stories above the base
ment, and as the basement above ground
and the first story are equal to two ordi
nary stories, the building is practically ti ve
stories in the main and six stories in the
pavilions.
Circulars and full information can I*
obtained by writing to Wm. E. Eeffing
well, Dansville, Livingston Co., New \ ork.
Also we advise any of our readers who may
be in ill-health, or the mother of a family
of children, to send a stamp for a sample
copy of "The Laws of Life," a standard
health journal that has been published tor
the past twenty-five years.
The total indebtedness of six great
nations on July 1, 1883, with the rate
Per head.
S 28 41
128 40
108 23
78 33
35 70
153 41
per capita, is thus given :
Total.
The United States..........£1,538,781,823
France........................... 4,800,550,306
United Kingdom........... 3,015,220,700
Italy............................... 2,232,512,200
Russia............................ 2,912,518,254
Spain............................. 2,500,665.515
It will be observed Jhat Germany i- s
not included for the very creditable rea
son that it has only a nominal indebted
ness. Next to that nation the l nite
States makes the best showing.

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