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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, December 23, 1886, Image 5

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036143/1886-12-23/ed-1/seq-5/

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IIOU THEY TAKE TO IT.
Th<' Street Car Innovation Looked
I poll liindlv by Montanians-
How a Few "Oreenies"
A et.
Helena is not the oldest town in Mon
tana. in fact she is just out of her'teens,
hut for all that within her gates can prob
able be found a greater number of real old
timers, actual residents, than in any other
place in the Territory. Men who left
, ivili/.ation behind them more than a score
of years ago, traveled west and cast their
lot amid the wild surroundings of primi
tive mining camps, have concentrated at
Helena, raised families and fortunes and
made the town what it is to-day. The
more affluent mingled more or less
with the outside world in visits to the
•States." or "America" and kept pace
with the progress ol events. But many
restrained in part by force of circumstances
or the trend of inclination, remained stead
ily at home, content with their surround
ings and caring nothing for direct associa
tion with the great world of railroads,
electricity and general aggressive civiliza
tion to the east and south of us. The
families that grew up around them were
consequently confined in their notions of
our great republic either to book knowl
edge or the experience gained by contact
with the minute portion of the nation in
the vicinage of their homes. So it was
that before the advent of the Northern
Pacific many people there were in Helena
who had never seeu, much less ridden
upon, steam tars. And it was with enjoy
ment akin to the keen pleasure of child
hood that grown up people hailed with ad
miring wonder tlie arrival of the first pas
senger train in Helena.
l or similar reasons the street railway
IN' f is DAY A REVELATION
to this class of people. They knew that
such things existed, but it was an abstract
knowledge, and when presented in the
concrete their curiosity took the form of
gratified surprise. So it was that when
the venture was first talked of and the
street railway company formed, many con
tended that it would not be a success,
owing to the unfamiliarity of the people
with this metropolitan mode of transfer,
liven up to the day when the first o$r was
started la,st Autumn, these opinions ob
tained and the remark that "the street car
line would not pay expenses"' was heard
on all sides. As a rule, thoagh, Western
people take more kindly and "catch on''
more quickly to projects of public utility
than provincialists of the East. And as
demonstrative of this the Helena street
railroad has been
A PAYING INVESTMENT
from the start. 1 Hiring the day you will
occasionally see a vacant car rolling along,
but their crowded state at other times more
I hau strikes an average. The line is well
patronized and has now become not only a
convenience but a necessity. Like the tele
phone, electric light, gas and other recent
introductions it is indispensable.
ACTS OF THE FNINIATED.
A- with the growth of the railroad in
public patronage there are ludicrous inci
dents connected with the infancy of the
street railroad, and the drivers tell some
marvelous stories of queer acts of unso
phisticated patrons. The fare boxes are the
strangest things and the last feature that
uniniated travelers "tumble to.'' The
story of a "greeny"' dropping a gold
piece into the box and holding his hands
underneath expecting the change to drop
into it, has become a "chestnut, ' A later
tale and one of which, the drivers assure
us, there are frequent illustrations, is as
follows : A couple unused to street cars
enter for a ride. One approaches the
driver intent upon paying fare and bauds
him a quarter or half a dollar. The Jehu
of the rumbling cart politely hands back
a neat little envelope. The passenger
opens it, counts the money and is surprised
to iiud the same amount he gave the
driver. Then his eyes twinkle and he
communicates the fact to his friend, at the
same time uudging him significantly as
though to say, "the driver's made a mis
take and we ll have a free ride.'' Then he
complacently puts the change in his pocket
and settles down to enjoy the scenery. The
driver, however, usually
DISPELS THE ILLUSION
by tapping the bell and informing the self
satislied passenger that he is required to
deposit his fare in the box. Then the un
soph isicated stranger takes a huge tumble
to himself, arises and deposits his fare and
never thereafter tries to delude himself
with the idea that he can accidentally or
otherwise, unless lie's a member ot Con
gress or a newspaper reporter who has a
pass, obtain a free ride on the street cars.
The Struggle with Poverty.
Detroit, Mich., December 17.—A hor
iible scene of poverty and death has been
discovered in a dilapidated frame house
at No. 476 Woodbridge street, iu this city.
The house was occupied by a stone cutter
named Thomas Grears, with his wife and
live children. Mrs. Cream died last Sun
day and was buried W ednesday. her babe
being cared for by the neighbors. Since
the funeral the house has been closed and
nothing was seen ot Grears or his
children. Becoming suspicious that same
tliing was wrong, neighbors this morning
broke in the door and found the children
on the same bed on which their father lay,
who was crazy drunk. All the children
were down with a violent attack of scarlet
fever. The girl, three years old, was dead.
The hoy, eight years old, was strangling
and dying, and tiie other children were so
ill they could not move. There was neither
lire nor food in the house. The Poor Com
missioner will do everything possible to
relieve the children.
Dakota Affairs.
Hi. Paul, December 17.—A Huron, D.
T., special to the Pioneer Preen says : Ow
ing to the lack of a quorum last night the
legislature of South Dakota did not pass
the bill ordering au election ou the ques
tion of putting the State government into
operation, though the constitutional con
vention appointed a committee which
drafted a bill for this purpose. The lead
ers of the movement say the legislature
will be called together soon to act thereon.
\ lar-e and highly enthusiastic meeting
,,f citizens from all parts of South Dakota
was held this morning and a committee
appointed to arouse the people ot the
State to their danger. A resolution was
passed urging the press of the l nited
States to aid in the effort for a division
and admission as a State. An executive
committee was appointed to disseminate
information relating to the Statebooi
movement. Judge Campbell says that the
legislature, when again assembled, win
take steps to put the State government into
actual operation. The people are deter
mined that if the Springer bill passes con
gress to send a solid South Dakota delega
tion to the convention and re-enact t le
Sioux Falls constitution and re-estamisn
the Statehood of South Dakota.
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A SECOND TIME REJECTED.
A Bourbon Breaks up the Gubernatorial
Bargain.
1 lie Broaduater-Maginni* Democrats
Grievously Disappointed and
Disgusted.

lbe news of the resignation of Governor
Hauäer and the appointment of Preston H.
Leslie, of Kentucky, as his successor, pro
duced a great sensation in Helena. The
announcement quickly brought a throng
of people about the Herald balletin
board yesterday afternoon, an hour before
the paper wa$ on the street, and furnished
a theme for excited discussion throughout
the city. Our Democratic friends were par
ticularly displeased with the President's
selection of Leslie, as alien to the Terri
tory, while the Kepublicans principally
confined their regrets to the retirement
from the executive chair of their loDg
time fellow citizen and neighbor. Governor
Hauser.
It may as well be said here as anywhere
that the change was not so much of a sur
prise as some would have it appear. Early
in the recent delegate campaign the Her
ald gave out the report that Democratic
harmony hinged upon certain party agree
ments on the consummation of which de
pended the success of the Democracy at
the November election. In effect one and
the main proposition was something like
this: That Broadwater, estimated to con
trol as many as 1,000 votes in Lewis and
Clarke, Choteau, Fergus and Meagher
counties, and Maginnis, supposed to in
fluence the greater part of the Irish vote,
should jointly give their assistance to Mr.
Toole and swing their followings as solidly
as possible to his support. The other part
ot the agreement provided for the resigna
tion in due season of Gov. Hauser—who
was encumbered with and heartily dis
liked his official duties—and the substitu
tion, with his endorsement, of Maginnis.
So far there was hut one hitch to the bar
gain. While Hauser was entirely willing
and in fact eager to relinquish the Gover
norship, he hesitated for various reasons to
concur in the appointment of Maginnis,
the principal objection being his intimate
personal relations with Broadwater and
the venom with which he had opposed
Hauser's railroad and other enterprises. As
to these matters a sort of truce was patched
up. and the consent to Maginnis as his suc
cessor was believed to be fixed up with no
other condition than that, further along,
on the admission of the Territory into the
sisterhood of States, Hauser, iu preference
to any other, should have the support of
Broadwater and Maginnis for l". S.
Senator.
The outcome of the Governorship mat
ter is, as we have stated a serious disap
pointment to Maginnis' friends. Though
some of his followers, in the heat of pas
sion, accuse Gov. Hauser with playing
falsely, we are constrained to believe he
acted squarely, and in recommending Ma
ginnis lived up to his agreement in good
faith. The blow falls heaviest upon the
ex-Delegate, and the indications are that it
will be lomr before he and his friend re
cover from its dire effects.
I tali Industrial Home.
Washington, December 16.—The Sec
retary of the Interior, in response to a let
ter from Senator Edmunds, chairman of
the Senate judiciary committee, asking
for information as to the supposed difficulty
or want of harmony in ltah concerning
the item in the miscellaneous appropria
tion bill passed at the last session of Con
gress appropriating $40,000 to aid in the
establishment of an industrial home for
polygamous wives and their children in
Utah, has transmitted to the judiciary !
committo the annual rej>ort of Hon. Caleb {
W. West, Governor of Utah, which con
tains reference to the industrial home and |
a copy of a letter from Mrs. Angie New
man. of Lincoln, Nebraska, in which she j
vigorously protests against Gov. West s in- |
terpretation of that portion of the act ,
making the appropriation Mrs. Newman |
writes that the wishes of the members of j
the Industrial Christian Home Association |
of Utah, through whose active instrumen- I
tality the appropriation was secured, have i
beeu disregarded by the board of control j
contrary to the spirit of the law. She also
criticises the methods thus far pursued by I
the board, and intimates that all the labor
and money expended by the promoters ol
the enterprise is in danger of being sacri
ficed to ruisjudgment and mismanagement.
Mrs. Newman asks lor a legal construction
of the text of the act as to its intention.
The present l>oard of control consists of
the Governor, Justices of the Supreme
Court and District Attorney of the Terri
tory.
The Soldiers' Home.
Washington, December 17.— In the
House Mr. Negley. of Pennsylvania, asked
unanimous consent to strike out from the
bill the paragraph providing that no per
son shall be eligible to a position or em
ployment in the government or manage
ment ol any soldiers home who is inter
ested in or connected with, directly or
indirectly, in any railroad, brewtry, mer
cantile house, manufactory, dram shop or
distillery in the State in which such home
is located. .
Mr. Atkinson, of Pennsylvania, moved
to recommit the bill with instructions to
the committee on appropriations to report
it back with an amendment increasing
from $16,000 to $'2,000,000 the appropria
tion for out door relief of persous entitled
I to admission to soldiers' homes.
1 Lost—yeas 12.7, nays 167.
The bill was then passed.
Fugitive Mormon Shot.
Salt Lake, December 16.—To-day at
Parawan, Utah, Deputy Marshal A\m.
Thompson shot aud killed Ldw&rd Dal
ton, indicted for unlaful cohabitation in
March, 1867. Dalton has been arrested
and frequently escaped. He declared he
would never be taken alive. Thompson
and deputy Ortou saw him to-day in
Parawan on horseback and called on him
to surrender. Dalton turned his horse to
run. when Thompson shot, intending to
lire over him, but the bull took efiect in
Dalton's body. He died within an hour,
j Thompson and Ortou were arrested for
! murder by the local officers. They will be
! taken to' Beaver to-morrow. There is a
! iTood deal of excitement over the afi'air.
; Salt Lake, December 17.—Thompson,
the deputy marshal who shot Dalton at
Parowan yesterday while trying to escape
arrest for unlawful cohabitation, was taken
to Beaver for examination. The officer
S . IVS he intended to shoot over Dalton and
not hit him. Dalton had twice escaped
after arrest, and had sent the deputy word
that if he wanted him to come well
"heeled," for he would get away from him
aud would not lie taken alive. The ex
citement has subsided, but the Mormons
are pushing their wrongs in angry words.
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Found Gailtv*
New York, December 17.—McQaade
was found guilty on the first ballot.
New York, December 17.—Recorder
Smith, in his charge to the jury, in the
McQnade case, to-day stated that the cor
roboration of the testimony of the accom
plices pronounced the testimony of the
servant girl, Katie Metz, as direct, un
shaken and worthy of much weight. It
was for the jury to decide whether Dufly
and Fnllgral's testimony had been cor
roborated. The court also reviewed at
length, and laid stress upon the relations of
Maloney and the members of the board of
aldermen with the officers and attorneys
of the Broadway road. The fact that the
prisoner had not been put on the stand in
his own behalf must not be taken against
him, the liecorder said, in conclusion.
Just half an hour after the retirement
of the jury. as General Tracy and Mr.
New combe were passing down stairs to
dinner, an officer ran after Newcombe and
catching him, breathlessly exclaimed :
"Come back, they have agreed."
The crowd, which had hardly left the
court room, rushed back, and lor several
minutes the greatest excitement reigued,
but the principal man, whose liberty was
at stake, showed no more sign of interest
than if an ordinary spectator.
Presently the jury came in. They had
a funeral expression on their faces, lioll
was called and the foreman. Henry (Itten
berg, stood up and in reply to the ques
tion replied: "Guilty of the crime as
charged in the first count in the indict
ment.'' Boll was called again and each
juror answered "guilty" as his name was
called. When the verdict was given to
the court McQuade alone remained un
moved. His demeanor was not different
from that of any other day of the trial.
The jury at once left the court room, de
clining all interviews.
New York, December 17.—The Court
of General Term, where "boodle
ex-Alderman Mctjuaid was to be
arraigned to-day, was crowded to the doors
with spectators anxious to witness the
proceedings. McQuaid came to the court
in custody of Under Sheriff Sexton, five
minutes before the opening of the proceed
ings. He wore an air of bravado, the first
symptom of the kind in the long drama in
which he has figured, and said: "Good
morning, boys," in tone and manner savor
ing of the reckless. As he removed his
overcoat and pulled off his gloves he smil
ingly surveyed the faces about him aud
nodded recogafoion to a friend here and
there in the audience. When he had
taken his seat before the bar he chatted
with one or two friends, who happened to
be sitting near. Gen. Tracy, ex-Senator
Thomas F. Grady and Richard Newcombe,
of McCJuaid's counsel, entered the court
room five minutes after their client. »They
were serious, and the face of Newcombe
was grave in the extreme. They each
talked in turn with their client. The
lawyers for the prosecution were late in
putting in appearance,, though Recorder
Smyth was on hand promptly aud took his
seat on the bench.
The Stock Market.
New York, December 16.—The stock
market after 11 o'clock was much less ac
tive and remained steadier for sometime,
but St. Paul lost 1, Louisville & Nashville
2, Reading 1, and New England l 1 ,. The
general market afterwards becoming heavy
through losses were for fractious only. A
rally succeeded but for fractions only, and
prices soon gave way again, Western Union
showing decided weakness. At noon the
iparket warket was moderately active aud
weak.
The presence on the street of T. A. L.
Bateman, F. C. Hollins, Victor Newcomb,
and others, who were absent during the
break, also helped to restore confidence.
The largest crowd is in the loan corner of
the Exchange. The demand for stocks in
dicates that a very large "short" interest
has been created.
The advances at the opening over Last
evening's closing quotations ranged up to
2} in Vanderbilts, while three or four were
a shade lower and a few unchanged. The
advantage was mainly due in early deal
ings and in most cases was lost in the first
ten minutes, Lackawanna losing 2, Read
ing 1and Canada Southern, West Point
and New England each one. The market
then rallied and material gains were made
under the lead of Omaha. Towards 11
o'clock Grangers gave way again and the
remainder followed, but at 11 the market
again firmed close to the opening ligures.
St. showing the heaviest decline among
the active stocks. Money is loaning at
from 12 to 20 per cent.
New York, December 17. — The opening
of the stock market to-day was strong and
very active, but weak, the first prices
showing a decline from last evening's final
figures of from J to ; per cent, generally,
while Reading was off 1'. and Norfolk «&
Western preferred 1 The early dealings
were extremely feverish and weak, and in
the first ten minutes Richmond & West
Point dropped, 11, Lackawanna, Reading
and New England 1 each, and the re
mainder fractional amounts. A rally im
mediately followed and early losses in
many cases recovered, the market there
after remaining feverish but generally
firm until near 11 o'clock, when prices
yielded again, and Reading showed a net
loss of 2 ;. New England 1', Lackawana 11,
and Pacilic Mail 1.
At noon money was tight ai 1per cent.
The stock market continued to decline
until nearly 11:30. The market then ral
lied, and Louisville & Nashvilled showed
the greatest strength, both gaining 1 from
the lowest figures. Business during the
rally became dull, but later there was
more activity, prices again yielding slowly,
and at noon the market was quiet and
heavy.
RedStar
TRADE\^to7 MARK._
bsa I lltcll/^^^Ê^^^
1'ree from Opiaten, nineties and noise"
SAFE.
SURE.
PROMPT.
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253s
GERManremÉDY
ff» M a Cures Rheumatism. Neuralgia,
Pnr Pa n
13 ' Ç ] PK1«'E. FIFTY CENT*.
ß VI B Ulll at dktggi^ts and Dt viarj,
THF. CHAULES A. YOU HER (O., BALTIMORE, Ml>.
Dakota Constitutional Convention.
St. Paul, December 17.—A Huron,
Dak., special to the Pioneer Press saytî
The constitutional convention met this
morning, President Edgerton in the chair.
Judge Campbell presenter! the following
resolution which was unanimously
adopted :
Resolved, That a conference committee of
nine delegates l>e appointed to consider the
present plan of action ; also inviting the
Senate and House of South Dakota to ap
point joint committees of conference for
the same purpose, and that the president
of this conference and the Governor of
South Dakota be invited to participate.
Judge Campbell was appointed chairman
of this committee.
It is said that all the memliers of the
! committee are lawyers and that all agree
that the repeal of the restraining clause is
both right and feasible.
The convention adjourned until to
i morrow. ___
Dakota Legislature.
St. Paul, December 17.—Both Houses
of the Legislature met at noon and ap
pointed committees ot conference, and
called lor a general conference. The com
mittee met this afternoon and Campbell,
Owen, Myers and Killain argued in favor
of repealing the restraining clause of the
ordinance.
Gamble opposed such repeal before the
legislature and large assemblage.
Gov. Millete to-night delivered his mes
sage. expressing the hope that the popular
house of Congress may consent to the di
vision and admissiod.
Senate State Admission Bill.
Washington, December 17—The Senate
bill providing for the admission of Wash
ington Territory into the Union of States
! was taken up by the House committee on
! States to-day land amended by adding a
j section including Montana Territory with
] in the scope of the bill. Iu this shape it
will be reported to the House.
Montana's Governor.
Washington, December 17.—Preston If.
Leslie, who was to-day nominated to be
Governor of Montana, is a native of Ken
tucky, about 67 years of age, and an uncle
of Representative McMillan, of Tennessee.
He was Governor of Kentucky after the
war aud was for some years a member of
the Circuit bench ofthat State.
Land Decision.
Washington, December 17.—The Sec
retary of the Interior to-day denied the
motion for a review and affirmed the de
cision of Acting Secretary Muldrow of
August 14,1386, i u the celebrated case of
Thos. Reese vs. Central Pacific Railroad
Co., in which is involved the title to large
tracts of land as between the railroad com
pany and certain settlers on the line of the
road between San Jose and Sacramento.
By this decision the title of the railroad
company is affirmed to certain lands not
covered by the Mexican grant of January
21,1870, the date of the definite location
of the road.
Sudden Death.
Louisville, Dec. 17.—Gratiot Wash
burne, son of Hon. E. B. Washburne and
secretary of the general council of the
American London exhibition, who arrived
here yesterday in the interest of the exhi
bition, dropped dead at the Galt House to
day of cerebral appoplexy.
3ddV^\
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1 HUM
Pine
AnN u\\
cNî cinog \
MANHOOD
RESTORED
The reason that Thousands cannot yet cured of
SEMI SAL WE ASSESS, LOSS OF MAX
IIOOO. and the resntt of abase, disease or excesses,
is oie ill f J to a complication called EE OS TA ToR
ElIEA. EE. LIEBIG'S IX VIG ORATOR ts
the OSL Tea re for PROS TA TOE EUE A. Price.
N).(K) per pack aye, 6 packayes, $10.00. Guide to
leatth and Setf-Analyst sent f ree. Address LIE
'it; EISPESSAEVfor Diseases of Men,
400 Gears/ St.. S'*" F rancisco. < '.</■
Geo. K. Reeder. Robert J. Walker.
Office of City Engineer.
REEDER & WALKER,
Mines surveyed and patents obtained. Surveys
and maps of underground workings. Farms sur
veyed and ditches run. Blue printing and tine
draughting a specialty.
Brown's Building, Warren street, next to Audi
tor's office._ d.twly-ap23
LADIES
u How to permanently remove Superfluous Hair.**
•• How to reduce Hupernuou* F1e«n 15 pound* * month.'*
*• How to develop the Hu«t scientifically."
*• How l^an Ladle« may speedily become Atout.**
(TJ* Describe Tour cas»» fully, an l «end 4 cents for aealed
in': ructions« Wilcox specific to., pmi»., p*.
"These Specifics stand alone in the present condition of
medical science." Scientific limes.
wlyeow -decl
ASSAY OFFICE AND CHEMICAL
LABORATORY.
BRADEN & W1SSMAN.
(U. S. Assayers.)
Parclieu's» Building, eor. Main Hired
"anil Broadway: en I ranee on Broad
way.
Office Hours : 3 to 6 p. m. Samples for assay
can be left at the U. S. Assay Office, corner Broad
way and Warren street. dxwly-jd!5
* 4 KlM c
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel of purity
strength and wholesomeuess. More economical
than the ordinary kinds, and cannot be sold in
competitio i with the multitude of low test, short
weight, alum or phosphate powders. Sold only in
cans. 'Royal Baking Powder Co., 106 Wall St.,
New York. _____
SCALY, ITCHY SKIN
And All Itching and Scaly
Skin and Scalp.Diseases
Cured byCurtlcura.
1 )SOKIASIS, Eczema, Tetter,^ Ringworm, Li
chen, Pruritus, Scald Head, Milk Crust, Dan
druff, Barbers', Bakers', Grocers' and Washer
woman's Itch, and every species of Itching,
Burning, Scaly, Pimiy Humors of the Skin and
Scalp, witli Loss of Hair, are positively cured by
Cl TltTRA. the great Skin Cure, and Cuticira
Soap, an exquisite Skin Beautitier externally,
and Cvticvra Resolvent, the new Blood Puri
fier internally, when physicians and all other
remedies tail.
PSORIASES,"0RSCALY SKIN.
I. John J. Case. D. D. S., having practiced den
tistry in this county for thirty-live years and
being well known to thousands hereabouts, with
a view to help any who are afflicted as I have
been for the past twelve years, testify that the
Ct'Tici'KA Remedies cured me of Psoriasis, or
Scaly Skin, in eight days, after the doctors with
whom I had consulted gave me no help or en
couragement.
Newton, N. J. JOHN J. CASE, D.D.S.
DISTRESSING ERUPTION.
Your CTtk tba Remedies performed a wonder
ful cure last summer on one of our customers, an
old gentleman of seventy years of age, who suf
fered with a fearfully distressing eruption on his
head and face, and who had tried all remedies
and doctors to no purpose.
Texarkana. Ark. J. F. SMITH A CO.
DUSTPANFÜTÔF scales.
H. E. Carper ter, Henderson, N. Y., cured of
Psoriasis or Leprosy, of twenty years' standing,
by Cl rn i i:a Remedies. The most wonderful
cure on record. A dustpanful of scales fell from
him daily. Physicians and his friends thought
lie must «lie.
ECZEMA RADICALLY CURED.
For the radical cure of an obstinate ca»e of
Eczema of long standing, I give entire credit to
the Cvticur a Remedies.
E. B. RICHARDSON, New Haven, Conn.
Sold by all druggists. Price: Cutici ra, 50
cents; Resolvent. $1 ; Soap, 25 cents. Potter
Drug and Chimical Co., Boston.
Send lor "How to Cure Skin Diseases.'
nil 1 IITIFY tbecomplexion and Skin by using
DA AU the Cutictra Soap.
IT FEELS GOOD.
Those worn out with Pains, Aches
and Weaknesses lind reliel' In one
minute in the Cuticura Anti
Pain Plaster. At Druggists. 25
cents.
L.S.L
CAPITAL PRIZE, $150,000.
"ITis do hereby certify that ire supervise the ar
rangements for all the Monthly and Quarterly
Drawings of The Louisiana State Lottery Company,
and in person manage and control the Drawings
themselves, and that the same are conducted with
honesty, fairness, and in good faith toicard all par
ties, and we authorize the Company to use this certifi '
cate, with facsimiles of our signatures attached, in
ts advertisements."
Com m ission ers.
HV, the undersigned Banks and Bankers, will pa}
all Prizes drawn in The Louisiana State Lotteries
which mag be presented at our counters.
J. H. OGLESBY, Pres. Louisiana Nat'l Bk.
J. W. KILBRETH, Pres. State Nnt'l Bank.
A. BALDWIN, Pres. New Orleans Nat'l Bk.
I TNPRECEDENTE» ATTRACTION !
Over Itall'.a Million Distributed
Louisiana State Lottery Company.
Incorporated in 1868 for 25 years by the Legis
ture for Educational and Charitable purposes—
with a capital of 81,000,000—to which a reserve
fund of over $550,000 has since been added.
By an overwhelming popular vote its franchise
was made a part of the present State Constitu
tion adopted December 2 d. A. D. 1879.
The only Lottery ever voted on and endorsed by the
people of any State.
It never scales or postpones.
Its Grand Ningle Number Drawings
take place monthly, and the Nemi
Annual Drawings regularly every^siv
months (June and December.)
A SPLENDID OPPORTUNITY TO
WIN A FORTUNE. FIRST GRAND DRAW
ING. CLASS A. IN THE ACADEMY OF MUSIC.
NEW ORLEANS, TUESDAY, January II
I8S7—200th Monthly Drawing.
CAPITAL PRIZE, £150,000.
««-Notice.—Tickets are Ten Dollars
only. Halves. Fifths. 82. Tenths SI.
LIST OF PRIZES.
1 CAPITAL PRIZE OF
$150,000...
...$150.000
1 GRAND PRIZE OF
50,000...
... 50.IKK)
1 GRAND PRIZE OF
20 , 000 ...
... 20,000
2 LARGE PRIZES OF
10 , 1 ) 00 ...
... 20,000
4 LARGE PRIZES OF
5,000...
... 20,000
2 )) PRIZES OF
1 . 000 ...
... 20,000
50
500...
... 25,000
100 "
3lK>...
... 30.000
200 "
200 ...
... 40,000
500 41
100 ...
... 50.000
1,000 "
50...
... 50,000
APPROXIMATION PRIZES.
100 Approximation Prizes of $300...... 30,000
100 " " 200 ...... 20,000
100 " " L00...... 10,500
2,179 Prizes, amounting to........................$535,000
Application for rates to clubs should be made
only to the office of the company in New Orleans.
For further information write clearly, giving
full address. POSTAI. NOTES, Express Mon
ey Orde-s, or New York Exchange in ordinary
letter. Currency by Express (at our expense)
addressed
M. A. DAUPHIN.
New Orleans, I.a.,
or M. A. DAUPHIN,
Washington. D. U.
Make P. 0, Money Orders payable and ad
dress Registered Letters to
NEW ORLEANS NATIONAL BANK.
New Orleans, I.a.
DEMCMDEU That the presence of Genfs
nUVIUflDLn Beauregard and Early.who
are in charge of the drawings, is a guarantee of
absolute fairness and integrity, that the chances
are all equal, and that no one can possibly divine
what numbers will draw a Prize. All parties
therefore advertising to guarantee Prizes in this
Lottery, are swindlers, and only aim to deceive
and defraud the unwary.
FURNITURE.
JOHN BOWEH,
< lore Street, under Encore Hall.
A full and complete line at low prices,
iwly-jell
BANK.
Hain and Edwards Street. Helena.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
Paid up Capital - 8250,000
Surplus & Profits, • 60,000
DIRECTORS.
C. A. BUOADWATKR, . - President
A. O. CLARKE. • • - Vice-President
E. SHARPE,........Cashier
8. E. ATKINSON...................Asst. Cashier
8 . C. ASHBY. HERMAN OAN9.
B. F. POTTS. H. F, GALEN.
N. H. WEBSTER. S. H. CBOÜNSR
C. W. CANNON. R. B. HARRISON.
A. H, WILDER.
dAw-janl _____ _
SECOND NATIONAL BANK
HELENA, MONT.
Dees a General Banking business. Sells Foreign
Drafts and Passage Tickets. Pays interest on
Time and Saving Deposits. Collections
receive prompt and Faithful Attention.
Has a Savings Department.
THE ONLY
SAVINGS INSTITUTION IN MONTANA!
DIRECTORS:
E. D, Edgertox, J. B. Sanford,
President. Vice-President
Chas. K. Cole, Chris. Kenck.
E. H Edgerton, St. Paul. S. J. Jones.
GOLDEN, COLORADO.
Fall Term Begins Sept. 29, 1S86.
Complete courses in
CIVIL AND MININ6 ENGINEERING.
Special courses In
Assaying. CSemical Analysis ani Snr
nmi
The Laboratories and Assay Rooms for
practical instruction, are the most com
plete of any in the West.
TUITION ϻRJE3E
For catalogue address
REGIN UHAUVF.NET. President.
FARM LOANS.
We will undertake the negotiation of j
three to five years loans on improved farms j
in Montana. We desire a select class of I
mortgages, and upon such the rate of in
terest will be made satisfactory. Corres
pondence solicited.
References—First National Bank, Helena.
WALLACE, STYLESI& THORNBURGH.
XXoloua, — . Montana.
Ursnline Convent of the Holy Family
At Saint Fetor's Mission near Fort
Shaw, M. T.,
WILL REOPEN ON WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 1ST.
This institution is situated in one of the most
beautiful locations in Montana, under the direc
tion of the Ursuline Nuns, for the purpose of
affording the young girls every advantage for
obtaining a solid and useful education.
Tuition free. Board $10 per month. For further
particulars address
MOTHER SUPERIOR,
w2m-aug5 Fort Shaw. M. T
THE DINGEE & CONARD CO'S
BEAUTIFUL EVER-BLOOMING
Our Great Specialty is growing and distributing
I JOSES, We nave all the latest novelties and tinest
standard ^its, in different sizesand prices to suit all
wants. Ovt r 1.50 choicest varieties to choose fron..
We send strong Pot Roses safely by mail to all Post
Offices, purchaser's choice of varieties, all labeled,
3 TO 12 PLAHTS SI. *?,fÆ
according to value. Two year Roses by express. Our
New Guide,78 pages.elegantly illustrated. Free.
Address THE OIMGKE He CON Alt 1» CO.,
Rose Growers. West Grove, Chester Co. Pa.
SI. Peter's Mission BoarâiiiE School
For Boys.
Under the Direction of the Father* of
the Society of Jésus.
WILL REOPEN ON WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 1ST.
The object of this institution is to afford means
of a solid, moral, mental and physical education
to boys.
Tuition free. Board $10 per month. For further
particulars apply to
REV. J. DAMIANI, S. J., Ft. Shaw, M. T.
w2m -aug5
O The BUYERS' GUIDE 1*
Issued Sept, nml March,
each year. G* 312 pages,
8j g x 113 inches,with over
3,500 illustrations — a
whole Picture Gallery.
G IV ES Wholesale Prices
direct to consumers on all goods for
personal or family use. Tells how to
order, and gives exact cost of every
thing you nse, eat, drink, wear, or
have fun with. These INVALUABLE
BOOKS contain information gleaned
from the markets of the world. \Yc
will mail a copy FREE to any ad
dress upon receipt of 10 cts. to defray
expense of mailing. Let its hear from
yon. Respectfully,
MONTGOMERY WARD & CO.
227 A 229 Wabash Avenue, Chicago, III,
THE NORTHWESTERN
CONSERVATORY 9 F BUSIG.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN'.
Piano, Organ, Voice. Theorv. all Orclie.-tral and
Band Instruments. Modern Language- I:i>m ;,011
SPECIAL GOLD MEDALS i pngr,.,.
Piano, organ ami Voice. VALUABLE FREE
CLASSES. Strongest corps ot Teachers in the
West. Dto$15 for20lessons. Pupils 1 .....ivsdatsi f
time. Fall term begins Sept. 9. Send for Calendar
CH ARLES H. MORSE. Hire. toe.
'FIT'ANTED.—A live, energetic man, to repre
v » sent us. $75 per month, anil expenses.
Goods staple; every one buys; outiit and par
ticulars free.
STANDARD SILVERWARE CO.. Boston.
I ADIES wanted to get up Tea Clubs for our '
lj Pure Teas and Coffees. A host of useful ar
tides to select from as premiums. Send for II- I
lustrated Price and Premium List. Special !
Offer: to every tent h person that anau ers tin's
advertisement, we will send free one pound of !
choice Tea. Addre««
NAT'L. TEA & COFFEE CO„ Boston, Mass.
Live Stock Qeailprtors
Ol Montana.
j,
............. IPP
IMPORTED
Clydesdale, Percheron Norman,
English Draft and Standard Bred
Trotting Horses on hand and for
sale. Also, a choice large lot of
High Grade Young Stallions on
hand.
FOE QUALITY. PEDIGREE. AND
PRICE, WE DEFY COMPETITION.
Roadsters and Work Horses for
sale. Visitors welcome. Circu
lars free. Correspondence solic
ited.
HUNTLEY &CLARK.
Tost on. N. I*. II. K., Forty Miles East of
Helena. wly-mhlS
A. ï H0LTËB & BBO
DEALERS IN
HARDWARE
Mechanics' Tools, Mill Supplies, Belt
ing, Erass Goods and Pipe Fitings,
Battery Screen, Steel Wheel
barrows, Iron, Steel, Pipe
and Heavy Hardware.
Disston s Celebrated Circular Saws,
and Rival Steam Boiler Feed Pumps.
Agents for Atlas Engines and Boilers,
and Leffel Double Turbine Water
Wheels. Catalogues Furn
ished on application.
ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF
LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS,
STORE FRONTS, ETC.
wy 1-anglo
DON'T SHOOT!
But if you do. Nave mosey by buying
the best goods at the
HELENA ARMORY!
SPECIALTIES:
Sharpe'.», Winchester,
Marlin and Ballard
Rifle» ; Parker, Colt's
and Remington Breech
and M lizzie Loading
Shot Guns; Mervin A
Hulbert, Colt's and S. Si
W. Revolvers.
Wholesale and retail dealer in Arm», Ammuni
tion, Tobaccos, Cigars, Fruits, notions, etc.
dJv-;anl M. SILVERMAN.
Gü^GlOSIKI
j
j
I
EDICAL/
Nervous.
chronic
—X-—
PRIVATE
DISEASES.,
jspenswy
YPUTHFUü
F0LLI ES
fr EXCESSES*
S PE E D I -Y .
CURED.
N'ervoti* Debility. Seminal Weak
ues«. Exhausted Vitality, Lost Man
hood, and all the terrible effect» of »elf-afcuse
and excesses in maturer years, such as nocturnal
emissions, loss of memory, dimness of vision,
aversion to society, the vital fluid passing unob
served in the urine, and other symptoms that
lead to insanity and death. Young and Mid
dle-aged Men suffering from the above should
consult u» at once. Cure guaranteed in
all saeli ease**. CONSULTATION FREE.
Chemical Analysis, including thorough micro
scopic examinations of the urine, $5. An honest
opinion given In all eases. 5\ e furnish Tne
Great English Remedy, Sir Aatley
Cooper'* Vital Restorative at $3 a bottle
or four time- the quantity, $ 10 .
SAMPLE BOTTLE FREE
to m y one -tating symptom», sex and age. Ad
dress ENGLISH MEDICAL DISPEN
SARY, No. 11 Kearny street, Sau Fran
else*. Cal. d*wtf
G
DR. JORDAN'S
Of
751 Market Street.
1 O AND LEARN HOW to avoid
disease, and how wonderfully
you are made. Private office, 211
Geary street, San Francisco. Con
sultation of Lost Manhood and all Diseases of
Men. *#-Send for catalogne. wly-nov5
LOST
VIGOR
i
'
I
!
!
100
F.\hnii«tu<l \ italitv, \ u r \ o 11 «*
Il e It 1111 y, aii'l \VuttU.u—t * In
Mm, resulting from Kxuesse*. cure l
liout StoniMuh Mediuutiuii
Mur-toii Koliit.
Martton K.'med} Co., I *•* l*nrl. Place, Vw Y aril
LEGAL BLANKS.
FOR THE USE OF
LAWYERS. JfSTICES OP THE PEACE, CONVEYAN
CER». »CRVEVOHS, AGENTS, OWERS AND LESSORS
OF REAL ESTATE, ETC.
(CUT THIS OUT FOR REFERENCE.!
THE HERALD has in stock the following
blanks. They are neatly printed on good paper,
with red ruling fora liorder. The forms have
bee» carefully prepared by a lawyer, are in con
Tjnnity with the statutes of the Territory, anil
are applicable to any county in Montana.
DISTRICT COURT BLANKS.
Per doz. Pi
Notice of Appeal........................50
Undertaking on Appeal.............5u
Aff. ord. and notice for wit..........75
Subpoena.....................................35
Summons.....................................50
Und. on claim and delivery.........50
Writ of attachment......................50
Und. on attachment...................50
Affidavit for attacqment.............50
Aff'. publication sumtnuos..........75
Ord. publication summons..........50
Deposition...................................75
Execution....................................35
Summons for juror......................35
JUSTICES COURT BLANKS.
Warrant of arrest............
Writ of attachment..........
Und. on attachment....................
Affidavit for attachment.............
Subpoena.....................................
Summons.....................................
Summons for juror......................
REAL ESTATE BLANKS
Bond for deed..............................
Quit claim deed...........................
Warranty deed...........................
Bargain anil sale deed.................
Lease............................................
Mortgage ....................................
Assignment of mortgage............ 1
Mechanics lein............................
MINING BLANKS.
Notice of location (quartz .....
Deed of mining claim..............
Application for patent.............
MICEELANECUSB
Sheriff sale...............................
Bounty certificate (wild animal
Certificate of Incorporation.....
Bond.......................................
Acknowledgements................
Chattel mortgage.....................
Bill of sale...............................
Power of attorney....................
A discount of ten per cent,
amounting to $5. and twenty
orders amounting to $10 or over.
Postage prepaid on alt orders,
of any blank» made to order at low prices
Cheek and money orders to be made payable to
FISK BROS. Helena, Mont.
.50
4 00
3 IN)
3 00
4 00
3 00
4 00
2 CM*
2 Ml
3 00
2 00
2 Oil
2 IN)
2 00
4 00
4 IK)
4 (Ml
4 (Nl
3 (K)
4 IK)
4 00
4 IK)
.50
3 00
.50
8 (JO
LANKS.
.50
3 00
i) .50
3 00
.75
4 00
3 00
75
4 00
4 (K)
.50
3 00
made on
orders
■five per cc
lit. Oil
■s. Special
forms

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