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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, April 07, 1887, Image 5

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RAILROAD BLOCKADE.
Sufferings of Fifteen Hundred Pas
senger«.
Sr. Johns, N. F., April 1— A dispatch
from Moncton contains news of the stalled
trains on the northern division of the
Inter-Colonial railway. A break has been
■ nude from St. Flaven to Camp Felton.
Two Mocked trains between these points
ne working their way out through a tun
nel of snow. Fully 1,500 passengers, in
ludin 1 ' Too emigrants, are halted eu route
u t j ie railway. The authorities are strain
o get food to the passen
0 workmen who are try
• to du' them out. One train is at Kivier
'n I oup another at St. I.uce, and another
at St. Flaven, Sir Charles and Lady Tapper
I j H , r nassen -ere on the former. All north
ern mail of last Thursday from Prince Ed
wards Island, New Brunswick and Nova
^cotia is at St. Flaven and seven mail
clerks are guarding it. Fully halt the con
ductors. baggage masters and express mes
.-eii'-er- of the line are hemmed in at this
point.
A dispatch from New Castle, five hours'
vide from Moncton, says the Quebec night
train, the first that has passed the New
Brunswick borders since Friday, has
worked its way through. It has seven
ars all loaded with passengers who have
been delayed by the storm, exhausted by
the long sojourn amid the snow drills, and
freed at last only hy the superhuman
efforts of 1,500 workmen who worked
night and day. Tuesday the sliovelers
were so exhausted P. S. Archibald, chief
engineer, started with a special train and
all the men he could collect. He arrived
at Camp Felton, pushed Ins way through
to St. Flaven, and last night at 8 o'clock
broke the blockade.
People have no idea of the amount of
snow there is on the New Brunswick bor
ders. In order to clear the track five ter
races were made from the rails to the sum
mit of the hank and each line of men
threw to the terrace above. In many
places the snow drifts are thirty feet deep.
During their week's sojourn in the snow
drilts the passengers endured great hard
ships although the railway authorities did
all in their power to make them comfort
able. It was fortunate for the women and
hildren that so many sleepers were
snowed in with them. No scruples were
observed in taking coal from cars on
sidings to supply them w-ith fuel.
The main line has been opened and a
channel cut through the snow at enormous
labor and expense, and yet the work is but
hall' doue. Every branch is blocked and
every car on the sidings snowed under. It
will take more than a week to get the road
in any kind of running order.
Iron and Steel Industry.
PlTTSBt EG, April 1.—The lodges of the
Amalgamated Association of Iron and
Steel workers throughout the country will
elect delegates during the coming month
to their annual convention, which meets j
in this city on June 7th. There is a great I
amouet of business already on hand and j
it is expected that the convention will be ,
in session at least two weeks. The most j
important matters to he considered will
!*■ the recent trouble with the Knights of I
Labor, the scale of wages for the ensuing :
year and the advisability of further |
strengthening the organization hy taking j
in mtn under new characteristics, and also ;
that all skilled mill labor will have a j
representation. It is said that tbe admis- |
sion of the pipe mill workmen and steel j
makers will be strongly advocated, and ;
that if they are taken in it will increase |
the membership of the association tol25,000 |
men. In regard to the new scale ot
wages nothing is known. A number of
delegates chosen favor a scale based on j
three different grades of iron, instead of on j
bar iron as at present.
Church Differences.
New York, April 1.—Rev. James Cur
ran, a staunch friend and former assistant
of the deposed piiest, Dr. McGlynn, ap
jiearcd with the latter at Jones' Woods on
ISt. Patrick's day. For this he was sent to j
Elleuville, N. Y., to rellect on his con- I
tumacy in appearing in public with a
priest in disgrace. Dr. Curran did not j
profit hy the hint, however, and came j
down on the night of Dr. MçGlynn's lec- j
ture and appeared w-ith him on the plat
form. For this Curran has been ordered I
mto solitary retreat at Hoboken w ith fasts j
and penance for ten days. At the palace j
ot Archbishop Corrigan it was intimated j
that the parishioners of St. Stephen's j
church would do well to take the hint and j
behave themselves lest they sutler excom
munication. The punishment of Dr. Cur
ran is taken as evidence that Archbishop
Corrigan's course toward Dr. McGlynn has
!*een approved at Rome. The parishioners
of St. Stephen's church are excited over
the affair aud propose to hold meetings in
Dr. Curran's support, as they have doue iu
Dr. McGlynn's.
Appointment
Railroad Ke
nt
ceiver.
Chicago, April 1.—The appointment
of a receiver of the Wabash railway lines
east of the Mississippi river to succeed
Judge Cooley was to-day offered to J. K.
Calloway, the general manager of the
Fnion Pacific railroad. General Manag
er Swayne, Messrs. Williams and Thomp
son, George W. Smith and W. G. Beall, had
held a lengthy consultation and reported
that all parties having an interest had
agreed upon Callaway as eminently fitted
for the position. Judge Gresham at once
consented to make the appointment and
Mr. Callaway was telegraphed to at Omaha.
He replied signifying his willingness to
accept, hut was afraid that he could not
do so at once. As J udge Cooley has to be
in Washington on Monday at the Inter
State Commission it is necessary that the
new receiver should qualify without delay
Telegrams were again sent to Manager
Callaway, bnt at the adjournment of
court no answer had been received.
Texas Tragedy.
G AI. VESTON, April 1.—A special to the
Ketrs from San Augustine, in east Texas
near the Louisiana line, says - A terrible
fight occurred this morning ten miles
lielow Hemphill, in Saline county be
tween Capt. Scott and his little company
of State Rangers on the one side, and old
Willis Connor and his sons on the other.
Three of the Connor family and one ranger
uamed Rogers, were instantly killed, and
Capt. Scott and another of his men were
badly if not fatally wounded. One of the
Connor Hoys escaped, but rangers are in
pursuit. The Connors brought on the fight
by firing from an ambush upon the
rangers, who were hunting timber thieves
A doctor of this city has been sent for hy
the rangers to attend to the wounded.
Another Defaulter.
Detroit, April 1.—A. M. Stanton, man
ager of Geo. K. Sistares Sons' hank in this
city, absconded with betweeu $28,000 and
$20,000. Part of this sum was taken from
the Detroit branch bauk and the balance
war, secured by means of fictitious orders
sent to linns in New York.
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OCEAN HORRORS.
Two Hundred and Sixty Lives Lost.
Boston, March 31.—A special to the
Journal from St. Johns, N. F., says : The
steamer Eagle was last seen by the steamer
Aurora, on the night of the 11th inet.*
near Funks Island. A terrible sea was
running at the time. The next morning
the Aurora could find no trace of the
Eagle, and nothing has l>een seen of the
ill fated vessel since.
A message from Greenpond, about 100
miles from here, says the light house
keeper Cabott had boarded the steamers
Vanguard aud Hect. Both of those vessels
reported passing the spare, forecastle and
tbe name hoard of the Eagle near the
spot where she was last seen. Light House
Keeper Cabot is a reliable man, and from
his knowledge of the affairs there and the
tact that the Eagle has not been seen since
the 11th, while other vessels of the fleet
have been spoken of every few days, it is
universally believed that the vessel with
her 250 souls on board was driven on the
reefs, so numerous around Funks Island;
that the sea broke her up and that she
probably sank immediately w-ith her fifty
seamen on deck, on 210 seal fishers below.
The sea that swept the coast that night
was the worst ever witnessed by the oldest
sealers on hoard the vessels. No ship, once
getting in those terrible breakers, could
possibly escape.
Captain Jackman, commander of the
ill fated vessel, was considered to he the
bravest skipper Newfoundland ever pro
duced. He was called "king of the seal
ing fleet," until in 1885. when, for the first
time in his experience, he failed to secure
any seals. Last year's bad luck again
overtook him and he lost the steamer
Resolute, near the same fatal Funk Island,
but all of his crew escaped.
Late the same season he took command
of the Eagle, and within a few weeks she
broke her shaft. She was refitted and a
month ago started with the rest of the j
the lleet on what is now felt as her last
voyage.
The majority of the unfortunates are ^
married and are residents of this city ami j
vicinity, and all were in their prime of
life.
The city is in mourning to-day. This is
the greatest calamity aud the most fright
ful loss of life in the modern history of this
unfortunate colony.
BUSINESS OUTLOOK.
Duu «V Company's Trade Circular.
New York, April 1.— R. G. Dun & Co., |
in their weekly trade review, say: With
three inches of snow iu Virginia, the roads
in many sections almost impassable, and
Canada railroads blocked by drifts, the
distribution of products is difficult. But
for the extraordinary demand to antici
pate the interstate act and its change of
rates, this retarding weather would have
been seriously felt. As it is, dry goods and
hoot and shoe dealers complain that from
the regions buried in snow small orders
come for summer clothing, and the deep
mnd and bad roads in many States arrest
the movements of produce. Business the
past month has been remarkably large,
not only at New York, Boston and
Chicago, ports of phenomenal record,
but in other cities a9 well. This
business has been largely in anticipa
tion of the demand for eight days to come
or more. Hence it is scarcely possible that
a noteworthy unseasonable reaction should
not be felt. Opinions grow that the inter
state act will help the railroads rather
than commerce. Its evident tendency will
he to cause lower charges on local traffic,
which is the smaller, aud higher charges
on long through traffic, which for impor
tant roads is the larger. Neither uncer
tainty nor activity iu the market, under
the circumstances, indicates much for the
future. Wheat has run over one cent, with
sales of 45,000,000 bushels for the week,
the exports continuing heavy for corn, oats,
oil and pork. Sugar and tea have scarcely
changed, with moderate dealings. Coffee
has advanced ]. Cattle and wool are
weaker, as also are tin and copper. Cotton
has boomed, with sale of 1,088,200 bales at
New York in six days. Print cloths are
barely 3.39 cents, with only 108,000 pieces
in sight, against 184,000 pieces two years
ago. Iron is weaker at Philadelphia and
Pittsburg. The collapse of the coal com
bination, and the higher aud fixed rates tor
the transportation of coal, do not encour
age consumers. Whether the hank clear
ings outside of New York ranging 11 per
cent, above those of last year would indi
cate more than temporary activity, we
cannot judge.
Fut the great reduction of rates on the
Canadian eanal3 for shipment to Canadian
ports and tbe attitude of the Grand Trunk
toward other trunk lines foreshadow
sharper competition between Canadian and
New York forwarding merchants, as other
new arrangements indicate manufacturing
development in Canada. The Mexican
tariff' promises a larger traffic in that
direction alter July 1st. With Aprils
settlements over, a large amount of money
usually returns hither, aud this year the
amount sent to Boston has been unusually
large, dividends payable there reaching
$12,662,049 against $7,061,111 last year.
Money has ranged from three to eight
per cent, for a week, but operations to
cause a stringency will now be increasingly
difficult every day unless an unusual outgo
of money should set in, as in 1884, in
place of a return as is customary in April.
The failures during the first quarter of
1887 were smaller in number than in 1886,
1885 and 1884, but the aggregate of liabili
ties were larger than last year, not because
of a general enlarging of indebtedness, hut
because a few unusually heavy failures
were included. The failures for the last
seven days number for the United States
196, for Canada 27, total 223 ; compared
with 259 last week, and 214 for the corres
ponding week of last year.
New Secretary of the Treasury.
Washington, March 31.—It is authori
tatively stated that the following appoint
ments will be made to morrow : Secretary
of the Treasury, Charles S. Fairchild, of
New York; Assistant Secretary of the
Treasury, Isaac H. Maynard, of New York.
Mr. Maynard is the present Second
Comptroller of the Treasury, having been
appointed to that position by President
Cleveland, on June 1st, 1885. He has made
id excellent record in that position. At
the time of his appointment, Sir. Maynard
was Second Deputy Attorney General cf
New York. Two years prior to his ap
pointment to tbe federal service, he was a
candidate ou the Democratic ticket for
Secretary of State of New York, bnt was
defeated owing, it is said, to his prohibi
tion record. His home is in Delhi, N. L
Death of a Poet.
Albany, N..Y., March 31— John God
frey Saxe, the poet, died here to-day. The
burial will take place in the Greenwood
family lot, in Brooklyn.
Died.
Washington, March 31.—A telegram
received to-day from Hot Springs, Ark
announces the sudden death oi Judge
Francis P. Cuppy at that place las night
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IS .THERE ANY HOPE?.
NEW AND IMPORTANT OPINIONS
OF PULMONARY EXPERTS !
Can the Universal Consumption bs
Successfully Treated ?
Dr. Borgeon, a loading French doctor,
has a new treatment for consumption.
He gives an enema of carbonic arid
sulphuretted hydrogen gases, the lattet
gas carrying the former into every part
of the throat and lungs.
This treatment, too, is directed at
effects—the cause remains undisturbed.
Wlmt this raus eis has l>eon stated hy
perhaps the highest pulmonary authority
in the world, i. e., the Frompton Hos
pital for Consumptives, in London, Eng.
This malady every year carries off from
one-seventh to one-fiftli of the entire
population of England!
Dr. Payne, M.D., M.R.C.P., London, is
authority for this statement.
The same or a greater proportion of
deaths obtains in America.
Dr. Payne also says that one-half the
total number of deaths from ail other
causes have seeds of this disease in the
system which only require some irritant
to develop !
Dr. Hermann Brehrner, an eminent
German authority, says tiiat consump
tion is caused by deficient nutrition of
the lungs, by poor blood.
'These authorities cannot he disputed.
The medical vvorld recognizes them. The
uric acid is the irritant in the blood that
causes the development of the seeds
which Dr. Brehrner says lie dormant iu
the blood.
Every particle of blood which passes
through the lungs and heart, also goes
through the kidneys, and if they are in
the least deranged tlrey cannot rid the
blood of its killing poison. The thousand
little hair-like sewer tubes of the kidneys
very easily get blocked up and diseased ;
and when they do, they corrupt instead
of purifying the blood. Kidney disease
may exist, and yet no pain occur in that
organ, because it is deficient in nerves of
sensation.
Dip yourfi nger in acid every day and
it soon festers and is destroyed. Send
acid poisoned blood through the lungs
every second, and they soon give way.
The Brorapton Hospital investigation
showed that 52 per cent, of the victims
of consumption were afflicted with de
ranged kidneys, which permitted the uric
acid poison to remain in the biood and
irritate the lungs. This uric acid is al
ways fighting every vital organ, and if
there be any inherent weakness in the
lungs it inevitably causes pneumonia,
cough and consumption.
The real cause of pulmonary troubles
being so authoritatively shown to be
faulty even though unsuspected action of
the kidneys, explains why, in order to
master the dreaded consumption, one
must rid the blood of the uric acid irri
tant which inflames and burns up the
lung substance. For this purpose there
is nothing equal to that great specific,
Warner's sate cure. This remedy has
now the favor of medical men all over
the world purely on its merits. We have
no doubt ttiat it the kidneys are kept in
natural action, consumption and a great
many other diseases, caused by uric acid,
will not only be cured but will be pre
vented.
When the kidney is healthy, no albu
men appears in the water, but albumen
is found in the water of more than half
of those who die of consumption !
This, then, is the condition of things
that always precedes consumption:
First, weakened kidneys; second, re
tained uric acid, poisoning the blood ;
third, the development of disease in
the lungs by the irritant acids passing
through them. Then there is a little
cough in the morning ; soon thick, yellow
matter is spit up, followed by loss of
flesh and strength, with dreadful night
sweats; and w hen the patient goes to his
school physician for help, he is put on
cod-liver oil which his stomach, weak
ened also by uric acid in tbe blood, can
not digest. Because there is no pain
present in the kidneys, the patient does
not think they are affected, but the kid
ney acid is doing its work every minute,
every hour, day and night, and by-and-by
the disease of the lungs has advanced
until pus is developed, then come hemor
rhages, and at last the glassy stare which
denotes that the end is near !
A post-mortem examination of such
cases shows that the terrible uric acid
has completely destroyed the substance
of the lung.
It is impossible to cure lung disease
when the blood is poisoned with uric
acid.
- *•» -
INTER-STATE COMMERCE.
Organization of the Commission.
Washington, March 31.—About 11
o'clock this morning Messrs. Cooley, Mor
rison, Schoonmaker and Walker, the four
members of the Inter-State Commerce
commission, called at the White House
and paid their respects to the President.
Commissioner Bragg did not arrive in the
city on time to go with them, hut called at
the White House shortly afterward and
then joined his associates at Willard's
hotel, where an informal gathering took
place to enable the members to become
better acquainted with one another. At
three o'clock the commissioners met 1 y
agreement at the Interior department
where their commissions were handed to
them and the prescribed oaths of office ad
ministered. On motion of Colonel Morri
son, Judge Cooley was selected as chair
man of the commission. This action was
unanimous and was taken without dis
cussion, the members having all come to
the conclusion that J udge Cooley was best
fitted tor the position. The commission
then proceeded to the temporary quarters
selected for them in the Hool building, on
F street, just below the Ebbett house, and
after an inspection of the rooms parted
with the understanding that another meet
ing should be held to-morrow for consul
tion. No candidates for the secretaryship
of the commission were proposed and that
mfttter was still held in abeyance.
Chairman of the Commission.
Washington, March 31.— Prior to the
selection of Judge Cooley as chairman of
the commission, Messrs. MorrisoD, Bragg
and Schoonmaker, the three Democratic
members, held a conference, at which it
was decided that in view of Judge Cooley's
long experience and eminence as a Judge,
and in order to demonstrate to the country
that it was their object to promote har
mony and unanimity in the board, Colonel
Morrison should propose and Mr. Bragg
second Judge Cooley's nomination as chair
man. The first business that will come
before the board after its organization will
be the fixing of a time and place for tbe
hearing of the questions to be submitted
by M. P. Smith, vice president ot the Lou
isville & Nashville railroad, and Virgil
Power, general commissioner of pool rates
for the Southern Railway & Steamship
company. These questions relate to the
long and short haul provision of the inter
state commerce bill, as it applies to the
railroads of the Mississipi river, South of
the Ohio and West of the Potomac.
I POSTOFFICE ROBBERY.
The Thief^Captured and Money Re.
covered.
New York, March 31.—At an early
hour Wednesday morning, Superintendent
Pouch, who rooms at the regular division
New York postoffice, was surprised by the
discovery that a package which had ar
rived late Tuesday night in pouch No. 606,
from Portland, Oregon, containing $10,000
in currency, was missing. He had checked
the package off sometime before and he
could not imagine where it could have
gone to, as no one was in the office except
the clerks, 180 in number. The Superin
tendant telegraphed for Inspector Dosser,
and detained the clerks until Dosser ar
rived. Dosser took the clerks to his office
and as his subordinates were away he sent
for Geo. F. Bangs, of the Pinkerton
agency to come and help him. The clerks
were examined one at a time and the ex
amination continued all day and through
the night, until early- this morning. .Sus
picion pointed in the direction of Wm. A.
Clarke, a clerk who has been in the Depart
ment for about five years. He was exam
ined last. For a long time there have
been robberies committed in the Depart
ment and over sixty packages and letters
have been stolen, and the inspectors have
been unable to trap the thief. Clarke is a
married man and lives in Brooklyn. He
was accused of stealing several of these
packages but he stoutly denied his guilt.
At noon to-day Inspector Adsit made an
other search of the registry office and found
the package secreted behind some rubbish
iu the bottom of a closet. It was from the
First National Bank of Portland, Oregon,
and was addressed to the Chemical Na
tional Bank of this city. It was delivered
to the bank office and counted and found
intact. The Inspectors had Clarke locked
in a room with them and told him that
the package had been found and that they
had enough evidence to convict him
He called Inspector Dosser to him and told
him that he had stolen the package aud
that he had also stolen the other sixty
packages that had been missing from time
to time for the past three years, and he
said that he had committed the theft to
pay his debts. He was addicted
to drinking and had gambled some.
He could not say how much he had stolen,
but it is supposed that he has takeu be
twween four and five thousand dollars.
Clarke, after he made his confession was
taken to the Ludlow street jail. He will
have an examination to-morrow before the
United States Commissioner.
Contested Land Cases.
Washington, March 31.—Commissioner
Sparks to-day issued an order creating a
contest board to which all the contest cases
now pending or hereafter arising in pre
emption and public land decisions shall be
referred for examination and decision.
After action is taken by this board upon a
contest case, it will go to the board of re
view. The board is to consist of five mem
bers, selected from the several divisions of
the general land office.
EDSTAR
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ANATOMICAL MUSEUM. Mention this paper.^
GEORGE K. REEDER.
CITY ENGINEER.
Brown's Building, Warren Street.
Mines surveyed and patents obtained. Surveys
and maps of underground workings. Farms sur
veyed and ditches run. Blue printing and fine
draughting a specialt y. ____ dawly-ap23
F. ADKINSON.
Attornoy-»t-Ij»w.
Office in Masonic Temple, Helena. M. T.
Special attention given to suspended and con
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E. S. KELLOGG, M. D.
Surgeon and Homoeopathic Physician.
HELENA, MONTANA.
Gives special attention to diseases of the EY 01 ,
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DR. HI. ROCKMAN,
Physician, Surgeon. Aeeonehenr, Oe
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Member of San Francisco Medical Society, a'.ao
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MRS. ISAAC PHELPS, Ravenna, O.
no medicinFlike them.
We have sold your Cuticura Remedies for the
last six years, and no medicines on our shelves
give better satisfaction.
C. F. ATHERTON, drufigitt, Albany, N. Y.
cuticurTTemedies
Cuticura Remedies are sold everywhere.
Price: Cuticura. 50 rents; Resolvent, 81.00;
Soap, 25 cents. Prepared by the Potter Drug
and Chemical Co., Boston, Mass. Send for
■■lb»« to Cure Skin DIm-hscs."
f> n 11 HP Pimples,Skin Blemishes, and Baby
13 11 U DO) Humors, cured by Cuticura.
I ACHE ALL OVER.
Neuralgic, Sciatic Sud ien, Sharp
and Nervous Pains, Strains and Weak
ness relieved In on«* minute by
the 4'iitieur>« Anti-Pain Plan
ter. New and perfect At druggisst,
__!5 cents ; five for 81. Potter Drug and
Chemical Company, Boston, Mass.
CAPITAL PRIZE, $150,000.
" We do hereby certify Hint we supervise the ar
rangements for all the ifonthly and Semi-Annual
Drawings of The Louisiana State Lottery Company,
and in person manage and control the Diawings
themselves, and that the same are conducted with
honesty, fairness, and in good faith toward all par
ties, and we authorize the Company to use this certifi
cate, with facsimiles of our signatures attached, in
ts advertisements."
U&k
C'oiniiiiMHio tiers.
We, the undersigned Banks and Bankers, will pay
all Prizes drawn in The Louisiana State Lotteries
which may be vresented at our counters.
J. H. OGLESBY. Pres. Louisiana Nat'l Bk.
PIERRE LAN AUX, Pres. State Nat'l Bank.
A. BALDWIN, Pres. New Orleans Nat'l Bk 1 ?
CARL KOHN, Pres. Union National Bank.
I TN PRECEDENTEI» ATTRACTION I
> Over Haifa Million Distributed
Louisiana State Lottery Company.
Incorporated in 1868 for 25 years by the Legis
ture for Educational and Charitable purposes—
with a capital of 81,000,000—to which a reserve
fund of over 8550,000 has since been added.
By an overwhelming popular vote its franchise
was made a part of the present State Constitu
tion adopted December 2d, A. D. 1879.
The only Lottery ever voted on and endorsed by the
people of any State.
It never scales or postpones.
Ifn «rand Mingle Number Drawings
fake place monthly, and the Nemi
Annual Drawiugn regularly every six
months (June and December.)
A NPLEXDID OPPORTUNITY TO
WIN A FORTUNE. FOURTH GRAND
DRAWING, CLASS D, IN THE ACADEMY OF
MUSIC, NEW ORLEANS. TUESDAY, April
12, 1887—20:id Monthly Drawing.
CAPITAL PRIZE, $150,000.
Ae-Xotice.—Tickets are Ten Dollars
only. Halves, 15. Fifths, §2. Tenths 81.
LIST OF PRIZES.
1 CAPITAL PRIZE OF 8150,000......8150.000
1 GRAND PRIZE OF 50,000...... 50,000
1 GRAND PRIZE OF 20,000...... 20,000
2 LARGE PRIZES OF 10,000...... 20,000
4 LARGE PRIZES OF 5,000...... 20.000
20 PRIZES OF 1,000...... 20,000
80 " 500...... 25,000
100 " 300...... 30,000
200 " 200...... 40,000
500 " 100...... 50,000
1,000 " 50...... 50,000
APPROXIMATION PRIZES.
100 Approximation Prizes of 8300...... 30,000
100 " " 200...... 20,000
100 " " 100...... 10,000
2,179 Prizes, amounting to........................$535 000
Application for rates to clubs should be made
only to the office of the company in New Orleans.
For further information write clearly, giving
full address. POSTAI. NOTES. Express Mon
ey Orders, or New York Exchange in ordinary
letter. Currency by Express (at our expense)
addressed _
M. A. DAUPHIN.
New Orleans, La.,
or M. A. DAUPHIN,
Washington. D. C.
Address Registered Letters'to
NEW ORLEANS NATIONAL BANK,
New Orleans, La.
n P M C U DUE) That the presence of Genfs
Il L lYl L IYI D L VI Beauregard and Early, who
are in charge of the drawings, is a guarantee of
absolute fairness and integrity, that the chances
are all equal, and that no one can possibly divine
what numbers will draw a Prize. All parties
therefore advertising to guarantee Prizes In this
Lottery, or holding out any other impossible in
ducements, are sw ndlers, and only aim to de
ceive and defraud the unwary. _
S£j£jDS!
E. J. BOWEV8 Large Illustrated Descrip
tive and Priced Catalogue of Vegetable, Flower,
Clover. Grass and Aifafa Heeds, containing Valu
able Information fer the Gardener, the Farmer
and the Family, mailed FREE to all applic nts.
Addiess:
E. <1. Bowen, Seed Merchant,
815 and 817 S tisome street, San Francisco. Cal.
w2m-ftbl7
IQKAL
BANK.
Main slid Edwards Street, Helena.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
Paid up Capital - 3250,000
Surplus & Profits, - 60,000
DIRECTORS.
C. A. BROADWATER, - - President
A. O.CLARKE, - • • Yice-1*resident
E. SHARPE.........Cashier
N. E. ATKINSON,..................Asst. Cashier
3. C. ASHBY.
B. F. POTTS.
N. H. WEBSTER.
C. W. CANNON.
HERMAN G ANS.
H. F. GALEN.
K. B. HAKKiSON.
A. H. WILDER.
SECOND NATIONAL BANK
HELENA, HONT.
Does a Générai Banking business. Sells Foreign
Drafts and Passage Tickets. Pays Interest on
Time and Saving Deposits. Collections
receive prompt and Faithful Attention.
Has a Savings Department.
THE ONLY
SAVINGS INSTITUTION IN MONTANA!
DIRECTORS:
K. D. Edgerton, J. B. Sanfoid,
President. V !ce-Pre«ldent
Oh as. K. Colk, Cnr.18. Kenia.
E. S Edgerton, St. Paul. S. J. Jc nbs.__
GOLDEN, COLORADO.
Fall Term Begins Sept. 29, 1886.
Complete courses In
CIVIL AND MINING ENGINEERING.
Special courses In
Assaying, Chemical Analysis and Snr
yeying.
The Laboratories and Assay Rooms for
praotioal instruction, are the most com
plete of any in the W est.
TUITION
For catalogue address
KFGIS nf AFTENET. President.
THE DINGEE & CONARD CO'S
It K A I T IF l L E' VER-B LOOMIN'«
Our <* mit Specialty is frying and distributing
ItOS KS. We have nil the latest novelties and tin est
standard sort«, in different sizes and prices to suit nil
wants. Over 4ôO choicest mri'ti* - to choose fror ^
Wb send strong Pot Roses safely by in*«il to all Post
Offices, purchaser's choice of varieties, ali labeieJ,
Offices, purchaser's choice ui —• *— »
3 TO lg PLANTE R I _
according to y« ln« Two vearxtoses by express. Our
New
Addre
Rose
r—■—m---rn uii h ■ ■ .. ........
recording to value. Two year Ro«es by express.^ Our
New Guide,78 pafres,elegantly illustrated, ircc.
Address THE DIM-I.K A < ON A KM < O'
Rose Grower«. W est <»rove, tu enlCf t <>• ■ •**
FARM LOANS.
of
We will undertake the negotiation of
three to five yeara loans on improved farms
in Montana. We desire a select class of
mortgages, and upon such the rate of in
terest will be made satisfactory. Corres
pondence solicited.
Reference—First National Bank, Helena.
WALLACE, STYLES & THORNBURGH.
Helena, - . Montana.
Pi i
^ ws
SevoVsXA*
s »
Cancer of the Tongue.
My wife, some three or four years ago, was trou
bled with an ulcer on the side of her tongue near
the throat. The pain was incessant, causing loss
of sleep and producing great nervous prostration.
Accompanying this trouble was rheumatism. It
had passed from the shoulders and centered in the
wrist of one hand, she almost losing the use of it.
Between the suffering of the two, life had grown
burdensome. By the use of a half-dozen small
sized bottles of Swift's Specific, she was entirely
relieved and restored to health. This was three
vears ago, and there has been no return of the dis
ease: H. L. Misolkbbooks.
Sjiarta, Ga., Jnne 5, 1886.
Treatise on Biood and Skin Diseases marled free.
Tu b Swift Spxcxvm do, . Drawer 3 , Atlanta. Ga
ForSale.
I will sell at my ranch, near Winnemucca.
Nevada, from 400 to 5i 0 head of good stock cattle,
Also. 8 saddle ho-ses, some mares and colts. For
further information call at my ranch, 7 miles
south of Davenport, or. address ~j
JOHN RILEY, Davenport,
w4t-mli31 Lincoln County, Wash. Territory
|
Only Perfect
Body Battery
everlnyent'dl
y Gives an Elec
pjtric Carrent
' withorwiTH
out ACIDS.
Electric Süstinsort
FREE with every Belt,
Address,
304 no:
run every Belt. w Free Pami
JWMBPÂfiSBîïî»
ELECTRIC
BELT
Best Made!
Chronic Dis
eases of both
sexesC ored
w ithoutMedicine.
Estab. 1875. Send for
FreePam^tietNsÄ
704 BAC I CKNTO BT., BAN FRANCISCO. CAT, .'
Life Stock Heafluuarters
Of Montana.
of
of
loss
It
the
it.
For
~j
tf/t
iff.
■n
*

3*raw
IMPORTED
Clydesdale. Percheron Normal
English Draft and Standard Breo.
Trotting Horses on hand and for
sale. Also, a choice large lot of
High Grade Young Stallions on
hand.
FOR QUALITY, PEDIGREE, AND
PRICE, WE DEFY COMPETITION.
Roadsters and Work Horses for
sale. Visitors welcome. Circu
lars free. Correspondence solic
ited.
HUNTLEY «St CLARK.
Tonton. N. F. It. ft.. Forty Riles East «*f
Helena. wly-mhlS
A. H
DEALERS IN
HARDWARE
Mechanics' Tools, Mill Supplies, Belt
| ing, Brass Goods and Pipe Fitings,
Battery Screen, Steel Wheel
barrows, Iron, Steel, Pipe
and Heavy Hardware.
Disston's Celebrated Circular Saws,
and Rival Steam Boiler Feed Pumps.
Agents for Atlas Engines and Boilers,
and Leffel Double Turbine Water
Wheels. Catalogues Furn
ished on application.
ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF
LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, SftSH, DOORS,
STORE FRONTS, ETC.
wyl-anglo
DON'T SHOOT!
But if you «1«. Nave money by buying
the best goods at the
HELENA ARMORY!
SPECIALTIES:
Sharpe's, Winchester,
Marlin and Ballard
Rifles; Parker, Colt's
and Remington Breech
and Muzzle Loading
Shot Guns; Mervin A
Hulbert, Colt's and S. A
W. Revolvers.
Wholesale and retail dealer in Arms, Ammuni
tion, Tobaccos, Cigars, Fruits, notions, etc.
dly-jan 1 M. SILVERMAN.
ERJBOSH
Nervous Debility. Seminal Weak
ness. Exhausted Vitality. Lost Man
hood. and all the terrible effects of self-ai use
and excesses in niaturer years, such as nocturnal
emissions, loss of memory, dimness of vision,
aversion to society, the vital fluid passing unob
served in the urine, and other symptoms that
lead to insanity and death. Yonne und Mid
dlo-nged Men suffering from the aliove should
consult us at once. * lire guaranteed iu
all auch rw.'s. CONSULTATION FREE.
Chemical Analysis, including thorough micro
scopic examinations of the urine, 8-5, An honest
opinion given In all cases. 5V e furnish Tue
Great tCntrliMh Remedy. Sir A.tley
Cooper'* Vital Restorative at 83 a bottle
or four times the quantity, 810.
SAMPLE BOTTLE FREE
to any one stating symptoms, sex and age. Ad
dress ENGLISH M EIHC At. DISPEN
SARY, No. 11 Kearny street, San 1'ran
ciseo. Cal. dawtf
G
DR. CIBBON'S
Of
751 Market Street.
O AND LEARN HOW to avoid
JT disease, and how wonderfully
your are made. I'rivale office, 211
Geary street, San Francisco. Con
sultation of Lost Manhood and all Diseases of
Men. 49rSend for a book. wly-nov5
Kihüctcl 4 it »II ty. Nervous
l»e I. i I i l v. ami Weaknesses In
Men, resnltinn from Kxi-esse,. rurfl
.itlnnit Stomach MedleutInn by
be Marston Bolus.
Scal*sl Book »cut for 2 stamp*,
»--«ton Remedy On.. I« Purl. Plane New York.
LOST
VIGOR
LEGAL BLANKS.
FOIt THE USE OF
lawyers, justices op the peace, conveyan
cers, SURVEYORS, AGENTS, OWERS AND LESSORS
OF REAL ESTATE, ETC.
(CUT THIS OUT FOR REFERENCE.)
THE HERALD has ill stock the following
blanks. They are neatly printed on good paper,
with red ruling for a liorder. The forms have
bee* carefully prepared by a lawyer, are in con
.»rmity with the statutes of the Territory, and
are applicable to any county in Montana.
DISTRICT COURT BLANKS.
Per doz. Per 100
83 00
3 00
4 (X)
2 00
3 00
3 00
3 00
3 00
3 00
4 00
3 00
4 00
2 00
2 at
3 00
2 OO
# 00
3 no
•J no
2 Ul
2 Ul
4 00
4 OO
4 OO
4 00
3 at
-4 00
-4 00
-4 00
Notice of Appeal...................
Undertaking on Appeal.........
Aff. ord. and notice for wit.......
Subpoena..........................
.50
.50
.75
Und. on claim and delivery.
.50
Writ of attachment..............
.50
Und. on attachment...........
.50
Affidavit for attacqment...
.50
Aff. publication summnos........
. .75
Ord. publication summons...
.50
Deposition.......................
.7-5
Execution............................
.25
Summons for juror..................
.25
JUSTICES COURT BI
.ANKS,
Warrant of arrest..........
.50
Writ of attachment.........
..i5
Und. on attachment.........
.25
Affidavit for attachment.........
.50
Subpoena.........
.25
Summons....................
REAL ESTATE BLANKS'
Bond for deed.............................
Quit claim deed..........................
Warranty deed..........................
Bargain and sale deed................
Lease..........................................
Mortgage ...................................
Assignment of mortgage...........
Mechanics lein.....................
.75
.50
.75
.75
MINING BLANKS.
Notice of location (quartz)........
Deed of mining claim.................
Application for patent...............
MICELLANEOUS BLANKS.
Sheriff sale.................................
Bounty certificate (wild animals)
Certificate of Incorporation.......
Bond..........................................
Acknowledgements...................
Chattel mortgage.......................
Bill of sale..................................
Power of attorney......................
A discount of ten per cent, made on orders
amounting to 8-5. and twenty-five per cent, on
orders amounting to 810 or over.
Postage prepaid on all orders. Special forms
of any blanks made to order at low prices.
Check and money orders to be made payable to
.50
.50
.50
.75
.50
.25
.75
.75
-50
3 00
4 no
8 oo
3 00
3 OO
4 00
3 00
2 00
4 00
4 (X)
3 00

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