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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, January 26, 1888, Image 5

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

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TUE SNOW EATEKs.
Neu Machine)* Used on I he Northern
l'acitic lor Fight mg Snow
Blockade»«.
The rotary sdow plow is one of the
greatest inventions of the age and has
proved of incalculable value to trans mon
tane railroads during the last two or three
years, the machine beiDg only a recent in
vention and one just coming into general
use. Who the inventor is or when he per
fected his invention we are not informed,
but his name is sure to descend with honor
through the annals of American railroad
ing. The Union Pacific used the rotary
plow last winter with great success and
the Northern Pacific purchased three of
the machines this winter, one of which has
been successfully operated on the Cascade
division during the recent storm ; and to
its work may be attributed in great part
the regularity of train movements west of
Helena this month, when the road east of
here was paralyzed by blockades.
From a railroad man who witnessed the
performance of the " rotary " on the Cas
cade switchback a few weeks ago we
obtained the following brief description
of the wonderful snow plow : In
exterior apjtearance the rotary looks like
a large box car with a few windows in it,
surmounted by a large iron pipe that bears
some resemblance to a funnel of a steam
ship. The machine looks harmless enough
on side and rear view, but in the front it
assumes a decidedly wicked and business
like aspect. Here is observed a tremendous
steel screw, that looks like a gigantic
augur protruding from the head of the
car. This is the vital principle of the in
vention. Within the car is a complete
steam engine and all necessary machinery
for the work. Here an engineer presides
over the machine and directs its move
ments according to signals received from a
look-out or pilot, who is perched in an
elevated observatory nr pilot house at the
rear ot the car. Both men communicate
with the crew of the locomotive that
pushes the machine by means ol bell sig
nals. When adrift is encountered the rotary
sharpens its teeth and is pushed ahead by a
locomotive. The engine in the rotary is
started and the mammoth augur com
mences to revolve like the screw of
a steam propeller. It strikes the face
of the drift with a sound like
a buzz saw going through a knot and,
whether the snow is one foot or six teet
«deep, just naturally eats it up with its iron
teeth. The augur bores right into the
-now bank and as fast as it forges ahead
the -now loosened is thrown back into a
pipe and ejected with the force of a stream
of water from a fire hose through the fun
nel-shaped pipe on the top of the car. This
is so arranged that it can be easily moved
and the snow thrown on either side of the
track as desired. Some idea of the force
with which the snow is thrown out can He
gained from the following instance: One of
the machines was boring through a six foot
snow bank on the Oregon Short Line last
whiter when the ''rotary" reached a section
hou«e, located near the track. In passing
it the funnel happened to be turned to
ward the section house and the snow
it vomited forth knocked over
a brick chimney on one end of the build
ing. The performance of the Northern Pa
cific machine was no less remarkable on
the Cascade switchback. Here the grade
runs as high as 300 feet to the mile, and
yet the rotary walked right up it. through
snow that was from four to six feet deep,
and cleared the entire track in one night.
This is the onlv one of the machines now
in use on the Northern Pacific, though two
more have been ordered and are expected
every day,one of which will be placed on
the Kocky Mountain division of the road.
The "rotaries" come high, as the vernacu
lar puts it, costing about $15,000 apiece,
but then the railroads "mast have 'em."
They are quickly taking the place of the
old fashioned snow plow, and will soon be
in general use on all roads liable to snow
blockades. •
THE HENDRY MONUMENT.
Circular Letter from the Committee of
the Press Association.
His Bones Will Bleach.
The committee appointed by President
Sutherlin of the Montana Press Associa
tion, notably James H. Mills, ot the I)eer
Lodge New North- West, W. H. Todd, of the
Benton River Press , and George H. Wright,
of the Livingston Enterprise, have issued
the following circular letter upon the Hen
dry monument:
Committee Rooms, 1
Hendry Memorial Committee,
HELENA, January 10, 1888. j
Recognizing the eminent worthiness of
our lamented brother and friend, Joseph E.
Hendry, editor of the Helena Independent ,
who died in the line of duty, conducting
with marked ability one of the leading
journals of Montana, giving his untiring
services to maintaining and increasing the
usefulness and efficiency of a force which
we claim, in simple justice, has doue much
toward the material development of the
Territory and the prosperity of its people
while it lias achieved distinction, collect
ively, throughout the land for its merits in
all that goes to make up the beiter record
of journalism, the Montana Press Associa
tion has taken the initiative to perpetuate
his memory.
It is unnecessary to amplify here on the
great heart, the brilliant intellect, the con
scientious courage and the many noble and
endearing qualities of him whose memory
we would perpetuate, b bile his greatest
monument will he in the ever saddened
memories of those whose privilege it was
to be nearest aud know him best, and who
saw him fall in the very portals of that
temple where knightly service had so early
won him eminent distinction, it is becom
ing that the journalists of Montana, who
are ever generous in their assistance in
perpetuating in substance more enduring
than our lleeting lives the memories ol
those eminent iu other walks of life, should
do so unto their own. First fallen in many
years, of a fraternity now so numerous,
we trust so prosperous as to be able to do
thus without undue demand upon them,
we believe it eminently proper that a
worthy and enduring memorial should be
erected to the memory of one so deserving
as our brother Joseph E. Hendry. The
manner and form of this memorial will be
determined by the Montana Press Associa
tion at its next annual meeting at Great
Falls this season, hut it is desirable that
all should respond to this, that the associa
tion may determine what is to be done,
the plan propo-sd being the erection ot a
monument in Helena, subject in form to
the determination of the Press Association
at its next annual session.
Says the Butte Inter Mountain: The
earch for Gust Sanders, who got lost in
the big snow storm while out deer hunt
ting near Georgetown three weeks ago,
has at last been given up. Every cabin
in the mountains in which he could pos
sibly have found shelter was visited but
be had not been to any ol them. It is
conceded that there is no possibility for
him to have escaped death. The section
of country in which he was lost is all but
inaccessible even in the summer time, and
there is little probability that even his
bones will ever be found.
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THOEBfc-CAKLlSLE.
Democrats Again Defeated in Affirm
ing the Speaker's Title to
His Seat.
Washington*, .Tan. 21. —In the House
Mr. Crisp of Georgia called up the contest
ed election case of Thoebe against Carlisle,
the pending question being on the resolu
tion of the majority of the committee on
elections confirming Mr. Carlisle's title to
his seat. Mr. Hogg of West Virginia en
tered a motion to reconsider the vote by
which the House yesterday defeated the res
olution providing for reopening the case.
Mr. Chipman of Michigan asked unani
mous consent to offer- a resolution bearing
on the subject, but objection came in the
shape of demands for the regular order.
The vote on the majority resolution result
ed : Yeas 140, nays 6. No quorum.
Mr. Crisp, stating that the vote had dis
closed the fact that there was no quorum
present, moved that the House adjourn.
The Speaker pro tem. stated that he
made a mistake in entertaining the motion
to reconsider, entered by Mr. Hogg ; that
the motion could not be entertained until
the previous question, under which the
House was now operating, should have
been disposed of.
The motion to adjourn was agreed to—
yeas, 139 ; nays, 123—a strict party vote.
HOW TO DO IT.
Strikes Advised to Demand Aid From
the Poor Authorities.
Wilkesuakee, Pa., January 21. —In an
address before a mass meeting of miners at
Ashley, last evening, W. H. Hines advanced
a new idea relative to strikes. He advised
strikers to apply to the poor authorities in
their districts lor aid. This would, under
the law, have to be accorded them, and a
tax would have to be levied, which would
nece8ssarily fall most heavily on corpora
tions and wealthy coal operators. They
wonld thus be compelled to contribute to
the support of the men they are trying to
starve into submission, aud iu this way
could soon be brought to terms.
MONTREAL FIRE.
A Property Loss of Two Hundred
Thousand Dollars.
Montreal, January 21.—Borgeau &
Heron's coffee mills aud the premises oc
cupied by the Dominion Art Furniture Co.
aud the Menard Hat and Cap Co. were
burned this morning. Owing to the ex
treme cold weather, the thermometer beiDg
20° below zero with a high wind, the fire
men suffered severely and were greatly
hampered by the hose freezing. Loss,
$200,000. _
BOARDING HOUSE BURNED.
Ten Persons Perish the Flames.
Minneapolis, J i unary 21.—A special
from Tower, ninety miles north of Duluth,
says : The boarding house and saloon of
Nelson Barnaby burned last night. Many
of the inmates jumped from the upper
stories. Ten perished in the flames. Two
other boarding houses burned, but the in
mates escaped. Loss $12,000. The mer
cury was 36° below zero, and absolutely
nothing could be done to extinguish the
flames. ___
MONEY ACCUMULATION.
A Large Amount of Idle Cash Piling
Up in New York.
New York, January 21.—The weekly
bank statement shows a reserve increase
of $5,123,000. The banks now hold $20,
914,000 in excess of the legal rale.
The importations of general merchandise
at the port of New York for the week end
ing January 20th. amount to $7,282,000.
In Favor of New York City.
New York, January 21.—A Washington
special to the World says: That the Demo
cratic National Convention will be held rn
New York city is now reasonably certain.
The president favors such a decision and
most of the party leaders believe that the
best way of securing the Empire State to
the Democratic column is by selecting New
York city as the place to begin the cam
paigu. , - ' -
Death of the Venerable Mother of the
Late President Garfield.
CLEVELAND, January 21.-" 'Grandma"
Garfield, mother of the late 1 «»'dent Jas.
A. Garfield, died this morning at the home
of Mrs. Garfield, in Mentor, at the age of
86 .
INTERESTING DEBATE.
Charges of Corruption Against Con
gressman Springer.
Washington, January 20.—Springer,
rising to a question of privilege, sent to
the clerk's desk and had read an extract
from the speech made yesterday by Kelly,
of Pennsylvania, to the effect that a mem
ber of Congress which had made an ap
propriation for the Philadelphia Centen
nial (and who was a member of the piss
ent House) had claimed a fee of $10,000
for having astutely inserted a'clause in the
Centennial bill making it a loan on which
he could go into court and enforce its pay
ment. Springer said he had no doubt he
was the member referred to by the gentle
man. He had moved an amendment in
the 44 th Congress to the Centennial appro
priation which changed that appropriation
from a congressional donation to a loan.
At the close of the exposition the board of
finance was of the opinion that the money
belonged to the stockholders and not to
the government.
The United States Attorney at Phila
delphia was instructed to bring suit against
the board of finance, and sait was brought.
It was decided that the money belonged to
the beard. He (Springer) went to Attor
ney General Taft and asked him to appeal
the case to the supreme court. This was
done, and the Attorney General had desired
him to appear on behalf of the United
States. He did appear in the case, and
the supreme court reversed the decision of
the court below, and ordered the money to
be paid into the treasury. That ended his
connection in the case as a lawyer. He
never demanded a fee for his services. He
did file one petition, asking that his case
should be referred to the court of claims,
with the right of appeal of the determina
tion as to whether his services had been of
any value. The committee on judiciary
had asked him to fix a sum, but
he had declined to do so, as
he did not desire any compen
sation from the body of which he
was a member. He hoped the gentleman
would, in view of these facts, retract the
statement he had made.
Kelly said he had not meant to do an
injustice, nor did he mean to do one now,
when he reaffirmed in the language of the
Record what he said yesterday. If there
was n wrong to the gentleman in that
statement, he (Kelly) regretted it. He was
no longer young as he had been when he
entered the bar, but since that time he had
followed the lessons derived from senior
members of the bar. One of those lessons
was that no man was entitled to a fee in a
litigation which he had engendeied, and
the gentleman would not deny that he
had called attention of the United States
officials to the fact that there was a clause
in the bill that he had caused to be in
serted aud that he hud gone into court to
press that clause, after the District At
torney had declined to pursue the case
further. The thing had an ugly Odor then
and it was not savory now.
Kelley did not think the gentleman
claimed a fee for inserting that clause.
What he meant to say was that, knowing
the purport of his own clause, the gentle
man was the one man among 50,000,000 of
American citizens v> ho felt that subscribers
to the exposition stock ought to be made
to pay and who, following his own tracks,
hunted them until he stripped them of
their investment, patriotic as it was.
New Pension Bill.
Washington, January 19.—Among the
bills introduced in the Senate to-day were
the following :
By Hoar—To grant a service pension to
all survivors of the late war. It provides
that all officers and enlisted men who
served in the army, navy or marine corps,
(including regulars and volunteers), subse
quent to March 4,18—, and prior to July
1, I860, shall be entitled to pension at the
rate of one cent for each day's service. This
sum to be in addition to any pension for
disability.
Public Timber Lands.
Washington, January 19.—Senator
Hawley offered a resolution directing the
Secretary of the Interior to report the
plan of legislation thought by him to be
needed for the disposition of public timber
lands so as to secure the preservation of
national forest lands at the headwaters of
navigable rivers, and to put within the
rights of settlers legal means of providing
themselves with timber for building their
homes. Adopted.
Advance in Price of Barb-wire.
Chicago, January 10.—The barb-wire
Manufacturers Association to-day advanced
the price of wire to $3.40 per hundred, to
take effect at once. R. E. Lears, of Mar
shalltown, Iowa, presided. The associa
tion decided not to take advantage of the
recent decision ef Judge Shiras, at Du
buque, declaring the Washbum-Moen
patent void. The members will keep on
paying license fees until the matter is
passed upon by the United States Supreme
Court.
Death of Riggs.
Washington, January 19.—Thomas L.
Riggs, of Riggs & Co., bankers, died this
morning of Bright's disease, aged 33.
Died of Apoplexy.
Boston, January 19.—Gen. p. G. At
wood, president of the Mutual Life In
surance Company, of New York, died this
morning of apoplexy.
Contagious Blood Poison.
ÎTr. D. R. Adams. Union, South Carolina,
writes : " I was afflicted with a terrible ease
of blood poison for about thirteen months. I
was treated by the best physicians, and used
various kinds of remedies, but received no
substantial relief. I finally tried the Swift
Specific, and about four bottles cured me
sound and well." ...
Col. B. H. Kieser, editor and proprietor of
the Opelika, Ala., Times, under date of
August 3, 1837, writes : " When I was
a young man. through indiscretion, I con
tracted a disease which has stuck to
me for vears. Some five or six years
since I was troubled with pains, so us to
make it difficult for me to walk. Having
advertised the S. S. S. in my paper for several
years, I concluded I would try it to see if
ttiere was any efficacy in the medicine. I
commenced using it according to directions
at d used half dozen bottles. I was once at a
way station and, getting left, I walked the
seven miles and have never felt any return
of the old maladv. After experiencing the
good effects I must say I am satisfied with
the result. I am sixty-eight years of age and
I feel now like a young man and can go to
the case when necessary and set up from six
to eight thousand ems without any incon
venience. I send you this without solicita
Vr. F Wochl. 211 North Avenue, Chicago,
under date of J une 12, 1SS7, writes : *'I deem
It my dutv to thank you for the cure I re
ceived from your excellent medicine. I con
tracted a very severe case of blood poison
ing about two years ago. Hearing of your
medicine, I went to a drug store, the pro
prietor of which persuaded me to buy a
preparation of his own, which he said was
a sure cure. I used six bottles of liis stuff
and grew worse all the time. At last I got
disgusted and despaired of a cure. I met a
friend who told me tuat your medicine had
cured him. I went to the same druggist
again and demanded your medicine. He re
luctantly sold me twelve bottles, and I am
now perfectly cured. I write this for the
benefit of sufferers, to prevent their being
deceived by false representations. I thank
you again tor the benefit derived from your
medicine." . ....
■ Dr. J. N. Chenev, a prominent physician,
residing iuEllaville, Schley County, Georgia,
In a letter recounting the infallible success
he has in curing contagious blood poison
cases ln bis extensive practice, writes:
"Those who know tha almo .t inevitab.e,
permanently dangerous effects of mercury
will welcome your discovery of S. S. S. as a
boon to humanity. The medical profession,
always warv of proprietary medicines, is
coming slowly, and in some cases secretly,
to the use of S. S. S. In cases of blood dis
order. Of course a medicine that cures
poisoning in Its worst form must purify the
blood of every disorder.''
Treatise on Blood and Skin Diseases mailed
free. Tu* Swift Specific Co., .
****• Drawer 3, Atlanta, Qa. J
Sw».
MWflJ
ROYAL
I
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never varies. A marvel of purity,
strength and wholesomeness. More economical
than the ordinary kinds, and cannot be sold in
competition with the multitude of low test, short
weight, alum or phosphate powders. Sold only
in cans.. Koval Baking Powder Co., 106 Wall
street. New York._____ _
SCRATCHED 28YEARS
A Scaly, Itching Skin Disease with
Endless Suffering Cured by
Cuticura Remedies.
If I had known of the Cuticura Remedies
twenty-eight years ago it would have saved me
8200.00 (two hundred dollars) and an immense
amount of suffering. My disease (Psoriasis)
commenced on my head in a spot not larger than
a cent. It spread rapidly all ovay my body and
got tinder my nails. The scales would dropoff
of me all the time, and my suffering was end
less, and without relief. One thousand dollars
would not tempt me to have this disease over
again. I am a poor man, but feel rich to be re
lieved of what some of the doctors said was
leprosy, some ring-worm, psoriasis, etc. I took
. . . and . . . SarsaparUlas over one year and a
naif, but no cure. 1 cannot praise the Cuticura
Remedies too much. They have made my skin
as clear and free from scales as a bayb s. All I
used of them was three t»oxes of Cuticura. and
three bottles of Cuticura Resolvent, and two
c*kes of Cuticura ?oap, If you had been here
and said you would have cured me for 8200 you
would have had the money. I looked like the
picture in your book of Psoriasis (picture num
ber two, ''How to Cure Skin Diseases.") but now
i am as clear as any person ever was. Through
force of habit I rub my hands over my arms and
legs to scratch once in a while, but to no pur
pose. I am all well. I scratched twenty-eight
years, and it got to be a kind of second nature to
tue. I thank you a thousand times. Anything
more that you want to know write me. or arty
one who read this may write to me and I will
answer it. T ENNIS DOWNING.
Watdrbury, VU, Jan. 20tli, 1387.
Psoriasis, Eczema. Tetter, Ringworm, Lichen,
Pruritus, Scall Head, Milk Crust, Dandruff, Har
bers', Bakers', Grocers' and Washerwoman's
Itch, and every species of Itching, Burulng,
Scaly Pimply Humors of the Skin and Scalp
and Blood, with Loss of Hair, are positively
cured by Cuticura, the great Skin Cure, and
and CUTICURA Soap, an exquisite Skin Beautt
fier externally, and Cuticura Resolvent, the
n w Blood Purifier internally, when physicians
and ail other remedies fail.
Sold everywhere. Price, Cuticura, 50c ; Soap.
25c ; Resolvent. 81. Prepared by the Pottrk
Drug and Chemical Co , Boston, Mass.
Azj"8end for "How to Cure Sain Diseases," 61
pages. 50 illustrations, and 100 testimonials.
PIM
PLES, blackheads, chapped and oily skin
prevents i by Cuticura Medicated Soap
Catarrhal Dangers.
To be freed from the dangers of suffocation
while lying down; to breathe freely, sleep
soundly and undisturbed ; to rise refreshed, head
clear, brain active and free from pain or ache ;
to know that no poisonous, putrid matter detiles
the breath and rots away the delicate machinery
of smell, taste and hearing ; to feel that the sys
tem does not. through Us veins and arteries,
suck up the poison that is sure to undermine and
destroy, is indeed a blessing beyond all other
human enjoyments. To purchase immunity
from such a fate should be the object of a.. af
flicted. But those who have tried many reme
dies and physicians despair of relief or cure.
Sanford's Radical Cure meets every phase
of Catarrh, from a simple head cold to the most
loathsome and destructive stages. It is local and
constitutional. Instant it relieving, permanent
in curing, safe, economical and never-failing.
Sanford's Radical Cure consists of oneladtle
of the Radical Cure, one box of Catarrhal
Solvent, and one Improved Inhaler, all wrap
ped in one package, with treatise and directions,
and sold by all druggists for 81.00.
Potter Drug & Caemical Co., Boston.
No Rheumatiz About Me
IN ONE MINUTE
* ^ j The Cntienra Anti-Pain
Planter relieves Rheumatic,'Sci
» KF atic, Sudden, Sharp and Nervous
I a Pains, Strains and Weaknesses.
\ g The first and only pain-killing
l/ plaster. New, original, instantane
OU-, infallable, safe. A marvellous Antidote to
Pain, Inflammation and Weakness. Utterly un
like and vastly superior to all other plasters. At
all druggists, 25 cents ; five for 81.00 ; or. postage
free, of Potter Drug and Ch rmical Co., Bos
ton, Mass. _
FIRST
[No. 1649.1
NATIONAL
Or HELENA.
ORGANIZED IN 1866.
T) 1 XTTT
K. ■
Designated Depository ot the United
States.
Paid-Up Capital........................... #»00,000
Snrplne an«l Profits.................... 300,000
S. T. HAUSER, President.
A. J. DAVIS, Vice-President.
E. W. KNIGHT, Cashier.
T. H. KLEINSCHMIDT. Ass t Cashier.
Board of Directors.
S. T. HAUSER, JOHN O. CURTIN.
A. M. HOLTER. R. S. HAMILTON.
JNO. H. MING, C. P. HIGGINS,
E. W. KNIGHT. A. J. DAVIS,
T. H. KLEINSCHMIDT, HENRY M.PARCHEN
T. C. POWER.
Associated Banks.
FIRST NATIONAL...........Fort Benton, Montana
MISSOULA NATIONAL........Missoula. Montana
FIRST NATIONAL.....................Butte. Montana
General Banking Business Transacted.
INTE REST P AID ON TIME DEPOSIT S.
READ! READ!!
We carry tlie Largest Stock of
TRUSSES, ELECTRIC BELTS,
AND
SHOULDER BRACES,
Of any house in the Territory,
Orders by mail will receive
prompt attention.
Pope & O'Connor.
druggists.
Dissolution of Copartnership.
Notice is hereby given that the partnership
in the butcher business, heretofore existing at
the town of Wickes, county of Jefferson, Ter
ritory of Montana, between James J. Mayne
and Ed H. Cooney under Ihe firm name of
Mayne & Cooney is this day mutually dissolved.
The latter will retire from said business. The
former will continue the business at the old
stand and pay all debts of the said firm and
collect all accounts due the same
JAMES J. MAYNE.
d<kwlm-jan!6 ED, H. COONEY
Montana National Bank
HELENA. M. T.
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
Capital, - - - - $250,000
Surplus Profits, - - 90,000
DIBECTORS.
C. A. BROADWATER, • - President
A. 6. CL.VISE. • • • Tice-President
E. SHARP E,........Cashier
8. E. ATKINSON...................Asat, Cashier
( W Canmtn. Herrn an Gans, S (' Ashby,
H. F. Galen, A. H. Wilder.
SECOND NATIONAL
BANK.
Helena, - - - Montana.
Dom a Genera' Banking business. Sells Foreign
Drafts and Passage Tickets. Pays interest on
Time and Saving Deposits. Collections
receive prompt and Faithful Attention.
Has a Savings Department.
THE ONLY
SAVINGS INSTITUTION IN MONTANA!
DIRECTORS :
E. D. Edgsrtor. J. B. Sanford,
President. Vice-President
Oh ab. K. Cols, Chris. Kxnck.
B. 8 Edgrrton, St. Paul. _ 8. J. Joys.
STATE SCHOOL OF VINES.
GOLDEN. COLORADO.
Fall Term Opens Sept. 28, 1887.
complete courses In
CIYD AND MINING ENGINEERING.
Special courses In
Assaying, dnemical Analysis and Sur
reyiag.
The Laboratories and Assay Booms fo
practical instruction, are the most com
plete of any in the West.
TUITION lfllJaH
For catalogne address
KF-OT8 fiHArVKVET. President.__
C. K. COLE. M. D. J. M. SLIGH. M. D.
COLE & SLIGH,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
HELENA....................................MONTANA.
Office—106 Grand street, (near Main.) Calls
promptly answered, night and day. Telephone,
N o 78. __ d<tw-je24
E. S. KELLOGG, M. D.
Surgeon and XX >mceopathic Physician.
HELENA. MONTANA.
Gives special attention to diseases of the EYE,
EAR, THROAT and CHEST. Also, All
Chronic Diseases. _ «L».wly-aug24
drTm. rockman,
Physician, Nnrgeon, Accoucheur, Oc
cults! and Anrlst.
Member of San Frandsoo Medical Society, also
Nevada State Medical Society.
Office—Over Parchen's drug store. Entrance
from Broadway and Jackson street. Consulta
tions In German and English._____cLt wtf-o2S
GEO. K. REEDER
REEDER & HELÎ1ICK.
Brown's Building, Warren Street.
CO
CS CO
Li >
ca lu
C. W. HELMICK.
C. E.
Mines surveyed and patents obtained. Surveys
and maps of underground workings. Farms sur
veyed and ditches run. Blue printing and fine
draughting a specialty.
pat.qct
20.35.
ÜE N ONLY
BUCKS FO R SALE.
Thoroughbred
FRENCH MERINO BUCKS
FOR SALE OR TRADE.
Address JAS. S. LYTLE. Augusta, Montana.
WEAK MENP"' mw '
_____ Indiscretions or
Excesses, WKfit ARANTKK TO
CUHfc by this New Imi-boved
this specific purpose, CURE OF
■ I. — -Enebative Weakness, giv
ing con^^jP55**^Tiniiou s, mild. soothin' currents of
Electric- ity directly through all v*»# *parv lestor
ir.gthera^/Ag'vto health and Vigorou* oirengtl. Electric
Current ''^^^Ç-feltinstûnth o r wc forfeit 85,000 in cash.
Greatest Improvement® over ail other belts. Worst cases per
manently cured in three months. Sealed pamphlet4c. stamp
The Sanden Electric Co. 169 LaSalle at., Chicago.
DRS.S.ID.DAVIESON
ST- I.OUIS. MO-,
The Great Specialists,
Members of University College Hospital, Lon
ioii, England, M. D., New York and Giessen. Ger
many, beg toinform theirpatients and others that
they can be consulted by correspondence in all
tas&s of Spermatorrhoea. Lost Manhood and all
diseases resulting from Self-Abuse and kindred
causes.
Cases of Gonorrhoea and Syphillis, Primary,
Secondary and Tertiary treated by new and infalli
ble methods, by which patients are saved much
trouble and great expense.
Fees moderate. Consultation Fee, tnclnding
Biscroscop ical examination of urine, #5.00.
Practical observation on Nervous Debility and
Physical Exhaustion sent on receipt of one 2-cent
stamp. Address, Drs. S &. D. DAVIESON,
I 707 Olive street St. Louis. Mo. „
!3f*Vi sitors to St. Louis should visit the Great
ANATOMICAL MUSEUM. Mention thit papei.
Notice of Forfeiture.
To Henrv O'Connor, W. F. Colgrove and
Henry W Brooke :
You are hereby notified that I have expended
one hundred and thirty-five dollars in labor and
Improvements upon the Silver Hill Lode min
ing claim, situated in Lewis and Clarke county,
M. T.. about six miles west of Helena and one
and one-half miles west of the Grass Valley
Lode, and the notice of location thereof being
of record iu the office of the county clerk and
recorder of said county, and recorded Sept. 15,
1885, in book of lodes, page 255. In order to
hold said premises under '.he provisions of Sec.
2324, revised statues of the United States, being
the amount required to hold the same for the
year of 1887, and if within ninety days after this
notice you fail or refuse to contribute your pro
portion of such as co-owners your interest in
and to said Silver Hill Lode claim will become
the property of this subscriber In accordance
with law in such cases made and provided.
GODFREY LaSALLE.
Dated Helena, M. T„ Jan. 14, 1888. w90d-jan!9
BALL'
PÇEISTEE^O T«ME MAf^L
AF4.I9 US7.
CATARRH !
[Asthma, Hay Fever, Bronchitis, Sore
Throat, Neuralgia, Headache, in
stantly relieved by the use of the
Ho^ojfitE Aftof*cTot(r, GENUINE CARBQIC SMOKE BILL
jlOI/UlApoLls}
i
\)
V'
and Debellator Package. Carbolic
Smoke Ball, $2. Beware of Imita
tions. For Sale by
H. ffl. PÄRCHEN &. CO,, Druggists,
A. J. DAVIDSON.
Dealer in
BAIN WAGONS,
HARNESS AND SADDLES.
Sole Agent for Hill's Concord
Harness.
Wall and "A" Tents, Wagon
_ Covers, etc. _
ESTABLISHED 1866.
GANS & KLEIN.
Tli© Xieadlng
CLOTHING HOUSE
of Montana.
Country Orders Solicited.
Corner Main Street and Broadway,
i H HOLTER & BRO
DEALERS IN
HARDWARE
Mechanics' Tools, Mill Supplies, Belt
ing, Brass Goods and Pipe Fitings,
Battery Screen, Steel Wheel
barrows, Iron, Steel, Pipe
and Heavy Hardware.
Disston's Celebrated Circular Saws,
and Rival Steam Boiler Peed Pumps.
Agents for Atlas Engines and Boilers,
and Leffel Double Turbine Water
Wheels. Catalogues Furn
ished on application.
qiRu FI
Rcrs''
*4
e r/nc
Debility,
Dyspepsia
ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF
LUMBER, LATH, SHINGLES, SASH, DOORS,
STORE FRONTS, ETC.
wyl-angl3______
Life Renewer
DR. PIERCE'S New Gal
vanic CHAIN BELT with
Electric Suspensory, guur
anteed the most powerful,
durable aud perfect Chain
Battery in the world. Cures,
without medicine. Nervous
ÏÏ Pain in the Back,Kidney Disease,
^ Rheumatism, Weakness of Sexual
Groans. ''"<** Call orsend star p fonPamph.No. 2.
MAGNETIC ELASTIC TRUSS CO.,704 Sacramento st
Over 6,000,000 PEOPLE USE
O.M.FERRY&CO.
are admitted to be the
Largest Seedsmen
fn the world.
D.M. FERRY,4 CO'S
Illustrated, Deserip.
tire and Priced
SEED
ANNUAL
For 1883
will be mailed
Lfreeto all
applicants, and
to last season'*
customers with
out ordering it.
' Invaluable to all.
Every person using
fCarden.FleldorFlower
f ^ ^ should seed for
_ ___ it* Addres®
D. M. FERRY&CO.,Detroit, Mich.
Great English Remedy.
Murray's Specific.
A guaranteed cure for all nervous
._ » diseHses.such as Wesk Memory,
* I .ohm of Krain Power. Hysteria,
Head ehe, Pain in toe B«c»a, Äer
Vims Prowtra'inn, Wakeful*
[before] jk-ss. I.eneorro ««*<». Universal
Lassitude. Seminal Weakness, Impo
tency and general loss of power of the Generative
Organs;—in either Sex. caused by indiscretion
or over exertion, and which ultimately le ad to
Premature Old Age. Insanity
ami Consumption. 81.00 a box or
six boxes for 85.00. Sent by mail on re- V
ceipt of ptice. Full particulars in pam
phlet, sent free to every applicant. 7* ^
We tiaarrantee Mx Boxes Laïterj
to cure any case. For every 85.00 order received,
we spnd six boxes, with written guarantee to re
f .nd the money if our Specific does not effect a
cure. Address all communications to the Sole
Manufacturers.
THE MURRAY MEDICINE CO.,Kansas City. Mo
.Kÿ-Sold in Helena by H. M. PARC <-iEN At CO.,
Sole Agents. __ daw-sep26
THE DINGEE & CONARD CO'S
LEADING SPECIALTIES.
ALL VARIETIES, SIZES AND PfUCES
FINE EVER-BLOOMING PERPETUAL,
CLIMBING AND MOSS ROSES;
NEW AND RARE FLOWER SEEDS
HARDY PLANTS . New Moon Flower, Clematis,
Spring Bulbs, JAPAN LILIES. Hew Chrysanthe
mums, A our WONDERFUL ORNAMENTAL
I 9 ■ cnhiivw nvf Bis ■
department*. Our NEW CU IDE. 1MipjL gej
illustrated, describe* over 1800 N EWEST
CHOICEST Varieties Of ROSES, SEEDS*
PLANTS and BULBS« and tell* how to grow
th^Ftee.Hroawish to plant anythin«, send
tor it. 20 Years Established. oèêrÿSLarg*
€rreenhouses. THE DINCEE A CONARD CO.
BOSE GB0WEBS, West Grove, Chester Co.. Fa.
VE WAJVT
TO SELL Ti GOOES
Through our Mail Order Depart
ment.
Our prices are in your favor,
we know. We keep everything
that goes to make the stocl^ of a
Big Dry Goods Establishment;
your wants, your family's and
your house's.
Dress Goods to Lace Curtains.
Silks to Calicos.
Forty years' experience in busi
ness helps us to fully meet yonr
wants. We are the leading es
tablishment in Western Pennsyl
vania. Write for samples, prices
and information, we guarantee
a prompt reply.
JOS. HORSE & CO.'S
Penn Avenue Store*«, Pittsburgh, Pa.
wl2t-oct20 •
DR. JORDAN'S
u Inen of Anatomy,
751 Market Street.
G O AND LEARN HOW to avoid
disease, and how wonderfully
,u your are made. Private office, 211
_ Geary street, San Francisco. Con
sultation of Lost Manhood and all Diseases of
Men. A®-Send for a book. wly-nov5
LEGAL BLANKS.
FOR THE USE OF
LAWYERS, JUSTICES OF THE PEACE, CONVEYAN
CERS, SURVEYORS, AGENTS, OWERS AND LESSOR 0
OF BEAL ESTATE, ETC.
(OUT THIS OUT FOR REFERENCEJ
THE HERALD has iu stock the following
blanks. They are neatly printed ou good paper,
with red ruling for a border. The forms have
bee' carefully prepared by a lawyer, are in con
'.»rrnity with the statutes of the Territory, and
are applicable to ary county in Montana.
DISTRICT COURT BLANKS.
„ , Per doz. Per 100
Notice of Appeal........................50 £3 00
Undertaking on Appeal........... .50 3 00
Aft', ord. and notice for wit..........75 4 00
Subpoena.....................................35 2 1«)
Summons.................................... (50 3 00
Und. on claim and delivery.........50 3 00
Writ of attachment......................50 3 00
Und. on attachment...................50 3 00
Affidavit for attacqment.............go 3 00
Atf. publication stimmnos..........75 4 00
Ord. publication summons..........50 3 oo
Deposition...................................75 4 00
Execution.............................. 35 2 00
Summons for juror......................35 2 00
JUSTICES COURT BLANKS.
Warrant of arrest.......................50 3 OO
Writ of attachment......................35 o 00
Und. on attachment....................35 0 00
Affidavit for attachment.............50 3 (X)
Subpcena............................... 35 2 00
Summons................. 35 2 00
Summons for juror......................35 2 Oo
REAL ESTATE BLANKS;
Bond for deed..............................75 4 OO
Quit claim deed........................ .75 4 00
Warranty deed...........................75 4 00
Bargain and sale dued.................75 4 00
Lease...........................................50 3 00
Mortgage ....................................75 4 00
Assignment of mortgage............75 4 00
Mechanics lein............................75 4 00
MINING BLANKS.
Notice of location (quartz).........50 3 00
Deed of mining claim...«.............75 4 00
Application for patent.................50 3 00
Water Right location..............-, .50 3 OO
Lode Representation...................50 3 00
Placer Location...........................50 3 (XI
MICELLANKOUS BLANKS.
Sheriff sale..................................50 3 00
Bounty certificate (wild animals) .50 3 00
Certificate of Incorporation.........75 4 00
Bond...........................................50 3 00
Acknowledgements.....................35 2 00
Chattel mortgage........................75 4 00
Bill of sale...................................75 4 00
Power of attorney............... .50 3 00
A discount of ten per cent, made on orders
amounting to $5. and twenty-five per cent, on
orders amounting to 810 or over.
Postage prepaid on all orders. Special forms
of any blanks made to order at low prices.
Check and money orders to be made payable to
FISK BROS., Helena« Mont.
_ t _

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