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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, January 24, 1889, Image 8

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LOCAL NEWS
From the Daily Herald of January 17.
MEDICAL MEN.
The Doctors' Association Meets and
Takes Steps for the Suppres
sion of Quackery.
The Montana Medical Association met
in the city hall last evening, President E.
D. Leavitt, of Butte, in the chair.
Secretary Bullard called the roll, to
which the following medical gentlemen
responded:
Butte— R. L. Gillespie, E. D. Leavitt, T.
J. Murray.
Helena—W. R. Bullard, G. H. Barbour,
C. K. Cole, J. C. Hunter, D. M. H. McK^y,
■ty. alufris, J. M. Read, W. L. Steele, A,
Treacy.
BCZCïnan — G. W. Monroe.
Wiekes— W. M. Bullard.
The meeting was an adjourned one from
the meeting of last August, the present
session of the association having been
called principally for the discussion of i
bill for presentation to the Sixteenth Leg
islature.
After the minutes of the August meeting
were read and approved, the President an
nounced the next order of business the con
sideration of applications for membership
The chairman of the committee on creden
tials presented the following list of gentle
men who we e duly elected to the associa
tion by the adoption of the report, after
which a recess of ten minutes was taken to
give the new members present an opportu
nity to sign the constitution, so as to have
a voice and vote in the proceedings.
Those present and who became qualified
T Dr Shultz, Butté; Dr J H Owings, Deer
Lodge; Dr L D Pickman and Dr Leason,
Dillon; Dr Dickson, Granite; Dr Buckley,
Missoula; Drs Snyder and Leiser, Anacon
da; Dr C M Chambliss, Helena; Drs R M
Whitford and F M Higgins, Bozeman; Dr
N Atkinson, Fort Benton; Dr A A Tozer,
White Sulphur Springs; Dr H Hansen,
Townsend; Drs Gnnn, Hammond and How
ard, Butte; Dr G W King, Marysville; Drs
Leiser and Museer, Helena; Dr J B New
man, Sun River, and T H Pleasants,
Helena.
The judiciary committee then presented
a bill for presentation to the legislature.
It provides that the governor shall appoint
a board of seven skilled physicians, whose
duty it shall be to examine the diplomas
of men who come to Montana to practice
medicine and pass upon their qualifica
tions for the profession; all doctors must
have a certificate from this board before
they can practice in the Territory and
fines are imposed on persons attempting to
practice without such certificate. The
bill is designed to protect the people of
Montana against the dangers of quackery
and to prevent irresponsible men from ex
perimenting on them with drugs. It met
with the unanimous endorsement of the
meeting.
On motion it was agreed to appoint a
committee of five to present the bill to the
legislature and urge its passage. Drs
Steele, Thompson, Chandler, Treacy and
Barbour were selected.
Dr. Bullard, of Helena, was appointed to
fill the vacancy on the judiciary commit
tee caused by the removal of Dr. Maguire,
of Butte, to California.
On motion the meeting adjourned to
meet in Butte the first Wednesday during
fall meeting of the West Side Fair and
Racing association.
Nipped In the Bad.
Is It not better to nip consumption, the greatest
scourge of humanity, In the bud, than to try to
stay Its progress on the brink of the grave. A
few doses of California's most useful production,
SANTA ABIE, the king of Consumption, wil
relieve, and a thorough treatment will cure
Nasal Catarrh, too often the forerunner of con
sumption, can be cured by CALIFORNIA CAT
R-CURE. These remedies are sold and fully
warranted by H. M. Pärchen & Co., at SI, or
three for 82.50.
Gov. Hauser Goes to Butte.
Ex-Gov. S. T. Hauser recently returned
from the East, where he formed a syndi
cate for building the Rocky Fork & Cook
City railroad to the coal fields, the work on
which is now being pushed day and night.
It is surmised that Henry Yillard heads
the New York wing of the syndicate and
that Haggin & Daly are among the promi
nent Montanians interested. The Governor
left for Bntte this morning, and we miss
our guess if this little excursion does not
result in the early completion of a direct
line to Butte for the purpose of supplying
that great city of smelts« with Rocky
Fork coal. The Governor has been too
busy to be interviewed, but we learn that
he leaves for New York Saturday. For a
number of years he has returned home
only to put in operation some new railroad
scheme, until now his enterprise has given
to the Territory some eight or nine roads
Will this trip result in a new road, and, if
so, where ?___
Boulder Chief.
Superintendant J. F. Taylor is in this
morning from the Boulder Chief with good
news tor the stockholders. He says in
raising from the bottom of the shaft which
is down 174 feet to 126 foot level, he has
struck a three foot vein of high grade ore
which promisee to be one of the richest
strikes in the Boulder district.
Celor Line in the Churches.
I Philadelphia Times. 1
The Northern and Southern Presbyte
rians, after praying over the matter and
talking about it from every point o vew,
have decided to remain Northern and
Southern Presbyterians still. It was the
colored brother that perpetuated the
schism. The Southern Presbyterians in
sisted that the colored brother should
flock by himself, and that there
shonld be no misunderstanding or
false pretenses abont the mat
ter. The Northern Presbyterians wanted
him admitted to chmches, presby
teries, synods and assemblies on professedly
equal terms. The southern wing declined
this as the fundamental basis of a reunion,
and no reunion is probable. There is lit
tle donbt that the negotiations for a re
union of the Methodist and Baptist bodies
will fall to the ground for the same reason.
Race prejudice is a principle so deeply em
bedded in human nature that it requires
more Christianity than the average human
being has yet been able to absorb or eradi
cate it. _ _ __
Undeservedly Laughed At.
The unthinking are prone to make game of
neivousness. Yet this la a very real and seri
ous affliction, the harraalng symptoms of
which are rendered all the more poignant by
ridicule. The stomach la usually responsible
for these spmptoms—It« weakness and disorder
find a reflex in the brain, which la the head
quarters of the nervous system. As a nerve
tonic and tranquillizer, we believe that not one
can be pointed out so effective aa Hostetler's
fr tonisch Betters. In renewing vigorous diges
tion, it strikes the key note of recovery of
strength and quiet ude by the nerves. Headaches,
tremors in quiet sleep, abnormal sensitiveness
to unexpected noises—all these modify and ulti
mately disappear as the system gains strength
from the great tonic. Dyspepsia, biliousness,
rheumatism, constipation and kidney oomplalnta
aie subdued by the Bitters, jan21-23-25w24
E.
to
T.
A,
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to
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From the Dailv Herald of January 18.
VICTIMS OF HARD LUCK.
Two Men Injured in Mines Near
Helena.
A miner named Michael Loftus. who
was working in one of the Broadwater
mines was brought to St. Peter's Hospital
yesterday afternoon, suffering from severe
horns and wounds sustained in
an explosion in the mine.
A blast went off prematurely and
Loftns, who was the only man in the drift,
was hurled to the ground by the force of
the concussion. Both arms were shattered
aud his arms fearfully mangled, besides
other bruiseq and cuts on bis face and
j breast. Physicians amputated both arms
yesterday evening, one at the wrist and the
other in the middle of the forearm. He
was placed under the influence of chloro
form during the operation The unfortun
ate is a single man and came here from
Pennsylvania. It is doubtful if he will
survive his injuries.
Another accident is reported from
the mine of Hazleton & Harris
at Placer, which took place Wednes
day afternoon. Brady Hanson, a miner
slipped from the ladder as he started down
the shaft and fell to the bottom, a distance
of ninety feet. He fell vertically fifty
feet f>nd then struck the incline, which he
descended with scarcely less rapidity.
Marvelous ta relate he escaped any
serious injury, sustaining only a few
bruises and a bad ent n the nose. His
escape from instant death is most re
markable. He is also being cared for at
St. Peter's Hospital and will be ont in a
few days._
NEW ENGLANDERS.
Another Meeting of the Montana
Yankees.
The meeting of the New England so
ciety last evening was well attended, a
□umber of Yankee guests from outside
points being present.
The following were elected to member
ship: Prof. C. G. Swallow, A. L. Stone,
Herbert Chandler, W. G. Morton, Anna
Brown, J. W. Silliman, Fred Cutler and
Mrs. Cntler.
The rales were suspended and the fol
lowing were proposed and unanimously
elected: Jndge Hiram Knowles, of Butte;
Judge H. N. Blake, of Virginia City; Mr.
and Mrs. Clinton H. Moore, of Deer
Lodge county; Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Rea, of
Miles City; H. D. Pickman, of Dillon;
Oscar Willis, of Virginia City; G. H. Car
ver, of Livingston; L. W. Hanscombe, of
Butte; L. B. Olds, of Madison county; H.
J. Haskell, of Glendive.
The literary excercises opened by a solo
on the piano, "Erminie," by Miss Jennie
Tonn, after.which the society took np the
pending question, "What native son of
New England has rendered our country
the greatest service? Jndge Knowles sup
ported John Adams; Prof. C. H. Moore ad
vocated Dajiel Webster. W. M. Bickford
advocated Wm. Fessenden. J. G. Somerville
presented the claim of Brigham Yonng.
C. H. Bowen spoke earnestly for Roger
Williams. Miss Knowles again supported
Daniel Webster and J. W. Kinsley William
Lloyd Garrison. Prof. Logan divided his
admiration between Horace Mann and
Brigham Yonng, and Prof. Carleton closed
the debate, assisted by Jndge Hedges, in
presenting his claim of Benjamin Franklin.
A ballot was then taken with the follow
ing result:
Benjamin Franklin, 25; Daniel Webster,
6; Horace Mann, 6; Roger Williams, 4; B.
F. Butler, 4; Wm. Lloyd Garrison, 2; Jas.
G. Blaine, Brigham Yonng, Horace Greeley,
John Adams and Joelyn Story one each.
Messrs. Logan and Carleton and Miss
Knowles were appointed a committee to
prepare and present a subject for discussion
at the next meeting.
A Brilliant Musicale.
Among the social events of the season
will long be remembered the delightful en
tertainment given last evening at Governor
Leslie's residence, on South Rodney street,
by Mr. and Miss Leslie, to the yonng
society people of Helena, principally, how
ever, to musical people and mnsic lovers.
The cnltnre, elegance and talent assembled
there combined to make it a most happy
evening, while the mnsical selections were
of rare excellence. The parlors of the
Executive Mansion were tastefully decor
ated, ' and the entire honse was
thrown open for the comfort of
the gnests. Mrs. Leslie was assisted
in receiving by Miss Manpin, Mrs.
Shobe and Mr. and Miss Leslie; their
courteous manners, and attention to the
pleasure ot their gnests, throughout the
evening, left a remembrance in the minds
of all, and evinced that true type of cor
dial Kentucky hospitality so famous in
the home life of that warm-hearted people.
The programmes were clearly written
on cream colored cards, with covers beau
tifully decorated with crimson and gold,
and fastened with knots of parti colored
ribbons; they were distributed to all the
guests, who eagerly scanned their contents
and expressed their pleasure at the selec
tions. The mnsic began at half past eight,
as|follows:
PAST FIRST.
Instrumental Solo—Sonata..................Beethoven
Miss Wade.
Contralto Solo—"Thine Eye« so Blue''.................
Mrs. Webster.
Piano Solo—"Marche Militaire'' ............Schubert
Mrs. D. W. Fisk.
Vocal Duet—"In the Starlight"............................
Messrs. Eddy and Leslie.
PART SECOND.
Plano Solo—"Mennetto Grazlosa," from Sonata
Opus 31..........................................Beethoven
Mrs. D. W. Fisk.
Soprano Solo—"Let Me Love Thee".........Arditi
Miss Atkinson.
Plano Solo—Polish Danes.................Scherwenka
Mr. Niables.
Instrumental Dust—"Allegro Conbrto," from
Second Symphony'............. Beethoven
Mrs. D. W. Fisk and Mrs. W. B. Raleigh.
Several pieces were given in response to
the complimentary applaase of the appre
ciative audience, and at the close of the
programme congratulations and happy ex
pressions were interchanged with hearty
good will. At 11 o'clock refreshments
were served and enjoyed with a zest com
mensurate with their excellence, and it
was a late hoar before the gnests took
their departure, commenting on the pleas
ures of the occasion and the hospitality of
the Governor's family.
Among those present were: Miss Wade,
Mies Atkinson, Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Fisk.
Miss Brooke, Miss Floweree, Mr. Atkinson,
Mr. Webster, Miss McConnell, Miss
Hedges, Mrs. Raleigh, Miss Johnson, Mr.
James Sanders, Miss Rosenbaum, Mr.
McCreery, Miss Martin (of Great Falls)
Mr. Hirschfeld, Mr. Keerle, Mr. Word, Mr.
John W. Eddy, Mr. H. Palmer, Mr. Cock
rell, of Great Falls, Mr. Niebles, Mr. and
Mrs. H. Cannon, Mr. J. Gnnn, Mr. Stoner,
Mr. Gibbs, Mr. Shobe, Dr. Barbonr, Mr.
King and Mr. Craig.
Appointed Commissioner.
C. P. Connolly, the Helena lawyer, has
been appointed by the Supreme Court as
United States Commissioner for Montana.
This is the position formerly held by Jndge
Alden.__
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria.
in
of
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From the Dally Harald of January 19.
A BOX OF SAND
A Medical Crook Palms it Off For
a Watch and Raises Money On It.
a
Great Falls, January 19. —[Special to
the Herald.]—Dr. Brown was arrested at
Crookston, Minn., last night for obtaining
money from Dr. Wiedman, of Great Falls,
ander, false pretenses. He had given a
box of sand in place of a watch and is
said to have taken away some mortgagad
property. Gov. Leslie will be asked to
make a requisition on the Governor of
Minnesota.
THE HOSSFELD MURDER.
The Radersburg Ranchman Killed
by a Friend Without the Slight
est Provocation.
The news of the killing of Robert Hoss
feld, briefly reported in the Herald last
evening, was brought in from Radersburg
by passengers on No. 1 yesterday. The
tragedy occurred in a saloon at Raders
burg and the principal actors in it
were John P. Freeman and Robert
Hossfeld, both ranchmen of that section.
Hossfeld had been pasturing some horses
belonging to Freeman and yesterday the lat
ter called to take them home. Hossfeld re
fused to let him have them nntill the bill,
$28, was paid. Thereupon Freeman raised
the money and paid the bill, both men
then going to Shepp's saloon
where they talked of and shook
hands over the difficulty while drinking
together. Hossfeld then tock a chair. He
had hardly seated himself when Freeman,
who was perceptibly the worse for drink,
palled a revolver and pointed it at him,
saying, "There's one thing I can do." Hoss
feld arose and stepped toward him. saying,
"I'm not afraid of your gnn", when Free
man fired and Hossfeld fell. Freeman, it is
said, attempted to fire a second
shot, bat was disarmed by the
bystanders. He then made an effort to
reach his horse and escape bat was canght
and lodged in jail. Hossfeld was struck
in the right side, the bullet catting the
main artery. He expired in twenty min
utes. Both men were well known. Hoss
feld had lived near Radersbnrg since the
early days and leaves a wife and several
children. He was a highly respected citi
zen and a large circle of friends bewail his
tragic fate. Freeman is a man abont 24
years of age and lives on a ranch on the
North Fork of the Musselshell with his
brother. He has been in the country only
a few years. The fanerai of the victim
will take place to morrow.
THE CUMBERLAND.
A Deal in Progress for the Purchase
of the Noted Mine at Castle.
It is reported that a deal is in progress and
almost assured of successful consumma
tion at White Snlpbnr Springs, by which
a syndicate of capitalists of that
place will acquire a controlling in
terest in the Cumberland Mining
and Smelting company, ot Castle, now
laboring ander financial embarrassment.
The result of the deal will be to wipe ont
the existing attachments against the Cum
berland company and to at once resume
the production of bullion. The new in
vestors will bring sufficient capital to
undertake the working of the property
on a more extensive scale than ever, and it
will not be long before the Cumberland
will again come into prominence as a bul
lion producer. The opinion is general that
that the property is a valuable odo and
only needs capital to make it one of the
most noted mines in the Territory. All the
prominent business men of White Snlphnr
are represented in the syndicate and it is
expected the deal will be closed in a few
days. This transaction together with the
favorable ontlook for a railroad bnilding
into that section early this year, will tend
to boom the Castle Mountain district and
bring into prominence several mines that
are now only promising prospects.
New Incorporations.
Messrs. M. H. Halle, W. C. Anning,
Richard Lockey and C. D. Chambers have
filed papers for the incorporation of the
Montana Confectionery and [Cracker com
pany for the purpose of carrying on a gen
eral confectionery and cracker bnsiness in
the city of Helena. The capital stock is
$25,000 in 2,500 shares of $10 each.
Certificate of incorporation of the Bntte
Wood company, the objects of which are to
deal in all kinds of wood, lumber, timber
and building material of all kinds. Opera
tions are to be carried on in Bntte and a
portion of Jefferson connty. The capital
stock is $50,000, and the incorporators are
Hngh Kirkendall, Peter Larson, John F.
Co wen and James A. Talbott.
Certificate of incorporation of the Ana
conda Water Company, the objects of
which are to furnish Anaconda with water.
The capital stock is $100,000, divided into
the same number of shares at $1 each.
The directors are James B. Haggin, Marcus
Daly, John R. Toole, William Thornton
and A. L. Kempland.
The Contract is Signed.
The committee appointed at the last
session of the City Council to act with the
Mayor and City Clerk in executing the
contract for water have, after three meet
ings, signed the document which authorizes
the Woolston Water Company to famish
the city with water. Owing to the persist
ent efforts of Alderman Donnelly, who at
tat seemed to be playing a lone hand, a
provision was inserted which guarantees to
protect the city amply in cases of fire.
This provision makes it imperative for the
company to have at all times a sufficient
stage of water in their reservoir, enabling
the fire department to fight the flames an
hoar or more without direct pressure from
the works. The penalty for failure to com
ply with all provisions of the contract is a
forfeiture of throe months' pay.
The Water Case Decision.
The case of The Helena Wator Company,
heard on appeal as to the validity of Ordi
nance 93, bronght yesterday a decision
from the Supreme Court of the Territory,
which affirms the decision of the conrt be
low. In a nut shell, the cate was this:
The City Council by Ordinance 93 granted
The Helena (Woolston) Water Company
the exclusive franchise to fnrnish the city
with water. This the decision declares
nnll and void, as bids for furnishing water
had not been advertised. Opinion by
Liddell, A. J.
We would be pleased to know of a man
or woman who has never had headache or
been subject to constipation. As these
seem to be nniversal troubles a little ad
vice may be in order. Why shonld per
sons cram their stomachs with nanseating
purgative pills, etc., which sicken and de
biliate when such a pleasant and sterling
remedy as Prickly Ash Bitters will act
mildly and effectively on the liver, kidney,
stomach and bo« els, and at the same time
tone np and strengthen the whole system,
caosing headache, constipation and all
such distressing evils to quickly disappear
to
at
a
is
to
of
it
is
to
MONTANA.
A Few Figures From the Report of
Our Auditor and Treasurer.
The annual report of Territorial Anditor
Sullivan and Treasurer Prenitt, for 1888,
the receipt of which was acknowledged
yesterday,"contains some figures on the
state and progress of Montana that will be
of interest to all the citizens of the Territory.
By the report itappears that lastyearthere
were in Montana 3,741,459 acres of land
ander improvement and cultivation, the
assessed valuation of which was $12,323,
085. When we remember that these
figures are taken from the returns of
county assessors and that in many cases
these officers failed to obtain the total
nnmber of acres cultivated in the dif
ferent counties, the showing is one
to be prond of. The nnmber
of town lots is given at 55,249 and the
assessed vaine thereof $14,939,634. The
nnmber of horses is given at 142,040 (far
below actnal figures) yalued at $4,852,933.
Other livestock and their assessed valua
tion are stated as follows:
Number of cattle, 488,467; value $9,057,
293. Sheep, 1,153,771; value, $2,165,719.
Mules and asses, 1694; value $W,076. Hogs,
8,791; value $41,286. An actual connt of
livestock wonld far exceed these figures.
Shares of stock held are assessed at
$2,086,059, of which Lewis and Clarke
county is credited with over $1,000,000.
Capital invested in mannfactares, $404,500.
Money and credits, $5,600,785. These
returns are also far from complete.
The total assessment of the Territory
shows an increase of over seven millions of
dollars since 1887 and is tabulated as fol
lows:
COUNTIES.
1887
1888
Beaverhead............
$ 2,897,706.00
4.372.555.00
3.931.071.00
8 3,084,120.00
3.679.489.00
3.292.495.00
3.370.874.00
1,440,349.20
7.419,364 00
2.401.873.00
4.108.692.00
3.666.366.00
12,028.890.00
3.075.835.00
2.668.547.00
3.428.761.00
2,379 983.50
9.068.823.00
2.316.072.00
Dawson..................
Deer Lodge............
Fergus...................
1,086,881.00
6.308.254.00
2.613.997.00
3.522.612.00
2.745.737.00
11,416,750.00
2.800.754.00
3.050.146.00
2.717.913.00
2.270.050.00
8.160.829.00
2.205.238.00
Jefferson...............
LEWIS £ CLARKE
Meagher.................
Park.......................
Silver Bow............
Yellowstone...........
Total................
Increase.................
«60,099,493.00
867,430,533.70
87,331.040.70
It shonld be borne in mind that Lewis and
Clarke, Chotean and Meagher counties lost
territory and taxable property by the
creation of Cascade connty last year. This
accounts for the apparent decrease in the
assessment of Meagher and Chotean conn
ties. Lewis and Clarke, however, shows
an increase in spite of its loss, bat lees than
it would have shown had its boundaries
remained the same.
The report Bhows that the total net in
debtedness of the several counties on
March 1st, 1888, was $1,385,882.93. an in
crease over the previous year of $137,491.99.
Deer Lodge, Cascade and Missoni a show
the largest increase of indebtedness, while
Lewis and Clarke, Caster and Gallatin
show a decrease of over $25,000 each. The
Territory itself is ont of debt and has
a balance of $114,000 in the treasury.
INTERVIEWED.
A Statement from Rev. Mr. Raleigh as
to the Independent's Attacks.
Oar reporter, meeting Rev. Mr. Raleigh,
questioned him as follows:
"Have yon seen the charge of libel made
against yon in this morning's Independent ?"
Mr. R.—"I have, and have only to say
that, in discussing the late election in the
ministers' meeting of this city, I endeavored
to make the point that the hopes of tem
perance reform were in the Republican
party. I recited several circamstances to
verity my position, among which
I made a comparison between the
Democratic and Republican headquarters
in this city. My statements, of coarse,
were made on information obtained from
others, as I never frequented either place
When the Independent took exceptions to
my statement in reference to the Demo
cratic headquarters I went to that office
in person and had a conversation with the
editor, Mr. Martin. I told him I was
ready to publicly apologize if my state
ment was not true, and wonld do so if he
would deny it. He refused to deny it,
though other parties standing round as
serted its trnthfnlness. I am still
ready to apologize for the statement
if Mr. Martin will deny its truthfulness.
And now, while npon the subject, may I
say farther through yoar paper, that I care
nothing for this discussion of why I was
defeated for the Honse Chaplaincy, whether
it was because of my "pulpit partisanship,"
or the "sponsorship of Jndge Davis," or
that the Honse was too respectable a body
to elect a "volunteer libeler" to each a po
sition, the three different statements that
the editor of the Independent has made. I
think it possible that if the editor keeps
on developing reasons for my defeat he
may sometime hit the trae one,
which in all probability was that I was
unknown to every member of the Honse
except Jndge Davis, had never sought per
sonally or through friends for a single vote,
so the only wonder to me is why my name
was presented and why I got any votes.
Bat I did. object to the statement in the
Independent that I had offended by my
"pulpit partisanship," as I never take my
political convictions into the pnlpit. The
statement in the Independent was not made
editorially, and therefore I asked the editor
to correctly as a contemptible
falsehood. Neither was this a reflection on its
real anthor, as often honest and trathfnl
men make statements in their ignorance or
carleeenees that are false. The editor of
the Independent declined to correct the
statement made in his coin ms and instead
reported me editorially as (giving way to
angry passions and writing something I
would be mortified to see in print, and
therefore*I bad no recourse bat to publish
my card in yoar paper, and am sincerely
grateful to the Herald for its kindness.
rFor the Herald.
OVER THE MOUNTAINS.
Over the mountains, Car away,
Beyond the dim horizon gray,
The piny peaks green girdled stand
That shelter love's enchanted land;
There sunny skies will drop their gay,
Rtherial slants of gilded spray
Amid the mists that sweep their train
Among the heights of love's domain.
Over the mountains linger still
The haunts where blooms their incense spill.
While wintry winds in fury sweep
Beyond that vale's untroubled sleep;
And flitting now by fancy's feet
Those blissful days themselves repeat—
Sweet as the odor of the pine
That echoed "love" to yours and mine.
Over the mountains— peace my heart—
Can come no "meet" to answer "part;"
Ah! lingering, last, un languished look
When each unconscious farewell took;
While breathed uncertainly the breeze
A thing nnseen that yet forsees
The shadow of the hovering hand
That led from love's enchanted land.
Fort Smith, Ark. L. A. Osborne.
Children Cry for Pitcher's Castoria.
of
be
of
of
at
of
00
I
TOWN AND TEBÄIT0BY.
—If you wish a large, handsome calen
dar foi 1889, sent 25 cents to N. W. Ayer
& Son, advertising agents. Times build
ing, Philadelphia.
—A man named Henry Meyers is at St
Peter's hospital with his hands and feet
badly frozen and amputation may be
necessary. He comes from Jay Gonld, and
from his statement, laid in the snow five
days, having left Jay Gould the 7th and
reached Marysville the 13th.
—Ed Lathrop, Deputy Sheriff, went over
the range to-day, accompanied by the man
Vinson, of Kansas City, who has been ad
judged insane, and will be placed in the
Warm Springs Asylum. Vinson is the
man who imagined people wanted to kill
him and sought "protection" at the hands
of the Sheriff. He was evidently de
ranged.
—A man from Kansas City, whose men
tal balance wheel showed signs of slipping
off the axle, visited the Sheriff's office yes
terday and demanded protection. He was
laboring ander the hallucination that cer
tain men, whom he met on the streets bat
did not know, war*''' 1 ~ kill him. He
said he coaid see it r eves. His de
mands for protect so insistent that
the officers gavt , him by locking
him np in jail.
— E. Goujon, the man recently arrested
for Lyman D. Follett, of Mich., is ont with
printed circulars denouncing the officers
for his arrest and detention in jail. Under
Sheriff Walker, who was seen with the
circular in his hand, says the whole thing
is a tissue of exagérations and misrepresen
tations. From all accounts we think the
officers were folly justified in arresting
him on suspicion.
—There is some talk bat very little
jubilation over the receipt of the news that
the "omnibus bill" had passed the lower
House of Congress. Most of onr citizens
aie nnwilling to hazard an opinion on it
until they learn more about its provisions,
bat all nnite in the sentiment that if there
is nothing objectionable in it, it cannot be
passed too quickly for Montana. A ma
jority of the Republicans think the bill
will never pass the« Senate as now Bbaped.
PKB 80 NAL.
— E. B. Gray, of Des Moines, Iowa, is in
the city for a few days.
—V. J. Johnson, of Stevens Point, Wis.,
is spending a few days in the city.
— W. D. Wheeler, wife and baby, of An
gnsta, are stopping at the Grand Central.
—I William Adams and his wife, form
erly Mrs. Lowry, have returned from their
wedding tour in the East.
— B. P. Clark, of Turner, Clark & Raw
son, the Boston owners of the Woolston
water works, is in the city.
—Miss Mary Teagne, of Townsend'
niece of Hngh McQnaid, is visiting the
city and is the guest of Mrs S. A. McBrine.
—Mrs. C. H. Moore, of Pyrenees, Mont.,
wife of Representative Moore, of Deer
Lodge Co., has arrived and is at Mrs Nor
ris,' No. 220 Fifth ave. Mrs. Moore was a
former teacher in the Helena high school.
—George L. Fish, of Phelan & Fish,
wholesale grocers, Oakland, Cal., is making
his first visit to Helena. Mr. Fish is a
nephew of Mr. W. 8. Paynter, of this city,
and is stopping for a few days on his way
East.
—Mrs. J. J. Rohrbangb, wife of John
Rohrbangh, of the Grand Central, is in
receipt of a telegram announcing the death
of her mother, Mrs. Dr. Alleman, of Han
over, Pa. Mis. Rohrbangh has the sympa
thy of nnmerons friends in her bereave
ment. A singular coincidence is that Dr.
AllemaD, Mrs. Robrbangh's father, died
one year ago on the same day at the same
hoar.
Election of Officers.
The following officers and directors of
the Montana National Bank, of Helena,
were elected at the annnal meeting held
January 18,1889:
Directors—C. A. Broadwater, President;
L. G. Phelps, Vice President and Acting
Cashier; 8. E. Atkinson. Assistant Cashier;
A. G. Clarke, H. F. Galen, Herman Gans,
S. C. Ashby, C. W. Cannon, Peter Larson,
R. C. Wallace, I. D. McCntcheon.
A semi annnal dividend of 4 per cent
was declared, payable at once. The sur
plus was increased from $37,000 to $50,000.
Mr. Sharpe Resigns.
Mr. E. Sharpe has resigned his position
as Cashier of the Montana National Bank
of this city and Mr. L. G. Phelps is now
Vice President and acting cashier of that
institution. Mr. Sharpe has been Cashier
of the bank ever since it was opened.
Wbat his intentions are as to fntnre resi
dence and occnpation are unknown, bat it
is presumed he will remain in Helena.
INDIAN SERVICE.
Resolations Adopted by the Board of
Commissioners.
Washington, January 17.—The Board
of Indian Commissioners held its annual
meeting to-day. Résolutions were adopted
deprecating the changes of Indian officials
for partisan reasons and urging the exten
tion of the civil service system to the In
dian service; opposing the removal of
tribes from reservations where they are
settled and are making progress towards
civilization; nrging the passage of bills for
the relief of the Mission and Ronnd Val
ley Indians, in California, and for the pay
ment of expenses of Indian coarts; asking
for liberal appropriations for carrying ont
land in severalty acts; that immediate
steps be taken for the industrial education
of all Indian children, and demanding that
the sacred obligations of treaties be re
garded in all negotiations with Indians.
Carriage in High Life.
Philadelphia, January 17.—The mar
riage of Edward Devanx Morrell and Miss
Lonisa Bouvier Drexel, daughter of the
late Francis A. Drexel, took place this
morning at the Roman Catholic Cathedral
in this city. Part of the honeymoon will
be spent in Europe. The gifts to the bride
were nnmerons and costly, and aggregated
in value nearly a quarter of a million
dollars.
JACOBS OH
ONCE C URED NO R ELAPSE,
annual Statement, m
BmvrlRoT., ISM.
X. B. Xyle,
lui*
.ppomattoz Co., Vs.,
"Had scuts rfcom

several yean;
row worse; eminent
liclsns attended me;
spesms; so relief; soi
Mpscted to live for hoars;
robbed sll over with St.
Jacobe Oil; first sppUes*
Von relieved; second re
■seed pels; continued
nee cared me; no relspee
P foar years; do ss mash
Werk se ever."
original Statement, 188L
Renewed Hot. S, 111#.
Kr. Jm. H. Well, 01« A
4th St., 0. Boston, Ksm.1
"Buffered sente psina B
months in both knees; Be
hsd eonld notfetnp
stsirs. Applied n. Js
eobe OU st night; mil
relieved In the morning.
Med it sgsln; pain final
ly left me entirely. I
have hsd no retain of path
■ ln so. I sm completely
ATDRUOOISTS ABDDKAtKBS KVKKVWHE BB.
fM CHARLES A. VOfilLM CO.. Bmltimor«. M.
calen
Ayer
build
St
feet
be
and
five
and
over
man
ad
the
the
kill
hands
de
men
yes
was
cer
bat
He
de
that
locking
with
officers
Under
the
thing
the
little
that
lower
citizens
it
there
be
ma
bill
Bbaped.
in
Wis.,
An
form
their
Raw
the
Mont.,
Deer
Nor
a
school.
Fish,
is a
city,
way
John
in
death
Han
Dr.
died
same
of
held
Gans,
cent
sur
Bank
now
that
resi
it
of
In
of
are
for
Val
pay
ont
that
re
mar
Miss
the
this
will
bride
A
B
Be
I
ROYAL "owotB
'-^esOLUTtl.N pu»
rut
HKIH*
POWDER
Absolutely Pure.
This powder never w les. A marvel of purity,
strength and wholesomeness. More economical
than the ordinary kinds, and cannot be sold in
competition with the multitude of 'ow teet, short
weight, alum or phosphate powders. Sold only
in cant.. Koyal Baking Powdeb Oo., 106 Wall
treet. New York. ____
ECZEMA CAN BE CURED.
The Most Agonizing, Humiliating,
Itching, Scaly, and burning Eczemas
are cured by the Cnticura Remedies,
when Physicians and all other reme
dies fail.
I have been afflicted since last March with a
skin disease the doctors call Eczema. My face
was covered with scabs acd sores, and the itch
ing and burning were almost unbearable Seeing
your Cuticcba Remedies so highly recommend
ed, concluded to give them a trial, using the
Cuticcba and Outicuba Soap externally, and
Retolveht Internally for four months. I call
myself cured, in gratitude for which I make this
public statement.
MRS. CLAR V A. FREDERICK.
Broad Erook, Conn.
Eczema Three Years < nred.
Cuticcba B*medies are the greatest medicines
on earth. Had the worst case of Salt Rheum in
this country. My mother had it twenty years,
and in fact, died from it. I Delieve Cuticura
would have saved her life. My arms, breast,
and head were covered for three years, which
nothing relieved or cured until I used the Ccti
ccBA Resolvent.
J. W. ADAMS, Newark, O.
Eczema on Baby f ined.
My baby has been troubled with eczema on his
face, neck, head, ears, and entire body. He was
one mass of scabs, and we were obliged to tie his
hands to prevent his scratching. I have spent
dollars on remedies without effect, but after
using one box Cuticcba and one cake of Cuti
ccba Soap the child is entirely cured. I cannot
thank you enough for them.
F. W. BROWN,
12 Mull St.. Brooklyn, E. D., N. Y.
Eczema on Hand« Cured.
Two years and a half ago Salt Rheum broke
out on my reght band. It appeared in white
blisters, attended by terrible itching, and grad
uully spread until it covered the back of the
hand. The disease next appeared of my left
hand, 1 tried many remedies, but could find no
cure until I obtained the Cuticcba Remedies.
which effected a si eedy and permanent cure.
fiJAMES P. KEARNEY,
284 Wood Avenue, Detroit.
Sold every where. Price: Cuticcba. 50 cents;
Soap, 25 cents ; Resolvent, 81. Prepared by the
Potter Drug and Chemical Co., Boston. Mass.
BSP'Send for "How to Cure Skin Diseases," 64
pages, 59 illustrations, and 100 testimonials.
DiDV'C Skin and Seal p preserved and beauti
DAD I O fled by CcriccRA Medicated Soap
â Word About Catarrh
"It is the mucus membrane that wonderful
semi-fluid envelope surrounding the delcate tis
sues of the air and food passages, that Catarrah
makes its stronghold. Once established Ueatsinto
the very vitals, and renders life but a long-drawn
breath of misery and disease, dulling the sense
of hearing, trammeling the power of speech,
destroying the faculty of smell, tainting the
breath and kliling the refined pleasures of taste.
Insidiously, by creeping on from a simple cold
in the head, it assaults the membranous lining
and envelops the bones, eating through the del
cate coats and causing inflammati' n, sloughing
an4 death. Nothing short of total eradication
will secure health to the patient and all aleviatives
are simply proersttnated sufferings, leading to
a fatal termination. Sanford's Radical Cure,
by Inhalation and by Internal administration,
has never failed; even when the disease has
made frightful inroads on delicateate constitu
tions, hearing, smell and taste have been recov
erd, and the disease thoroughly driven out."
Sa ford's Radical Cube consists of one
botte of the Radical Curb, one box Cat> bbhal
Solvent, and one Improved Inhaler, neatly
wrapped in one package, with full directions;
price, $1.00
Potter Drug <Sc Chemical Co., Boston.
KIDNEY PAINS.
Strains and Weaknesses,
Relieved In one minute by that Mar
velous Antidote to Pain. Inflammation
and Weakness, the 4'nttcnr» Anti
cs JH Pain Planter. The first and only
1 pain-killing strengthening plaster. Es
1 «■•Specially adapted to instantly relieve
and speedily cure Kidney and Uterine Pains and
Weakness. Warranted vastly superior to all
other plasters. At ail druggists. 25 cents: five
for $1.00 ; or. postage free, of Pottkb Drcg and
Chemical Bo., Boston. Mass.
A puatOTVEi ETABLI PREPARATION
ÎÜfcisflBAHK amo
idöj^Pricwy,
I SENNA-MANDRAKE-BUCHU
AMD OTHER UyjAUy EFFICIENT REMEDIES
It has stood the Test of Years,
in Curing all Diseases of tho
^MBLOO
lSsg|£
BITTERS
CURBS
ULwo sam n
LIVER
KIDNEYS
STOMACH
AND
BOWELS]
ALLDRUGGISTS
HIIIH5 üHHd3
D, LIVES, STOM
ACH, KIDNEYS, BOW
ELS, 4e. It Purifies tho
Blood, Invigorates and
Clean ses the Syst em.
DYSPEPSIA, CON STI
PATI0N, JAUNDICE,
BICKHEAD ACHE, BIL
IOUS COMPLAINTS, fee
disappear at once under
its be neficial infl uence.
It is purely a Medicine
as its cathartic proper
ties forbids its use as a
beverage. It is pleas
ant to the taste, and as
easily taken by child
ren as adulta.
PRICKLY ASH BITTERS CO
Sols Proprietors,
StJjOUIS and Kansas Cm
This is the T op of the Genuine
Pearl Top Lamp Chimney.
All others, similar are imitation.
This exact Label
is on each Pearl
Top Chimney.
A dealer may say
and think he has
others as good,
BUT HE HAS NOT.
Insist upon the Exact Label and Top.
For Sale Everywhere. Made only by
CEO. 4. MACBETH & CO., Pittsburgh, Pi.
purity,
in
short
only
Wall
____
reme
a
face
itch
Seeing
the
and
call
this
in
years,
breast,
which
Ccti
O.
his
was
his
spent
after
Cuti
cannot
Y.
broke
white
grad
the
left
no
cents;
the
Mass.
64
beauti
Soap
tis
sense
the
taste.
cold
lining
del
to
Cure,
has
recov
one
bbhal
neatly
Mar
only
Es
and
all
five
and
a
3V
Dr. Reeves and Dr. Bunk
(Late of New York.)
Who has made many wonderful cures in the
East and throughout the country, has
now located
IN HELENA, *. T.,'
Corner Main and Wall Streets.
The OLD RELIABLE
SPECIA LISTof many
years' experience,
treats with v. onoerful
success all LUNG
THROAT, CANCER,
PILES, FISTULA.
HIJPTt Kt. cured
without pain or hin
drance.
Treats all forms of
Throat, Lung, Nerve
and Blood Disease.«,
Chronic Diseases and
Deformities far in ad
vance of any lnstiut
tlon in this country.
Those who contem
plate going to the Hot Springs for treatment
of any Private or Blood disease can be cured
for one-third the cost at our Private (Dispensary.
LADIF.H, By this treatment a pure, lovely
comn'ixion, free from sallowness, freckles,
blackheads, eruptions, etc., brilliant eyes ar.i
perfect health can be had.
43-Tliat "tired" feeling and all Female Wo»k
ness promptly cured. Bloating Headaches,
Nervous Prostration. General Debility, Sleep
lessness, Depression and Indigestion, Ovarian
Troubles, Inflammation and Ulceration, Falling
and Displacements. Spinal Weakness, Kidney
Complaints and Change of Life. Consult the
old Doctor.
EYE AND EAR
Acute or Chronic Inflammation of the eye-lids
or globe, and Far and Near Sightedness, inver
sion of the lids. Scrofulous Eyes, Ulceration. In
flammations, Abccss, Dimness of Vision of one
or both eyes, and Tumors of the I.id.
49-Inflammation of the Ear, Ulceration or
Catarrh, Internal or External Deafness or
Paralysis, Singing or Roaiing noises, Thickened
Drum. etc.
NERVOUS DEBILITY SPERMATORRHŒA
Seminal Losses, Night Emissions, Loss of Vital
power. Sleeplessness, Despondency. Loss of
Slemory, Confusion of Ideas, Blurs befo.e the
eyes, Lassitude, Languor, Gloominess, Depres
sion of Spiiits, Aversion to Society, Easily Dis
couraged, Lack of Confidence, Dull, Listless,
Unfit for Study or Business, and finds life a
burden, safely, permanently and privately cured.
BLOOD AND SKIN DISEASES SYPHILIS
(a disease most horrible i in its result,) com
pletely eradicated without the use of mercury.
Scroffula, Erysipelas, Fever Sores. Blotches,
Pimples, Ulcers. Pain in the head and bones,
Syphilitic Sore Throat,Mouth and Tongue,Gland
ular Enlargemei t of the Neck, Rheumatism,
Catarrh, etc, permanently cured when others
have failed.
UmINABY, Kidney and Bladder Troubles,
Weak Back, Burning Urine, Frequency of Uri
nating, Urine high colored or milky sediratnt
on standing. Gonorrhoea, Gleet, Cystitis, etc.,
promptly and safely cured. Charges reasonable,
PH1VATI I> IKE AN» S.
Blood Poison, Veneret-. Taint, Gleet, Stricture,
Seminal Emissions. Loss of Sexual Power,
Weakness of the Sexual Organs, want of desire
in male or female, whether from Imprudent
habits of young, or sexual habits of mature
years, or any cause that debilitates the sexual
habits, speedily and permanently cured.
Consultation free and strictly confidential.
Medicine sent free from observation to all parts
of the United States. Correspondence receives
prompt attention. No letters answered unless
accompanied by four cents In stamps. Send ten
cents in stamps for pamphlet and list of ques
tions upon Private, Special and NervouH Dis
eases, Seminal Weakness. Spenaatoirhcea, Im
potency, Syphillis, Gonorrhœa, Gleet and Vari
cocele.
Terms strictly cash. Call on or address,
DBF, BEEVES A Bl'MTOK,
Cor. Main and Wall Sts., Helena, M. T.
nov20-d&w
I No. 1649;!
FIRST NATIONAL BANK.
OF HK1.ENA.
ORGANIZED IN MW
designated Depository ot the United
■States.
Pald-Vp Capital.........................M00.000
<4nrplns ana Profi '•................ .. 800,000
L T. HAUSER, President.
A. J. DAVIS, Vice-President.
f, W. KNIGHT. Cashier.
T. H. KLEINSOHMJDT, Aas't Cas Wer.
Board of Director*.
4. T. HAUSER, JOHN O. CURTIN
A. M. HOLTER. R. 8. HAMILTON.
/NO. H. MING, C. P. HIGGINS.
B. W. KNIGHT. A. J. DAVIS,
T. H. KLEIN SCHMIDT, HENRY M.PARCHEN
T. O. POWER.
Associated Banke.
FIRST NATIONAL...........Fort Benton, Montana
MISSOULA NATIONAL......Missoula, Montana
FIRST NATIONAL.....................Butte. Montaus
General Bank ng Business Transacted.
ntTBREAT °AID ON IIMR DKPOPTT*
loin W. Schmidt. Boyd T. Dickinson, lohn Schulz.
THE HELENA
Wholesale Butchering Co.
Beef, Pork, Veal and Mutton at lowest
Oash Prices. Orden by mai! promptly
attended to.
SCHMIDT & CO.
â&w P. 0, Box 136, Helena, M. T.
%
%
BEST FITTING CORSETtk\W0RL0
FOR SALE BY LEADING MERCHANTS.
MAYER, STROUSE & CO.
MTRS.-4I2 BROADWAY, N. Y.
STATE SCHOOL OF MIS
GOLDEN, COLORADO.
Winter Term Opens January 2,1889.
COMPLETE COUR8E8 IN
CIVIL AKD MMß EMNEERINß.
8. fcCIAL COUR8E8 IN
Assaying, Chemical Analysis
and Surveying.
The Laboratories and Assay
Rooms for practical instruction, are
the most complete of any in the
West.
TUITION FREE.
Schedule of charges on Analytical and Assay
Work, sent on application.
For Catalogue address,
REGIS CHAUVENET PRESIDENT.
TO ADVERTISER8.
A list of 1000 newspapers divided Into STATES
AbD SECTIONS will be sent on application—
FKant
To those who want their advertising to psy,
we cam offer no better medium for thoroughjaad
effective work than the various sections or our
Select Local Liât.
GBO. P. BOWEL L A CO.,
Newspaper Advertising Bureau, 1
10Si —
I Spruce street. New York.

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