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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, February 14, 1889, Image 6

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036143/1889-02-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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IFTEBEM ING TO EMIGRANTS.
Montana offers better inducements to the
thrifty emigrant at the present time of
any country. In the northern portion, till
recently one continuous Indian reservatioa,
there are now nearly fifteen million acres
of land open lor settlement, nough to
furnish a quarter section to nearly 100,000
heads of tamilies. Though in the north
ernmost part of the territory it lies at
a lower altitude and has a milder
climate and a more copious
rainfall. It is all good wheat land and
equally good for vegetables, grass or stock
of atiy kmd. The Manitoba road traverses
the whole of it and furnishes the settler a
twofold market, either at the greatest mill
ing or mining centers ol ehe country. This
is a great consideration to those looking
lor permanent homes. Montana will al
ways furnish a rich home market
of her own. She leads all the
States even now with the products
ofjher mines which have been developed
within the past ten years. Within the
nexe ten years, more or less these products
of precious and useful metals will exceed
$100,000,000 a year. Drouth or flood, heat
or cold cannot harm or hinder this portion
ol Montana's harvest. Her mines net only
produce wealth but attract wealth, and it
is true to-day that if all her available
wealth were assessed Montana would show
a greater per capita of riches than any
country in the world or than any other
poritou ol our own country.
£The developments of the past five years
have shown that Montana possesses ex
haustlesa coal fields underlying more than
a third of her vast area. This will make
her presently 3 great manufacturing .State,
for w hich also she has endless water power.
Though one ol the last sections of the
country to be visited by railroads, in none
has their progress been eo rapid. Several
of the beet estabbshed systems of the coun
try are already competing for her profitable
trade and others are hurrying to share the
rich harvests'.
Tbelë Is not in the world at present a
more inviting field tor the resolute and
thrifty emigrant than Montana. ^
Thk war between the Democratic Gov
ernor and Legislature of Dakota has little
significance further than to show the in
herent abominations of a system that can
impose upon the people of an inchoate
commonwealth a ruler hostile and invid
ious to nii* •**» I we I litthsofthose whom
he is to govern, and this, under a system of
government that professes the principle that
the consent of the governed is the
only legitimate source of authority.
What does Governor Çhnrch care for
the people of Dakota^ He Is not
beholden to them for his position. Wbat
Cleveland cares for them is evidence
enough in his appointment of a man well
known to him to be politically and every
other way opposed to the people of Dakota,
and appointed for this very reason. There
is an old saying that, "whom the Gods
would destroy they first make mad." Ac
cordingly Governor Church Beems ripe for
destruction. He will soon realize how
brief his petty authority is. The only
wonder is that a system of territorial gov
ernment so open to abuse has not been
more abused than it has.
The English spy Le Caron, who testified
in the London Timet Parnell trial, is a re -
freshing person. By his own confession he
has been an informer in the pay of the
British government since 1865, and has
taken the oath of allegiance in a number
of Irish organizations only to betray their
secrets to the English officials. In giving
his testimony the other day, he laughed
heartily at the recollection of a particular
ly dirty piece of work. He is the basest
and most contemptible kind of a man. To
be a spy in time ol war is oftentimes an
admirable action. To be an informer dur
ing nearly thirty .years of peace is detest
able.
The defeat of the Mormons in Ogden in
the municipal election yesterday is well
worthy of congratulation. It is the begin
ning of the end. The day of barbarism is
getting its death wound. It is stronger in
Washington to-day where it is known
slightly through its subsidies, than in por
tions of Utah, where it is known by its in
fernal tyranny and uncleanness.
James B. Walkek, city editor of the
Herald, goes East this evening, to be ab
sent several weeks. Mr. Walker has been
newsgathering for several years without
rest and he takes now a well earned vaca
tion. If he can so arrange he will attend
the inauguration of President elect-Harri
son before turning back homeward. Dur
ing hie alrsence John E. Bennett will have
charge of the Herald's local columns.
There is more curiosity than interest to
see how the Hons« will dispose of the
Small»-Elliott contest. The session is near
it« end and Elliott has held the seat and
drawn the salary of a Congressman and
voted lor the Mills bill, and nothing bat
the peel of the orange is left, sacked dry.
It »» an extreme case to test the decency of
Southern Democrats, and whether they still
bold to the doctrine that the black man has
no rights which the white mac is bonnd to
respect __
The Pionttr Pres» says the thoroughbred
Prohibitionist delights more in agitation
than eucceee, and would as soon get np a
petition as close a saloon.
There is no nse of sending more ships
to Samoa. If there is io be fighting with
Germany it will not be out in the Pacific,
but over in the North sea.
The act creating the Department of Ag
riculture was to-day approved by the Pres
ment, and Coleman, of Missonri, present
commissioner, was nominated for Secretary.
"" » --
There is an irrepressible conflict be
tween the Democratic Governor and the
Republican Legislature of Dakota. Presi
dent Harrison will be asked to appoint a
new Governor as soon as he gets sworn in.
New
931.
Price of Silver.
York, February 13—Bar silver,
his
on
in
a
[From To-day's Chicago Times' Report.
A LONG FIGHT.
Prize Ring Battle--Myers and McAu
litte the Contestants.
North Judson, Indiana, February 13.—
The Myers-McAnliffe fight began before
seven o'clock this morning.
There was a wrangle over McAnliffe's
having plastered his hands under his
gloves. Finally he was allowed to put
them on. At 6.40 two marshals jumped
on the platform and informed those present
that the fight could not go on. Alter a
long wrangle with the referee and sheriff it
was agreed to allow a boxing match and
time was called at 6.58
First Roud<I— McAuliffe led, forced Billy
to the ropes, and landed his left on the
nose and his right on the ribs. In favor of
McAuliffe.
Second Roond—Exchange of blows, in
which Myers landed on his opponent's
neck, getting in return a stinger on the
nose. McAnliffe slipped at the ropes, sav
ing himself from a terrible right hand
swing. Foul claimed, but not allowed.
The round ended with cautious sparriDg.
Third Round—Cautious sparring. Mc
Auliffe led lightly, then landed heavy with
his left, receiving a right. Mc Auliffe
rushed with an even exchange, Bill y get
tiDg in a good right hand blow on McAul
iffe's face which staggered him.
Fourth Round—Both men were very
cautious, sparring for an opening. Not a
blow was struck.
Fifth Round—Myers landed on McAn
liffe's ribs with his right; strack short with
his left.
Sixth Round—Again cautions; but one
blow was struck, McAnliffe's right being
cleverly stopped by Myers.
SeveDtlf Round—McAuliffejlanded lightly
on Myers' mouth without return. McAn
liffe rushed Myers to his corner, short
arm exchanges resulting.
Eighth Round—Opened with cautious
sparing, Myers on the defensive as usual.
Myers led with his right, landed on Me*
Anliffe's month, and following it with his
left on Mac's nose without return.
Ninth Round—Myers led with his right
on McAnlitfe's arm. After cautious spar
ring, JMcAuliffe got in a good right and ieft
on Myers' face without return.
Tenth Round—Same opening. In this
ronnd not a blow was struck.
Eleventh Ronnd—McAuliffe rushed at
Myers. Two short arm blows were ex
changed and ended in a clinch.
Twelfth Ronnd—Exchange of short arm
blows and ending in a clinch. McAnliffe
again led with his left, receiving a stinger
in the face. Myers landed lightly on the
ÜÜsè:
^thirteenth Round— Cautions starring for
over two minutes, when Mac led abd re
ceived a sharp counter in the face.
Fourteenth Round—Mac rushed at My
ers landing on his nose and receiving two
stinging blows on the face and neck. In
rushing a second time Mac slipped and
fell, Myers on top. Mac then commenced
forcing matters and rushed.
Fifteenth Round. Repetition of the four
teenth.
Sixteenth Ronnd. Opened with a heavy
exchange of arm blows. Myers canght
McAuliffe a vicions right hand swing in
the face.
Seventeenth Ronnd. McAuliffe led with
his left and reached Myers' eye bnt was
heavily countered on the body.
Eigthteenth Ronnd. Myers' right eye
showed signs of closing, otherwise both
men were in good condition. Cautions
sparring, for wind, followed for several
rounds. Neither man was anxions to force
matters. Blows were mostly at short range
with little damage, and followed by ^clinch
ing. McAnliffe opened the round with a
rash, landing lightly on Myers' forehead,
followed by a clinch. Myers landed heav
ily on McAuliffe's ribs with his right; then
there was careful ^sparring to the end of
the ronnd.
Nineteenth Ronnd. Both of the
men came np fresh and
strong, Myers' eyes blacking; otherwise
neither showed signs of punishment. The
ronnd was a repetition of past tactics—
sparring for an opening. McAnliffe opened
with a rush, landing heavily on Myers'
nose Some in-tightiDg followed, which
resulted in a clinch. Mac led with his
left arm, and again landed on Myers' face,
and got away without a return. Myers
barely missed a vicious right and left
lange which would have settled the affair.
The next few rounds were unimportant
Twenty sixth Ronnd—Mac again opened
with a rash, short arm exchanges being
followed by a clinch. Both men were in
good condition. After about two minâtes
time was called. Two minutes was requir
ed for referee McDonald to show the sheriff
that this was a boxing match, not a fight.
The sheriff left the ball after promising if
he hears that either of the men is hart he
will arrest every one in the room.
Twenty-seventh Ronnd—Myers opened
with a stinging left hander on McAnliffe's
nose, followed with a wicked right hand
upper cut. Both strong, with honors even.
Twenty-eighth Ronnd—This round had
jnst opened when one of the town marshals
came in and said he would not have it aDy
longer, aB he understood it was not a box
ing match, bnt a fight. At this time (9
o'clock) the fight had been delayed twenty
minutes. Arrangements have jnst been
made to continue it.
Twenty-ninth ronnd.—Time was called
at 9:15. Both men freeh after 25 minutes
rest. Mac rushed, and falling short, was
heavily conntered.
Thirtieth round.—Myers landed a right
hand swing on Mac's lip and was
allowed first blood. Then followed
another season of cautions work for
several rounds without any execution,
some of them without a blow struck.
Finally the crowd began to grow impatient
at the dilatory tactics, and called on the
fighters to do something, bat neither of
hem was ready for gennine business
Sparring continued with an occasional tap
and counter, in which the honors were
■boat even.
North Judson, Ind.—11:15 a. m.—The
sixty-first round bas been fooght. The
it
if
(9
of
battle at this hoar has lasted four hoars
and ten minutes. Neither of the contest
ants show mach punishment and the bet
ting is about even.
The fight was declared a draw in the
sixty-fonrth round.
SOUTHERN EXPOSITION.
Reported Interview With Blaine
About the Project.
Baltimore, February 12.—Col. Julian
Allen, of Statesville, N. C., who has been in
the city lor several days in the interest of
the Southern Exposition that will be held
the coming fall in one of the northern
cities, to-day told a reporter of the Ameri
can that while in Washington recently he
had an extended interview with James G.
Blaine. The latter gentleman expressed a
cordial interest in the project, und a wil
lingness to do anything m his power to
help it forward. He also took occasion to
express his deep interest in the develop
ment of the South, and his earnest hope of
the settlement of the race problem in a
way that will inure to the beet inten sts
of the whole people. In the selection of
Federal officials for the Southern States
Mr. Blaine led Col. Allen to think he
would favor the appointment of conserva
tive Republican men who had laid aside
the hatreds and bitterness of war times,
who were aiming at the development of
the country and the happiness and welfare
of the people. In many ways Blaine ex
pressed his concern lor the welfare ol the
South and his interest in its future.
Blaine also spoke with freedom about
his acceptance of the position ot Secretary
of State in Gen. Harrison's cabinet, and he
said President Harrison tendered him the
position a few days after election and did
it in such a cordial way thaï ne at once
accepted it in the same spirit.
De Lesseps Sick.
Paris, February 13.— M. De Lesseps is
ill. His daily levees have ceased and the
family will not allow visitors to refer to
the Panama canal.
Live Stock.
Chicagf, February 6 —Cattle—Receipts
8,000; market strong; choice beeves, 4.25
@,4 80; steers, [email protected]; stockers and feed
ers, $2 10(a>3 45; Texas steers, [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts 6,500; market slow and
[email protected] lower; natives, [email protected]; western,
cornfed, 4 [email protected]; Texas, 3(3)4 25.
Chicago, February 7.—Cattle—Receipts,
11,000; market stronger; choice to extra
beeves, 4 @4.85; steers, [email protected] 40; stockers
and feeders, 2 [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts. 7,000; tnarket weaker;
natives, 3 [email protected]; westerb, corn fed, 4.40
@4 65; Texas, 3 [email protected]
Chica go, Febru ary 11.—Cattle- - Recei pts,
12,000; strong for good; others steady;
choice to extra beeves, [email protected]; steers,
[email protected] 20; stockers and feeders, 2 [email protected]
3.40.
Sheep—Receipts, 8,000; firm and 10c.
higher; Datives, 3 [email protected]; wesiern, corn
fed, 4 [email protected]
Chicago, February 12.—Cattle—Re
ceipts, 9,000; market weak and a shade
lowet; choice to extra beeves, [email protected];
steers. [email protected] 50; stockers and feeders, 2.25
@3 50; Texas steers, [email protected]
Sheep—Receipts, 8 000; market weak and
5c lower: natives, 3.85; western, corn fed,
[email protected]; Texans [email protected] 90.
Wool Harket.
Philadelphia, February 12 .— Wool—
Quiet. Prices nominal and unchanged.
Boston, February 12.—There has been a
fair movement in all kinds of wool daring
the past week. Prices remain steady and
unchanged.
U NPRECEDENTED ATTRUTMM.
over » vtlllton Dietrlbnied.
Louisiana State Lottery Company,
Incorporel
t ion al
rated by the Legislature In 1868, for
and Charitable purposes, and its
Euucati
a part
tution, in 1879, by an overwhelming popular
frahclse made a part of the present State Consti
l, in 1879, by i
vote.
Its MAMMOTH DRAWINGS take place Semi
Annua'ly, tJune and December). and its GRAND
SINGLE NUMBER DRA WINGS take place in
each of the other ten months of the year, and are all
drawn in public, at the Academy of Music, New
Orleans, La.
FAHED FOR TWEN I Y YEARS,
For Integrity of its Drawings, and
Prompt Payment of Prizes,
Attested as follows:
" IT« do hereby certify thnt u-e supervise the ar
rangements for all the Monthly a~..d Sem -Annual
Drawings of the Louisiana State Lottery r'ompany,
and in person manage and cotitiol the Drawing
themseU es, and f at the same are conducted with
honesty, fairness, and in good faith toward all
parties, and we authorize the Company to use this
certificate, with fac-similes of our signatures at
tache in its iv.vertisements."
1 PRIZE OF
1 PRIZE OF
1 PRIZE OF
1 PR'ZE OF
2 PkIZE* OF
5 PRIZES OF
25 PRIZES OF
10U CR1ZES OF
200 PRIZES OF
500 PRIZES OF
Com m Inm loners.
We the undersigned Banks and Bankers will pay
all Prizes drawn in the Louisiana State Lotteries
which may be vresenled at our counters.
R. M. WaLviSLEY, Pres. Louisian» Nat. Bank.
PIEKkE ANAUX. Pres. 8'tate Nhtional Bank.
A. BALDWIN, Pres New Orleans Nat'l Bank.
CARL KOHN, Pres. Union National Bank.
GRAND MONTHLY DRAWING,
At the Academy of Music. New Orleans,
Tuesday, March 12, 18«9.
CAPITAL PRIZE, $300,000.
100.000 'liekctM at Twenty Hollar*
each Halves 810: Quarter« 85;
Tenth« 82 : Twentieth« 81
list OF PRIZES.
5300,000 is........................5300,000
100,000 is....................... 100,000
50.000 is........................ 50 0C0
25.000 is........................ 25,000
10.000 are...................... 20.000
5.000 are...................... 25.n00
1.000 are...................... 25,000
500 are...................... 50,000
300 are..................... 60.000
200 are.................... 100,000
APPROXIMATION PRIZES.
100 Prizes of 5500 are................................. 50,000
100 do 300 are................................. 30.000
100 do 200 are................................. 20,000
TERMINAL PRIZES.
999 do 100 are................................. 99.900
99» do 100 aie ................................. 99,900
3,134 Prizes, amounting to.....................51,054,800
Note—T ickets drawing Capital Prizrs are not
entitled to Terminal Prizes.
49** Fob Club Rates or any further informa
tion desired, write legibly to the undeisigned,
clearly stating your residence, with State. • oun
ty. Street and Number. More rapid return mail
delivery will be assured by your enclosing an en
velope bearing your full address.
Send P«»T*L XIII»«. Express Money
Orders, or New York Exchange in ordinary let
ter. Currency by express (at our expense) ad
dressed.
M. A. DAUPHiN.
New Orlen «. La.
or ML A. DAUPHIN
Washing tou. D. C.
-ddress ReüstereTfetters t
NEW OttLEANh NATIONAL BANK,
New Orleaas, La.
"REMEMBER, that the pa> men t of Prizes is
Ol' aR A aTKED Ml lOrRSAt WVAL
U.NK8 of New Orleans, and the Ticket« are
signed by the President of an Institution, whose
chattered rights are recognized in the highest
Court«; therefore, beware of all imitations or
anonymous schemes."
DOLLAR is the price of the smallest
part or fraction of a Ticket iSkl'ED BY I'S
in any Drawing. Anything in our name offered
for lees than a Dollar is a swindle.
A BIG LOTTERY AT HELENA.
A Grand Prize Distribution at Ming's Opera House
March 30th, embracing nearly a third of
Million Dollars in Value.
$60,000 FOB $1, AND $300,000 FOB $5.
THE OPPORTUNITY OF A LIFETIME.
A #300,000 HOTEL FOR #5.
AIVD
One hundred and fifty-three other prizes in cash to be awarded to
ticket holders at a grand drawing to be held at Ming's Opera House,
Helena, Montana, Saturday, March 30th, 18S9, by the Montana Invset
ment Company, under the IMMEDIATE SUPERVISION of Hon. T. H.
Kleenschmidt ex-Mayor of Helena and Assistant Cashier First Nat
ional Bank; Hon W. R. Kenton, ex-Mayor of Butte; Hon J. M. Clem
ments, Probate Judge of Lewis and Clarke County, Montana, and Hon.
A. A. Ames, Mayor of Minneapolis, Minn.
LIST OF PRIZES,
One Grand Prize consisting of the well known Aborn House, a magnificent brick
hotel 132A feet square, covering a quarter of a block with all the modern improve
ments, and situated in Des Moines, Iowa, the great railroad center and capital of
the State, with a population of from 50,000 to 60,000, which is valued
at....................................................................................................$300,000
1 cash prize of $5,000 is.................................................................. 5,000
1 cash prize of $1,000 is.................................................................. 1,000
1 cash prize of 500 is.................................................................. 500
50 cash prizes of 100 are................................................................ 5 000
100 cash prizes of 10 are................................................................ 1,000
154 prizes drawing.............................................................................$312,500
Secure tickets for the Grand Drawing, which is to take place at Helena, M. T,
March 30th, 1889.
OS,OOO Tickets at $5 Each, $012,500
Remember that the presence of the Hon. Gentlemen whose names occur in this
announcement as supe r visors, is a guarantee of absolute fairness and integrity ;
that the chances are all equal and no one can possibly tell what number will
draw a prize.
THE FLAN OF DRAWINTO*
The numbers corresponding with those on the tickets, printed on sep
arate cards, will be placed in one wheel. The one hundred
and fifty-four prizes similarly printed on separate cards will be placed
in another. The wheels will be revolved and the tickets thoroughly
mixed, and a number will then be drawn from the wheel of numbers
by a child completely blindfolded. The numbers and prizes drawn will
be exhibited to the audience and registered by the committee, the prize
being placed against the number drawn. This operation will be repeat
ed until all the prizes a r e drawn Out.
THF LnAWINro ASSURED
The Grand drawing of the Montana Investment Company for the
Aborn House at Des Moines, and 153 cash prizes ranging from $5,000
down to $10, will take place publicly at Helena, M. T., on Saturday,
March 30th, 1889.
The Deed in EscRow.-Remember that the deed to the capital prize, the
Aborn House, is now in escrow at the First National Bank, Helena,
M. T., ready to be turned over to the holder of the winning ticket.
IMPORTANT NOTICE- How to Make Remittances,
Remit by Postal Note, Express, Money Order, New York or
Chicago Exchange or Draff.
FRiCS OF TICKETS.
Single Whole Ticket«................................................................................................... 85*00
OLjUB R. A.TFD»,
Book of 5 Whole Ticket«......................................................................................... 8 20 OO
Hook of 10 Wh»le Ticket«....................................................................................... 40 OO
Book of 25 Whole Tirhrt,....................................................................................... IOO OO
Fifth Ticket«, 81 each.
A person can order as many FIFTH TICKETS as they mav desire^
ALL OF DIFFERENT NUMBERS.
For further information and tickets address or apply to
THE MONTANA INVESTMENT COMPANY,
Office, Grand Central Hotel Block, Helena, M. T.
Established 1864.
A. G. CLABKE. THOMAS CONRAD. J. C. CURTIN.
CUKE, CONRAD 4 CURTIN
ad
is
are
or
I'S
Importers of and Jobbers and Retail Dealers in
Heavy Shelf and Building
HARDWARE.
SOLE AGENTS FOR"THE
Celebrated "Superior"" and Famous Acorn
COOKING AND HEATING STOVES,
;and
W. G. Fisber's Glnclnuati WraugM Iron Rasies far Hotels and Family Use.
--O--
Iron, Steel, Horse and Mule Shoes, Nails, Mill Supplies, Hoes, Belt
ing, Force and Lift Pumps, Cutlery, House Furnishing Goods,
Centennial Refrigerator*, lee Chests, Ice Cream Freezers,
• Water Coolers Etc., Etc.
Visitor* to the City ore re*pe«*tfnlly invited to call and Examine onr Good*
anti price* before pnrcha*ing;.
ALL ORDRES RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION AND SHIPMENT.
CLARKE, CONRAD & CURTIN,
32 and 34 Main Street,
Helena, M. T.
^WIGHT'S /
/soo/TV
THE COW BRAND.
TO MAKE —
DELICIOUS BISCUITS or WHOLESOME BREAD
USE
Dwights Cow-Brand Soda»»Saleratus.
ABSOLUTELY PURE.
ALWAYS UNIFORM AN» FILL WE'SffT
Be ewe that there is a picture of a Cow os your package and you win have
the best Soda made. THE COW BRAND.
\ DWIGHT'S
/SALE RAT IJ^\
SANDS BROS.
New Arrival of
WALL PAPER,
CARPETS,
AND
HOUSE F UBNI8HIS O GOODS.
We carry the largest line of the above stock in Mon
tana. Orders receive prompt attention.
SANDS BROS.
THE
WEEKLY HELEN) HERALD
Is the
POPDLAR FAMILY
Published
In the Territory of
Montana.
It is the Oldest Paper in Mon
tana, dating from Novem
ver, 1866.
It contains more Reading Mat
ter than any other paper
in Montana
In Typographical appearance it
is not excelled by any news
paper in the country.
It is a Model American News
paper.
It has the Largest Circulation
of any paper in Montana
Subscribe for it yourself. Send
a copy to relatives or friends
in the East.
Subscription Price, $3 per year
For the year 1889 we are not
offering any premiums, but we
have on hand a few of RAND &
McNALLY'S STANDARD AT
LAS OF THE WORLD, that we
will furnish to those of our sub
scribers who may desire them,
at $1.25. This Atlas retails at
all book-stores at $5.
We also have on hand a few copies
of Rand & McNally's Popular Atlas,
which we will furnish our subscribers,
at 50 cents each.
Address all Communi
cations to
FISK BROS.,
HELENA.
MONTAN A
ESTABLISHED 1866.
GANS & KLEIN
Tlx© Ijeadlng
CLOTHING HOUSE
ol Montana.
Country Order« Solicited.
Corner Main Street and Broadway.
ARTHUR P. CURTIN.
FURNITURE, CARPETS, WALL PAPER and
HOUSE FURNISHING COOOS.
Having leased the two upper floors of the Davidson Block and con
nected same with our already immense Salerooms, we now occupy four
entire floors extending through the whole block from Jackson to Main
street, stocked throughout with goods of every grade and at prices that
defy competition. Every purchase made STRICTLY FOR CASH
direct from FIRST HANDS and shipped in CAR LOADS ONLY. An
examination of stock and prices solicited.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT.
Pianos, Organs, and (Musical Merchandise.

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