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Helena weekly herald. [volume] (Helena, Mont.) 1867-1900, March 21, 1889, Image 6

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OUR PEOPLE.
Conservative Estimate of the
tion of Montana.
Popula
Bozemax, Mont., March 16. Editor
Herald: As onr twenty-fifth birthday
approaches, and as we are about to attain
onr lull majority by admission as a State,
the present time would seem a ^ood one to
pause and take account of stock. M e all
take a pride in pointing to the name of
Montana at the head of a column as a pro
ducer of precious metals. We brag on
Butte as the greatest mining camp in the
world. We love to astonish strangers by
showing the remarkable statements of the
Helena banks. We put the Gallatin valley
tor fertility aDd productiveness agaimt the
valley of the Nile. We count up more
sunshiny days and point to bluer skys than
those of sunny Italy. We foot up our
yearly swelling assessment lists and point
ing to a full treasury take pride in being
able to say, that Montana owes no man a
dollar. All around us are evidences of
material prosperity, and in all the counties
the poor lund has the fewest demands up
on it.
These are, however, mere surface indica
tions. Behind them all stand the men and
women of Montana. They are the pro
ducers of all this material wealth. By
their efforts they have created this magnifi
cent empire which is now at last to take
rank as an equal alongside of the proudest
of the older States. The future of Mon
tana depends not so much on the richness
of the treasures of our mountains, or the
wonderful fertility of our valleys and
plains, as it does on the character of the
people to whom shall be confided the de
velopment of these great resources with
the guardianship of which we have been
entrusted.
We have few known facts to guide no in
any inquiry about the people of Montana.
We are careful every year to instruct our
assessors to gather all possible information
about our material wealth, but no atten
tion whatever is given to information about
the people themselves, the accumulators of
this wealth. Now, first as to the number
of people who are to-day engaged in build
ing this commonwealth. So much has been
done and such rapid progress made that it
is natural for us to overestimate onr num
ber; but the fewer the actual number the
greater is the credit due them.
Our biennial elections give us a rough
basis for an estimate of the number of
voters. Our annual school census gives an
actual count (although not a very perfect
one) of all the population under 21 years.
The women above that age are never
counted. From the census of 1880 we find,
however, that multiplying the number of
votes cast by 1 £ we approximate the num
ber of men over 21 years old. and multiply
ing the number of children of school age
(4 to 21) by 2} we arrive at the snir of the
number of both sexes under 21 years and
the women above that age. As, however,
the Federal census of 1880 was notoriously
imperfect, it is probably fair to add 10 per
cent, to the figures so obtained, and that
has been done in the subjoined table. The
figures are taken from the reports of the
Auditor and Superintendent of Public In
struction. The latter of these is the great
est piece of botchwork it has ever been
my ill fortune to examine. Figures which
should be the same in the different tables
are hardly ever given alike; but I have
used the figures given in the detailed re
ports of each county, which are probably
most nearly correct. For the sake
of comparison I have added the vote
for 1886, estimated in the same manner:
NAME OF
COUNTY
2s c-sæ £ss
of g §" ««I
Hg
•ei: -a « ® 3 0\£
> Ü « Kîi
Beaverhead............ 1,634
Cascade................... 1,852
Custer.................— I 1,275
Choteau..................; 1,342
Deer Lodge............ j 5,457
Dawson.................. 442
Fergus..................... 1,328
Gallatin..................i 1,731
Jefferson................. ; 2,510
Ijewis and Claxxe...| 6,001
Madison..................j 1,418
Meagher.
Missoula........
Park..............
Silver Bow....
Yellowstone.
1,541
3,688
1,745
7,225
925
1,439
931
1.025
1.127
2,673
391
925
2,586
1,193
3,200
1,495
1,013
2,789
1,084
3,660
592
40,014 26.123
6,258
5,360
4,641
4,839
15,620
1,697
4,480
9,256
7.094
6,040
5,050
12,988
5,562
20,979
2,992
130,678
'd O •
« 'S -5
83-"
s g.0
00 ©-*
K Sh
5,152
5,740
*4,701
10,1*1
1,848
tll.562
6,260
17,822 116,210
6,072
17.913
8,758
16,895
3.013
105,105
Totals.... _ _____
-Cascade included ; tP«k Included; JPart of
Cascade Included; IFergus Included.
A very striking feature of this table is
the proportion between the number of
voters and number of children. In two
counties only, Madison and Gallatin, does
the latter exceed the former, while the pro
portion in the mining counties is about two
votes cast for each child of school age.
Gallatin is preeminently the county of
homes. The number of school children is
one and one-half times greater than the
number of votes cast. Park county cast 14
more votes than Gallatin, but has only two
fifths the number of children. Silver Bow's
vote exceeded that of Gallatin four times,
but she has only one and two-fifths times
the number of children. These numbers
are significant. Probably in no other coun
try are there so many men able to support
a family as in Montana, and yet the homes
are comparatively few. Without any in
crease in the number of men, if the same
proportion of families prevailed throughout
the territory as in Gallatin county, our pop
ulation would to-day exceed 200,000. It is
in this direction that growth is the most de
sirable.
The past eight years show a great com
parative increase of families; but we have
now entered on the permanent stage of onr
career. We are no longer pilgrims without
any fixed abode. We are citizens of the
State of Montana, and if we expect to build
ourselves homes, they most be built here.
We need the conservative influences which
come from the thought of wife and child
ren at home, and while we look forward to
rapid growth in all directions, we trust
that the next decade will cause the present
number of Montana homes to be multiplied
fourfold. Peter Koch.
Exciting Scene in Court*
New York, March 15. —District Attor
ney Fellows finished his address to the jury
this morning in the case of Thos. B. Kerr
charged with bribery. Judge Daniels then
addressed them, reviewing the evidence
and law in the case. When Judge Daniels
concluded the charge the jury retired
They returned with a verdict of not guilty
at a few minutes past five o'clock. Then
there was a scene. Hats flew np and there
were cheers in the room. Judge Daniels
was much angered and he directed the
court officers to arrest any one participât
ing in the riotous proceedings. Kerr's
brother Chauncey and a friend were seized
upon. The judge lectured them and told
them to come around to-morrow and re
ceive their punishment. Kerr's counsel,
Colonel Ingereoll, pleaded for them but in
vain. _ _
Minnesota Decision.
St. Paul, March 18. —The supreme court
has decided that the Railroad Commission
of this State has no authority to prescribe
the rates of transportation by Commission
carriers between points in this 8tate and
an over route extending across a neighbor
ing State. Such power is vested exclusive
ly in Congress. The case in question in
the State of Minnesota is the ex-railroad
Commissioners vs. Omaha road.
PARNELL.
His Speech on the Irish Question.
London, March 13.—St. James hall was
crowded with people this evening anxious
to hear Parnell's speech. Parnell was re
ceived with an ovation. He expressed his
gratitude and said he felt sure his country
men in Ireland, America and Australia
would be equally glad of hearing this re
ception. He would not enter into the
charges and allegations against him. He
had not said his last say on the subject.
But he wished to reserve a last word for
the witness box and the House of Com
mons. The commission has been a scanda
lous waste of money. The hall was hand
somely decorated with flags and mottoes.
Parnell was nnable to speak for several
minutes when he stood up owing to the
volleys of cheers, etc. When quiet was re
stored he warmly expressed gratification
and went on to speak at length. In the
course of his remarks he said:
"I will not enter into the details of the
charges and allegations made by the Times,
but speaking generally I want to know
why, if these charges and allegations had
any foundation, the government ot the
country did not take them up itself and
investigate their source by the machin
ery at their command, and if they wanted
special machinery why did they not con
struct it with the power at their command.
When were these charges first started? It
was at the very moment when Lord Car
narvon was inviting ns to confer with him
on the future government of Ireland and
as to the new constitution, for these were
his words in opening the conversation,
which was to be given to Ireland on es
tablishing her parliament. That was one
of the reasons why the business of unearth
ing the crime was left to amateurs later,
and a pretty mess they made of it. Why,
again, when Lord Carnarvon was driven
from his office owing to the failure ot hia
colleagues to carry ont the pledges he had
given ns, with the chargee strengthened by
proofs of forged letters, did not the govern
ment undertake the job? Why, again, did
not the government, instead of fighting be
hind the petticoats of the Times, say boldly,
'We think these matters worthy of clear
ing up and will ourselves appoint a tribunal
for that purpose?'
But no; they had recourse to every sub
terfuge and dodge. Indeed, they pretended
they had established a commission to en
able me to disprove the letters, but they so
carefully framed the terms oi the act that
the Times was enabled to compell ns to
appear in court day after day for nearly six
months; for 52 actual sitting days of the
commission; while every charge, every al
legation devisable by the cupidity and in
genuity of informers and jail birds against
everybody else bnt ourselves was brought
forward and investigated, until at length
they approached letters most unwillingly
and gave us for the first time an oppor
tunity. The skill of Sir Charles Russell
and other gentlemen was promptly used
for exposing what, without disrespect to the
judges, I shall venture to call one of the
most scandalous wastes of public time and
money ever instituted under the guise ol
judicial investigation. (Cheers.]
Why do onr political opponents go to all
this trouble to throw discredit upon the
representatives of Ireland, and necessarily
upon the cause they represent and their
allies? Well, I think the plain answer is,
because the people of England, not being in
contact or communication with, and not
understanding the real wishes, thoughts
and aspirations of the people of Ireland, it
is comparatively easy to lead them astray
on any political question in Ireland. Com
ing down to the question of government
for Ireland, Mr. Parnell said: "The land
question, for instance, is only one example
of the bangles every English government
made in the attempt to rule Ireland from
Westminster. I do not say the
land question is the only question,
bnt bring it forward as the most salient
example of the unfortunate incapacity of
the Engl ish Parliament to do justice to
Ireland. Referring lightly to the history
of the land question, the speaker pro
ceeded: "Yon Englishmen and women
ought to reflect wkeu yon read of
the forcible resistance in some cases by
Irish tenants against armed force that it is
not real resistance, because it amounts to
such resistance as a fly might make to an
elephant about to crash it under its foot."
Cheers and langhter.]
Bnt when yon hear these things yon
mast reflect that after all these people are
being expelled from the homes that|they
bnilt themselves and which are their own
property. You must see that it is some
thing not in human nature to endure and
withstand this without provocation, as
passively as we desire they should for the
eake of the future of their country, and
that sometimes their manhood revolts and
they strike a blow in their own defense.
It is an honorable thought that I feel to
night, that since the introduction of that
great measure of 1886, Ireland has definite
ly turned her back upon all base, hopeless,
and desperate courses, that she is confident
in the ways of the constitution lies her
safety and under the genius and guidance
ofthat great and devoted Englishman,
Gladstone, (prolonged cheers) hew hope
has come into all onr hearts and breasts.
The day ot ultimate freedom for Ireland
cannot long be deferred. We are on the
eve of a great popular upheaval,of a move
ment which will not subside until you
have enabled your great leader to carry
through the legislature of the empire a
measure which will give Ireland all the
legitimate control of her own future, her
own interest and her own welfare without
any shadow of harm or ill to yonr own
greater interests.
Parnell resumed his seat amid load and
prolonged cheering.
his
of
ed
of
Live Stock.
Chicago, March 13.—Cattle—Receipts,
9,500; market stronger. Choice beeves
404.40, steers, 2.9003.80; stockera and
feeders, 203.35.
Sheep— Receipts, 6,000; market steady to
strong. Natives, 3.5005, Western com
fed, 3.5004.85.
Chicago, March 14.—Cattle—Receipts,
85,000; strong, 10 higer; choice to extra
beeves, 4.2U04.6O; steers, 3.0004.00
stockera and feeders, 2 2503.35.
Sheep—Receipts, 6,000; weak; natives
3.500510; western com fed 4 5004.75
Texans 3.0004.25
Chicago, March 15.—Cattle—Receipts
3,000; dull and 10c. lower. Choice beeves
9 0003 35; steere 3.0003 80; stockera and
feeders 2.00(3 3.10; Texas steers 1.7503 00.
Sbeep— Receipts 5,000; weak. Natives
3 500500; western, corn fed, 4.40(3,475.
Chicago, March 18.—Cattle—Receipts,
7,000;steady; choice beeves, 4.00(5,4.15;
steers, 304; stockera and feeders 2.00(3,
3.35; Texas steers 3.4003 50.
Sheep— Receipts,5,000; strong; natives
3.5004.85, western corn fed, 4.2504.70.
Chicago, March 19.—Cattle—Receipts
,000; steady to strong; choice beeves 4.00
04.50; steers 3.003 85; stockera and
feeders 2.1003.30.
Sheep—Receipts 5,500; steady; natives
3.0005.35; western, corn fed, 4 2504.70;
Texans 3.0004.25; lambs 4.7506,00.
Lands Open to Settlement.
Washington, March 15.—By proclama
tion the President has released from the
reservation the southeast quarter of sec
tion 6, township 36, north range 9 east, in
the district of lands at Wausau, Wis. These
lands were reserved for the purpose of
river improvement in 1881.
on
as
no
is
in
of
in
or
to
to
OUT OF THE DEPTHS.
Story of the Entombed Men Rescued From
the Shamokin Mine.
Five of the Six Saved by the Heroic
Efforts of Their Fellow Workmen.
THE MINE DISASTER.
The Statement of Two of the Rescued
Men.
Mount Carmel, Pa., March 15.—Su
preme joy reigns in the homes of five men
to-night on account of their miraculous
deliverance from what last night seemed
certain death. Two of them, Hall and
Revels, though suffering extremely from
nervous exhaustion, gave to an Asssciated
Press Reporter to-night their first experi
ence. These two men were engaged in
driving new shutes in breast No. 8, in the
South Slope mine. About noon yesterday
they heard a terrific roar and the ne x t minute
they experienced a shock which caused
Hall to exclaim, "My God, Nick the stop«
has caved in." Reeves descended to the
gangway and twelve feet from him he
found their egress to the Blope cut off by
huge rocks. He called to the miners who
were working in No. 7 and soon saw
Roknsjfcrawling from the debris. They
both joined in shoota and then they heard
Nearehalski calling from the No. 7 cham
bers for help. He was pinioned by a huge
rock and urged his companions to come to
his rescue. Then the second fall occurred
and no more sounds were heard and he
was in all probability killed, though a
force of men are still working for his de
liverance.
The five miners who were saved heard
their rescuers stop work ontside about 6
o'clock last night and, growing desperate
endeavored to climb np an abandoned
chamber and gain exit but the mountain
like boulders stood in their way. Later,
however, they heard sounds outside of
work again and their hopes grew brighter.
They then signalled five time on a solid
pillar. The rescuers returned the signals,
and the wives and children and hundreds
of friends at the month of the
colliery knew the five were safe. At 12
o'clock to-day the deliverance had been
effected by driving a tunnel twenty-nine
yards. Hundreds of tons of debris must be
removed before the mine can be put in
running order.
Shamokin, Pa., March 15.—There is
very little hope of rescuing alive the six
entombed miners at the Black Diamond
colliery. The scene of the accident is in a
slope 1,000 feet below the surface. Hopes
were entertained of reaching two of them
to-day, but a fall of coal, bringing down
with it thousands of tons, occurred at 3
o'clock this morning. It is believed the
men were then killed or will be killed by
coal continually falling, or suffocated for
lack of air. It is estimated it will take
several days to drive a passageway to the
men. Their exact fate cannot be determin
ed at the present writing.
Mounn Carmel, Pa., March 15.—Five
of the six miners at the Black Diamond
colliery have been rescued alive. The
sixth will soon be brought to the surface.
in
of
INTERSTATE COMMENCE.
Commissioner Cooley's Advice to
Railroad Corporations.
Washington, March 18. — Chairman
Cooley said to managers in part: It is veiy
manifest that there have been things going
on here that should stop at once. We must
compliment Mr. Hayes for coming forward
and stating frankly just what the facts were
as regards his own road. We should have
been better satisfied if the course had been
taken by all others. They ought all to do,
no donbt, as Mr. Hayes will do, namely:
Endeavor to comply with the law. Here
is the law and it is not for you hereafter to
say to us that there are practical obstacles
in the way of complying with it That
yon would lose business by so doing and all
that sort of thing we are not concerned in;
that we do not wish to do anything to
make yon less business. Some time we
cannot accept it as valid excuse that if yon
obey the law yon will thereby lose business.
The time onght to be considered as gone by
when a manager can come to yon and say:
I named this rate and I did it regardless
of law, because my company had done the
same thing." There is no excuse for that
practice. If wrong is done by one road to
the injury ol another, the proper
method of redress is not to duplicate
the wrong bnt to go before the committee
in authority, whether it be the commission
or volantary association, with complaint of
the wrong.
One crime in railroad circles is not more
to be excused by another than one theft is
to be justified by another.
Judge Cooley announced that for certain
Southern roads that had asked for a hear
ing on the continuance of the investigation,
two weeks had been granted, bnt the
Commission did not wish to express an
opinion that would effect the interest of
those roads until they hadjbeen folly heard,
but in the meantime the practices in the
North which have all appeared unjustifi
able should not be continued. I trust, he
added, that after saying so much we shall
not in two weeks hence have complaints
brought to ns that these practices have
been going on in the meantime. Parties
mnst not take the redress of wrongs into
their own hands when the legality of what
they complain of is, to say the least, very
donbtfnl. They ought also to remember
that while we continue this case for two
weeks, the law is not suspended. That re
mains in force as well as its penalties.
Nominations To-Day.
Washington, March 19. — President
Harrison sent the following nominations to
the Senate to-day:
John R. McFie, of New Mexico, to be
Associate Justice of the Supreme Coart of
New Mexico.:;
Frank R. Aikens, of Dakota, Associate
Justice of the Supreme Court of Dakota.
Whitelaw Reid, of New York, Minister
to France.
Jalins Goldschmith, of Wisconsin, Consul
General at Vienna.
The nomination of Engene Schuyler, of
New York, to be Assistant Secretary of
State, has been withdrawn, he having de
clined the appointment
in
is
of
in
is
of
a
Confirmed by the Senate.
Washington, March 19.—In executive
session this afternoon the Senate confirmed
the following nominations: Elbert D
Weed, U. S. District Attorney for Montana.
Smith A. Whitfield, Ohio, Second As
s is tant Postmaster General.
Abraham D. Hazen, Pennsylvania, Third
Assistant Postmaster General.
Samuel R. Thayer, Minister to the
Netherlands.
Va W. ThoauM, Jtjrf Maiae, Minister
to Norway and Sweden.
Ordnance Department—Lieutenant-Col.
Adelbert R. Buffington to be Colonel; Major
Joseph P. Farley to be Lient Colonel ; Capt.
Otto E. Nichocles to be Major.
Medical Department—Captain Jalins H.
Patseki to be surgeon, with rank of Major.
First Regiment Artillery.—First Lient
Gilbert P. Cotton to be Captain ; 2d Lient.
Charles H. Hanter to be 1st Lieutenant
Postmaster.—James M. Kellogg, Wickes,
Montana.
LATEST SENSATION.
Elopement and Marriage of Chief
Justice Fuller's Daughter.
Chicago, March 19.—A Daily News
Milwaukee special says: Miss Paulina
Fuller, fifth daughter of Chief Justice
Fuller, was married here to-night at the
Kirby House by a justice of the peace. The
groom was J. Matt. Aubrey, Jr., of Chicago,
and it was a runaway match. When the
6:30 St. Paul train arrived this evening a
petite woman was helped off the steps of a
parlor car by a well knit young man with
smooth face. The lady was closely veiled
pnd was escorted to a carriage by her com
panion. They were driven at once to the
Kirby House, where they registered. No
room was assigned to them and the lady
and her companion spent the early evening
in the hotel parlors.
About 9 o'clock the yonng man came
down stairs and informed the clerk that he
waited a justice of the peace. Clerk Cole
is well up iu such affaire, so he winked
knowingly and assured the young man
that everything would be arranged inside
of fifteen minutes.
Justice Gregory arrived. There was a
hurried consultation, and then the young
man brought the young lady forward. The
ceremony was a brief one, and the Justice,
who is a very prosaic gentleman, put on no
extra frills. He did not know that the
bride was the daughter of the Chief Jus
tice of the United States, nor did any of
those who were present outside of the con
tracting parties.
When the ceremony was concluded the
Justice called for witnesses, and yonng men
in the billiard room ran to affix their signa
tures to the necessary documents
The knot legally and firmly spliced, the
justice coughed dryly, the young man
slipped a bill into his hand and Mr. and
Mrs. Aubery were escorted to the bridal
chamber. Mrs. Aubrey, nee Pauline Fuller,
is 19 years of age, highly educated, and a
remarkably handsome wjman. J. Matt
Anbrey, Jr., is 23 years of age. He is a son
of the general western agent of the Mer
chants' Dispatch fast freight line, J. M.
Anbrey, Sr. He has been a resident of
Chicago since 1876, when he left Milwau
kee. He is well known here, and Con
gressman Isaac VanSchaick is one of his
most intimate friends. Young Aubrey is
employed in his father's office in Chicago.
He is a handsome young fellow.
As near as can be learned the acquaint
ance of the bride and groom began about
three years ago. Justice Fuller, who was
then plain Lawyer Faller, lived with his
eight daughters on Lake avenue only a
short distance from the home of young
Aubrey. The young people met first at a
party given in the neighborhood. An at
tachment sprang np between them and
when it became apparent it was opposed
by the Fullers. Miss Panlina declared,
however, that she would marry whom she
pleased and her father recognized her right
to do as she pleased. Mrs. Fuller, however,
vehemently opposed the match.
About this time Lawyer Fuller was
named as Chief Jnstice of the United
States. Mrs. Fuller gleefully packed up
and carried Miss Paulina away to Wash
ington with the other MisseB Fuller. About
the 1st of last January Miss Paulina in
formed her mother she was 19 years of age
and that she intended to make a trip to
Chicago. Mrs. Fuller opposed the trip but
the girl was firm in her determination and
a few days later she left. Since that time
Bhe has been in Chicago visiting friends of
the family.
The story of the elopement of the youDg
pair is an interesting one and demonstrates
that yonng Anbrey has cut his eye teeth.
To begin with he hired two detectives io
shadow him and his affianced until they
left Chicago. These two guardians he paid
$5 apiece. His object was to learn if any
one was following them and to prevent the
yonng lady being rescued. It was early
this afternoon when he met Miss Fuller,
and Gunther's candy store was their try
sting place.
They boarded a Milwaukee & St. Paul
train at the Union depot at 3:30 o'clock.
To make matters more interesting yonng
Aubery 's father also left for Milwaukee on
the Northwestern road; at least that is
what the yonng bridgroom thought this
evening, while flashed with the success of
his elopement.
However, all efforts to locate the senior
Anbery this evening was unavailing.
Young Mr. Aubrey, to use his own lan
guage, will "rustle" around a bit in Mil
waukee before returning home.
of
ARTHUR P. CURTIN.
FURNITURE, CARPETS, WALL PAPER and
HOUSE FURNISHING GOODS.
Having leased the two upper floors of the Davidson Block and con ;
nected same with our already immense Salerooms, we now occupy four
entire floors extending through the whole block from Jackson to Main
street, stocked throughout with goods of every grade and at prices that
defy competition. Every purchase made STRICTLY FOR CASH
direct from FIRST HANDS and shipped in CAR LOADS ONLY. An
examination of stock and prices solicited.
MUSIC DEPARTMENT.
Pianos, Organs, and iMusicil Marchandise.
Illil^r TO MAKE
-A —
Ww Delicious Biscuit
WK Ask your Grocer for
W COW BRAND
SODAMSALERATUS.
_____ ibiolitelj Pm.
SANDS BROS.
New Arrival of
WALL PAPER,
CARPETS,
AND
HOUSE F URNISHIN G GOODS.
We carry the largest line of the above stock in Mon
tana. Orders receive prompt attention.
SANDS BROS.
BOOMERS BOUNCED.
A Rough Experience cf Oklahoma Immi
grants.
DESPERATE CONFLICT.
Oklahoma Boomers Worsted by U S.
Troops.
St. Louis, March 20.— A Republic's
special from Wichita says: Oklahoma
boomers having fled to the woods upon the
appearance of Lieut. Carson and a body of
soldiers, scouts were sent out to hunt them
down, but were instructed not to resort to
violence. In what is known as Crutch
county, northeast of Oklahoma station,
quite a large number of boomers had
gathered around William Beck. Among
the number were his daughter, a relative
named Samuel Anderson and an old man
named William Adams. Their property
had been destroyed in a former raid aud
they cherished bitter animosity against
the troops. Their hiding place was dis
covered by an Indian scout and reported to
Lieut. Carson, who sent a detachment.
As soon as the boomers saw the troops
coming they made preparations to stand
their ground and protect themselves.
When surrounded and called upon to sur
render they began parleying and made
threats which exasperated the soldiers,
who charged the party, but seeing that the
boomers were armed and having orders to
avoid conflict they dismounted and by an
adroit movement some of the boomers were
relieved of their arms. Anderson and
Adams, however, held out and made a des
perate resistance with guns. The former
received a terrible blow from the bntt of a
revolver and the latter was strnck in the
mouth after being disarmed. The boomers
fonght with clubs and stones bnt were soon
compelled to surrender. Several soldiers
received slight wounds, bnt none serions.
There has been great excitement among
the boomers since the conflict, while all
expressed their determination to make
similar resistance. They are seeking safer
hiding places.
AMERICAN COMMERCE.
An Effort to Be Made to Extend Our
Trade.
Washington, March 14. —Mr. Hale said
if there were any j ust grounds for the forma
tion of a like committee for relations with
Canada the grounds were surely as strong
and imperative in regard to Mexico. It
was of the utmost importance that the
people of Mexico should cease to cherish
jealousy of the people of the United States
or resentments which grew out of the
Mexican war. The friendship of Mexico
was needed in order to uphold the Monroe
doctrine and it was important to cultivate
friendly relations in order to develop
American trade. At present France alone
sent into Mexico doable the value of goods
the United States does.
Morrill hoped if the matter be considered
at all it be by the Committee on Com
merce or Finance.
Platt, while recognizing fully the im
portance oi cultivating friendly relations of
a commercial character with Mexico and the
South American States, agreed with
Morrill.
Reagan spoke vigorously in favor of the
resolution.
Call favored the adoption of the resolu
tion and opposed the motion of reference.
He also advocated indirectly his own reso
lution proposing a like select committee
for Cuba and the West Indies. He had re
cently had various letters showing that
public attention is being directed to the
subject of annexation lor the acquisition of
the Island of Cuba. If it was important
as to certain commercial relations between
Canada and the United States it certainly
is as equally important to ascertain then in
regard to Cuba.
Hale objected to farther consideration of
the subject in executive session, and the
Senate adjourned until Monday.
Whitelaw Reid.
New York, March 19.—A reporter foi
the Sun, this evening, saw Mr. Whitelaw
Reid for a moment. Mr. Reid said the
nomination as Minister to France came
withont any solicitation on his part. He
feels greatly honored by the distinction
and hopes it may be thought also a complj
ment to the profession, whose good opinion
and honor he values more thaD any office.
Mr. Reid added that he would certainly
try to arrange his business so as to accept
the appointment if confirmed.
of
of
in
of
;
TELLING nt
-FROM THE—
Forty-fourth Annual Report
-OF THE—
NEW YORK LIFE
Insurance Company
WILLIAM H. BEERS, President.
BUSINESS OF 1888.
Premiums........................................................................................................................8 21,127,590 75
Interests, Rents, etc......................................................................................................... 4,273,692 08
Total Income........................................................................................................$ 25,401,282 33
Death Claims and Endowments.......................................................................................5 5,425,926 78
Dividends, Annuities and Purchased Insurances............................................................ 5,547,143 27
Total to Policy-holders.........................................................................................f 10,973,070 05
New Policies Issued......................................................................................................... 33,334
New Insurance Written...................................................................................................8125,019,731 00
CONDITION JAN. 1, 1889.
Assets....................................................................................................................8 93,480,186 55
Divisible Surplus, Company's New Standard.................................................................8 7,082,250 25
Tontine Surplus................................................................................................................ 6,423,777 13
Liabilities, New Standard (4 per ceni).............................................................................. 79,974,159 17
Policies in Force............................................................................................................... 129,911
Insurance in Force...........................................................................................................8419,886,505 00
PROGRESS IN 1888
Increase in Benefits to Policy-holders.............................................................................. 1,437,859 26
Increase in Surplus for Dividends................................................................................... 1,653,206 91
Increase in Premiums...................................................................................................... 2,840,737 03
Increase in Total Income.................................................................................................. 3,348,495 71
Increase in Assets ............................................................................................................. IS, 400,340 70
Increase in Insurance Written.......................................................................................... 18,270,436 00
Increase in Insurance in Force......................................................................................... 60,950,969 00
Th~ reßults'i'not estimates) on the Blew York 1, lie's Iciiuiiè I ôTïcics lfint lm»e kin*
tare«i;have been larger than those of any other company, comparisons being made
between policies taken at the same age and premium rate, and running through 'ne same period
of time.
-The Blew York Life was the first company—and is still nenrly itie only corn«
pany—to attach to each policy issued a ropy of the application upon" w hieb
the contract is based.
A MONTH'S GRACE
shall be allowed in the payment of all premiums falling due within the Tontine period.
L -jjJB.
£This is a privilege guaranteed by no other life company on any policy, and is of inestimable
value to many policy-holders; and is only one of the many liberal features of the New
York Life, which has made it the most popular life insnranee company in
as well as throughout the w hole world.
HENRY TUCK, Vice President.
ARCHIBALD H. WELCH, Second Vice President.
RUFUS W. WEEKS. Actuary,
THEODORE M. BANTA, Cashier
A. HUNTINGDON, M. D., Medical Director.
Montana General Agency,
Granite Block, Main Street,
Helena, Mont.
E. D. SNIFFEN, General Agent.
BEN. E. KING, ResidentfAgent, Atlas Block,
Established 1864.
A. G. ClARKE. THOMAS CONRAD. J. €. CURTIN.
CLARKE, CONRAD k CURTIN
Importers of and Jobbers and Retail Dealerslin
Heavy Shelf and Building
HARDWARE.
SOLE AGENTS FGRJJTHE]
Celebrated "Superior" and Famous Acorn
COOKING AND HEATING STOVES,
;and
W. 6. Hiker's Cincinnati Wrought Iron Ranges for Hotels and Family lise.
--0--
Iron, Steel, Horse and Mule Shoes, Nails, Mill Supplies, Hoes, Belt
ing, Force and Lift Pumps, Cutlery, House Furnishing Goods,
C entennial Refrigerators, lee Chests, Ice Cream Freezers,
Water Coolers Etc., Etc.
Visitors to the City are] respectfully Invited to call and Examine onr Goods
and prices before purchasing.
ALL ORDRES RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION AND SHIPMENT.
CTArkIÉ, COTVrUTD~<STCURTIN,
32 and 34 Main Street, - Helena, M. T.
ESTABLISHED 1866.
GANS & KLEIN.
Tb.e Zjeadlng
CLOTHING HOUSE
of Montana.
Country Orders Solicited.
Corner Main Street and Broadway.

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