OCR Interpretation


The Western news. [volume] (Stevensville, Mont.) 1890-1977, January 03, 1900, Image 1

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036207/1900-01-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Hamilton
DRUG AND
JEWELRY
STORE.
THE WESTERN NEWS.
Tou Get the Hews
IN THB
WESTERN NEWS
And get it Straight
Volume XI.
HAMILTON, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 3. 1900.
Number 9
*AND*
Warm Clothing
GO TOGETHER.
The first doesn't cost anything, and
theotherwill not costyou much
more if you get it at the
Valley Clothin g Store
SÄS
men's mi moot Underwear
-Of all grades and prices
..WOOLEN FOOTWEAR.
FROM THE FINEST HALF HOSE TO
HEAVY GERMAN SOX.
Wool Sweaters, Mackinaw Coats, Lined Gloves
and Mittens, Overshoes.
nobby minier Suits.
Stylish Neckwear,
At way down prices.
Valley Clothing Store,
HAMILTON, MONT.
mmmm
!
j
j
Hamilton Laundry.
CHRIS SANDVEN, Proprietor.
All kinds of WHITE GOODS done up in
the best ^.ossible manner. A spec
ialty of •**
WOOLEN GOODS,
WE GUARANTEE THEM NOT TO SHRINK. GIVE THE HAM1L
j TON LAUNDRY A CALL AND YOU WILL NOT REGRET IT.
Goods called tor and delivered to any part ot the city
Go
a
I Hamilton Bargain Store J
Carries a complete line of ^
y Groceries, Fruits, Novel- §3
ties and Goods Usually §j
j found in a Bargain Store ^
WE BUY
Eggs, Butter And Other Produce,
And Pay the Highest Market Prices. I
k share ol the public patronage Is respectfully solicited.
LLOYD REIMEL, Hgr., ?"
j
***
COUNTY CORRESPONDENCE.
REGULAR REPORTS OF HAPPEN
INGS IN VALLEY TOWNS.
TERSELY TOI.D IN NEWSY I.rftTERS OT
THE COUNTY PAPER FROM THE WEST
ERN NEWS' CORPS OF ALERT CORRE
SPONDENTS.
ing
of
go
VICTOR.
Special correspondence to the Western News
Miss Ethlyn Million, of Etna, went
to Helena last Wednesday to attend the
state teachers' association.
Edwin Mitchell, who has been vis- I
iting his uncle, Thos. Cole, returned to
Rossland, B. C., last Wednesday.
R. V. Jameson returned from Stark
Mont , last Wednesday.
E. T. Buker, of Stevensville, wa
visiting old friends in Victor, Thurs
day.
! Miss Zella Goudy returned from i
visit to Florence, Thursday aud-wa
accompanied by Miss Allen.
J. A. Barnhill, of Mt. Vernon, Iowa,
arrived Friday to clerk in the drug
store of Dr. T. H. Hanbidge. Mr.
j Barnhill comes well recommended hav
ing acted as druggist for Dr. T. J
j Baird, one of our former physicians,
now of Mt. Vernon, Iowa.
County Commissioner Johnson was
in town Saturday.
Miss Anna Sawyer returned to Ham
ilton Saturday.
Master Frank West returned horn,
Saturday, after having spent a week
in Missoula visiting friends. j
Mrs. J. H. Chilson came down from
Hamilton, Monday, to visit the family j
of Cortez Goff on the east side.
Mrs. Frank Marsh came up on Sat
urday's train to visit her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Martin Cramer.
Burch Swiggert left for Missoula
this morning to accept a position there.
I Misses Bertha and Blanche and Mr.
; Lawrence Simpson, of the east side
; were visiting in town Monday. They
j returned to the university at Missoula
i this morning.
in
!
I
j
I
:
Chris Wrinkler and Miss Hattie Van
Meter, of Pleasant View, took their
friends by surprise last week by going
to Hamilton and having the few words
said which united them for life. The
happy couple returned Sunday and are
spending their honeymoon with tiw
bride's uncle, J. T. Firth.
The Masonic ball at Victor, by the
Masons was a decided success socially
she
nd financially, there being over 8u
tickets sold. The supper was superb
be
and enjoyed by all.
Misses. Anna Bond and Floy Olds
returned to Hamilton, Monday.
Miss Elsie Strange, of Etna, went to
Missoula this morning for a week's
visit.
The Victor merchants are busy bal
ancing up their books ready for a new
year's work.
The Victor school opened again this
morning after a week's holiday.
Miss Carrie Harlan came up from
Missoula Saturday and opened her
school Moinday.
The entertainment given by the Vic
tor school on Saturday night was a de
cided success. Standing room was at
a premium and the sum of $46 was
cleared.
.
he
of
STEVENSVILLE.
(From the Tribune.!
Howard Smart was down from Ham
ilton over Christmas and seemed to
enjoy himself.
Casper Schachtle, Joseph Haigh.
John William Haigh and James Haigh
all of Hamilton, left on Wednesday'»
morning train for Missoula where
they boarded No. 2 on the main line of
the N. P. railway, for a visit to their
old home in Lincoln, Buffalo county
Wisconsin.
Mrs. Robert Harper and son, Oti
came down from Hamilton on Chris',
mas and are the guests of Mrs. Thos
Baird. They went over to visit, friend»
at the mill yesterday.
A letter from J. A. Landram, in
New York City, states that he ha
had his cancer cut out and that he wii
be out of the hospital soon.
Abraham Williamson, of Etn 1
brought in some splendid sausage f">
j the Tribune family last week. Ab*
knows how to make the clear quill
Thank you for this kind remembrance
-Next.
Local sportsmen are keeping close
watch of certain parties in
the valley who are suspected
ble
to
this end of
, f trao
°
ping and killing quail«, and there are
*** 'likely to be some arrests in the near
future. The birds were put out at a ^
considerable expense and arc multiply t
ing rapidly and should be given the
protection the law affords them. The
evidence is very strong againrt some
of those suspected and it is likely to
go hard with them.
John W. Bennett, of the West Side,
was up before Judge Sedgwick last
Monday for killing beaver and was
bound over to appear before the Dist.
Court in the sum of S250. He gave
bail for appearance.
VACATION IN A BALLOON.
I story is being whispered around
l>«ris of two pretty actresses who are
Two French Girls Have Determined
to Take a Novel Trip Dnrinir
Their Holidays.
j
j
going to take their vacation this summer
in a balloon. They do not propose to
imitate Andree and start for the pole,
bpt they have an idea that it will be
pleasant making short trips in a bal
loon. A skilled balloonist is to accom
pany them and manage the flight of the
»«rial ship.
The balloon which they will choose
is an ordinary picnic balloon, such as is
u$ed every spring at county fairs. The
ascension is made with the aeronauts in
a car suspended from the balloon, and
the travelers carry with them pro
visions to last a day or two, also cork
life preservers and a few toilet neces
sities.
Ascensions will be made pleasant
mornings, with the intention of -jour
neying only as far as some neighbor
ing town and dropping there to rest,
after which a return trip is to be made
home. But as all signs fail in balloon
ing. there may be a slip, and it is this
which the fair balloonists are provided
for.
! In case the balloon soars too faraway
I and exhausts too much air for a return,
a skilled balloonist, who is of the party,
j will lower them to the earth. Then
they will pack up the balloon and jour
I ne y home on the cars. The rubber suit
: is to be used in case of a watery descent
in tlic middle of the ocean or river. In
this case the life preserver is hurriedly
put on and the party get to shore as well
as they can. The provisions are for a
stomach stay unt il shelter and food are
found. It is an adventurous plan, and
the capricious young women may aban
don it before the summer season is here.
—Providence Telegram.
CLOTH CARRIES PERFUME.
Novelty That One llreaamaher 1
Dividing Among Her Favorite
Cnatoinera.
A dressmaker, recently returned
from Paris, brought a small but very
valuable piece of red material, which
she is going to divide sparingly
among her most favored customers,
After awhile, says the Chicago Inter
Ocean, it will be accessible to a larger
freie as (he material will ultimately
be put upon the market
we
he
six
{
. , , ...
he has rheumatism, or did wear until a
short time ago. Later it will be possi- *
Just now the
manufacturers have not been able to
complete the material in the way they
desire. Now the only color in which
this material can be made is light red,
of the hue that the farmer wears when
ble to impart the merits of this iuven- |
tion to other colors, although it would 1
probably become just as popular iu the
present red monotoDy. For this cloth
can retain in the most wonderful way
the odors of perfume. It is expected
to solve, in the best fashion, the prob
lem as to the best way in which to per
fume dresses.
Many other expedients have been
tried, such as small sachets sewed in
the draperies, but none of them is so
simple as this cloth, which is laid in
the lining or otherwise concealed about
the waists. It diffuses a delicate odor,
which is never exhausted, however long
the time of a gown's use may be. Vari
ous scents may be given to the cloth,
and the number will be increased ns the
maker» complete the details of the
work.
When the material goes on the mar
ket there is little danger that this new
invention will ever become common.
The price is prohibitive to any but
women who are willing to pay for what
they want, whatever it may cost.
Destroying tile Point.
Everyone knows the man who is no
torious for so telling a story ns to de
stroy its point. An English nobleman,
Lord P-, was noted for his success in
thus ruining the prosperity of a story.
The author of "Collections and Recol
lections" exhibits a specimen of his
lordship's peculiar art. Thirty years
ago two large houses were built at Al
bert Gate, London, the size and cost ol'
which seemed likely to prohibit ten
ants from hiring them. A wag chris
tened them "Malta and Gibraltar, be
cause th*-v can never be taken." Lord
P- tho /ht this an excellent joke,
and ran round the town, saying to every
friend he met: "I say, do you know
what they call those houses at AllA*rt
Gate? They call them Malta and Gib
raltar, because they can never let them.
Isn't it awfully good?" Someone told
Lord I*-the old riddle, "Why was tin
is
I
of e * e l ) l ia nt. the last animal to get into the
to which the uuswer is, UecauM*
ho hud to pack his»truuk- Lord 1
1hc 0 f ,hc next friend Iu
met, and gave as the answer "Because he
a ^ had topack his portmanteau."—Youth's
t ' ■•uipnniou.
DEWEY'S VALET AN AUTHOR,
What the Admiral Can»ht Him Writ*
ln» One Mght In His
Chamber.
After Admiral Dewey retired one
night recently at the Waldorf-Astoria,
he discovered an uuthor in his room.
He was not surprised, because nothing
ever surprises him. He laughed about
it when he got up in the morning, and
he joined heartily in the laughter which
followed his rehearsal of the incident
to his relatives.
It seems that when the admiral re
tired, shortly before eight o'clock, he
was too tired to sleep. Finally lie
opened his eyes and discovered that
the far corner of the room was illum
inated.
"What are you doing, boy?" he cried,
and his Chinese servant jumped to his
feet with a start. It was his custom
to sleep under his blanket in the corner
of the room.
"Writing," replied the scared Celes- !
tial.
"Writing what?" demanded the ad
miral.
"Book," and that was all he could
say.
The admiral got interested. What
could the boy mean? he asked himself.
Then, from his position in bed, be in
vetigated. On the floor there was a lit
tle Chinese lamp, throwing out a feeble
and intermittent light and ingeniously
shaded so that its rays would not pene
trate the darkness surrounding the
admiral's couch. Before it on the floor
the blanket was stretched, and in one
corner rested a lot of Chinese writing
materials and paper.
"He told me he was writing a book
about roe and my reception, and he
was going to take it to China and have
it published in his native language,"
»nid the admiral, in telling the story to
his relatives, "lie thought the story
was too good to keep, and he meant to
enlighten his people.
lie was writing
a book about me on the floor of my bed
room while I was trying to sleep."
When the servant was helping him
with his toilet iu the morning the ad
mirai started to converse with him.
He could not subdue his interest, it
was like a new baby coming into the
family and had to be discussed. The
admiral invited his impression of other
things.
_
What do you think of this hotel,
boy?" he asked.
"Grand," replied the boy, as he
stopped in the middle of the floor to
give the word emphasis and eloquence.
"Why, that was a pretty fine hotel
we stopped at iu your country," said the
admiral.
"Oh, no," said the boy, quickly. Then
he stopped and looked around before
continuing: "China hotel four, the,
six times go inside."— N. Y. Times.
BANKING ON LUCK.
Why Gambling EatablUhmenU Prove
Profitable In the
{ Luna Ran. «
"In all gambling games," said an old
time sport, "there is a percentage in
favor of the house." Anybody except a
born fool knows that a man couldn't
^ tQ . an establishment, hire
... ,, .l_ >.....
help, pay rent and defray all the hun
dred and one incidental expenses un
less he derived a profit that was based
on some fixed principle and not de
pendent upon mere luck or chance.
Just where the profit comes in, how
ever, is something that very few people
understand. Most of them imagine it
is derived from some slight advantage
in the arrangement of the game, such
as the 'zero' numbers in roulette or the
'splits' in faro, but. they are very much
mistaken.
''It really depends on a principle that
applies to all games alike, and is what
might be termed the 'percentage of
capital.' Strange as it may seem, 1
could take a capital of $1,000 and begin
pitching nickels, in which the chances
are perfectly even, letting the players
guess either way they wanted to, and I
would make a steady profit, day in and
day out. The secret is this: The aver
age player has only a. limited amount of
money, and a slight run of bad luck '
wipes him out. He is obliged to quit,
and somebody else takes his place,
I while the house keeps right on through
good luck and bad, continually swell- j
ing its reserve with the cash of the :
broken players.
•'To simplify the matter, suppose 1
have 100 pennies and you hav® one, and
we begin matching. One loss breaks
you, but I can stand 10 !» losses before
having to quit. You may have a spurt
of luck at the sttyt, but in the long run
I am morally Certain to wipe you out.
That principle of the percentage of
capital is at. the bottom of the profits
of every gaming house in the world
from Monaco to Long Branch."—N. O.
Timca-Dcmocrat.
,i u iy lectured for his lack
"You seem, icy lod, tobe be
taught.** "Very like*.** a
Too Many for the Deaa.
A well-kuown dean of Norwich tells
the following good story against him
self: Some few weeks ago he came to
a stile which was occupied by a farm
lad who was catiug his bread aud ba
con ltiucli. The boy made no attempt
to allow bis revereuce to pass, so was
of manuers.
better fed than
ught." "Fcr.v like." answered the
lad, slicing off a piece of bacon,-"for ye
teaches Oi, but Oi feeds meself."—Lon
don Answers,
We wish to say a few words
to the people of the Bitter
Root about
fiolidayPurcbasc*
WE ARE SHOWING A
PLETE LINE OF-
VERY COM
Dishes...
Such as Cup and Saucers,
fancy Plates, fancy Cream
and Sugar Bowls, fancy
Bread, Cake and Fruit, plates,
and a varied assortment of
things in thia line too nu
merous to mention here that
make useful as well as pleas
ing présenta. Also our line
of
Albums, Plush Goods,
Picture Frames
And some of the rt ry
latest things in
Pictures
arc complete. Oui- assoi tment of
ABE LA KGE AND Cil EAP.
Lampst
We will positively sell you any
hing iu above ment ion» I cheaper
hau it has ever before been offered
in this section, regardles of the fact '
that they cost us more than former
years.
We do not expect to make any.,
money out of these goods, but •»»- '
going to make everyone that buy» a
CHRISTMAS PRESENT
Of the profit that Is usually made on theso
kkIs.
Wo take this method of showing our ap-
p.eclatlon of the 1 itoar»» patronage we have
received In the last year.
Come and see our goods and we will nét •
disappoint you.
~~ ^
M. M. CO.
j
VICTOR, MONT.
'
j
:
XttiiiW^Y.VïV.Vô.WtV.W.VAWAV'WiV^W/
' VIC iOR DRUG STORE
newly Startrd at Uictor, montana,
Till* a Cong Telt Want.
It will not be any longer neces
sary for the people of Victor and
vicinity to make a long drive
_ when in need of medicine for the
*£ sick ones. We keep everything
fur the sick room.
Pure Drugs.
GIVE US A CALL.
VICTOR DRUG
STORE.
ï Dr. T. H. HANBIDGF, Proprietor.
^.iuiuiiiuuhi ft 1
'1 HE
HAMILTON
BAKERY.
IS THE 1 LACE TO GET-
FRESH BkEAD.
' SBB-- P a*. T .J V 1 OLLS
CONFriCTItNS, ETC.
verythin/ that is to lie 'ound In a first
clast bakery at living . rices.
ww
GIVE US A CALL.
JACOB HELWIG, Proprietor.
'
Hamilton Cafe...
The Only First-Class
Short Order fi ouse jn ftamtlton.
vAf White Help Employed.
^ Bates Reasonable.
DINNER FROM ta to 4 P. H.
35 CENTS.
Turtiisbd Rooms in Con nection.
~ V ..»»« M B #
W. H. GORHAM, Proprietor«,

xml | txt