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The Western news. [volume] (Stevensville, Mont.) 1890-1977, June 18, 1902, Image 5

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YOUR. FAITHS:
awlljfih T——. , ■
Shiloh's
Consumption
>t>d oan U so ttronc we
I -iS 1 g* guarantee a cure or refund
^ ■* ■ » money, and we send you
free trial bottle if you write for it.
SHOOH'B coeta IS cent» and will cure Con
sumption. Pneumonia, Bronchitis and all
Lung Troubles. Will core a cough or cold
in a dap, and thus prevent serions results.
It baa been doing these things for 60 years.
a. C Tsus at Co- Le Boy. N. Y. _
^CufsClavarRootTeaOT
OFFICIAL DIBECTOBT.
STATE OFFICIALS.
Governoi. Joseph K. Toole. ' v
Lleusni-t 9 tr>t « >•. Frink lllrxltis
Secretary of State, M. Hays.
8tate Auditor. J. H. Ca.u'i-'tead.
«tale Treasurer, A. II. Barret..
Attorney General Twines Donne 7 .
Superintendent df Public Instructic . *v. IV.
Welch.
Chief Justice. Th. odore Brantley.
Associate Justices, W. T. PI got t, and Geo. K
Kllbum.
-Clerk of Supreme Court. H. G. Klckarfs.
Representative In Congress. Caldwell 'Ed
wards.
United States Senators. W. A. Clark and
Paris Gibson.
COUNTY OFFICIALS.
Gberriff.J. D. Watts.
County Treasurer, Chas. H. Buck.
County Clerk and Recorder, Howard U, Smart
Clerk of District-Court, J. F.Cone.
Assessor. Ohas. M. Johnson.
County Attorney, \V. P. Baker.
Superintendent of Schools, Kitty Ostermeyer
'Coroner, W. T. Adair.
■ublle Adminis trator, J. D. Miser.
'Comity Commissioners, James R. Rawlins.
W. E. Gleason and Ed. A. Johnson.
CjTY OFFICIALS.
Mayor— Ml lee Romney.
Treasurer—' W. O. Fisk.
Attorney —B- Lee McCulloch.
Clerk—Richard C. Parmenter.
Marshal— Josh Pond.
Night Officer—John J. Fitzglbbons.
Police Magistrate—Frank J. Morris.
Xldermen First Ward—Louis Peterson. H.
8. Page.
Aldermen Second W ard—Geo. H. Taylor. F.
L. Barns.
Aldermen Third Ward—E. A.Trosdahl, J.'J.
Hawley.
SOCIETIES.
•RAVALLI LODGE. No. 38, K. OFF., MEETS
every Tuesday evening at Konger s Hall,
-cor. MsSn and Third streets. All Knights In
.good standing cordially Invited to visit. ^
JOHN J. HOWLEY, K.of R. and S.
3AMILTON, LODGE. NO.. * 8 . I. 0. 0 F
meet» every Monday night at Odd Fel
<ws ' all. South Second street. All Brothers
good standing invited to visit.
I. A. Martin, N. G.
F. M. ljockwood, R. 8 .
B. C. Black. Per. S.
BITTERROOT ENCAMPMENT, NO. 10, T.O.
O. F.. meets first, and third Fridays at Odd
Fellows hall. Visiting Brothers^Invited to
-fettend. F. L. BURNS, 0. 1*.
WM. N.BOMBOUGH. Scribe.
IONIC LODGE NO. 3«. A. F. & A M. MEETS
first and third Saturdays ofeach month at
Odd Fallows hall. Second street. Sojourning
orethran inv,tcd to attend^ oom>ER w w
J. J.SOUTW1CK, Sec.
HAMILTON LODGE NO, 80. A. O. U. W..
meet» every second and fourth Thursday at
• Odd Fellows Hall, at 8 p. M w
HENRY G ROVER. Rec.
OHAKITY LODGE. NO. 11. I. O. O F
meets the second and Fourth Wednesdays
• ofeach month at Odd Fellows hall.
MRS. ADA RURNS, N. G.
MRS. J. T. BOAuDMAN. Secrotary.
SITTER ROOT TENT K. O. T. M.Meets Ev
ery Friday evening at Odd Fellows Hall
Visiting Knights are cordially Invited to at
lÄ,d ' JOHN STEPHENS.Commander.
MARTIN TINGLEY, Record Keeper.
HAMILTON CAMP NO.
Woodmen of America.
5804. MODERN
Meets at Odd
Fellows Hall every Tuesday evening
E. F. Richakdb. Clerk. 0 . O. Coulteb. Y . O.
B A.Y. RAVALLI LODGE NO. 540 MEETS
•wiry Thursday evening at 8:30 o clock In
theOddFefli
REV. L U. HUBBS, Sec.
day .
°w s HaU . RI8 sandven , h. F.
EVENING STAR. No. 58, I. O. O. F. MEETS
every Saturday evening in Miles Hall.
Darby. All brothers in good standing in
vited to attend. Chas. Lawrence, N. g.
August 8ot»i»eder* Sec.
CORVALLIS LODGE No. 28. A. F. & A. M.
meets every second fourth Saturday
evenings In Masonic hall. Corvallis. Visit
ing bretbern in good standing cordiallyin
ylbed. R. R. Smithet. W. M
G. G. Lockwood, Sec.
VICTOR SOCIETIES.
Vlctqr Lodge No. 43 A.F. &A. M.,meets first
and third Saturdays at Appolonio, Watters &
Company's hall, Victor. A cordial invitation
is extended to visiting members. James H.
White, W. M.; M. D. Fulkerson, Secretary.
Dr.
, Hanbldge. N. G.; Geo. Rowe. Sec.
Victor Tent No. 35 K. O.T. M.. meets first
and third Tuesd ays of each month at Appo
lonio, Watters & Go.s' hall. Visiting Knights
always welcome. J. E. Marvin. Com.; J. A.
Barnhill, R. K.
Victor Camp N a. 5696 M.W.A.,meets second
and fourth Saturdays at A. W. & Co.'s hall.
8 . H. Ault, V. O. M. M. Williams, Clerk.
Naomi Chapter Not 9 O. E. 8,. meets first
and third Wednesdays of each month at A.
W. A Co.'s hall. Mrs. Louise Watters, W. M. ;
11. D. Fulkerson, Sec.
Charity Lodge No. 6 D. of H. meets sc
and fourth Saturdays at Workman hall,
.manda Vert. 0. H.; Mrs. Msry E. G re
second
Mrs.
Gregory,
Bitter Root Hive No. 40L.O. T. M.. mec
s econd and fourth Saturday afternoons
I'M», m. Mrs. T. B. Ray, Commander; M
Curas williams, R. K.
PRAIRIE WINDS ARE QUIETED.
Flour Mill in Dakota That Ma« to Bo
Abandoned Beoaoao of look
of Breeses.
The old wind wheel flour mill at Hur
ley has been torn down and the mate
rial of which it was composed will be
convened into a more paying enter
prise, says a Yankton report. This
old mill and its failure to justify the
faith of the parties who built it point
to the fact of one big change in the
conditions of -this country during the
last 20 years. When settlers first lje
gan to arrive there the constant and
heavy winds which were a source of
extreme annoyance to all, as also of
positive loss ns well, in grain blown
out of the grounds in the spring and
broken down in a more mature state,
was at the same time an inspiration
that a fortune would go to the man or
men who could successfully utilize this
great power in the industries of the
country.
Many attempts in this direction were
made, and covered the whole range of
farm operations from a threshing ma
chine to running the whole farm from
central station. None of these at
tempts was more successful than that
of milling, and many mills of thAwind
variety have run continuously for
years and made money. The atmos
pheric conditions seem to have
changed, however, and mill after mill
lost money and was dismantled. Un
less the old mill at Kampseka is still
standing, „the Hurlej' mill was the last
in the state, and none has been able to
run for many years.
GYPSY COMMUNICATION.
Wee of the "Patteran" ant Other
Method« of Informing Their
Wandering Brethren.
The ancient road signs of the Ro
many, the "patteran," takes the place
of sigiüwards or maps. The "patter
an" is a little, carefully arranged pile
ot sticks, grass or stones, placed at
eross roads, where none but a gypsy
would notice it any more than anyone
but a Romany could read It; but to him
it is as plain ns the noonday sun, and
by it—a succession of such wayside
tokens—one family or company can
follow others who may be days ahead
of them for hundreds of miles, says
Frank Leslie's Popular Monthly.
Though the gypsy has uses for other
methods of communication besides the
mysterious "patteran," he is not a let
ter writer. He rightly cares first for
his own immediate family circle; the
closest "inlaws" do not travel together
unless perfectly congenial or unless it
is convenient for them to do so, and as
the roving life is not conducive to let
ter writing, even the nearest relatives
do not usually hear from each other
directly more than once or twice a
year at most.
In the city livery stables and pawn
brokers' shops opportunities are af
forded for the exchange of news, but
y
for those who roam in small groups
and rarely strike a large city or the
great bureaus of information, summer
camping grounds, where all the gossip
of the year is retailed, communication
of personal family news is uncertain.
ENGLAND'S SHODDY BOOTS.
Footwear That Look« A*II night, Bat
fiolcklr Goes to Pl«eea Wkta.
Pat la Uee.
&
A.
;
Boots and shoes in England have
been subject to a very considerable fall
in prices of late years. Partly this is
owing to the use of machinery, partly
to the employment of lads where men
used to do the work, partly to the use
of what was formerly waste mate
rial and partly to sheer dodgery and
trickery. Men's lace boots are now to
be bought for 2s. lid; they are made
of leather, too, and to look at them
you might think it genuine enough.
The truth is, however, the uppers are
made of what are known as "center
splits," and the soles are an artificial
compound of leather waste, states
Chambers' Journal. The "center
splits" are very ingenious forms of
shoddy. Good, honest skins are cun
ningly split into three thicknesses.
The -center is soft and spongy and has
no natural grain upon it; but this de
fect in its appearance is supplied by a
process of printing which produces a
surface "grain*' and makes it, to the
inexperienced eye, just like ordinary
leather. It is then made up into boots
that give every promise of good serv
ice—a promise to the eye (to parody
Macbeth)—pretty certainly destined
to be broken to the hope.
Wn Becomes Americanised.
An Atchison (Kan.) girl, who is at
tending school in Washington, went
to the reception recently given by the
wife of 'Minister Wu, at the Chinese
legation, and of her observations she
writes as follows:
"The house is very much like an
American one. The servants were
English, and the few Chinamen scat
tered about seemed out of place. I
found myself wondering that the serv
ants didn't give the Chinamen the
family wash, and put them out. The
lVus are becoming more like us every
year. Formerly Minister Wu received,
and his wife was poked back in a cor
ner. Now she receives, and he mere
ly wanders around and looks lone
some, all the same like American man
when his wife gives a party."
Rapid Traastt.
A gentleman traveling on the New
Jersey Central flyer put his head out
of the window to bid his wife good
by, as the train was moving out of the
Jersey City station. . Instead of suc
ceeding in his purpose, however, he
found that he had kissed à strange
lady standing on the platform at the
next station. This is one of the New
York Times' prize stories, and as the
Boston Herald suggests the only im
proper thing about it is that it only got
a second prise. . ............
n
\
The Difference
Between this same lady's two
suits of hair is Just twelve
weeks' faithful use of Newbro's
Herplcide. It destroys the germ
or parasite that burrows Into
the hair at the root and causes
dandruff. thin hair. Anally bald
ness; thus coring dandruff,
and causing hair to grow lux
uriantly. v
For Sale by all Druggists.
NEWBRO'S HERP1C1DE.
Market Report.
The quotations given below are the
prevailng orices Wednesday morning
and are subject to change at any time
Butter, ranch 20c per lb„ creamery
35c per lb
Apples,Si. 50.
Eggs, 20c doz.
Potatoes, 1.25 per 100 lbs
Hay—Wild, [email protected]$3.00; mixed, $8
[email protected]; timothy, 10.50 Baled.*
Oats, [email protected] per 10Q lbs
Wheat, 75c per bushel.
Onions,$1.50 per 100 lbs.
Cabbage, $1.50 per 100 lbs.
Beets, 45c per 100 lbs.
Carrots, 40c per 100 lbs.
SPRING FEVER.
Spring fever is another name for
biliousness. It is more serious than
most people think. A torpid liver and
inactive bowels mean a poisoned sys
tem. If neglected serious illness may
follow such symptoms. DeWitt's Lit
tle Early Risers remove all danger by
stimulating the liver, opening the
bowels and cleansing the system of
impurities. Safe pills. Never gripe.
"I have taken DeWitt's Little Early
Risers for torpid liver every spring for
y ears,''writes R. M. Everly, Mounds
ville, W. Va. "They do me more good
than anything I have ever tried.
Hamilton Drug Co. *
as
'•
of
The Farmer's Twice-a-week Tribune
of Minneapolis, The Western News
and your choice of a superb portrait
of McKinley or Roosevelt or the "The
Horse Fair" for only $2.50. For all
kinds of clubbing arrangements, call
on or address the Western News. tf
READ IT IN THE NEWSPAPERS
George Schaub, a well known Ger
man citizen of New Lebanon, Ohio, is
a constant reader of the daily Volks
zeitung. He knows that this paper
aims to advertise only the best in its
columns, and when he saw Chamber
lain's Pain Balm advertised therein
for .lame back, he did not hesitate in
buying a bottle of it for his wife, who
for eight weeks had suffered with the
most terrible pains in her back and
could get l-o relief. He says; "After
using the pain balm for a few days
my wife said to me, 'I feel as though
born anew,' and before using the en
tire contents of the bottle the unbear
able pains had entirely vanished and
she could again take up her household
duties." He is very thankful and
hopes that all 'suffering likewise will
hear of her wonderful recovery. Tnis
valuable liniment is for sale by Corner
Drug Co.
1*
A.
The greatest ambition of Amer*
lean men and women is to have
homes blessed with children. The
woman afflicted with female dis
ease is constantly menaced with
becoming a childless wife. No
medicine can restore dead or
gans, bat Wine of Cardui does
regulate derangements that pre
vent oonoeption; does prevent
miscarriage; does restore weak
fonctions and shattered nerves
and does bring babies to homes
barren and desolate for yean.
Wine of Cardui gives women the
health and strength to bear heal
thy children. You can get a
dollar bottle of Wine of Cardui
from your dealer.
WME^CARDUI
MS Market fittest.
Win# of Osranl and one pookas* of
i Thedfoid's Black-Draught. Ihadnsea
I married fifteen years and had n*
Siren birth tea child until I took W
of Cardui. Now I am mother of a I
bebygirl which was born March «LU
I Tbs baby weighs fourteen pounds I
For adviee
THE BODY AND ELECTRICITY . 1
Application of the Carrent to the Ha
— »■ Syctem Man* Bo Intelli
gently Dome.
The body resembles nothing so much
as a machine for generating electrici
ty. Occasionally it gets out of repair
and consequently fails to produce the
amount of power needful to keep us
riive; ami it is upon this subject that
Prof. D'Odiardi has much of interest to
i-ny, according to Pearson's Magazine.
Pointing out the various static ma
chines and queer instruments which
adorn his hospital?he explained :
"It may at once be said that while
there is hardly any result that cannot
be obtained by means of electricity and
the physical forces suitably adminis
tered. yet this electricity, must be con
veyed in Hoses as accurately measured
as to time, quantity and intensity as
the most powerful drug; its effects
also vary in the most remarkable man
ner according to the strength, quantity
'• and quality of the current.
"it is possible by its means to in
crease by one-fourth the quantity of
oxygen in the blond; to increase, or di
•''inish the supply of blood to pry part
of the organism, however deeply seat
ed; to raise or lower the temperature;
to increasfe or diminish the frequency
and quality of the pulse and respira
tion; to stimulate or slacken the func
tion of any organ; to recharge ex
hausted organic cells and to make
them proliferate new cells of a supe
rior type; to cause a hundred and one
other things which 50 years,ago would
have been looked upon as miracles;
and. Inst but not least, by its use it Is
possible to sustain the circ ulation of
the blood and the respiration in eases
where without such help syncope or
asphyxia would supervene. According
to this last method I have kept patients
alive for days, until at length the new
supply has told upon the system and
snatched them from death's door."
THE SPANIARD AT HOME.
Shares His Bread and Win* with
■very Mrasser and Stabs a
Friend Over a Trifle.
The Spaniard at home is not under
standable. He loves flowers and car
ries a pistol. He is passionately fond
of the theater, but does not keep quiet
that he or his neighbors may hear. He
is charmingly courteous ànd inexcusa
bly cruel. He shares his bread and
wine with every stranger and stabs â
friend over'a trifle. Such are the traits
of some. The bullfight is the favor
ite amusement of this class, and the
bullfight, though declining somewhat
in popularity, is yet the national di
version. A distinguished member of
the present ministry has made a large
fortune and is adding to it yearly by
breeding fighting bulls.
The proverbial Spanish courtesy has
not diminished toward Americans by
reason of the recent little war. The
American—the North American, as he
calls the voyager from the United
States, in distinction from his kins
man from South America—is given a
most cordial greeting throughout
Spain. The English are not liked, but
the dislike of the English does not ex
tend to their American cousins. There
is, on the contrary, a real admiration,
such as one brave man may feel for an
other, no matter what the result of a
combat between them. The Spaniard
goes out of his way to do the Ameri
can visitor a kindness. True, he has
not many American visitors; not near
ly so many as the other European
countries, but he exerts himself to the
utmost for thos^he has.
ed
in
of
it
MILLIONS FOR BEAUTY.
.eakBOSr« of American Income
Through CMtlsens Who Spend
Thotr Time and Money Abroad.
The greatest economic pitfall of our
western civilization is, in my judg
ment, waste, and our chief item of
waste is the leakage of income to
Europe, through citizens who live
wholly or partially abroad, says
Brooks Adams, in Municipal Affairs.
These individuals live abroad because
they find their senses gratified in Eu
rope more perfectly than in the United
States, because in some respects Eu
ropeans are more .intelligent than
Americans. Bankers estimate that
Americans spend upward of $100,000,
000 annually in foreign countries—a
sum, possibly, not far from the net
earnings of the United States Steel
company, after deducting the cost of
the renewal of the plant. For the
most part, this enormous outlay is
dead loss. We have nothing to show
for it. It has been absorbed by for
eign railways, hotels, theaters and
dressmakers. Were New York as at
tractive to our own people as Paris,
much of this money would stay at
home, and we should also attract
strangers hither. In reality, New
York somewhat resembles a gigantic
railway junction. New York is
thronged, but those who visit her
are apt to come for business, and not
to tarry for pleasure. The same thing
is true of most American cities.
Birthday of a Nation.
The new Australian federal govern
ment is appointing a Commonwealth
day on the lines of the American In
dependence day. It is now engaged
in weighing the claims of July 1, when
QUeen Victoria assented to the con
stitution; September 30, the date of
the proclamation; January 1, the in
auguration of the commonwealth, and
May 9, the date of the duke of Corn
wall's opening of the first federal
parliament. The January date is the
one most favored.
Mlraeolooa Water.
The Chinese believe that the water
obtained from melting hailstones is
poisonous, and that rain water which
falls on certain feast days will cure
ague and malarial fever.
1
Only 50 Cents
I to make your baby strong mad
1 well. A fifty cent bottle et
Scott's Emulsion
I will change a sickly baby to
I a plump, romping child.
Only one cent a day, think
I of It. Its as nice as cream.
Send for a free »ample, and try it.
SCOTT & BOWNE, Chemists,
1 409415 Pearl Street, New York.
50 c. and Jiao; all druggists.
VIRULENT CANCER CURED.
Startling proof of a wonderful ad
vance in medicine ia given by drug
gist G. W. Roberts of Elizabeth. W.
Va. An old man there had long suff
ered with what good doctors pronoun
ced incurable cancer. They believed
his case hopeless till 'he used Electric
Bitters and applied Bucklen's Arnica
Salve, which treatment completel/
cured him. When Electric Bitters are
used to expel bilious, kidney and
microbe poisons at the same time this
salve exerts its matchless healing
power, blood diseases, skiu eruptions,
ulcers and sores vanish. Bitters 50c,
Salve 25c at Bitter Root Drug Co. *
TEN DOLLARS REWARD.
One pale red and white cow, brand
ed HZ, bar underneath, on left side
and with quarter circle L on left hip.
Was last seen on Sleeping Child range
in March of last year. I will pay $10
reward for return of same.
Theo L. Crum,
21-tf Corvallis, Mont.
* LEADS THEM ALL.
"One Minute Cough Cure beats all
other medicines I ever tried for
coughs, colds, croup and throat and
lung troubles," says D. Scott Currtn,
of Logantoa, Pa. One Minute Cough
Cure is the only absolutely safe cough
remedy which acts immediately.
Mothers everywhere testify to the good
it has done their little oues. Croup is
so sudden id its attacks that the doctor
often arrives too late. It yields at
once to One Minute Cough Cure.
Pleasant to take. Children like it.
Sure cure lor grip, bronchitis,coughs.
Hamilton Drug Oo. *
Very Nicely,
Thank You.
When everybody realizes bow quickly one can
reach Omaha, Denver, Kansas City and St. Louis if
one goes east on the St. Loms Special via Billings and
the Burlington Boute, everybody will go that way.
Meanwhile the St. Louis Special is doing "very
nicely, thank you."
We don't say it is crowded, but it is always wel 1
filled,
1>. 8 . The St. Louis Special via Billings Is tha QUICK
TRAIN to Omaha, Kansas City and St. Louis.
A. BRADT. aosnTj
Bailey Block. Helena. Mont.
H. B. SEQUR, aSMIMAL AaSNT.
Billings, Mont,
AGENTS WANTED
THE BEST
l LAWN
SWINQ
MADE /y W VL-% Laws Swlflgs aad Settees, Ha _
Chair*, Camp Chairs aad Steels,
Ironing Tables. Wash Benches, Etc.
Agents easily make
$5 to $10 iPer Day.
Will furnish samples at re
duced prices to those desiring
agency. Exclusive te rritory
given. Address,
CltarfMd Voodra-Vara 6a.,
CLEARFIELD, PL
10 DAYS FREE TRIAL
Wo Ship on mpppovm! to any person in U. S. <
Canada without a cent deposit, and allow 10 da;
ktree trial. You take absolutely no risk ordering Era
us, as you don't pay » cent if it dont suit
1902 Modfilt Kïï 2 $9 to
1900 and 1901 Models
600 SEOOIB HAID VIEIL!
' ow-Chicago retail store* #a|
ly good as nev........ ww
I taken In trade by
I standard mums,]
IDO ROT BUY töüäffägj
Tires, equipment, sundries and «xvttng j
half regular prices. In our Mg fias aalffi
tains a world of uaeful Inform atfcm Writs!
m'm
idMtj
iwn tori
fltzrotb $ 01
Painters and
Paper Hangers
Do First-Class Work and
Guarantee Satisfaction.
VICTOR. MONT.
Western hotel. :
C HI 8 well known hostelry has been
thoroughly renovate! and refurn
ished. A first-class cook has been
placed in churge of the cuisine. A
share of the public patronage Is re
spectfully solicited.
MRS. E. McINTYRE. Prop.
VICTOR, MONT.
Ravalli House
A. L. MOW ATT, Prop.
Appetizing Meats,
Clean, Comfortable Beds in
Well Furnished Rooms,
Reasonable Rat**.
VICTOR, MONT.
H. A. Briggs
LICENSED
AUCTIONEER
VICTOR, ÜXÆO-TT.

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