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The Western news. [volume] (Stevensville, Mont.) 1890-1977, December 02, 1903, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036207/1903-12-02/ed-1/seq-3/

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..CITY DRAY..
A. E. HART.
AU work- ntrusteA to my care will
be sidedily and satisfactorily done
PRICES REASONABLE.
Etape Oram i ft Beths' Store.
OFFICIAL DIRECTORY.
STATE OFFICIAL«.
©oyernoi. Joseph K Toole.
Lieutenant Govern >r. Frank HlifKius.
Secretary of State. • o M. Hays,
State Auditor. J. H. Calderb^aa.
State Treasurer, A. H. Barrel..
Attorney General lames Donne
Superintendent of Public Instructin' 'V. W.
Welch.
Oblef Justice. Theodore Brantley.
Associate Justices, W. T. Pigotl and Geo. it.
Holloway.
Clerk of Supreme Court. H . G. Kick arts.
Representative in Congress. Caldwell Ed
wards.
Onlted States Senators. W. A. Clark and
Paris Gibson.
COUNTY OFFICIALS.
District Judge, Frederick C. Webster.
Sheriff. Joshua Pond.
County Treasurer. Harvey L. Carter.
County Clerk and Recorder, C. M. Johnson.
Clerk of District Court, J . F. Cone.
Assessor. Arthur Beckwith.
County Attorney, W. P. Baker.
Superintendent of Schools, Kitty Ostermeyer
Coroner, F. M. Lockwood.
Public Administrator, John Campbell.
Surveyor, M. D. Kippen.
County Commissioners, Henry Grover, Geo.
Satterlee, J. U. Overturf,
CiTY OFFICIALS.
Mayor—Miles Romney.
Treasurer—W. O. Fisk.
Attorney—R. Lee McCulloch.
Clerk—Richard C. Parmenter.
Marshal—W. A. Strange.
Night Officer— J. M. Higgins.
Police Magistrate—Frank J. Morris.
Aldermen First Ward—Louis Peterson. U.
S. Page.
Aldermen Second Ward—Geo. H. Taylor. F.
L. Burns.
Aldermen Third Ward—E. A.Trosdalil, .1 J.
Ilowley.
SOCIETIES.
RAVALLI LODGE. No. 38, K. OFP., MEETS
every Tuesday evening at Fonger's Hall,
cor. Main and Third streets. All Knights in
good staudlngcordially invited to visit.
J. M. Higgins, C. O.
C. M. Johnson. K. of K. and S.
HAMILTON, LODGE, NO., 48. I. O. O. F.
meets every Monday night at Odd Fel
lows I all. South Second street. All Brothers
good standing invited to visit.
C. B. Irvint, N, G.
T. L. Adair, R. S.
BITTERROOT ENCAMPMENT, NO. 10. I.O.
O. F., meets first and third Fridays at Odd
Fellows halt. Visiting Brothers invited to
attend. WM. UOMBOUGH, O. P.
J. T. BOARDMAN. Scribe.
IONIC LODGE NO. 38. A. F. & A, M. MEETS
tirst and third Saturdays of each month at
Odd Fellows hall. Second street. Sojourning
Brethren invited to attend.
O. C. COOPER. W. M.
J. J. SOUTW1CK, Sec.
HAMILTON LODGE NO, 20. A. O.U. W .
meets every second and fourth Thursday at
Odd Fellows Hall, at 8 p. m.
F. J. MOhRIS. M. W.
HENRY GROVER, Rec.
CHARITY LODGE. NO. 11. I. O. O F.
meets the second and Fourth Wednesdays
of each month ut Odd Fellows hall.
MRS. M. J. FLETCHER, N. G.
MRS. ADA BURNS, Secretary.
BITTER BOOT TENT K. O. T, M. meets 2nd
and 4t li Friday evenings at Odd Fellows
Hall. Visiting Knights are cordially invited
to attend.
J. M. REINDEAlf, Commander.
MARTIN TINGLEY, Record Keeper.
HAMILTON CAMP NO. 5604. MODERN
Woodmen of America. Meets at Odd
Fellows Hall every Tuesday evening.
E. F. Richards, Clerk. C. O. Coulter, V. C,
PINE CCNE CAMP NO. 754 WOODMEN OF
the World meets every Thursday evening
In Fonger's hall, corner Main and Third
Btreets. O. C. Coulter. C. C
L. J. Watson, Clerk
HAMILTON FEDERAL UNION NO. 109.
A. L. U. meets every Saturday except the
last week of each month when it meets on
Wednesday, at 8:00 p. m. in Fonger's hall,
corner Third and Main streets.
Walter Warren, President.
Harry South, Recording Secretary.
EVENING STAR, No. 58, I. O. O. F. MEETS
every Saturday evening in Miles' Hall.
Darby. AH brothers in good standing in
vited to attend. Chas. Lawrence, N. O.
August Bolleder, Sec.
CORVALLIS LODGE No. 28. A. F. & A. M.
meets every second fourth Saturday
evenings In Masonic hall. Corvallis. Visit
ing brethern in good standing cordially in
vited. R. It. Smithev, W. M.
G. G. Lockwood, Sec.
VICTOR SOCIETIES.
Victor Lodge No. 43 A.F. &A. M.,meets first
and third Saturdays at Appolonio, Watters &
Company's hall, Victor. A cordial invitation
Is extended to visiting members. T. H.
Hanbidge.W.M.: M. D. Fulkerson, Secretary.
Ravalli Lodge No. 711. O.O. F., meets every
Friday at Appolonio, Watters & Co.'s half.
Visiting brotneJs cordially Invited to attend.
W. R. Rickman, N. G.; Jos. Appolonio, Sec
r Y ,c K r i r S nt S°- 35K. O.T. M.. meets first
Barnhill, R. K.
Victor amp No. 5696 M.W.A..meets second,
and fourth Saturdays at A. W. & Co 's hall
S. H. Ault, V. 0. M. M. Williams^Clerk.
Victor Lodge No. 30 A. O, U, W., meets sec
ond and fourth Saturdays at Workman hall
Benry McVey, M. W.; Wm. Tucker.Recorder
Naomi Chapter No, 9 O. E. 8,. meets first
and third Wednesdays of each month at A
W.& Co.'s hall. Mrs Louise Watters, W.M.;
11. D. Fulkerson, Sec.
Charity Lodge No. 6D. of H. meets second
and fourth Saturdays at Workman hall. Mrs.
Recorder Vert " Mrs - Mary E. Gregory,
Bitter Root Hive No. 40 L. O. T. M„ meets
second and fourth Saturday afternoons at
SSS.SufiSA.V'
IITTLE RED MQROCCO SHOE.
.The little red morocco fchoe,
■A-gap where baby's toes peeped through;
Here tiny pigs to market went
In the oid days of sweet content.
The buttons dangling by a thread—
Once touched by fingers, with the dead—
Each straggling one it brings to me
A perfume from life's sacristy.
This tiny shoe without a heel.
Where little piggies used to steal.
To me is more than priceless gem
Plucked from a royal diadem.
It brings from amaranthine shore
The face my loving eyes bent o'er;
It brings, dear heaven! from the night.
Her kiss, her voice, her smile's delight.
ma >' not a mother list
Whose ears are bended to the mist
That rises out of shadow land
Made glad by the angelic band?
Their voices come on wings of air
To greet her. patient, waiting there,
Enrapt with this morocco shoe
A-gap where baby's toes peeped through.
There comes no sweetness like the song
Of love's Invisibles, who throng
The sacred cloisters of the heart.
Unknown to all the world apart.
So, 1 may list the whispers soft.
Waft to me from the throne aloft—
Ah! only heard by me, the while
y mind recalls the baby's smile.
—Horace Seymour Keller, in N. Y. Sun.
A Double-Barreled
=_Ruse=—
By J. C. PLUMMER
(Uopyrlght, 1903, by Daily Story Pub. Co.)
C APT. PRAY gazed placidly around
from the bridge of the tramp steam
er Grimsby, moored alongside the huge
elevator, when Mr. Hogg, chief officer,
accosted him.
"Smiley is in trouble, sir," he said.
Capt. Pray frowned. "Out with it,"
said he.
"You see," began Mr. Hogg, "Smiley
used to run on the Pillman boats, and
on one of his trips to Baltimore he
meets a young lady. One thing led to
another, and the first thing Smiley
knows he is engaged to be married to
her. Then he leaves the Pillman line
and goes on the Grimsby in the Black
sea trade, and never expecting to come
to Baltimore again, he gets engaged to
a girl in Birkenhead."
"That's nothing," remarked the cap
tain, disappointedly; "all sailors do
that."
Mr. Hogg continued: "Smiley had a
quarrel with the second engineer of the
Pillman boat, and he knowing all about
the Baltimore engagement, writes the
girl of the Birkenhead woman and also
says Smiley is coming to Baltimore on
the Grimsby."
"Well," snapped the captain, as- Mr.
Hogg paused.
"When the pilot came aboard at the
capes he hands Smiley a letter from
the Baltimore girl raking him fore and
aft, and saying she would have him ar
rested for breach of promise as soon as
the ship moored."
Capt. Pray glared at his chief officer.
"Where am I going to get a chief en
gineer if Smiley is put in Jail?" he
roared, "and the Grimsby barely time
to load and save her charter."
"I've thought of that," said Mr.
Hogg, sadly, "but some years ago
Smiley did me a favor, and he expects
me to get him out of this bally bad
mess."
"If it wasn't for detaining the steam
er; I'd let him get out of it in his own
bloody way," growled the captain, "but
something must be done. Ha!" He
slapped the rail sharply. "I have • It.
I'm good at these things! I have it,
Hogg."
Mr. Hogg gazed admiringly at his
commander.
"Smiley must fall 3ick," announced
the captain, briefly.
"Sick!" ejaculated Mr. Hogg.
"Not real sick, you swab," snapped
the captain, "but make believe sick.
Lay in his bunk and groan. She'd never
haul off a sick man to jail."
Mr. Smiley was not enthusiastic at the
plan, but Capt. Pray waxed eloquent.
"You'll lay in Jail until you rot,
Smiley," said the captain. "You
haven't the money to pay the lawyers
Jwho'll swarm around you like tugs
about a stranded steamer."
"How long must I stay in my bunk?"
asked Mr. Smiley.
"Until the Grimsby pulls out o' dock,"
replied the captain, firmly. With
gloomy forebodings of evil Mr. Smiley
turned in.
"Now, Hogg," exclaimed the captain,
"you go to the girl's house and tell her
Smiley is confined to his bunk. Don't
lie. I'm a chapel member, and I won't
have any lying done. Tell her it may be
smallpox or yellow fever. Stick to
something, Hogg, but don't lie."
"You've a great head, sir," remarked
Mr. Hogg. "I'll work It all right."
"When you come to the catching part
put on all steam, Hogg," advised the
captain. "We don't want her coming
to the steamer, but be careful not to
lie."
"I'll be careful, sir," said Mr. Hogg,
winking his eye, and he departed on
his diplomatic errand.
Captain Pray then walked on tip
toe to Smiley's bunk.
"How are you feeling, my poor fel
low?" he asked, in subdued tones.
"I'm all right, sir," replied the Inva
lid, sulkily,
"Sh!" said the captain; "don't talk.
I'll get you some beef tea."
"This here is only make-belief sick
ness, sir," expostulated the engineer,
•aeasily.
"See here. Smiley," said the captain,
sternly, "this whole thing is done for
your benefit It's a kind of deception
Mr. Hogg and I are playing, and I want
to keep as close to the truth as I can, for
I'm a chapel member and Mrs. Hogg is
a religious woman. We'll have to «nah»
this sick business ss near to truth as we
can."
Mr. Smiley sighed.
1 "After you'?* takes your beef tea 111
give you: a nice dose of cod-liver on,"
announced the captaip.
MY. Smiley disgustedly swallowed the
oil, and then the captain, after sta
tioning a burly seaman at the state
room to give the alarm in case of a
crisis, went on deck.
He had Just reached the bridge when
Mr. Hogg excitedly rushed up to him.
"They're coming," he gasped.
"Who?" inquired the captain.
"The young lady; and she's fetching
a doctor with her."
"You have botched the whole thing,
Hogg," groaned the captain. "Now we
are in a devil of a mess."
"Told her your identical words, sir."
explained Mr. Hogg. "I said it might
be catching, and she says: 'I'll come
an „ t '. nurse ^ n ''> an d bring a doctor."
"You didn't come out strong enough
on it's being catching," said the cap
tain, in despair.
"Indeed, I did, sir," said Mr. Hogg,
wringing his hands, "and she says: 'l'!I
nurse my poor Henry if he has all the
Plagues of Egypt.' "
At that momenta tall, reddish-haired
young woman and a slender man with
spectacles on his nose walked on deck
and asked for the captain.
The two officers sheepishly descended
from the bridge and approached the
couple.
"Oh, captain!" cried the lady, "Is
Henry worse?"
He s no better," replied the cap
tain, guardedly.
"I've come to nurse him, and ha«*,
brought a doctor," exclaimed the lady.
"Take me to him."
"Some sicknesses are catching," said
the captain, hesitating.
"Orful," chimed In Mr. Hogg.
I m not afraid when Henry's life **
in danger," she persisted. "Take me to
him."
The two officers, with perturbed coun
tenances, led the way below, and th»
lady pushed the burly man on guard
away as if he was of straw.
"Henry, are you very sick?" she
asked.
Mr. Smiley caught the glowering per>
of the captain, and said, feebly, that i; -
felt very ill, which was not 1er from th
truth, as the mixture of oil and bei
tea was not having a pleasing c!V' ct.
"I have come to nurse you, Henry,"
she said, "and I have brought the doc
tor to examine you."
Mr. Smiley turned very pale as the
doctor stepped forward and asked him
to put out his tongue. Then he tapped
his chest and asked hint to draw a deep
breath.
"Good Heavens!" exclaimed the doc
tor, with concern; "let me feel your
pulse.
"This is very serious," he continued,
placing his ear to where Mr. Smiley's
heart was supposed to be.
"What's the matter?" asked Mr.
Smiley in a cold sweat of terror.
"Where does this young man's family
reside?" asked the doctor, with solem
nity.
"Is there something the matter with
me?" asked the engineer, piteously.
"Am I going to die?"
"Be quiet, poor fellow," said the doc
tor, sadly.
Capt. Pray, with a pallid face,
dragged the doctor from the stateroom.
"Do you mean to say he's sick?" he
asked, hoarsely.
"He may be dead before morning,"
replied the doctor.
"He was well enough a little while
ago."
"My dear captain, some illnesses come
like the flash of a gun," replied the doc
tor, "but I haven't given up hope. We
may save him."
"I suppose you've plenty of tar on the
ship."
"Lots," excitedly replied the captain.
"Make two large plasters and place
one on his back and the other on his
breast," said the doctor.
"I'll do it," asseverated the captian.
The doctor then persuaded the young
lady to go home, as the patient was in
good hands, and they left.
It was a bad night for Mr. Smiley, as
between the tar plasters and the large
doses of cod-liver oil which the captain
insisted on administering at intervals,
he had much to bear, but the next morn
ing the doctor reported him as better,
but not out of danger.
The captain accompanied the doctor
on deck, and, pointing to the spouts
which were emptying the grain into the.
hold of the steamer, said, earnestly:
"See here, doctor, I've got to sail to
morrow and I can't'sail without an en
gineer. Is it likely Smiley will be able
to be up by to-morrow?"
"Mr. Smiley," replied the doctor, "has
a remarkable disesae. It comes quick,
and either kills or goes as quickly.
Thanks to your knowledge and prompt
use of cod-liver oil, I think he will be as
well as ever he was by to-morrow."
The next morning when the doctor
boarded the Grimsby the assistant en
gineer had steam up, and everything was
in readiness for a start. He hurried be
low. and, examining the engineer, said:
"You can get up, Mr. Smiley. You are
entirely well, but you have had a narrow
escape. Here's a letter for you."
While the Grimsby was steaming down
the bay. Mr. Smiley read by the sunlight
gleaming in a port the following let
ter:
"Dear Mr. Smiley: I never intended
marrying you. I was racking my brain
for a reason to break it off when I heard
of your treachery, and I resolved to scare
you, so I sent that letter by the pilot.
When Mr. Hogg came with his story
of your sickness, I saw through it and,
■e-lth a medical friend, gave you a little
scar" You were not sick In the least,
but you were awfu j g' Ted. I hope the
tar will stick longer than your prom
is«*. Yours forgivingly,
"MAGGIE."
Comparison of the ages of 1,500 uni
versity profeaso- î in Germany, Austria
and Switzerland shows the average to be
53 jrtn.
Pope Ptaa X. wears a watch of Amerl
ft r
e
Anaconda Copper Mining
LUMBER DEPARTMENT.
Mill and Wholesale Offices
At Hamilton, Montana.
O UR mill is one of the most complete in the West. It is
fitted with modern machinery in all departments. Our
planing mill and sash and door factory arc* complete, and we
guarantee satisfaction on ail classes of work, from mining tim
bers to fine interior finish

3 *
W E operate the only logging railroad in Montana. Our
logs are delivered to the mill clean and dry. This method
of loggiing makes it possible for us to fill orders for special
lengths and sizes on SM hours' notice. Special attention given
to this class of work.
Manufacturers of
Band=
LUMBER,
Sashes and Doors,
Cedar Shingles and
Cedar Posts
Estimates Promptly Furnished on all Classes of
Building. Our Large Stock ot Seasoned Lumber
Makes it Possible for us to fill Large Orders with
Promptness. We are Prepared to Give Quick
Service on Special Orders.
Correspondence Solicited.
Yard and Local Offices at Hamilton, Anaconda
and Butte.

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