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The Western news. (Stevensville, Mont.) 1890-1977, February 13, 1907, Image 1

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THE WESTERN NEWS.
VOLUME XVJI
HAMILTON, MONTANA, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 11)07.
NUMBER 17
$1.20 Each for Y our
DOLLARS.
You may think this is "Hot Air." but it is not, it is true.
We are giving $1.20 worth of value for $1 in ladies' and
gentlemen's underwear, sweaters, furs, caps and all
winter goods. These goods are all new, but to handle
them over means expense and room. To avoid the ex
pense and gain room, we are offering them at a
20 Per Cent Reduction Until Feb. 10th.
Our goods are always sold at a very close margin and
with 20 per cent reduction affords you the opportunity of
satisfying your needs along this line at a big saving.
If yon want real bargains get in on our 20 per cent
discount sale.
Appolonio, Watters $ Co. Sana.
Ravalli Flour
The highest achievement of modern milling
methods. The whitest flour made bynatural
means. Every grain of wheat thoroughly
washed; gradual reduction oil many rolls;
currents of pure air on stock at every stage
in milling. Sold by the best grocers.
MADE ON THEIR NEW MILLS BY
Hamilton Flour Mill Company
CITIZENS' STATE BANK
Hamilton, Montana,
Capital Paid in $30,000
J. L Humble, President T. A Chaffin, Vice President
O. C. Cooper, Cashier
DIRECTORS
T. A. Chaffin A. Christian R. A. O'Hara
A. L. Bank O. C. Cooper
Transacts a General Eanking Business
J. L. Humble
J. H. Watts
Look for the Red Label
Patronize Home Industry
CHAMPION
BEST BIT CIGAR MADE
RAVALLI
BEST 10 CENT CIGAR MADE
BANKABLE
BEST 5 CENT CIGAR MADE
Made by the Hamilton Cigar Factory
§ Beef, Pork, Mutton, Veal, Etc., Etc.
Fish and Game
in season.
ROLLER SKATING RINK
-WERNER 8 CRABTREE, Proprietors-
Open from 2 until 5 p. m. and from
7:30 p. m. until 10:30 p. m., daily
HAMILTON,
•North First Street.
MONTANA
l CITY MEAT MARKETf
V OPPOSITE BiVALJLI COUNTY BANK. Û
y <
Is prepared to fjruish the retail and wholesale trade b
M with the choicest :: ;; •• •• •• .. k'
) »
g
WAKEHAM & THORNING, Proprietors. &
é
THINGS LOOK BRIGHT
IN BITTER ROOT
Valley Will Witness Unpar*
alleled Prosperity. Big
Canal Means Much.
Residents of the Bitter Root valley
who have visited in Missoula during
the oast three days express the opinion
that the coming soring and summer
will be the most prosperous in the his
tory of that famous orchard, farming
and lumbering region, says Monday's
Missoulian. The prosperity that will
come as a natural result of the con
struction of the Milwaukee road, and
the line change of the Northern Paci
fic in Western Montana, will naturally
have its effect on that region.
The contractors will buy all the sup
plies they can get in Western Montana
and there will be a ready sale for
Bitter Root products. Railroad men
say that the idea that increased acre
age should be planted this year in
order to meet the demand of several
thousand workmen who will be
brought here, cau not be too strongly
impressed on the farmers. The Bitter
Root valley is one of the most re
sourceful districts in the west. It is
noted for its bountiful crops and the
high grade of its products. This year
there will be greater demand for them
than ever before.
The construction of the big canal of
the Bitter Root District Irrigation
company, definite announcement of
which was made some time ago, will
be one of the contributing- factors in
the development of the valley this
year. Construction work on a small
scale has already commenced. The
canal will have a capacity of 350
second feet, sufficient to irrigate about
35,000 acres. All of the land will be
irrigated by this means is that which
up to this time has produced little be
cause it has been impossible to get
water onto it. It is rich laud, how
ever, and when it is reclaimed the re
sult will be a large increase in the
products of the valley.
The source of water supply will be
Lake Como. Careful attention has
been given to the natural possibilities
of the water power afforded, and com
plete reports and estimates have been
made by Chief Engineer Lord. Be
cause of a 436 foot fall between the
lake and the Bitter Root river a small
amount of water will develop a great
power at a small cost. This power
transmitted, electrically, to Anaconda,
Butte or the Coeur d'Alenes would be
easily salable at a profitable figure.
The state lands in the region of
Three Mile creek are being carefully
surveyed by the company engineers
with a view of selecting some of the
best pieces. If a sufficient number of
acres of first class land, lying conven
iently in one compact body can be
secured, a purchase may be made, in
spite of the high price of $10 per acre
required by the constitutional enact
ment of the state. The company has
estimated that the possibilities of de
veloping to advantage a large number
of acres in one body, lying conven
iently and consisting of first class
soil, will offset largely the high price.
The lateral ditch from Burnt Fork
would be made large enough to irri
gate this land, and enough water
would be kept from the lands above to
supply this need.
The company believes that its go
ing into the valley, even with its
smaller project, is the most important
single event in the history of the Bit
ter Root, insofar as the prosperity and
development of the valley is con
cerned. The spending during the
next year of hundreds ot thousands of
dollars in construction alone means
much to the immediate prosperity of
every one of that region,
a
B
to
up
a
W
tne
South,
awing pro
.nd
.lack
Will Observe Francis E. Willard
Memorial Day.
The W. C. T. U. will observe Francis
E. Willard memorial day, February
17. The service will be held in
Methodist Episcopal Church
at 3:00 p. ui., and the foji 0
gram will be rendered;
T Ch ° rUS :...................Coronation
Invocation.........Rev. w M . W
Scripture Read.ng.....Rev. KneeD
Pra > er ...............Rev. B. C.P
Quartette
Twenty minute address.......
Rev. Thea. ' * • *
0010 .............. Misa Kit Barker
Recitation, Francis Will» Drayton
............... y rd.....
I Music...,........... -<mtj aa Dunham
I Chorus.........Rear ......Orchestra
I Benediction...... p ue T' ae Perishing
•ev. P. j) Hartman
of
no
in
The West era , T
year if paid in ^ ew
advance.
0 aly $2.00 per
TO DEVELOP CLAIMS
NEAR VICTOR
ing Company.
Arrangements have just been com
pleted for the incorporation of the
Hamilton Mining company. The com
pany has been capitalized for $1,500,
000, and is incorporated under the laws
of Idaho. The directors of the com
pany are Dr. J. E. St. Jean of Wallace,
Idaho, president; J. W. Carter of Wal
lace, Idaho, vice president; J. B. Wil
cox of Wallace, Idaho, secretary and
treasurer; and R. Eee McCulloch and
O. E. Smith of Hamilton.
Tne company has been organized
for the purpose of developing a group
of claims near Victor. The property
of the company consists of six full
claims, situated seven and one-half
miles north from Victor, in the
neighborhood of the old Curlew mine.
Development work, which has been
done on the property, consists of va
rious shafts and open cuts which have
opened up tne vein. The main work
ings consist in a shaft of a depth of 70
feet, from the bottom of which a 58
foot crosscut tunnel has been run.
This crosscut, it is said, has shown
a fine vein of high grade ore, which
averages from 6 to 7 per cent copper,
18 ounces in silver and values in gold
amounting to $4 80. The lower tunnel
which has been drifting on the vein
for a distance of 65 feet, is now in high
grade ore about 35 teet below the cross
cut tunnel. It is the intention of the
company to sink a shaft to a depth of
300 feet, following the dip of the vein.
RS. BEAVERS SURPRISED
On last Tuesday evening a large
number of the members of the Modern
B rotherhood of America gathered at
the home of Mrs. Thos. Beavers, the
president of that order, loaded down
with lunch baskets and other things
to pass away a few pleasant hours,
hours. The event was a complete sur
prise on Mrs. Beavers, and was gotten
up in honor of that lady's departure
for Washington. She was presented
with a silver cake basket as a token of
the esteem by which she is held by
the members of that order. Cards and
dancing were indulged in until a late
hour and then refreshments were
served, and all report having had a
most enjoyable time. The following is
list of those present: Mr. and Mrs.
W illiam Hicks, Mr, and Mrs. W. P.
Hall, Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Houchcns,
Mr. and Mrs. J. W'. Stout, Mr. and
Mrs. J. W. Leatherman, Mr. and Mrs.
John Lake, Mr. and Mrs. Lew Wil
liams, Mr. and Mrs. John Anderson,
Mr. and Mrs. George Witcomb, Mr.
and Mrs. Frank Cotrell, Mrs. Bullock,
Mrs. Higman, Mrs. Houston of Ana
conda, Miss Fannie Poarcher, Miss
Ruby Leatherman, Miss May Bucy;
Messrs. Sylvester Irvin, William
Irvin, Benjamin George, E. E. Smith,
William Sheridan, Thomas Skelton
and Wesley Swayze.
FARMERS' INSTITUTE MEETINGS
Farmers' institute meetings are
being arranged to be held in Ravalli
county next month. Meetings will he
held in Darby ori Friday, March 8,
Grantsdale, Saturday, March 9; and
Stevensville, Monday, March 11, The
speakers are sent out by the state
board of farmers' institutes. Those
who will be present are Prof. E. T.
Tannett of the Bozeman agricultural
college, I. E. O'Donnell of Billings,
and Governor R. B. Smith of Bi
Fork. When opportunity offers
of the lectures will be illus
the steropticon views,
ers are persons of
many lines of a
no farmer or
in the ?
sta
d
some
.rated by
hese speak
experience along
/(Cultural work,*and
Ottfeiüess »«an interested
-gf'chitViral development of the
Cab p.rford to be absent. The
evening 'meetings will be semi-popular
in chav^cter, and will be of interest
and yalue to every person in the corn
unity. The meetings held here in
the past have been very successful
and are growing more so every year.
Stray Notice.
One red cow with some white, both
earB cropped, left one split, not de
horned, no brand to be seen. One
white roan heifer two years old, de
horned, no ear marks, branded on left
ribs but cannot make the brand out.
One red heifer dehorned, but no ear
marks, branded on left ribs but can
not make out brand. Owner please
call, pay charges and take cattle away.
R. PARKHURST,
15.4t Victor, Mont.
RAILROAD COMMISSION
BILL PASSES HOUSE
And ° 0eS t0 the Senate-Many Biils Receive
Favorable Report that Interest Ravalli
People-Work of the Week.
Helena, Feb. 12 .—After a livelygde- ;
bate the house has passed the railroad
commission bill by a vote of 42 to 12, a ;
number of the members being absent, j
On its final passage two democrats, ;
Whiteside and Swindlehurst, voted j
with the majority, both explaining j
that they recognized the need for some
such legislation and believed the bill
the best that could be secured from
this session.
The minority offered several amend
ments to the bill before the roll was
called, but these were all voted down.
In explaining their votes, Duncan
and O'Connor said they could not con
sistently support the measure because
they believed the governor should be
given the right to name the commis
sioners.
As soon as the bill was passed it
was hurried over to the senate, where
it was iniroduced and referred to the
committee on railways. The latter
met in the Helena hotel to consider
the measure. An early report from
the bill is expected.
During the Week.
Aside from the consideration of the
railroad and warehouse commission
bill, the week has been, on the whole,
a rather uneventful one in both of the
branches. Several bills have met their
defeat, the most important being the
proposed Daly county, and the measure
increasing the salaries of the elective
state officials. The house witnessed
two warm debates "ver the bill requir
ing the placing of paddle wheels in
ditches for the prelection of fish. Af
ter being amended in several respects,
the bill was recommended f _«r passage
by the house committee of the whole.
The senate through the adoption of
an adverse report, killed Senator Mc
Carthy's bill to prevent hasty divorces
and also sent to its death house bill
107, relative to the filing of amended
articles of incorporation.
Both the senate and the house took
official notice of the death of former
Governor Preston H. Leslie through
the adoption of resolutions of regret
anil the appointment of committees to
arrange for a state funeral. The
members of the family, feeling that it
would be against the wishes of Gover
nor Leslie, declined the proffer of a
state funeral, but made concessions of
such a nature that it will be semi-of
ficial 111 character.
Among the more notable bills intro
duced during the week was one by
Senator Everett providing for a maxi
mum rate to be charged by railroads
for the transportatson of coal. The
state printing contract also came up
in the senate in the form of a résolu
tion looking to an investigation as to
why a contract had not been signed.
In the lower branch, house bill 16,
relative to the publication of the state
treasurer's report, after being amend
ed so that it must be published in at
least two daily newspapers published
at the seat of government, was passed.
The usual grist of bills was intro
duced in both branches, and the 306
mark has nearly been reached in the
lower branch. In the senate, the 100
limit is b-'hötf pressed.
Legislative Notes of Local Interest.
The prospect is bright that relief
will be afforded for the congested Con
dition of affairs in the Füürth judicial
district. Although the bills by Rom
ney in the senate and Beckwith in the
house, providing for the creation of a
new judicial district and Marshall s
bill providing for an additional judge
have been lost in the shuffle, all having
been indefinitely postponed. A bill
introduced by Senator Martien, pro
viding for dispensing with one judge
in the Helena district has passed the
upper house. The plan is to amend
this bill so as to provide for an ad
ditional judge in the Missoula district
who shall maintian chambers in Ham
ilton and who shall be appointed by
the governor. If the judge maintains
chambers in Hamilton he must, per
force, reside there and thus the original
purpose will be achieved in a little
different way. This plan appears to
be satisfactory to all concerned and
will doubtless have the solid support
of all western Montana members
A bill introduced by the sanitary
committee has passed both houses ap
propriating $20,WO to defray theex
<
.
penses of Dr. Ricketts while conduct
ing an investigation as to the origin
of spotted fever.
The horticultural deficiency bill pas
sed by the house was amended in the
senate so as to include an item for
$11.40, due J. O. Read of the state
board.
Senate bill No. 40, by Romney, pro
viding for an increase of ihe general
school levy and raising the limit of
special levies for school purpose that
may be levied, it desired by the people
of any district, from five to ten mills,
last I' riday passed the senate commit
tee of the whole by a vote of 14 to 7.
1 he bill as amended by the judiciary
committee provided that the general
levy should be raised from two to three
mills, but was amended in committee
of the whole by increasing the levy to
four mills. The bill passed the senate
Monday.
Whiteside's bill providing for the
establishment of a sub-experiment
station in connection with the state
agricultural experiment station at
Bozeman will probably be passed. If
so it will undoubtedly be located in
the Bitter Root valley. Mr. F. D.
N chols of the Bitter Root District Ir
rigation company, who arrived in
Helena yesterday has offered to donate
onehalf of the land needed for a site
provided the citizens of Ravalli county
will donate the other half. About
fifteen acres wi;l be required fora site.
MUCH MONEY FOR THE
MONTANA SCHOOLS
Superintendent of Public In
struction Harmon Makes
Apportionment.
Nearly a quarter of a million dollars
is to be apportioned among the twenty
's of Montana for the pur
lg the schools t he ensuing
ipportionment was made
by Superintendent of Public Instruc
tion Harmon 011 the basis of $3 for
each child of school age under the
census of September, 1906 Silver
Bow gets the largest amount, Cascade
the next largest anil Lewis and Clark
the third largest. The apportionment
shows there are 72,498 children of
school age in Montana. The money
seven con
pose of ru 1
year.
Tin
was distributed a>
follows:
No.
Per
Counties—
Children
Capita
Beaverhead .....
...... 1.545
$ 4,695
Broadwater ....
...... 752
2 316
'arbon..........
...... 3,170
9,810
Cascade .........
.....6,7(»1
20,283
Chouteau.......
...... 2,559
8.677
Custer ..........
..... 1,753
5.559
Dawson .........
...... 1,313
3,939
' zar Lodge......
......3,163
9,489
i'ergus.........
...... 3,023
9,069
Flathead........
...... 4,547
13.641
Gallatin........
.....3,845
11,262
Granite.........
...... 950
2,850
Jefferson........
...... 1,223
3,669
Lewis and Clark.
15.555
Madison.........
......2.105
6.315
Meagher.......
...... 579
1.737
Missoula.......
.....3,597
10,791
Park...........
...... 2,753
8,259
Powell..........
....... 1,196
3,588
Ravalli........
.......2,630
7,890
Rosebud.........
....... 584
2,052
Sanders .........
....... 640
2,052
Silver Bow......
.......12,375
37,125
Sweet Grass.....
....... 1,003
3,009'
Teton...... ....
....... 1,079
3,237
Valley..........
....... 1,366
4,098
Yellowstone ....
....... 2,552
7,659
Total.........
.......72,598 $217,594
Wlfe Wanted.
Widow woman that needs a good
husband to care for her farm, would
do well to read this notice. Young
man, well educated, with good habits
and kind disposition is willing to
correspond with the right woman.
Address, S. A. S„ care The Western
News. 17-2t
Stray Notice.
A brown mare came to my place
about September, brand small S on
left stifle, saddle marks, weight about
900 pounds. Prove ownership and pay
oharges. L. McKinney, Darby, Mont..

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