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The Western news. [volume] (Stevensville, Mont.) 1890-1977, October 21, 1910, Image 1

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'AtÔ'OOg IBOJJO^SIH
>2.00 » YtflH
Issued Twice a AYeelc
i Ht WEOltKlN 1NE.WS
(2.00 II YEAR
Every Tuesday and Friday
VOLUME XX.
. HAMILTON, MONTANA, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21, 1910
NO. 63
s
FIRST CORN PRIZE
EXPOSITION HELD HERE YESTER
DAY WITH THIRTEEN ENTRIES
FROM RAY ALLI-MISSOULÂ.
of
of
The James J. Hill corn exposition
was held in the chamber of com
merce building yesterday. There were
13 entries all told, made by boys from
Victor and Hamilton. Missoula coun
ty exhibits were to have been includ
ed but none came through.
M. L. Wilson, superintendent of the
experimental farm of the Great
Northern railway, located at Fallon,
was judge and made the awards. The
scoring resulted as follows:
First prize, $10—David Hope of
Hamilton. Score'78 1-2.
Second prize, $8—Brice Rickman of
Victor. Score 70 1-2.
Third prize, $7—R. Pollinger of
Victor. Score 67.
Fourth prize, $1—Charles Powell of
Victor. Score 64.
Fifth prize, $1—Lawrence Watters
Of Victor. Score 60.
Sixtti prize $1—Esther Howerton
of Hamilton. Score 57.
Seventh prize, $1—Ralph Powell of
Victor. Score 56.
Eight prize, $1—Herbert Hobby
Hamilton. Score 54.
Nintli prize, $1—Earl Welliver
Hamilton. Score 53.
The other entries were made by Sid
ney Albright, Ed Croughan, Sam
Downing and Lawrence Fairbairn,
whose exhibits were all good.
Those from the corn belt who view
ed the exhibits were fairly surprised
at the excellent showing.
This corn exposition was the result
of the offering of $1,000 in cash for
county and state prizes to Montana
pupils for specimens of corn during
the year 1910. For each county of
Montana prizes amounting $25 are of
fered. The Montana championship
includes a cash prize of $100. For state
prizes an amount aggregating $50 is
offered for .prizes for corn grown at
an elevation of 2,500 feet or under, at
elevations from 2,500 to 3,000 feet, also
the same amount for specimens
grown at altitudes above 3,000 feet.
A special championship prize of $25
was offered for corn matured at the
highest altitude.
The prizes were for 10 selected ears
offered in competition by each one
making entry. Each entry was se
lected from an eighth of an acre or
more.
The judging was according to the
following scale: General appearance.
20 points; trueness to type, 20; ma
turity and condition, 25; vitality-ger
minating power, 25, and shelling per
centage 10.
Mr. Wilson Addresses Schools.
Immediately after luncheon Mr.
Wilson, upon invitation of Superin
tendent Schwarm, addressed the pu
pils of the eighth grade and high
school on the subject of "Corn Grow
ing and Dry Farming in Montana."
Mr. W'ilson explained the manner and
purpose of the dry farming experi
ments and told the method of grow
ing things without water. He also
went into detail concerning the use of
corn. In part he said: "The aver
age person in this country is ignorant
of the many uses of cor». Hardly
anyone realizes that when he licks the
back of a postage stamp he tastes
corn. There are about 125 uses to
which corn is put. Until the last pure
food law was passed, when anyone put
maple syrup on h:s pancakes in the
morning be was using corn syrup in
stead of maple. One of the minor, but
unusual uses, to which corn is put is
the stopping up of holes in warships
made by bullets. A chemist in Wash
ington was experimenting with corn
and accidentally discovered that a
substance made with the interior of
the corn stalks would expand w r hen
coming in contact with water. This
was just the thing that the navy want
ed and it is now being used by almost
every country in the world. A horse
the remains of the
C.
feed made from
kernel after the oil has been removd
is used by the armies on a march, as j
it is light, healthy and nourishing.
PHONE exchange at darby.
,
l
j
Material and apparatus for a tele
Dhone exchange was shipped to Darby
yesterday by the Rocky Mountain Bell
Telephone company. This company
will immediately install an exchange
at Darby, located in George Miles'
store. Contracts have already been
signed up for 30 phones. A spelndid
showing 1er a town the size of Darby.
UtSI EVENING'S MIN
COLLIDED WITH TEAM
OCCUPANTS OF RIO ESCAPE WITH
SLIGHT INJURIES—TEAM
IS KILLED.
The southbound train last evening
crashed into a double rig at Dea
Nayer's crossing, a mile south of
Stevensville. The team was killed and
the carriage demolished, but all the
occupants, consisting of Mrs. Johnson
Daugherty and daughter, Mrs. Floyd
Daugherty and two sons and Mrs.
Dodge, miraculously escaped with
slight injuries.
The folk were picked up by the
trainmen and taken back to Stevens
ville, the train then proceeding to
Hamilton, arriving here nearly an
hour late.
CORVALLIS NEWS NOTES.
Corvallis, Oct. 20.—Teddy Cochran,
who has been ill with typhoid fever, is
Improving.
A. Wagy left Tuesday for Fort Scott,
Kansas, where he will visit his daugh
ter, Mrs. McVey. during the winter.
Mrs. M. J. Kelley and children left
this week for Tacoma, Wash., where
they will join Mr. Kelley, who is in
business there.
Don't fail to attend the oyster sup
per in Slack's hall next Saturday even
ing.
Miss Margaret Slack, represented the
Corvallis W. C. T. U. at the W. C. T.
convention at Billings last week.
Miss Slack will visit at other Montana
cities before returning home.
Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Carls came up
from Stevensville Sunday for a visit
with relatives. Congratulations are ex
tended to them from many friends in
this community.
The social given by the fifth and
sixth grades Friday evening was a
success, both socially and financially,
the grades clearing $29.
John Watts, John Christy and Har
ry Neifus left Monday for a hunt on
the east range.
Lee and Mason * Simmons, Dave
Washburn, C. Chaffin and Harry Mad
dox re turned Monday froi a hunt
ing excursion to Dominick lakes,
bringing home one lone deer.
Rev. Mr. Rickman of Washington,
will conduct Baptist services in the
Presbyterian church Sunday morning
and evening.
William Johnson is this week exca
vating for a barn, to be built on the
land he recently purchased from Ben
ton Goff.
Next Sunday is Yeoman's day at the
Methodist church and special services,
including special music, will be ren
dered, to which everyone is invited.
Mrs. Charles Hunt and baby, who
have ben visiting at the Milt Chaffin
home, returned to Spokane this week.
I
I
!
THE BLACK M'INTOSH
A BIRD OF PROFIT
Yesterday J. O. Read received Major
Boy, a likely son of Major Meddler,
whose register number is 149,145, and
who was a prize winner at the South
Dakota state fair last year. Major
Boy was sired May 26 of this year and
is a Poland China of most aristocrat
ic lineage. He came by express from
Sioux Falls and is now comfortably
installed at the Read hog yards.
Hogs, from which hams and bacon
are extracted, or "black Mclntoshes,"
as "J. O." terms them, are hogs now
adays. Most of the time during the
past year the price of pork, live weight,
has hovered around ten cents and there
is big profit in them at that.
Thanks to the progressive breeders
a high-grade of stock is maintained
throughout the valley.
POOR PRAY; HE'S ON
LABOR'S BLACKLIST NOW
Pray has been put on the blacklist
of congressmen, prepared by the
American Federation of Labor for his
vote against union labr on the Hughes
ap
amendment to the sundry civil
propriation bill,
The Hughes amendment provided
that no part of the $200,000 appropriat
ed for the prosecution of criminal cor
porations and trusts should be spent
in the prosecution of a labor organiza
tion for entering into an agreement
....... .... ................ .... ~——
having in view the increasing of wages
shortening of hours or bettering of the
conditions of labor, and Pray VOTED
AGAINST THE AMENDMENT AND
FOR THE PROSECUTION OF LABOR
UNIONS SEEKING TO BETTER
THEIR CONDITION—Firemen and
Enginemen's Magazine.
THE POLITIGAL LINEUP
IS ABOUT COMPLETE
DEMOCRATIC, REPUBLICAN, SO
CIALIST, NON-PARTISAN, AND
INDEPENDENT.
The regular democratic, republican
and socialist county tickets have been
filed with the county clerk and re
corder. In addition to these a num
ber of petitions have been filed nom
inating non-partisan judicial and in
dependent candidates. The lineup for
the election is now probably complete
unless some more threatened "inde
pendent" candidacies should develop.
In addition to the county tickets the
democrats have nominated the follow
ing candidates for constables:
Ward township—C. A. Bailey and J.
M. Higgins.
Edwards township—George R.
Waldo.
Skalkaho township— F. V. See and
J. A. Warren.
Corvallis township—Thomas Ran
dolph and James E. Craddock.
For constables the republicans have
nominated :
Ward township— G. E. Faduloff and
D. A. Bishop.
Corvallis township— C. B. Cates.
Stevens township—Cal Cook and
George F. Johnson.
The non-partisan judiciary law in
eludes the office of justice of the peace
and under its provisions the follow
ing candidates have been nominated by
petition :
Darby, G. W. Solleder; Hamilton,
A. J. White and E. C. Whaley; Victor,
T. J. Patty; Stevensville, Moses H.
Baker and Solyman Sedgwick.
Two "independent" candidates for
county attorney have been nominated
by petition. These are Judge George
W. Reeves and former City Attorney
Charles S. Wagner. Rumor has it that
Paul Anchling may also run for
county attorney.
Judge Reeves' Whirlwind Campaign.
That the race for county attorney
evidenced by the following special dis
patch that appears in the Missoulian
Wednesday:
Judge Reeves is conducting a whirl
wind campaign for election to the of
is attracting considerable attention is
Kw Uiù fnll nirin (r anûpî'j!
fice of county attorney of Ravalli
county. Owing to the fact that he is a
little weak on locomotion he has sta-.
tioned himself at the corner of Main
and Second streets, where he greets all
who pass in the interests of his can
didacy. He was a little late in getting
into the race but, to use his own
words, he is certainly "burning the
wood" now that he is started. "I am
burning the woods before me and the
bridges behind me," stated the judge
today. "Things look fine at the pres
ent time, and I have them all going at
a fast clip. And when you are talk
ing about flying starts, why I have
one that makes the Philadelphia Ath
letics' getaway sink into insignifi
cance. Judge Reeves has many loyal
friends in the Bitter Root valley, and
not an hour of the day passes that he
is not holding an impromptu recep
tion on his corner.
STATE SCHOOL LANDS
CAN'T BE CONDEMNED
Helena, Oct. 19.—The supreme court
today, in a decision in a case which
came from Sanders county, held that
school lands cannot be condemned by
the usual process of law, but must be
offered and sold to the highest bidder,
at not less than $10 an acre. One
Steele attempted to have the land con
demned under the eminent domain law.
The state demurred and this was over
ruled and then application was made
to the supreme court for a writ
prohibition. This the court granted
today.
THE GOBS LOSE
THREE STRAIGHT GAMES
The Philadelphia Athletics yester
day took another game from the Chi
cago Cubs, the score being 14 to 5. This
makes three straight in favor of the
Quakers.
, . , ~
Q ua * eis - n ® aioie an ' UJB
may exc alIB ' 1 ls ost ' etC
! A suit on contract entitled Peter
Ivanhoff versus Bitter Root Valley
I Land company et. al., has been filed
! in district court. R. Lee McCulloch
is attorney for the plaintiff.
FELLS
IT
JOURNALIST BIRDMAN PROPOSES
TO TRY TO CROSS ALL
OVER AGAIN.
New York, Oct. 19.—Walter Welknan
and his five companions were landed '
here this afternoon by the steamship
Trent, which picked them up at sea
after they had abandoned their diri
gible balloon America and failed in the
first attempt ever made to cross the
Atlantic ocean through the air. A
bruised right hand which Wellman
carried in a sling, was the only phys
ical injury that resulted from their
long voyage of approximately 900
miles, and a rescue the like of which
is unknown in all history.
None of the areonauts expressed re
gret for the loss of the America. They
agreed that it had served its purpose.
All stand ready to renew the attempt
as soon as Wellman and his engineers
find a way to conquer the difficulties
that brought their first trip to its
thrilling end Tuesday morning 400
miles southeast of Sandy Hook.
Standing on the deck of the Trent,
Wellman made this statement.
"We thought we could get along
without the equilabrator. Now we
find that we could not get along with !
it. Our plans for the future are
indefnite until we find something that
will do what we thought the equili
brator would do."
The "equilibrator," to which Well
man attributes the failure of the voy
age, was the series of tanks contain
ing the gasoline which floated in the
water and was attached to the airship
by a long rope. Its purpose, in addi
tion to storing gasoline and serving as
a wireless "ground," was to keep the
balloon steady, compensating for the
expansion and contraction of gas, due
to changes in temperature which
would have made the America rise and- 1
j
sink erratically. j
The America's experience proved
that this floating tail, jerking at the
nnîci/ifl a i ,oli i ni O fl û O
delicately poised airship, made it. im
possible to steer or to make headway
in the desired direction and weakened
the structure. To find another means
of compensating for this unavoidable
change i nthe volume of gas is the
problem to which Wellman and his
engineer will now devote their at
tention.
The direct cause of abandonment of
the America was exhaustion of the
supply of gasoline, which had to be
thrown out to save the ship, for when
the crew abandoned the ship only
enough was left to last about 24 hours.
Wellman tried to grasp a rope thrown
from the Trent and the rope got
twisted about his hand. Before he
got loose it nearly tore off his little
finger and badly bruised the rest of
the hand. The comparative unimpor
tance of the injury, however, was
demonstrated by the fact that as Well
man said this he had a cigar in his
bandaged hand and was not obliged to
let the member rest in a sling.
The other members of the America's
crew said they felt as well as ever
and they looked it. They are Melvin
Vaniman, engineer; J. Murry Simmons
navigator; J. K. Irwin, wireless oper
ator, and Albert L. Loud and oJhn
Aubert, sailors. There was also the
gray kitten which was so pampered
by the women passengers aboard the
Trent that her sides bulged with feed
ing.
TICKET MAT NOT SOIT
J. PIEBPONT MORGAN
quently he will be unable to vote. The
example of Mr. Morgan was followed
: b y a number of prominent republi
New York, Oct. 19.—J. P. Morgan
failed to register this year and conse
; cans in the Murray Hill neighborhood.
Not to Their Liking.
The action of J. Pierpont Morgan in
not registering carries with it the sig
nificance that, rather than vote for the
Roosevelt ticket in New York state, he
prefers to let the election slip by with
out even the semblance of interest on
his part. Similar views, it would seem,
are entertained by other prominent re
publicans of the elite and vastly weal
-
tll y Murray Hill neighborhood,
Jeff Whyte, Dan Breen, William
Morris and M. Perkins formed a party
who motored down from Darby Wed
nesday to attend a meeting of the Ra
valli County Retail Dealers' associa
tion.
TAFT NOT
TELLS ABOUT HIS BILLS, TOUCHES
ON THE TARIFF AND EXPLAINS
HIS VOTE FOR CANNON,
Hamilton was all "lit up" Wednes
day night—the first—the first bonfire
and Railroad Commissioner- E. A. Mor
ley. And the band played.
A 'fair sized house greeted Mr.
Pray and he was accorded most re
spectful attention, while making his
explanations.
Judge W. P. Baker presided at the
meeting, first introducing Mr. Morley,
who briefly told something of the
working of the state railroad commis
sion.
Then Judge Baker came forward
with that smile that never wears off
and in well chosen words introduced
the principal speaker of the evening
as "our present and future congress
man, the Hon. Charles Hartman," thus
drawing the merriest demonstration
of the evening. Backing up, the
chairman said he meant Mr. Pray and
that gentleman turned loose.
Pray told of a number of bills he
had passed, touched on Cannonism, ex
unheeded by the audience.
j -———— ----------------------
(1(111 f-PI I flÿUÇ Tf| Ilf**'FT
— — — * l«kl.Wll U IG I f i i
year term, Helena; John F. Davies,
of the season was built by the repub-,
lican county central committee in hon
or of Congressman Charles N. Pray j
„„a D„«1.___ a n ____________
a
;
;
plained that when prior to the election
two years ago, he announced that he
would not vote for Cannon he meant
that he would not vote for the speak
er in the caucus. Mr. Pray then rap
ped his opponent, Mr. Hartman, and
subsided.
The most striking thing about Con
gressman Pray address were the omis
sions. He scarcely touched upon
present day matters of interest. For
example, he never mentioned Taft
and he sidestepped the tariff. But
scant enthusiasm was manifested—
even mention of Roosevelt was passed
IN BILLINGS NEXT
Helena, Oct. 19.—The several grand
lodges of Odd Fellows today selected
Billings as the meeting place next year
and elected the following officers:
Grand master, William Dryburgh, Hel
ena; deputy grand master, E. G. Fox,
Deer Lodge; grand warden, R. H.
Swain, Great Falls; grand secretary,
R. W. Kemp, Missoula; grand treasur
er, Henry A. Meyer, Helena; grand
representative, Masena Bullard, two
ant David Vogal, Bozeman.
-
( , 0 y EUXMEÎ(T I{E GINS SU!T
Butte, one-year term; grand marshal,
J. E. Mallery, Livingston; grand con
ductor, O. K. Draper, Bonner; grand
guardian, F. E. Davis, Bozeman ; grand
herald, J. E. Trescott, Boulder; grand
chaplain, W. P. Burcher, Sun River.
Officers of the Rebecca assembly
were elected as follows: President,
Mrs. May Warner, Helena; vice pres
ident, Mrs. Alice Sibley Butte; warden,
Mrs. Nellie Nicol, Hamilton; secretary,
Mrs. Nellie W. Neill, Helena; treas
urer, Mrs. Duff, Chinook; trustees,
Mrs. Violet Madison, Walkerville, Mrs.
George, Great Falls; Mrs. Sarah John
son, South Butte; officers of the de
partment council, department com
mander, Colonel J. H. Gilbert, Butte;
vice president, Matt Sillers, Helena;
secretary, D. W. Selfridge, Butte;
treasurer Eugene Ames, Butte.
Officers of the day—Captain Wal
sauger, Missoula; aid, John Neuport,
Butte.
Appointive officers—Officer of the
guard, sergeant major, W. M. Prell,
Ekalaka; aide, Captain William Mills,
Butte; chaplain, Captain George Heg
gen, Ekalaka; sentinel, Captain A. F.
Sparling, Great Falls; picket, Lieuten
TO SET ASIDE A PATENT
. H ele na, Oct. 19.—Suit was begun in
the federal court today by the govern
ment to set aside a patent granted the
St. Paul, Minneapolis and Manitoba
railway and the Great Northern to 320
acres of land alleged to cover a val
uable water power site at Kootenai
Falls. It is alleged the company se
cured patent through an error.
OLD SETTLER IS BURIED.
Abx-aham Waugh, one of the old set
tlers of the Bitter Root valley, was
buried Sunday in the Hamitton cem
etery. Mr. Waugh died of Bright's
disease from which he had been a suf
ferer for some time.
MS CARBOLIC ACID
EDWARD FARRELL OF BUTTE MIN
ERS' TNTON,"TIRES* OF
TROUBLED LIFE.
Edward Farrell, a former Butte
miner, victim of the ravages of miner's
consumption"d rendered despondent
f. * W * e \ S debauch committeedjsui
clde yesterday morning by swallowing
vial of carbolic acid. # ;
Farrell was found .writhing in ? the
agony of death on the floor of a room
in the Wilson lodging house just be
fore noon yesterday by Charles Ejavis,
his room-mate. Davis immediately
notified Policeman Jack Howay and
Dr. Casserly was summoned. The phy
sician did everything in his power to
restore the unfortunate man, who had
lapsed into unconsciousness, but the
terrible acid had done its work; the
vital sparlT soon flickered away.
Coroner Kellogg was notified by tel
ephone and motored up from Stevens
ville. A jury consisting of George
Reeves, William Griggs, J. B. Blod
gett. Clark Ostrom, J. W. Gunter and
Frank Childers was empaneled and an
inquest held.
At the inquest the facts developed
that Farrell had been in town about
week, drinking heavily all the time.
Yesterday morning, accompanied by
Owen O'Donnell, with whom he had
worked in the Butte mines some 12
years ago, he took breakfast at the
Montana restaurant. After breakfast
they strolled along the street, Far
rell complaining of rheumatism. He
gave O'Donnell a quarter and re
quested him to enter a drug store and
buy a vial of carbolic acid. O'Donnel
did so, Farrell waiting outside. They
then went to the room, where Farrell
threw himself down on the bed and
requested O'Donnel to remove his
shoes, stating that he wished to rub
the acid on his knee. Grasping the
vial he suddenly drank of its contents.
O'Donnel, himself almost in a drunken
stupor, picked up the bottle and went
away. At the inquest he testified that
he had no idea that Farrell thought
of suicide and that he did not think
he had swallowed enough of the acid
to do any harm. Anyhow he went
away, down to the Union bar, where
be threw the vial into the alley and
thought nothing more about it until
placed under arrest.
After weighing all the evidence the
jury returned a verdict that the de
ceased had come to his death by tak
ing poison with suicidal intent.
Farrell was about. 50 years of age.
He had no relatives, so far as known,
excepting a brother, Mike, resident of
Butte. He was a member of the Butte
Miners' union, but having contracted
miner's consumption, was forced to
quit the mines. During the past sum
mer he had found employment with
the Sunset Orchard Land company.
MRS. NOBLE ENTERTAINS
AT BITTER ROOT INN
The social event of the season at
Bitter Root was the luncheon at the
Bitter Root Inn on Saturday when Mrs.
W. M. Noble was the hostess, her
guests being a party of ladies from
Hamilton.
The dining room of the Inn was
beautiful in a decoration of flowers
and autumn leaves, while the tables
were made most attractive with pyra
mids of red McIntosh apples. A menu
of a prescribed number of courses was
delightfully served and the whole af
fair was much enjoyed. Mrs. Madson
furnished several musical selections
which were highly appreciated.
Those present besides the hostess
were: Mesdames Marcus Daly, Pros
ser, Çage, Sloan, Thacher, Torrence,
McBain, Currie, Chandler, Buekman,
Bartlett, Saekett, Emerson, Totman,
Norton, Madson and Miss Sloan.
The ladies motored to Bitter Root
and back.
REPUBLICAN SPELLBINDERS
IN UPPER VALLEY
Two big automobiles, carrying most
of the republican candidates for coun
ty and legislative offices, spellbinders
and party workers leave Hamilton to
day for Sula, where they will hold a
rally tonight. Thence from Sula to
Eight Mile they propose holding a se
ries of meetings in every schoolhouse.
Judge George M. Bourquin of Butte
is expected to hold a few meetings in
the valley next week.

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