OCR Interpretation


The Western news. [volume] (Stevensville, Mont.) 1890-1977, October 25, 1910, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036207/1910-10-25/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE WESTERN NEWS
Published Each Tuesday ana
Friday.
MILES ROMNEY
Editor and Proprietor.
KENNETH ROMNEY
City Editor.
One Year in Advance .
Six Month in Advance
.....$2.00
_____$1.00
Entered at the Postoffice at
Hamilton, Mont., as second-class
matter.
A PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER.
To Advertisers:
The Western News absolutely
guarantees its advertisers an act
ual bona fide paid circulation
within Ravalli county two times
greater than that of any other
newspaper published in the known
world. Advertising contracts will
be made subject to this guarantee.
m
^ocifiS'
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1910.
The democratic nominees for the
legislature in Missoula county on
Thursday evening at a big meeting,
announced each in turn and without
reservation, that if elected they would
vote for T. J. Walsh for United States
senator. Next!
Gaby des Lys, the ballet dancer, who
is held responsible for the downfall
of Manuel, ex-king of Portugal, judg
ed by her pictures, is quite a hand
some woman. But she was hardly
worth a kingdom, at that. Pretty
women are too plentiful.
Mayor Andrew Logan and Fire Chief
Fox of Missoula won the heartfelt ap
preciation of Hamilton by the prompt
and effective manner in which they so
splendidly responded to the call for
help when Friday's destructive blaze
was creatiug havoc, as only the fire
fiend can.
The ever-increasing and fast-ap
proaching roar of the democratic
landslide that is sweeping (he country
must lead one to conclude that Robert
Lincoln Owens, candidate for coroner,
is about the only republican in Mon
tana who is sure of election this year.
IS THIS THE LAST CHANCE i
From the Butte News.
Twenty thousand homesteaders came
to Montana last spring. Not one of
them will have a vote this fall. When
they do vote their ballots will be al
most a unit in opposition to corpora
tion rule. They will be anti-Amal
gamated acquisition. A correspond
ent of the News suggests that this
unprecedented immigration is the oc
casion for the Amalgamated company's
desire (o control the coming legisla
ture 'This will be their last chance."
he says, "and they are going to make
the best of it."
There is nothing far-fetched in the
suggestion. It doesn't take 20,000
votes to change the complexion of
Montana's election. Five thousand has
always sufficed. Students of the state's
political situation are firm in the be
lief that the farmers' vote is the only
thing which will curb the power of
the company. This is undobtedly one
of the contributing reasons for Gall
wey, Alley & Co. This is all the more
reason why the people should stand
pat this time. An Amalgamated leg
islature recognizing that it was the
last chance, could do a great deal of
harm in 60 days. It might take «0
years to wipe out the damage.
ONE-CENT POSTAGE.
From the Standard.
The story is told that when Harriet
Leecher was married to Calvin E.
Stowe, she kept the letter describing
the ceremony more than four weeks
after it was written before she dis
patched it to her old friend. Miss Eli/.a
Waterman, of Hartford, Conn. Mrs.
Stowe was married in Cincinnati. The
distance from there to Hartford was
almost a thousand miles. Had the post
Have You Ever Tasted the
LANTIERBrand of
Olive Oil
Sold by C. S. Kendall, This product is in a
class by itself. Possessed of a bland, nutty
flavor, it is utterly free from the offensive
aroma and nauseating taste characteristic of
cheap olive oils.
The Rexel] Store C. S. KENDALL The
Quality Druggiat
jage been a cent she would, we doubt
not, have sent her letter the day it
j was written. But with a rate of 12
I cents for 300 miles and double that for
! «00 and treble for 900, the thrifty Mrs.
I Stowe was impelled to keep her letter
' by her until she could make it contain
an account not only of her marriage
; but of her honeymoon as well. We
; passed away from the necessity of fol
lowing her example long years ago.
But the episode is worth recalling to
day in view of the talk of reducing the
letter postage to one cent.
Postmaster General Hitchcock thinks
that one-cent postage is one of the
possibilities of the near future. He be
lieves that the postoffice department
will be placed on a self-sustaining bas
is before the close of another fisca»
year. He expects this to come about
through the introduction of several
labor-saving machines at Washington
and elsewhere. When that happy day
dawns, one of the first effects will
be to reduce the rates of letter post
age to one cent. The postal arrange
ments of the United States are among
the most perfect in all our domestic
economy. Even with the two-cent rate
the increase in correspondence has
been marvelous. What it would be if
that rate were cut in two one can only
guess.
DIFFERENCE BETYVEEEN GOOD
AND BAD CORPORATIONS.
Herbert N. Casson in LaFollette's Mag
azine.
A foolhardy corporation that defies
j the will of the public is like the rabbit
that got drunk and spat in the bull
dog's face.
The public is the Boss. It always has
been the Boss, whenever it wanted to
be. It always will be the Boss That
is the Bfe Pent ef .... ...... the
is the Big Fact of history and of
present political situation.
The bigger and richer a corporation
is the better it must behave. Impu
dence and haughtiness are forgivable
in a small corporation, but not in a
large one. We demand a far higher
standard of conduct, for instance, from
an elephant than we do from a canary
bird. And those corporations that
have the bulk of giants and the man
ners of newsboys, have got to get rid
<>f either the bulk or the manners,
The public admires efficiency. It
believes in the value of organization,
11 has no objection to the size of a cor
poration. It is even inclined to be
proud of an immense and well handled
company. But it will never allow a
big corporation to bully and swagger
and dominate. It will never permit
the strongest members of the national
family to be petted and pampered as
though they were babies in the cradle,
I here is no inevitable war between
the corporations and the public. When
the public learns to quit baiting all
corporations indiscriminately, and
when the corporations learn to play
fair and be sociable, there will come
an era of peace and good will that will
result in such prosperity as we have
never known.
The old days of secrecy and tricks
and I-can-do-what-I-llke-with-iny-own
property, are gone. Nobody can do
what he likes. Nobody can pitch his
private tent on the public highway.
Nobody can flout and despise his
neighbors We are all jumbled up to
gether in these United States, and U.
S. stands for "us."
No matter how rich, or how poor,
we are, we have got to play fair and
be friendly or get ruled out of the.
game. To dodge and quibble and
blustei* can do nothing more than to
delay and increase the punishment.
As for the corporations that are act
ing sensibly, it is necessary for us to
protect them from injustice as it is for
us to punish the others. When we at
tack a decent corporation, we pre.ent
others from becoming decent. In fact,
what we need just at this stage, as
a practical guide to good citizenship,
is a white list of corporations that are
really trying to be useful and honest
and polite, and a black list of corpor
I atlons that are stubbornly defying and
resisting the authority of the public.
How about it? Why not call the roll
on corporations?
DIVORCED.
Decrees of divorce were granted
last week by Judge Myers in the cases
of Bernice Lyon versus Arthur Lyon
and Clarence Waugh versus Jennie
Waugh.
COUNTY ATTORNEY STANDS
FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT
,au,Icnea - me OD '
jeCt beln S t0 attraCt fr0m McCulloch
R. LEE M'CULLOCH.
Because of the zeal he has shown in
the performance of the duties of his
office and because he has strenuously
endeavored to enforce the laws as he
found them on the statute books, par
ticularly in the matter of gambling and
the indiscriminate sale of liquors to
minors and habitual drunkards, Coun
ty Attorney McCulloch is up against a
hard fight in his campaign for re-elec
tion
The so-called sporting element is hot
after his scalp. To this end several
candidacies for the office of county
attorney have been launched—the ob
and fritter away as many votes as pos
sible that might naturally go to him.
The result of this fight will be
awaited with interest. The issue is
clearly defined. It is up to the voters
of Ravalli county to indicate whether
or not they favor strict enforcement
of the laws. That's all that McCul
loch has been trying to do.
JAMES GIBUS SLASHES
WITH POCKET KNIFE
James Gibbins, an old-time lumber
man, while temporarily deranged, the
result of excessive drinking, attempt
ed suicide yesterday morning about 8
o'clock. When discovered in a room
over the Scandia he was bleeding pro
fusely from cuts in his neck, "self
inflicted with a small pocket knife.
Dr. Casserly was called and dressed
the wounds and the patient is now
making good progress to recovery.
MISOSULA DEMOCRATS
HAVE NEWSPAPER NOW
Missoula, Oct. 21.—The Missoula
Democrat, a democratic campaign pa
per, made its appearance last evening.
The paper devotes space to the can
didates on the county ticket, but is
centering its fight on the election of
the legislative ticket and the defeat
of Carter. Kenneth Romney of Ham
ilton is editor of the new publication
and Frank McHaffie of Missoula is
business manager.
JONES COMES RACK.
Jason J. Jones, a Missoula mail clerk
who has been recuperating on a Vic
tor farm for the past three months,
returned to Missoula yesterday and
after a short stay will go south to
remain during the winter months. Mr.
Jones was taken ill early last spring
and when he was removed to the Vic
tor farm was not expected to live. At
that time he had been reduced in
avoirdupois from something like 145
to 87. On his return to Missoula yes
terday he tipped the scales at 117
pounds'and said he was feeling fine
Mitsoulian.
RESOLUTIONS OF RESPECT.
The following resolutions of re
spect were passed by Prudence lodge
No. 1474 Modern Brotherhood of
America, upon the death of Mrs.
Clara Marvel of Seattle.
Whereas God, in His wisdom and
providence has seen fit to take fron'!
our midst Sister Clara Marvel, and,
Whereas, In her death our lodge
has sustained the loss of one of its
worthy members; therefore be it
Resolved, That we bow in humble
submission to the divine will, know
ing that He doeth all things well.
Resolved, That we extend to the be
reaved husband and family in their
sad bereavement our profound sym
pathy in this their hour of sorrow.
Resolved. That a copy of these res
olutions be spread upon the minutes
and be dedicated to her memory; that
a copy be tendered her bereaved hus
band and family, and that they also be
published in The Western News.
MRS. FRANK JONES.
W. P. HALL.
MRS. V. J. HOUTCHENS,
Committee.
FOR SUPERINTENDENT
OF COUNTY SCHOOLS
MISS NORA SMITHEY.
If one good term deserves another,
Miss Nora Smithey is certainly de
serving of being re-elected superin
tendent of Ravalli county schools.
Two years ago Miss Smithey was
drafted by the democrats to make the
race, and graciously accepting the
nomination was elected by a hand
some majority. Since then she has
devoted her entire time to the schools
of the county, giving very general sat
isfaction. If a single complaint has
arisen it is because in the line of duty,
well performed, under the law, a just
decision could not please both sides
in case of a controversy.
Miss Smithey began teaching ii
Monroe county, Mo., in 1889. After
wards she attended the Kirksville
normal four years. Coming to Mon
tana she taught in the schools of
Florence, Woodside. Corvallis and
Darby for nine years. In November,
1908, Miss Smithey was elected county
superintendent and having received a
unanimous nomination from the dem
ocratic convention, she would greatly
appreciate a vote of indorsement by
the people of Ravalli county. She has
made good" and should be re-elected
STEVEN'SVILLE PHONE SERVICE.
Stevensville, Oct. 20.—Arrangements
are being made to move the Rocky
Mountain Bell telephone exchange
here, the change in location to be
made in a couple of weeks. From the
present location it will be moved to
rooms in the second story of the Bit
ter Root Valley bank building. When
the change is made a new switchboard
will be installed, which will be great
er in size than the present one. The
business of the Bell company has in
creased to such an extent that it will
require two operators to handle the
switchboard work, which one operator
is now doing. The management claims
that the change of equipment in the
local exchange will greatly improve
the service here.
SHERIFF WARD GOING
BACK TO THE FARM
Sheriff C. W. Ward is already mak
ing preparations to take up his abode
on his fine ranch, a few miles south
of Darby, when his term of office ex
pires on January 1. Rapid progress
is being made with the construction of
his new, comfortable and commodious
residence and so the genial sheriff
says Mrs. Ward, the children and he
will all be glad to get back to the
farm.
FARMERS DEMAND A
REDUCTION IN RATES
Walla Walla. Wash., Oct. 23.—Over
100 farmers, members of a farmers'
union, met here today for the purpose
of formulating demands for a reduc
tion in rates on Inland Empire wheat
consigned to coast or eastern points
over the Northern Pacific and Oregon
railways. An investigation of the pres
ent rates will be made this afternoon,
following the recent reduction to some
eastern and middle western points.
While the Oregon lines and the
Northern Pacific have made some
slight reductions in rates, the O. R. &
N. rates now equaling those of other
roads. President Clew of the Farmers'
union stated that the rates were still
prohibitive.
It is understood that unless the rail
roads make the reductions in rates de
manded, the farmers will store their
grain and refuse to ship it, even
though it remains on their hands at a
great loss.
NEW WAY TO FELL A TREE.
Berlin inventor has recently de
signed a simple device for the felling
of trees. The trunks are cut by the
friction of a steel wire about 1 mm.
indiameter, which, as demonstrated by
practical tests, is able to cut through
a tree about 20 inches (50 cm.) in
thickness in 6 minutes. The wire,
which is carried too and fro by an
electric motor, is heated by friction
FREE!
a Pair of
Regal Shoes
or a
McKibbo
with
w
every suit
overcoat
or
You know what Regal
shoes are, or if you don't
here is a chance to try
them.
• O
• •

«9
ۥ
GO
• •
RegalClothingCo.
on the tree to such an extent as to
burn through the timber, the result
being a cut which is both smoother
and cleaner than that effected by a
saw. The wire will work satisfactorily
on the thtlckest trees without the in
sertion of wedges into the cut and the
trees may be cut immediately above
or below the ground. In the latter
case the stump may be left safely in
the soil. The motor which actuates
the wire is placed outside of the range
affected by the fall of the tree and
when electricity is not already avail
able it can be generated by a trans
portable pow'er plant consisting of a
10 horse-power petrol motor and dy
namo, which are left at the entrance to
the forest during the felling opera
tions. '
DEMOCRATIC STATE TICKET.
For Representative in Congress—
CHARLES S. HARTMAN.
For Clerk of Supreme Court—
TIMOTHY O'LEARY.
For Railroad Commissioner—
PETER SANGER.
DEMOCRATIC COUNTY TICKET.
JFor State Senator—
H. C. GROFF.
Ror Representatives in the Legis
lature—
W. E. M'MURRY.
GEO. \V. JOHNSON.
For County Attorney—
R. LEE M'CULLOCH.
For Sheriff—
GEORGE SEE.
For Treasurer—
THOMAS J. HEFLING.
For Clerk and Recorder—
CHARLES S. MILES.
For Superintendent of Schools—
MISS NORA SMITHEY.
For Assessor—
J. C. DOUGHERTY.
For County Commssioner—
JOHN F. LOGAN.
For Public Administrator—
H. L. ROBINSON.
For County Surveyor—
LEONARD OERTLI.
DEMOCRATIC TOWNSHIP TICKET.
For constables. Ward township—
J. M. HIGGINS and C. A. BAILEY. 1
For constable, Edwards township—
GEO, A. WALDO.
For constable, Skalkaho towmship—
F. V. SEE and J. A. WARREN.
For constables, Corvallis township—
THOMAS RANDOLPH and JAMES E. !
CRADDOCK.
W. E. McMnrry
Democratic
Nominee
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
Tiflis 4 ». ajs
LORRIAUTS
a
o
PUREST
CAST©*
O/,
' PREPARED
NEW PI
PROCESS
AND
NOTH INC
CASTOR
à Wf ETCHED AND
PUVORCD
SWEET AS SUGAR
MEDICINAL EFFECTS
EXACTLY THE
SAME AS
ORDINARY CASTOR OIL
Keep Bottle Well Corked and
» _ in a Cool Place. _
DOSE
Ü to / Tablespoonful, Children
in Proportion to age.
Prepared by
Corner Drugstore
Mamikon, Hont.

xml | txt