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Fergus County Democrat. [volume] (Lewistown, Mont.) 1904-1919, October 19, 1916, Image 1

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A)L. XIII.. NO. 3
Fergus County Democrat
_ Su " 14 nri,,
LEWISTQWN, FERGUS COUNTY, MONTANA. OCTOBER 19. 1916.
PRICE FIVE CENTS
NEARING
ANARCHY
Athens' Excited People
May Refuse to Obey
King's Command.
ALL THE WAR NEWS
A Sanguinary Frontal Battle Is Pro
ceeding Three Miles North of the
Mallei Bridgehead in Galicia, the
Russians' Fire Endangering Teu
tonic Communication Between Halicz
and Lemberg—Apparently the Ru
manians Have Been Successful in
Stopping the Advance of Teutons
All Along Their Border.
ATIILNS, Oct. 18.—411:50 a. m., via
London, 8:30 p. m.)—A French ma
ilne patrol last evening arrested at the
joint ot' the bayonet seven youths
who were hooting the entente pow
A huge crowd gathered for the
purpose of rescuing them The Greek
out troopt\ who charged and dis
parsed the crowd. Greek patrols were
immediately placed in various dis -1
mm to control ...
• ntente manifestations.
f J± e SX* aCh ad , rairal in rommand in
at tha m?ni's7'rv e |e l l\ at ht? W0Uld
• h s rr st P n t le morning,
though it is thought possible that as
*ien^ U w«i, the u-| Brlti ^ 1 raini8ter ' s !lu '
i n<e Mith King Constantine the
nf C L tr °H PS , '"f" b '' withdrawn on
order * th<U ^ GreckH mainta?n j
i. i* , .. . . t , |
r.minJth,' 1 ! mi ' 'f ' " s , has K' ven
t 'h'monsti-a. j
ons must cease, as the very existence j
ot Greece is at stake. It is difficult ,
ln the Present state
ot public opinion over the presence
of marines of foreign powers at Ath
*!°' s mid P|raeuB, even tho king's or- I
dors will be obeyed by the excited
populace. |
—--
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SANGUINARY BATTLE.
LONDON, Oct. 18.— <10:02 p. m.)—
"A sanguinary frontal battle is pro
reeding three miles north of the Hal-i
eeoqing illree miles north of the Hal-U
lez bridgehead. Galicia, in the angle :
formed by the Junction of the Ntiray-i
ink* and Guiia Lipa rivers" says a j
is*-----».......... .. , . i
Reuter's Potrogrud correspondent
"The railway running northwesterly
1 coll) Halle* to Jidatcheff Is under the
Russian Are and the enemy's commu
nications between Halicz and Lemberg
are threatened."
ASSOCIATED PRESS RESUME.
Apparently the Rumanians havi
|
been successful, at least temporarily ,
in stopping the advance of the Tea'
i » g auiante oi me reu
. Al
tonic allies all along their border.
no point along the line does either
Ilerlln or Vienna claim fresh succeeaes |'
against the Rumanlana, while
Bucharest war office assert ath at Si
troops of King Ferdinand at various
points have repulsed the attacks of the
Teutonic allies, inflicting heavy losses
on them, and capturing numbers of
their officers and men.

Violent fighting Is still in prottresn
in Galica, where on the Narayuvka j
front the Ilavarans have stormed a i
Russian position and captured 300 mon j
and 12 machine guns. Berlin asserts
that west of Lutsk, in Volhynia, fol- !
lowing the repulse of tho Russians,
the troops of Emperor Nicholas have-cant,
not returned to the fray and are mere- j
ly bombarding the Teutonic positions. ]
The repulse of Austro-Gcrnian attacks
. ,, „ ... J
in the Carpathians, where snow is now !
falling, is recorded by Petrograd.
!
SAY
LEE E. EDWARDS OF THE Rov !
SECTION IS ARRESTED FOR
CASHING SOME OF THEM
MINT INFORMATIONS HOE FILED!
i k, ,,, .
late lu. Edwards ot the Roy coun
tiy wns arrested here yesterday on a
charge of cashing checks drawn
him on the State nank of Roy to the
Hdwards has no money in the bank.
He, however, asserts that he lias
funds there to cover all checks drawn
by him and that there is some mis
understanding. This, he says, will be
cleared up later, but meantime Mr.
Edwards is in the county bastile.
MANY INFORMATIONS.
The countv attor"- has filed 14 in
formations against various candidates
of all parties
niar.v nominating
to file their statements
their campaigns
statute. All of the delinquents arel
men w ho failed to land nominations, j
It Is assumed that in each case the I
failure to file is a mere inadvertence, }
the parties supposing that, as they |
were not nominated, they were not
required to take any further steps,
They are being notified of their de- j
linqency and will appear in court in
It is supposed,
due time to answer,
under the circumstances,
he ilea It with leniently.
that all will
WO MW
DENIED
House of Bishops Will;
Not Allow Them to
Sit as Delegates.
HISTORY OF CHURCH!
History of the Episcopal Church and
Its Doctrines of Continuity From
Apostolic Times. Are Portrayed at
the Coliseum in a Church Pageant
Given by the Episcopal Churches of!
St. Louis, and Witnessed by Dele-!
Safes and Visitors to General Con
vention— Bishop Tuttle Reproduces
Work in Montana.
ST. LOUIS. Oct. 18.—Women were!
denied equal rights with men in two
actions taken today by the house or
bishops of the Protestant Episcopal
| general convention in session here.
"A proposal to permit women to sit
'* s do * pga * es ' n the general convention
! Hankow, to be allowed to admit worn
i ''I 110 membership in his advisory coun
V* 1, '' as dpnipd - The house suggested
£?S ZuuSZZ
iliury council of women.
1 The proposal to give women equal
r ' glUH wlth n,en in the convention!
al-iwas sponsored by Hobert II Gardiner
'of Maine. uarainer
: A similar resolution is now on the
;calendar of tho house of deimties and
i it was pointed out action in
j rhe upper house does not preclude it
| being discussed in the lower body.
Thf house of bishops, which also
j considered changes recommended in
j the communion service by the com
, mission on the book of common pray.
[er, will suggest In its report to the
house of deputies that the Ten Com
raandments be printed in the praver
I book in both their shortened form and
jin their full form and that the clergy
| men be given optional use of either!
.in the sendee, it was stated.
Tho prayer suggested by the com-!
j mission asked that 'our laud be]
|,. . ... , - - ........
|"leased with honorable industry, sound
, rn " K antI pur ° manners." It also
, . ' pur ° manners. u also
: a8ks tbal wp bp from "violence,
dlsrord and confusion from pride and
j nrrogauce," and that our liberties bo!
i (letnndf'H nnH nnr nniK
- , . . ----------,
a T£cuss?o" d o7 r r^K n s , -t„oL
evonlng prayer wan concluded today, J
a number of minor changes being J
I
enabling the clergy to adapt the serv!
a . m''tro p olitan cathedraJ. or to that
° 3 rontlcr un88lon - Discussion of
new prayers resulted in the approval
jof one for state legislatures and an
Irtbw'fo^rrtTZ!
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the............
as co adjutor bishop of Kan
Tile house of deputies confirmed tho
° f thc Rev ' Jam '* s WlKC of
Isas
ice either to the ordered worship of
Hirtory of Church in Pageantry.
The History of the Protestant Epis- !
ropxTl I'hurcb nnd its doctrines of con i
ap08tuU(: lip ' U8 ' were P<>r |
f rCrk nt'T^T iT"'^ J" i
copal churches of St louts nnd u-it
b y the dlle^ternnd vi^i^ 1
to the general convention of the
chureh now m session tIle j
t 0
had I
nnd
the variov
their parts
parish church in St. Louis
e pag
for months the members of j
is parishes had worked on !
In all, more than 2,000
persons took part,
The pageant began with the
organ- !
izntion of the church in apostol-'c times
land then showed the church in the j
British Isles its history during the
pro-reformaton era and the contests !
between the throne and the papacy
for supremacy, the breaking away
from the Reman church in the reign
of Henry VII!., the planting of the
Protestant Episcopal church, as a part
of the Church of England, in the
United States, and the history of the
churrl1 in mo ' ,Rrn America.
The spectacle was divided into nine
groups, each composed of three to five ;
'scenes. The first group portrayed the
beginning of the apostolic church, and
(the scenes represented the Day of
Acts, the first church council—that
at Jerusalem, also recorded in the
'Rook of Acts—and the missionary jour
of the Apostle Paul to Athens
___O_
ADDRESS COMMUNITY BETTERMENT
MEETING HELD AT GRASS RANGE
L. W. Blodgett and A. A. Eranzke
went to Grass Range Thursday even
big where they participated in a pub
lie meeting under the auspices of the
Grass Range Commercial club. Mr.
Pa an organization or the charac
tPr 'her have there.
Mr. Eranzke's address was confined
to the same topic, hut he discussed
the idealistic side, drawing attention
to the advisability of selecting sites
for municipal buildings and parks for
the future Grass Range, and to the
necessity of looking forward in the
.matter of civic improvements and bet
termenLs.
The meeting was largely attended.
;
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This Wfly THE Pi C.ruRE IS JUST QUESTION n«R^
TURN IT OVER.
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G0V - 8. V. STEWART AND HAR
RY B. MITCHELL ADDRESS
A BIG AUDIENCE.
FINE SPEECHES
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j PRflUff) IQ IfCDV FMTUIKIICTIP
! UHUIlU Id iLlll Lll I llUdlnU 11ll
---------
I ...
Gov - sam v - huot "•"* »•
J Mitchell were given such a reception
J '»st uiglit as indicated clearly the very j
I lllpl1 r, 'Kard in which the democratic |
j raan ' respectively, aru held by the
| people of Lewdstown. Tho meeting, i
held at Armory hall, was one of the |
moat notable held here by either party
during the present campaign. The
large hall was filled early, evory seat
|^ n ? _oco«pledby the time the meet: |
ing began, und throughout the even-i
hal. "The w~Verc '|T i° f '
' . ,, '' erc ,ai gelj rep
! simw^the same keit'm'ter^in 1 the !
i address as the men. i
| Mitchell on' Issues.
i " U IK>K " lb Presided and intro
clucec * as tll( ' ,irKt s,)ea ^ er O rea t Falls'
1 i^ vorite V itizen . Harry li. Mitchell.
candidate was given a most cor-'
j dial greeting. Mr. Mitchell is. of |
course, more widely known as a think- i
j rap ' d progress in this campaign and i
! b '' s i1cidre8S w 'as logical, commending 1
tsell particularly to thinking men and
women. He took occasion to pay a]
! ,lne tril >ute to Governor Stewart in !
l *' ,> course °f bis remarks and devoted l
j all his speech to a review of >
|' h< ' *' PCHrd '"'lde by Woodrow Wilson 1
! and l *' e national administration. Tlie j
policies of flic president formed, he!
said, the one great issue in this cam
paign and the question involved was'
whether the American people desired
a continuation of those policies Q r:
iheir abandonment. He began his re
view with reference to the rural cred-|
its law, which he dts lared to be the
greatest piece of constructive legis-!)'
; lation ever enacted on behalf of the
farmer. The federal reserve law '
which replaced the worst banking!
legislation possessed by any civilized'.
ment of the democratic adminlstri
tion and then came the president's i
plan for a tariff commission. 4 Th
trust regulation law. known as the
Clayton act, was briefly
well as the income tax
Reasonable preparedness, such as
would give the citizens of every part
of the country confidence, was advo
rated, but he also advocated that sort
ol preparedness that will guarantee
better men through improvement in
their social environment.
Mr. Mitchell referred next to the
success of the democratic adiniuistra
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child labor law. There had been leg
islntion in the various states dealing
with this evil, but nationally the
United States lagged and it was not
until the president personally took
the matter up with congress and urged
the passage of the law that action
was finally taken.
Woodrow Wilson had also devoted
his energies to securing Justice for
* .....
(t nntiuued on Page Eight. I
BIG CROWDS
MEET WILSON!
AT TEN NEW YORK CITIES AND
TOWNS VA8T THRONGS SHAKE j
THE PRESIDENT'S HAND.
SYRACUSE, V y»04. 18. (On
L board i ; r, ' sidcnt
!train.)—ProBid^nt Wilson was greeted
b >' cheering crow ds at 10 New York
citlL>8 an<J tow »s during brief stops
this afternoon and tonight as !
passed through the state on his
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way ,0 Chicago to speak there to
morrow - At Syracuse he got his first
glimpse during the campaign of rod
lights burning in his honor. The pres
ident refused to make extended
h im. At Albany he said
" I ani a -ry poor hand, my friends,
,,| complimenting myself. You all
{T.h
M . nl . n ,, miM J H ! r ' l , t ou an(1 y .
crowd shouted
"Hurrah forth
Lincoln
know just as well as I do how to Judge I
it, so that 1 am perfectly content to '
leave myself in the (hands of the
Jury." I
At Oneida tonight a man in the
i
second Abraham [
the president called back. 1
Mr- Wilson appeared on the obser
vation platform of his private car at !
several points before reaching Syra-I
cus ''- Stops of more than five minutes
w ere made hero and at Albany, but at
t,u ' other places th<- train paused only
,or a minute or two.
Tl, e president's hand was shaken
It's good red blood, anyway," called i
80 vigorously af Albany that the skin
was ,orn nf f a finger on bis right hand
and ,or several minutes lie stood with
a bloody handkerchief In one hand. |
shaking hands with the other
out " . mnn - I
Tonight Dr Cary T. Grayson, the 1
hl,e house physician, bound up the :
inplrf ' d finger and Mr. Wilson used !
lliw lp|t band in greeting those
------:~r". «'«»»*>• |
alr " uson arnvetl - »' p re at Syracuse !
lht * bi * !K,,st demonstration of thc day :
wa8 8taepd - Members of n demoemiin
his left hand in greeting those who
met him. -
At several stops local democrats 1
had engaged bands which played when !
Mr. Wilson arrived. Here at Syracuse
the biggest demonstration of the day
was staged. Members of a democratic
iclub marched alongside the train
it ran
Hared. Democratic speakers in au
tomobiles addressed the crowds which
lined the tracks.
As the president's train passed
through West Albany the engineers on
nearly a score of locomotives blew
their whistles shrilly. Local politi
cians boarded the train at several
stops and met Mr. Wilson.
Tomorrow morning the president's
train is to make brief stops at Goshen,
Chicago
_ „____
DEATH OF d' P HARRIS
!). I*. Harris, postmaster at Maiden
died at the hospital here Tues.lVv
night of kidney trouble The
X abL. 6 " v, a?s ^of age^ nndTLur i
vived l'v , wi.b w und a daueh.e, wm!
are in California, and a son who is
in Fargo. North Dakota. No arrange
ments will be made for the funeral
until the relatives are heard front
0 . K. SELLERS
SHOTATHILEEB
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REVOLVER IN HANDS OF CLAR
ENCE NAPPER IS ACCIDENT
ALLY DISCHARGED.
VICTIM DIES COMING ID THE CITY:!:
shot and mortally wounded at Htlg'er
Thursday, immediately after the ac
As a result of the accidental die
charge of a .45 caliber revolver in
the hands of Clarence Napper, (). K.
.Seilers, n. well known grain bu.'er, was
cident, the wounded man was placed
in an auto and hurried to town, nriiv
ing here after midnight, the cur be
ing driven to St. .loseph's hospital.
Life was extinct when the hospital
was reached. Dr. .1. C. Dunn had been
Informed by telephone and was await
ing the party but nothing could be
done.
How it Occurred.
Mr. Napper, who is a prominent
elevator builder, and tin- decedent
went out into the I lllgor section yes
terduy on a hunt. They were return
big to the city last night and Mr.
Napper was taking out the revolver
intending to shoot at rabbits, should
any Jump into the light of the car,
as they came in. In some way the
weapon was accidentally discharged
'The hall entered the left side, inflict
Dr. Cottam w as secured
and came in with th
Mr.
Hilgor
party.
Popular Man.
Sellers had been engaged in
grain buying in this section for sev
eral seasons and was a popular man
He was about !S years of age, num.-li
ned and came from Minneapolis,
where Ills people reside
While th
how the fatality
that .fudge Edward
Brassey, who
acting as coroner in the absence of
( oroner Cn <*l, will ord**r an 1
'nqu.^t today '
acting
,---
*' rl( ' 1,v iRtenuioii the body «.f the
la, " Oswald K. Sellar, who was arri
d, n,allv s, 'i>t and mortally wounded
,
".b 0111 ,h, ' decedent was associated 1i
Ul ''' K ra m business Mr. WeUar is
hUrl '' ,,d h > the father and mot!
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hot and
at lfl iger Thursday night by Ills close j
friend. Clarence O. Napper. was ship ,
|), ' d l " llis ,f »' m, ' r home, Minneapolis,
accompanied by Howard McLean, with !
no question as to
1 P ™J! ' H likely j
...............
two brothers and
to have been married i;
to Miss Gertrude KHz,
young woman of Duluth
Rons of the parents we
all the arrangements,
made by the decedent'*
here, assisted bv Dr.
ist
He was
a short time
an estimable
The lusiruc
'<- followed in
these being
close friends
Francis Hag
strom. of Hit- local Masonic lodgo, the
decedent having belonged to Ionic
lodge No. ISG at Duluth. Me was 3!>
years of age and r.cine to Lewiston n
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6 0 wVt were sworn as jurors
—.......... .......__ L—
Friedle.in. A. D. Pcrsson, Rav Swift, -
W E I) Hyde, Mr. Kirkpatrick andl
Mr. Ward >
The Inquest. !
The inquest was conducted by Judge j 1
ting coroner i
Edward Brassey, as acting coroner j
Friday morning and J. It. Wcesc..
Western Houghton. A. J. McDonnell, I
M It. Wise, E. S. Smith and Harry |
t Continued
Page Five.)
I hey j
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PURSUIT
OF VILLA
Carranza Assures Com
missioners the Bandit
Will Be Caught.
WILL GIVE HIM TIME
Americans Insist That Any Agreement
Affecting the Control of the Bord
Must Be Based Upon a Reasonable
Indication That the Mexican Author
ities Are Capable of Maintaining Ef
fective Government in the Interior.
Driving Villa and Other Outlaws
From Border Will Not Be Sufficient.
Other Mexican News.
. AT1AKTIr <'ITV. N. Oct. IS.
Supplemental assurances from Gen
|'' lal Uninm/.a that he Is beginning a i
.new and vigorous campaign against j
\ ilia were received today by his rep
Join? commit,m"
[lie facto Mexican government asset i
ed all available troops would be used
in the pursuit of the bandit.
The American commissioners re
viewed at the joint session a care
fully prepared statement of the Mexi
can claims as to conditions, ns well
las proposals for restoration and main
tenanee of peace along (he frontier,
I bis Statement also Included - argil
meats designed to show why the Aint-r
icon troops should be withdrawn Irom
( 'hlhiialiua.
The Mexicans insist they are cap
able of driving \ ilia and other nut
laws from the border, btu the A tiler
leans attitude is that lie must deni
Ionstrate ability to do more than that
Tile Americans insist that
my agn
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nient affecting tin* control of the her-■l
der must he loused upon a, reasonable
indication that the Mexican author!
ties are capable of maintaining el'I'ec
tive government in the ntcror.
The ivllinguess of the Americans not
to urge compliance with their sug
gestions at this time is due to a hope
that General f'arran/a may be nblc
to direct a successful warfare against
Villa.
It was learned today that the troops
northward yesterday were not
intended for the campaign against
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Villa, but to relieve troops at Aguas |
Callentes and 7,ncntucas, wiio in turn I
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would be sent north to Torreon to re
Here others Hist would lie sent Into
the hills In search of Villa.
soidier'at (Nrri/al"'
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, "* od Juar, ' z " v an A
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CHIHUAHUA CITY ENTRENCHED
CHIHUAHUA CITY, Mex., Oct. 18.
(via El I'.iso .function, Tex.)
IT reucin-h with concrete protection,
shell proof dugouts nnd protected nr
tillcry emplacements, embodying tile
lessons of tho European war, are be
ing erected around Ibis city In accord
nine with the plans devised by Gen
eral Trevino and Ills general stall
When this work Is finished, the city
will he impregnable agninst troops not
possessing powerful artillery, it Is said,
and will prevent a recurrence of the
.events of Sept. 10. when Villa was
jable to make a surprise attack.
On ids round of inspection today
General Trevino was accompanied by
;n representative of the Associated
i'ress, who saw hundreds of laborers
engaged on this work. The defense
line Is several .thousand yards 1n
length.
ADAIR'S SADDLE MARE FOUND.
BL FASO, Oct.. 18. The thorough
bred saddle marc, which belonged to
Lieut. Henry Adair of the Tenth U. S.
cavalry, who was killed during the
lighting at Garrizal, Chihuahua, on
-1 uiie 21, was located in Juarez to
night and lias been delivered to the
United States army officers.
The equine survivor of the Garrizal
fight had been in the Carranza cav
airy since it was captured by a Mexi
It was recog
merican, and
upon being informed that the mare
had belonged to the dead officer. Gen.
Francisco Gonzales ordered it deliv
ered to Gen. George Boll here. The
mare will prnbnldy lie sent to Llenti-n
ant Adair's relatives in Portland, Ore.
DIAZ'S GOVERNMENT.
BROWNSVILLE, Tex., Oct. 18.
Felix Diaz lias set' up a provisional
'government in the Mexican state ol
Oaxaca, if specimens of copper and
.silver coins reaching the border to
'lay are to be relied upon.
MRS. J. L. ORIGHT JOLTED OUT
OF CAR AND PAINFULLY INJURED
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Mrs. John L. Bright was the vie
I
BXtiemely painful, although
i turn into the Valley View
ru " d - In doing this the car took quiffl
a bump, and while it did not affect 1
1,1 11 > P least those riding in the front,
1 * - SPPm cd to catch Mrs. Bright in just i
the position to jolt her entirely out of
She alighted upon her hip
sustained severe -
placed back in tlie
the position to jolt her entirely
the
and shoulder
bruises. Sin
car and Dr. 'I. H. Pleasants was called
to attend her as soon as she reached
her xipertinents. j
IQUAKE IN
GEORGIA
.
South Rocked and Swept
by a Tropical Hurri
cane at Same Time.
WIND IS TERRIFIC
While a Tropical Hurricane Was Flay
ing the Gulf Coast, Earth Tremors
Overturned Chimneys and Fright
ened Many People From Their
Homes In Georgia, Alabama and
Tennessee — The Earthquake Did
Little Damage, but the Wind, Which
Reached a Velocity of 114 Miles an
Hour, Sank Many Vessels.
ATLANTA, Ou„ Oct. 18.—Tho south
j"as rocked by earthquake and swept
by storm at the same time today,
'bile a tropical hurricane was flay
ing the gulf coast, earth tremors over
'" i " m a,,d »>*">'
People from their homes in Georgia,
Alabama and Tennessee.
1 lie earthquake did little damage,
but n wind that reached a velocity of
MU miles an hour, lifted roofs from
bouses at I'ensiicoln, Flu., and sunk
11 number of vessels In the harbor.
One life was lost.
Mobile reported that it bad been
touched more lightly, although thc
Mind blew 110 miles an hour. Two
small buildings were destroyed and a
negro woman was killed by n live
|»irr Shipping at Mobile had been
warned and apparently suffered little
barm. Two river steamers were sunk.
a schooner and a steamer were driven
ashore and sinal! bouts were lost
The earth shocks were felt shortly
n,, '' r * o'clock and were severest li
Montgomery and llirmingham, Ala.
"'here swaying office buildings wer
emptied w '
i It li in
few minute
In
three towns ehiiiineys were destroyed
jimd articles were hurled from shelves
in lealflnnoea and simps. Klsawliere
no damage was reported,
The earthquake wns felt as far north
-as Louisville. Kv, and east to Au
pasta, Ga. Ita duration wns nliout
[three minutes and there were two
shocks.
i The hurricane had been sweeping
| norlbward from Yucatnn nnd hit lh<
I eoast early today. It had moved well
j Into the interior tonight with do
I creased Intensity and shipping was
notified hy weather effect) Hint nil
danger was past on the sea.
Mobile was struck early In the day
and wire communication went down
in a short time. Soon Pcmacoln, too.
was cut off and not until tonight was
,it possible to reach that city. K«tl
mutes tonight put thc damage In Mo
, Idle at $ If, ,000, hut no estimates had
been made of the loss at I'enaacolu
New Orleans escaped the storm.
Everywhere the high wind wns no
> onipnnied by a torrential downpour
of ruin At Hurrwood, la , there was
a fall of nearly 11 inches during the
day. Montgomery, Ala , was swept, by
a heavy wind anil there was a heavy
rainfall, lint little damage. Houses
were damaged at Opp, Ala., and those
was damage at other small towns
throughout Alabama, Houses and
stores were unroofed at Troy. In
these sections, there w as no foport of
loss of life.
Reports coming in late tnnlftht from
many small towns in Alabama, indi
cated that the damage In rural dis
tricts might reach many thousands
of dollars. Traveling salesmen reach
ing Montgomery told of buildings
blown down and unrooted and of thou
sands of acres of timber being dam
aged throughput Alabama.
THE LAND SALE
L
SATISFACTORY PRICES REALIZED
FOR STATE ACREAGE, CON
SIDERING CONDITIONS.
CONSIDERATION NEARLY $200,000
Tlie sale of state lands conducted
at the coun house yesterday morning
occupied only a couple of hours, be
ing over around 11 o'clock, when Uio
calling of the list was completed, hi
all 21,"GG acres were offered and of
this total, 12.977 acres were sold, the
total consideration being $192,608.
The average price paid per aero
was $14.82, wlUi $30.50 as the maxi
mum price paid anil $10 the minimum.
Tliis summarizes the sale, but it
must be remembered that fully 80
per cent of the land offered is out
side of the Judith basin proper, some
of it being 30 miles from a railway,
in view of tlu-se facts, the officials
are well satisfied with the sale.
Those in Charge.
Thc officials in charge of the sate
Sidney Miller, register of state
i Rnd s; Charles A. Whipple state land
agent; John Van Hook, engineer and
George Hopkins, the auctioneer The
first sale made was at $11 an acre
aI „i from then ou tlie pareels were
disposed of rapidly.
_____ j_________
Walter Maloney, engineer ou the
Great Northern, leaves today for St.
Paul, being called here on account of
sickness.

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