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The Powder River County examiner and the Broadus independent. [volume] (Broadus, Mont.) 1919-1935, March 04, 1921, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036256/1921-03-04/ed-1/seq-4/

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TRAVEL BY STAGE IN THE EARLY DAYS
OF MONTANA; HOLLADAY GREAT FIGURE
*
A Sixty-Year-Old Concord Conch that Made Regular Trips Out of Virginia City in the Early Days
In the autumn of 1861 comple
tion of the telegraph ended the use
fulness of the pony express. "Never
before or since had mail been carried
so fast, so far, and so long merely
by horse power." But the cayuse of
the plains was not matched for elec
tricity and the day of the express
was done. It had been an immeasur
able factor in holding together the
bond of sympathy between widely
distant communities and this had
been national in its importance. Un
fortunately, however, the income was
in no wise commensurate with the
expenditures and the rashly splendid
venture brought ruin to Russell, the
man who had conceived it, and to
the firm to which he belonged.
The great figures in the overland
stage are Butterfield. Russell, Majors
and Waddell and Ben Holladay. Dur
ing the last years of the stage traf
fic the business became more precari
ous. Indian troubles consequent up
on the building of the railroads made
travel dangerous. New concerns
started in opposition and the old
firms had many powerful enemies.
Captain James L. Fiske with his
famous emigrant train had blazed a
new way from Minnesota to Montana
and he, upon his return to the east
over the stage line of Ben Holladay.
denounced that line of travel in un
equivocal terms. Henry Villard was
also a hostile critic. Nevertheless the
old stage coach magnate was a re
markable man. E. P. Paxson says of
him:
'Under Holladay's control the pas
senger and express service were
developed into what was probably
the greatest one-man institution in
America. He directed not only the
central overland, but spur lines with
government contracts to upper Cali
fornia, Oregon, Idaho and Montana.
He traveled up and down the line
constantly himself, attending in per
son to business in Washington and on
the Pacific."
Twelve Producing Wells
Contributing to Mitchell
Royalties' Treasury
The Mitchell Koyaltie* own royalty interest* in the famous WlMacbultz,
Joe Miller and Catlett lease*. Twelve completed and producing well* In the
heart of the Cat Creek glory hole are now paying, or are ready to pay, royalty
Into the Mitchell treasury. Five additional wells are now being drilled on thla
well proven land. With their completion, the earnings of the Mitchell company,
already considerable, will be increased. It is estimated that by July 1 not leas
than 25 wells will have been finished on this sure shot land. And every well
drilled on these leases must pay a proportion of its earnings to the Mitchell
Royalties Company.
MITCHELL DIVIDEND NO. 1
MITCH ELI. ROYALTIES COMPANY, THROUGH PRESIDENT A. R.
MITCHELL, ANNOUNCES THAT A DIVIDEND OF ONE PER CENT
WILL BE PAID TO ALL STOCKHOLDERS OF RECORD FEBRUARY
25. THE DIVIDEND WILL BE PAID ON MARCH 1. 1**L
The MITCHELL PETROLEUM GROUP trill drill a well on the northeast
quarter of 21, which la right in the center of Mitchell holdings. If a producing
well sheald he brought la by thlo drilling It trill mena Um immediate drilling
ef fear additional wells.
The Mitchell Royalties company also controls nine and three-eights gar mat
royalty In te rns t la the Mitchell leaae. IN acres. Adjoining thla lease the Fronte
company to drilling n troll *40 fast north of Frants d i ses va r y wall No. L which,
la spile of Inco m pe t ent drilling, to prod seing 1M hnmals of oil dally. If a pre
daring well le hrooght la by thlo drilling. It lo the In tea lion of thorn la con
trol of the Mitchell Royalties company to withdraw nil stock f re e s ante. It
might he well for all them contemplating purchasing stock la the Mitchell Roy*
eitles in make lamnedlato appUeatlea.
Thors to no toward la baying shares In the Mitchell Royalties at (LB par
stows, non nates cablet aatherised root teiltet tea gMO.MS. It la no nearly a stash
as nay Investment la the proven Oat Crook eeeatry ana possibly be. All the
Mg pro d seers will pay cash Into the tmnsnry of the Mitchell Royalties ovary
month, and In In w earing volume no the district to deve lo p e d.
The officers and dimeters of the com p a n y am R. Leonard DeKalh,
A. B. Mitchell Prank Lebert. end Marte C. G r aves oil p r om la m t
If y«n weald taka advantage of this exceptional apport unity,'fill ant the <
pen below and atoll at oa mi
MITCHELL ROYALTIES COMPANY,
3M Montana Bldg., Lewletown, Mont.
Enclosed please find chock for $-
script too for stock.
Nstoe----------
Address
for which eater ay eub
MMA
Towards the close of 1866 Holla
day sold out to Walls, Fargo & Com
pany. In May, 1869, the Union and
Central Pacific railway was com
pleted and the overland stage was a
relic of the past.
Having considered the trans-con
tinental traffic system we shall now
turn our atention to that of Mon
tana.
Immediately after the settlement
of Alder Gulch, a stage line was
established by A. J. Oliver between
Bannack and Salt Lake City. Not
long thereafter, there was a stage
coach service connecting the leading
camps of the territory. The Mon
tana Post of Saturday, January 20,
186, published at Virginia City, con
tains a most interesting table of
stage departures. It says that
Smith's stage leaves for Gallatin
every Monday; Oliver's to Helena,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, fare
$25. The overland stage for the east
leaves Sunday, Tuesday, Thursday
and Saturday, fare to Salt Lake, $75
in bankable dust.
The stage coach travel in Montana
differed little from the overland traf
fic. It was precarious, uncertain and
dangerous. The drivers were often
drunken and reckless, the roads over
mountain grades were unsafe, Indi
ans lurked in the canyons, and far
worse than the Indians were the road
agents.
The stage stations were conspicu
ous for the lack of accommodations
—"Dirty Woman's Ranch" was the
vulgarly descriptive name of one
stopping place of early days. An
anecdote illustrative of the operating
conditions is told of the late Col. W.
F. Sanders.
On one of his political campaigns
he stopped fatigued and hungry at
a typical mountain station. Noticing
that he did not seem to relish the
meal set before him, the proprietor
said:
"Colonel, ain't your egg hard
enough?"
"The whole damned breakfast is
hard enough," was the prompt re
tort.
The comfort of the passengers was
a matter of small concern compared
with the safe transportation of the
treasure carried by the earliest
coaches. The large shipments of
gold dust were the coveted spoil of
the road agent and the hold-up
of the stage became a matter of
ordinary occurrence and often of
fatal consequence.
BIG PARKWARK
TRAVEL EXPECTED
INQUIRIES COMING IN FROM ALL
PARTS OF EAST AND EUROPE
ON TOURING CONDITIONS
Headquarters of Highway Associa
tion In Denver Putting Out Pam
phlet in Which Points of Interest
in Various Communities Along the
Trail Are Described.
In anticipation of heavy travel this
summer over the National Park-to
Park Highway, the association fur
thering the movement is preparing a
pamphlet in which points of interest
of this and other communities on the
route will be mentioned, for the
guidance of road tourists. Side trips
will be featured.
An inquiry sheet has been sent to
every chamber of commerce or com
mercial club for information con
cerning drives, auto camps and other
things in which the traveler is in
terested. This slogan is passed along
to the towns: "Help the auto travel
er linger a little longer in your com
munity."
Inquiries are coming to the gen
eral offices in Denver, not only from
the east, but also from Continental
Europe, as to the wonders to be seen
on such a trip. The principal of a
private school in Holland asked for
details of the trip in the expectation
that some of the wealthy families
of the children might desire to make
the journey.
The road pamphlet will be of equal
importance and service to all cities
and towns, and for this reason each
is to be allotted a certain number for
distribution, according to the plans
of Gus Holms, secretary-manager of
the association. He believes west
erners are going to use the Park-to
Park highway, or part of it, to reach
the particular transcontinental high
way they desire to travel over in go
ing east.
Likewise, the easterner, or south
erner, in choosing any one of a dozen
transcontinental highways to jour
ney westward, comes in contact with
the Circle Highway on the eastern
slope of the Rockies. The road pam
phlet will convince him. in the esti
mation of Mr. Holm's, that a visit to
one or more of the national parks is
feasible and desirable.
Tourists may be induced to stay
over here for another day or two
through this plan.
-o—--
Cutieura Soap for th s Complexion.
Nothing better than Cutieura Son;
daily and Ointment now and hen ai
needed to make the complexion dear,
scalp clean and hands soft and white.
Add to this the fascinating, fragrant
Cuticnra Talcum and you have the
Cutieura Toilet Trio.—Adv.
---
Wlnnett Boom Is On
Two cars of casing went down to
Winnett for the West Dome com
pany a few days ago. ... Altogether
there were probably 10 cars of ma
terial for the oil companies operating
in Cat Creek.
Perfect Pancakes
Pflop! They are in your plate lour deep—steamy, brown,
luscious pancakes, made from Ceretana Pancake Flour—a
perfect blend of Montana wheat and corn. You could eat
a dozen more. They're so wonderfully good! They wouldn't
hurt you either—so feathery light are they, so fluffy.
The secret of Ceretana Pancake superiority is two-fold.
First, the exactly proper proportions of wheat and corn.
Montana's mile-high farmlands—teeming with fertility—
could tell you the rest.
Why not have Ceretana Pancakes for breakfast tomorrow?
Money back if you say so. The cost is small.
Ceretana
PANCAKE
Montana Flour Mills Co.
Hsrlowton, Lewittown, Great Fall« and
leicmui, Montana. Manufacturtrs of
Safphirb Floue
"ürV Th* Winn"
W.
STATE TAX LEVY
MAY BE BOOSTED
HOUSE MEASURE PROVIDING
FOR TAX OF 4 11-30THS
MILLS FOR STATE
State Tax Levy for 1020 For AU State
Purposes and On AU Property Sub
ject to Taxation Was 2 39-40ths
MUls; Levy Therefore UUp Nearly
Two MUls.
Provision for support of the gov
ernment of the state is made for the
next two years in House Bill 380, in
troduced by a committee on ways
and means, which provides for a
levy on all property in Montana sub
ject to tax, for state purposes. Un
der this bill the levy is 4 ll-30ths
mills for 1921 and 4 17-30ths for
1922.
The levy includes a tax of 3 1-2
mills for the general fund. Of this
two mills is to be used directly for
general fund purposes and 1 1-2
mills is provided for the university
maintenance fund in compliance with
initiative measure No. 18, which was
voted upon at the last election and
approved. By the terms of this law
the funds derived from the 1 1-2
mill levy must be paid into the gen
eral fund. The levy is the same for
both 1921 and 1922.
The bill also provides a levy of
4-10ths of one mill for 1921 for in
terest and sinking fund to retire the
state council of defense bond issue.
The same levy for 1922 is 3-lOths of
one mill. «.
The veterans' welfare commission
BEAVER
AND OTHER RAW FURS caught with
in the law, made Into coats, capes, coat
ees, stoles, scarf* and muffs. All work
guaranteed. WE BUY RAW FURS.
RICHARD P. HOENCK
Montana'* Leading Farrier
SS6 North Main St. BUTTE. MONT.
S. 0. HUSETH
Optician
GREAT FALLE. MONTANA
u
k.' Makr
cuts:
Me
h ! 1
1 \ (. \<
\ \ 1 \ l.
( < )M
1* AM
bond fund is given a levy of 1 1-15th
mill for 1921 and the same for 1922.
For initiative measure No. 19, the
$5,000,000 school bond issue, the
levy is 2-5th of one mil! for 1921
MONTANA'S OIL
BELONGS TO YOU
The Almighty placed oll Uder oar bills ud valleys as auch tor year beaeflt as
for aayeae else. It belongs to yea If yoa will advaaee a few dollars te help drill
the wall*. Thoasaads are becomlag wealthy by bayiag aalte la driUiag syndicates.
"58" Petroleam Unite am new worth HUN each on the open market. Merer-Schwarts
Units, Macdoaald, Unit-Eleven, Blackbnrn ud many ethers are worth doable or more
than they were n few weeks ago. The CAT CBEEK CENTEM SYNDICATE, with the
choicest lea «es In the very heart af the proven Cat Creek field, shows promise of sar
paeslng thorn all. Three wells, one u each lease, are to bo eoauneacod at ones. Thla
Is the Syndicate which haa dee d ed Ito leasee ta the LBWISTOWN STATE BANK as
Trustee for the Unitholders ud haa arruged for the Pipe Liu Company to make all
payments for Syndicate all direct ta the Lewletown State B a nk to bo divided pro rata
each month among the Unitholders. The Treaaarer of the CAT CBEEK CENTEB SYN
DICATE Is uder a Surety Band leaned by the HAETFOED ACCIDENT A INDEM
NITY COMPANY In favor of the U ait holders. Thas, year fonda ara absolatoly pro
tected from the time yoar chock lo mailed ae lang aa all la prodaced on the leases. It
Is this "Safety Pirat" feature aad the "Provu Acreage" la the heart of the field that
make* CAT CHEEK CENTEB SYNDICATE Ualts the beet Invest meat that ever came
ant of u oU field.
UNITS
$100
Each
/•*.g «Î» \
//% Drilling \
' O
a « <»/
CASH or
Monthly
Payments
wmmimmm
I i/n-rr ri r
SYNDICATE
The derricks shew locatloa of Isaacs swasd by the CAT CREEK CENTEB SYNDICATE.
Nate haw they parallel the predaclag field at Jut the right dtotaaeo "northward."
CAT CREEK CENTER SYNDICATE
HOME OFFICE, LBWISTOWN, MONT.
CAPITAL, $150,000.00. ( 1,500 UNITS
TEUSTEES
*• 4. KELLY, Begteter U. A Land Office, Lewtetewa, Ms
M. R. MARTIN, Atteraey-at-Law. Lewlatewa. Moat.
M. C. RLBORN, OU Opera to r, Lewlatewa,
BARTON à COMPANY, Fiscal Agiota
211 Bank Electric Building, Lewittown, Montana
ORDER BLANK
BARTON A COMPANY. LBWISTOWN. MONTANA.
Ualt........ af the CAT Cl
reaches yoa after Um ad<
Mall certificate ta addrsaa
shock for $------------------------as paymeat la fall for
CENTER SYNDICATE at SMS each. If this order
la pries to SMS each. RETURN MY CHBCKat
ADDRESS...
and 7-10ths for 1922.
The state levy for 1920 for all
state purposes and on all property
subject to taxation was 2 30-40ths
mills. -

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