OCR Interpretation


The Powder River County examiner and the Broadus independent. [volume] (Broadus, Mont.) 1919-1935, November 25, 1921, Image 3

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036256/1921-11-25/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

THE POWDER RIVER COUMTY
Huso Complin.....Editor and Manager
O* G Craw...........Associate Editor
rrauiaiD ivwr niDAT
•VNORimOl «ATM
On« Tear (lnadvanoo)..........UN
1:8
»«Haiittnu Mart Ba Bai« laXleaim
Official Paper (or Powdor River County.
Montana, and tta Only Paper Printed
Within County. *7 Miles «rem the
Nearest Railroad.
Entered aa second-close mall matter
Anguat Ifc Ml*. at the Poetofllce at
Broadua, Mont., under the Aet of
Maroh h MU
Advertising rate* upon application.
.NOVEMBER, 1921
iE® Sill®*
1
bbi
u
SENATOR WARREN ASKS CONSID
ERATION OF NEW TAX REFORM.
—SAYS PRESENT DEPRESSION IS
TRACED TO UNJUST TAXATION OF
Wl'R PRODUCERS.
<T3y Franchi E. Warren.)
(Editor's Note.—Francis E. Warren
of Wyoming is chairman of the com
mittee on appropriations for the Uni
ted States senate. As the nation knows
this means he must l»e a man of un
usual ability, cf a wide knowledge, of
keen appreciation of financial piob
lems and situations and an expert of
economics. On him rests a responsi
bility that woul'l stagger the average
man and to him there looks 100.000,000
citlsens for the wise distribution of
the vast sums to which they contrib
ute.)
With congress in a turmoil over
proposed Important changes in our
revenu^ laws and being swamped
with means of advice from economists
—real and theoretical—with unfavor
able business conditions, signs of de
pression. stagnation, passing of divi
dends, withdrawal of money frein in
vestment and failures here and there,
the only clear ray of light is one thut
points out the why of the condition
arid that why seems to be the present
methods of taxing incomes and excess
profits, methods so drastic that in
some cases the yauinunt to practical
confiscation.
Figures, often tricky things at best,
indicate that with $6.500.000,000 on de
posit in this country distributed among
11,500,000'depositors that every depos
itor should have $570 and every inhub
itant $62. On the face of it this may
seem a small sum for the average
"free-born American" to show for
period cf toil that may be many years
yet taken in comparison with the av
erage of only $158 per depositor in
the world's figures of savings Tt is to
be seen that we citizens of U. S. A.
did hoed the warning, guiding cry of
war-times, "economy, thrift and con
servatibn."
With savings depositors to Ihe nuni
ber of one-tenth of our population;
with Liberty Bond holders estimated
to number between fifteen and twenty
millions, less, of course, than there
were during and immediately follow
ing actual war times—we may safely
depend upon the stability of our cor
poration and believe I hut our Tom
Jcneses and Bill Smiths and other
stockholders are not holding a listen
ing ear in the direction of the voices
that preach radicalism, communism, or
some other ism, by whatever name,
that may propose departure frem the
safe and sane policies of our govern
ment.
As fellow-stockliolders. all of us arc
keenly alive to tke fact that, in the
Interest of goed business and the
smooth running of our corporate rna
qhlnery, we must raise money for our
expenses with the least possible dis
turbance to business progress if we
would attain the highest success.
Much has been said and written
about the lax scheme in Canada,
which has without doubt brought Into
the Canadian treasury a huge stum
and apparently no burden has been
felt by the taxpayers. Indeed, one
writer referred to the levy as "a pain
less tax,'' and, if any tax can bo truth
fully called painless, the sales tax of
Canada seems to justify the descrip
lion. It became effective in May. 1920
and, in its first year cf operation, levy
lng a rate of two cents on the dollar
yielded $50,000.000 in revenue. A slm
ilar levy in our country would, it is
estimated, yield about six hundred mil
lions annually. Without doubt
would he fair to all: wculd put a pre
mlum upon economy, and yet could
not' be said to carry any extra ltnpo
sition upon tke luxuries and extrava
ganees of those who do not want to
be economical. The distribution
other words, would he universal; the
collection would be economical; chances
1er dishonesty and evasion would be
minimised.
•But regardons of the fact that our
own country'has already had consider
able experience with sales taxes as
Imposed by the Acts of 1917 and 1918
the administration of which has been
satisfactory and successful, there
seems to be a hesitancy on .the part
of congress to do away with the oner
oub, annoying lines of taxes so diffl
cult and expensive to collect, and to
udopt instead—even on trial— some
sort of sale8-tax plan.
Chambers cf commerce, business and
commercial organisations of all sorts
throughout the entire country, aad
* many individuals generally, have ad
vocated the proposition as the most In
telligent, falreat. and least rppresslve
of all forms of taxation. The Indorse
ment of nur others would no doubt
follow If more thught were given by
the rum cf taxpayers to the tact that
tho men of modest Inoomes are really
finally paying the big surtaxes of tho
rich—for It is a (act that the more
the latter's Incomes arc taxed, the
more tt Is added to the price of the
product from which such incomes are
derived. A sort of endless-chain af
fair, and veritably a chain that has
all hound tight!
How much better would he a more
universal distribution of the burden—
for we must have taxes, and Incomes
must be taxed. How much better It
would be to have a simple, workable
plan that would nc-t cause hindrance
investments, withdrawal and with
holding of capital from Industrial
channels, and tho incidental tightness
and tenseness that mal{e living condi
tions mere or less unsatisfactory to
everybody.
If it should appear that there la
Justification fer hesitancy on the part
* congress to try forthwith a general
sales-tax plan similar to that which
Canada has adopted, which taxes the
sales of middlemen as well as manu
facturers, why not try the plan pro
posed by Senator Smoct, to levy a man
ufacturers' and producers* t«x of three
per cent on goods sold for consump
tion or use without further process of
manufacture?
Or, If not that plan, why not try a
modified general consumption qr "turn
over" tax plan, levying a half of one
per cent, or even a quarter of one per
cent, or such rate as may bo estimated
produce the required amount of rev
enue, not to be applicable to food
stuffs and products, but tc- apply to
expenditures.
The proof of any tax plan Is in the
working thereof—and in the working
only. Hence my belief In giving the
snles-tax theories a test.
Each stockholder in our vast corper-.
ation knows that simplicity In man
aging our affairs, the elimination of
red tape and of complex regulations
that can be understoed only l«y ex
perts—and about: which even experts
disagree, go that regulations have to
further regulated — would mean
more sucess In our business; in other
words, more prosperity in way of "div
idends" fc-r all.
So it Is up to us to strive toward a
time when thrift and production may
receive every encouragement from our
board of directors: when useless ex
travugance may be In the same degree
discouraged. If we werk together
conscientiously toward that end. we
shall surely again see normal times,
reduction of prices, and the sort of
prosperity to which we are entitled.
We can be Just as patriotic in peace
times as we were in war times. And
now. ns much as in the days cf war,
the time when the United States of
America. Incorporated, "needs a friend.
as
to
by
tho
PRINTERS* INK IS MAGICIAN'S WAND
FOR DIXIELAND — ADVERTISING
EXPKHT TKI.I.S OF AWAKENING
AND ITS FUTURE,
flly St. Elmo Miissengaie.)
(kl lor s Note.—Si. Elmo Masstqigulc
the leading figure in advertising cir
cles in the South. As most people
know, the big advertising, experts of
teday is a man of wide knowledge,
real executive ability and in constant
nd close touch with the economics
needs and conditions of 'the territory
herein his work lies. Whatever the
head of the Massengale agency says
ill be accepted us absorbing facts by
the merchants and leaders of the South
nd can bo accepted by those, of tho
orth ns tho note of authority.)
l'i> to a few years ago capital was
net sought in or did it hurry to the
South. l>ixio was considered as a pretty
section of tin country about which one
should and often did—write songs,
novels and dramas mainly remarka
for an impossible negro dialect and
the number of roses that intruded upon
every scene and setting'.
Cash, as the country considered its
se in Dixie, was a petty contrivance
used strictly as a medium of exchange
nd not as a power of development.
With blind allegiance the Scuth clung
to cotton as its great and only staple
and the shifting market on that single
staple spelled relative poverity of af
luenee for the territory south of the
Mason-DIxon.
A change has ocrai- to Dixie. It still
as its roses and its negro population,
but added to that has come a great
outpouring of industrial blood through
the veins of southern progress and in
instant response tho South has devel
opend until from a weak and pretty
sister in a cotton gown it 'stands to
day an industrial power to be reck
oned with inutile offices cf the world's
greatest banking, transportation, de
elopment and commercial units.
Figures m&y weary the average
ader, hut beneath them lies a ro
mance greater than any fictionist ever
drew with swift running pen if .one
has but the ability to see and under
stand. Of the entire output of the
United States in corn the South gives
51 >£ per cent, of tobacco 81 7-10, po
tato 92 per cent, peanut 99 9-10. apple
16 9-10. rice S5 per cent and sorghum
syrup 85 per cent. The annual peach
croP Is nearly $14.000,000. sugar cane
syrup $90,000.000. oats $175.000.000,
wheat $800,000,000 and cotton $2,000.
000,000, with a live stock value in the
South cf $2,500,000.
The South's development~~as an ag
ricultural, dairy and live stock coun
try is due to one cause more than all
others. Advertising was the force that
changed the South from a one-crcp to
a varied-crop and live stock section. It
was not until the Souther nnewspaper
and farm paper publications bad given
the widest publicity to the benefits to
be derived from varied crops and live
stfok raising that Southern farmers
could be induced to dethrone "King
Cotton." It took years of continuous
advertising on the part of these far
seeing Southern publtcaticns 'to sell
the Southern farmers on the idea that
prosperity depended not upon one kind
of a crop, but upon many kinds of
crops.
While the Southern newspaper and
farm paper publtcaticns were never
directly paid for such advertising, the
resultant prosperity of the South has
repaid them many fold for the space
so generously donated for the upbuild
ing of the Southern states agricultural
Interests.
But advertising has been not cnly
the means of building up the South ag
riculturally. It has built up the South
industrially from practically a minus
quantity, so far as manufacturing in
dustries were concerned, to a point
where Southern Industries rival the in
dustries of the other sections cf our
country. 1
It was only a quarter of a century
or
to
It
the
rf
his
his
of
fin
his
a
to*
of
of
in
ly
at
a
or so ago when Southern people had
to obtain even the simplest cf manu
factured commodities from the North.
It was this condition which Inspired
the late Henry W. Grady, the beloved
publicist of the South, to write in on«
rf his editorials, as follows;
"It was a one-gallnused follow,
whose breeches struck him underneath
his armpits and hit him at the other
end about the knees. He did not hu
licve in decollete clothes. They buried
him in the midst of a marble quarry.
The}' cut through solid marble to mark
his grave and yet, the little tombstone
that they placed above him was from
Vermont. They buried him in the heart
of a pine forest and yet, the pine cof
fin was imported from Cincinnati. They
buried him within touch of an iron
mine and yet, the nails in the coffin
and the iron in the shovel that dug
his grave were imported from Pitts
burgh.
"They buried him beside the host
sheep-ratsing country on the face of
the earth and yet, the wool in tho
coffin bands themselves came from the
North. The South did not furnish a
thing cn earth for that funeral but
the corpse and the hole in the ground.
"And they laid hint away, and the
clods rattled down upon the coffin. And
they burled him in a New Vorlt coat,
a Boston pair of shoes and R pair cf
breeches from Chicago and a shirt
from Cincinnati, leaving him nothing
to* carry into the netx world to remind
of the land frem which he came, and
for which he fought for four years,
but the chilled blood In his veins ami
the marrow In his bones."
It was advertising that changed the
South that Henry W. Grady pictured.
Today Southern people, may buy Scut li
era made shoes, hats, suits, gowns,
steam engines, automobiles and, in
fact, almost any commodity that, h
made anywhere In the United States.
Not only are Southern made goods
sold in the South, but the yare tu de
mand and are shipped to all parts of
our own countr.vjand to foreign coun
tries.
The upbuilding cf the South indus
trially has been due to advetrising. The
success experienced by the few South
ern manufacturers who first had the
courage to advertise encouraged not
only other Southern capital to enter
the industrial field, but brought cap
ital from ether sections of the coun
try to start manufacturing plants In
the South.
These new manufacturers In their
turn advertised and became success
ful, At the present time some of this
country's largest advertisers, doing an
annual business amounting to millions
of dollars, are manufactureras located
in the Scuth.
The growth of the South Industrial
ly has in Its own turn made the rapid
growth of Southern cities. During the
past twenty-five years there have boon
Southern cities that have doubled their
population, not once but time after
time.
The South today lias a »umber of
eitles which have developed into great
distributing centers. In these cities
are huge distributing and jobbing
houses representative of practically
every line of merchandise. Of so much
importance as distributing centers
have certain Southern cities become,
that hundreds of manufacturers locat
ed In other sections of the country
have -chosen them as locations fov im
portant branch houses.
Advertising, however, did not stop
at developing the South agriculturally
and industrially. It developed the
South as a groat winter playground.
There was a time when the South as
a winter resort was neglected. Ad
vertising lias changed all this an uuw
Southern resorts entertain thousands
of visitors uring the months when the
North has Its Inclement weather.
Advertising has acquainted people
with and sold to them Southern in
dustrial and agricultural products. It
has built up Southern cities and peo
pled the Southern resorts with visi
tors. It is recognized by Southern
people as the greatest factor in the
South's rapid development of its lands
and mineral resources.
To so great an extent do Southern
people believe in the power of adver
tising that New Orleans has already
made a large advertising expenditure
in telling people of its many advant
ages. Tlie state of Georgia is planning
tc- conduct an advertising campaign
extending over a period of years.
Savannah. Ga., and Montgomery, Ala.,
are each to put on an advertising
campaign to tell the rest of the world
the advantages of locating in a South
ern city. Proving that they believe
In and practice what they preach, the
Southern Newspaper Publishers' asso
ciation has conducted a remarkably
successful advertising campaign sell
ing the South to tlie rest of the United
States. There is not another section
of the United States which believes
more in advertising or shews greater
results from advertising than the
Southern States.
What has been accomplished in the
past by the South through advertising
is only a promise of what it will ac
complish in the future with its vast
mineral resources, its wonderful agri
cultural facilities, an its growing in
dustries all backe by the power of
avcrlising.
they
botii
near
are
der
at
riod.
are
well
are
ing
corn
a
but
Now
and
last
eent
of
is
eent
ers.
in
the
sas
age
and
er
the
as
ing
ter
a
as
AA
on
he
Human Parasites
Tt lias always been our impression
that only a very small part of our
population failed to work at some use
ful or gainful occupation, so It came
rather as a surprise to learn from a
recent book on management that more
than one-fourth of our adult popula
tion is composed of parasites.
By parasites, we do not mean the
children under 16, nor the men and
women over 65, nor the sick and dis
abled, nor the women in homes. Ex
elusive of all these, if this outhor's fig
ures are correct, there are 26 per cent
cf the people In this country that do
not w-ork in normal times when work
is plentiful.
It really looks as though one of the
things we need in this country is
fuller appreciation of the dignity and
value of gcod hard, old-fashioned
work.—Exchange.
Too Much Credit
A subscriber, writing, to a-magazine,
complains rf treatment given certain
industries by tbe government, and an
excerpt is:
"My Government, you have spoiled
me; now yon ure ruining me! Far bet
ter If you had never given mo any
credit at nil, then I would not have
made so much to lose."
STOCKMEN FEEDING THEIR
OWN CATTLE ON COHN IN NEIL
(Sheridan Post.)
Many Wyoming and ether western
cattle arc finding their homes this
winter in the eastern corn belt where
they arn being fattened on silage and
straight corn feed. From Sheridan
county Tip Wilson and E. C. Bowman,
botii ranchers In tho Big Horn section,
have shipped their cattle to a peint
near Broken Bow, Neb., where they
are being fed corn for tile winter un
der contract.
These contracts provide for the
weighing In and weighing out of the
cattle in the spring, and cost will bo
at a rate per pound cf the amount of
flesh gained during tho feeding pe
riod. It seems a very good plan for
winter feed and is one which may
prove popular for taking care of more
Wyoming cattle.
For the information of those who
are not thoroughly familiar with the
astern plans of feeding, it may he
well to know that recent experiments
are proving the possibilities In fatten
ing of cattle.
It has not been many years since
corn silage was considered merely as
a feed suitable chiefly for dairy cows
but it has rapidly attained a wide use
among beef producers in the corn belt.
Now all feeding that Is not done on
pasture may be divided Into two
classes—that in which silage is fed
and that in which it is not fed. As a
whole the two classes are now about
qually divided, but in some states the
difference is very marked.
Surveys by the United States De
partment of Agriculture covering the
ent
If
to
on
the
in
in
to
so
last two winters showed that 83 per
nt of 4.556 cattle fed in Indiana re- j
ived silage in their rations, S7 per !
eent of 7,280 In Illinois, 30 per eent of'plied
8,290 in Ic-wa, 8 per cent of 6,129 in '
Nebraska and 50 per cent of 8,964 in
Missouri.
Where silage is used it supplies most
of the roughage. Nearly all the silage
is made from corn, probably 99 per
eent of the total. Sorghum, sunflow
ers. and legumes are sometimes used
in localities on the extreme edge of
the corn belt, such as western Kan
sas and Nebraska and western and
Nebraska and western nnd northern
South Dakota. A greater use of sil
age depends largely upon the supply
and value of other roughage.
The main facts about the use of
silage- in fattening cattle are thus sum
marized by the department.: Tbe great
er tho proportion of silage to corn
the cheaper the gains. The greater tlie
quantity of corn the less silage con
sumed. Silage will not fatten cattle
unless accompanied by concentrates. In
silage most of the cornstalk is used.
Cattle fed on silage will eat more
straw cr stover. Tt purchased protein
feeds are added to the feed, the re
sultant manure is richer.
Siiage fed cattle do not finish quite
as well as those strictly dry-fed. Add
ing corn to the silage produces a bet
ter finished animal that usually brings
a better price, and it also results in
better gains on bogs that follow the
eatle. Silage-fed cattle shrink more
than these fattened without silage.
of
he
is
It.
The price of corn and the value of J
toher concentrates should be a guide I
as to tho limit of corn in a silage j
ration. ]
_________________ j
AA II AT HRADSTREET SAYS
ABOUT THE FAILURES
Bradstreet is the man wno started
the trick of looking about tc keep tab
on business and professional men. Then
he tells the other fellow about it. Re
cently they made a survey from Brad
street's headquarters and figured out
why business men fail. Following are
the reasons given and the percentage:
Incompetence .............38.2 per cent
Lack of capital............30.6 per cent
Special conditions.........11.3 per cent
Fraud .................... 7.0 per cent
Inexperience .............. 5.6 per cent
Neglect ................... 1.7 per cent
Unwise credit ............ 1.3 per cent
Failure of others......... 1.1 per cent
Competition ...... l.l per eent
Speculation ................7 per cent
An education would kncck out 50 per
cent of them.
Tleing ties in collars breeds and pro
vokes profanity.
Many talk a whole lot without say
ing anything.
a
an
WHEN IN MILES CITY
ST®I* AT THE
w
#4»J
SPECIAL BATES by tbe Week
Day Rates $1.00 and Up
************************** I
Î the ROSS NO. 50 SILO FILLER J
* HAS THE FLY WHEEL TYPE «
{ OF CUTTER KNIVES. ITS CA- j
ÿ PACITY IS 15 TO 30 TONS OF J
♦ ENSILAGE PER HOUR WITH *
A IS H. P. ENGINE. IT IS A J
MACHINE THAT DOES T1IE tf
WORK AND AT A LOW COST. O
_ Î
*
—Sold By-— J
THE GENERAL MACHINERY J
A SUPPLY CO. *
IS S 10«h St« Miles City, Mont. *
**************** **********
******* * * *****************
* THE
men store!
1 > HUGH B. REILLY. Proprietor
EVERYTHING IN RAWLEIGH
PRODUCTS
$ RANCH CREEK. MONTANA
I************ *************
SHORT TALKS OH HOMESTEAD MATTERS
By COLA W. SHEPARD, United States Commissioner
MORTGAGING A HOMESTEAD ENTRY
TALK NO. 31
(Copyrighted 1929 by Cola W. Shep
ard. Colony, Wyo.. and published in the
Powder River County Examiner thru
■pedal arrangement.!
Perhaps tlie principle of our pres
ent homestead iuws can be better un
derstood by means of an illustration
than otherwise. Suppose that a wealthy
man owned a large block cf unim
proved land. As long as it remained
unimproved It was of small value, but
If it could be sc,id off in smalt tracts
to industrious people who wculd bu *.I
on it, plow it up, fence it off, destroy
the predatory animals and stock the
land with domestic animals, then the
land would be quite productive end
valuable, and the surrounding land
would also become more valuable.
Now suppose that th's wealthy man,
in order to get the land settled up
and improved, should offer to sell . it
in quarter section tracts fer $25 a
quarter section, nr,.« should make all
sales conditional upon certain tilings
being done. He would enter into a
contract with any person who wished
to buy a piece cf this land on ids
terms, and this contract would give
such person the right to use 1 lie land
so long as he kept tbe contract, and
would contain a provision for giving
him a warranty deed whenever he
cculd show that he had fulls com
of'plied with tlie terms of the contract
Among the terms of the contract
might be a requirement that, the pur
chaser himself should live on the land
for at least seven months of each
year for at least three years, that he
should build y habitable house cn the
land, that he should, within two years
after the contract was signed, plow up
and plant at least ten acres of the
land, and that he should cultivate and
plant to crops at least twenty acres
of the land each year after that, and
that the purchaser should agree that
he was going to make this land his
permanent home. Such a contract
would be very similar to our present
homestead laws, and a man who files
upon a homestead has about the same
rights that such a purchaser would
have before he had completed his con
tract and secured his deed.
If the contract were to contain a
clause stating that it could not be
assigned, but that the purchaser him
self mus fulfill tlie conditions or the
contract would become void, then it
is plain that such a purchaser cculd
not sell the land, or his inti rest in
It. until he had completed his contract,
unless he were able to find some per
son who would advance him some
money and trust him to go .cn and
complete the contract.
So it is with a homestead entry. Tho
entryman has a perfect right to use
a
a
be
on
til
is
he
is
as
be
an d enjoy the land while he is enm
Plying witli the law, and lie can sell
what he produces from the land, or
can lease the pasture from yfiar to
year, but the land Itself remains the
property of tho government until he
has complied with all (he conditions
of the homestead laws, submitted his
final proof and received the final cer
tificate of the register of the land of
ice, shewing that he is entitled to a
patent. Up until this time he does not
own the land, and therefore lie cannot
give a valid mortgage on it. He can,
in
is
T
<
SHORTY'S GARAGE
Milton Turley, Proprietor
Auto Repairing a Specialty. Accessories, Tires
&.ndTubes, Oil and Gas. Efficient Mechanics
GOOD SERVICE

A Full Stock of Ford Repairs, Tires and Tubes,
Gas and High Grade Oil
ALSO GOOD LINE OF GROCERIES
Coalwood
Montana
BROADUS STAGE
Miles City and Broadus daily auto stage connects
with stages from Broadus for Boyes and Piniele,
Graham and Biddle, Pinto and Moorhead Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Saturdays.
BROADUS SI AGE—Milligan House, Miles City.
BROADUS-PINTO-MOORHEAD STAGE
BROADU8-BOYES-PINIELE STAGE —A. F. Edwards. Broadus
.boadUS-GRAHAM-BIDDLE STAGE
****************************************************1
lEpsie Merc. Co
\ GENERAL MERCHANDISE AT LOWEST PRICES
I
I Goods Delivered at Your Door.
I Let Us Figure Your Bill.
%***************************************»********mJ&:
however, give a mortgage which
become valid whenever he complot
his residence and cultivation and
tains his patent to the land, but III:
a mortgage is not valid until the put«
cut is issued, and if, after giving auoll
a mortgage, he should decide to aban
don the homestead, the mortage would
be of no value v. hat ever.
So a person who takes a mortgagn
on a homestead that lias not bMU
completed is taking a chance on the
entryman, and bis mortgage is of no
value unless the entryman goes *»n
and completes the entry, and fc-r this
reason few mortgages are given un
til after the final certificate is issued.
While it is against the law to sell
any part of the land embraced in a
homestead entry until after final proof
is made on tlie entry, it is not against
the law for the entryman to borrow
money to complete his entry, and be
may mortgage the prospective interest
he will acquire without Invalidating
the entry. If. however, he attempts to
avoid the law by giving a mortgage
before he proves up, which mortgage
is to take the land later and is to act
as a conveyance, he may encounter
trouble, for in tlie final proof he will
be asked about any mortgages lus may
have given, and if it appears that un
der cover of a mortgage he has virtu
ally sold the land the patent may be
withheld.
-TAXED TO DEATH .AND
DAMN NEAR HI IVED"
Those who are squirming under tax
ation burdens will read with keen in
terest tlie following letter sent to an
English bank by one of its customers,
explaining why he was unable to re
duce his overdraft. It was embodied
in an address by Harr} Oce, vice pres
ident of the Anglo and London-Paris
National Bank. San Francisco. Here
is the letter:
"Dear Sir: For tin; Tollowlng reasons
T regret being unable to reduce my
overdraft: I have been held up, held
down, sandbagged, walked cn, sat
upon, flattened out and squeezed by
our income tax, tlie super tax. the ex
cess profits tax, war loans, war bonds,
war savings certificates, the automo
bile tax. and by every society nnd or
ganization that the mind cf man con
invent to extract what I may or may
not have in my possession.
"The government has governed my
business so that I do not know who
< wns it. I am inspected, suspected,
examined and re-examined, informed,
required and commanded, so that I
don't know who 1 atn. or why I am
here at all.
"All that I know is that 1 am sup
posed to be an inexhaustible supply of
money for every known need, desire
or hope of the human race, and be
cause I will not sell all I have and
go out and beg. borrow or steal money
to give away. I am cussed, discussed,
boycotted, talked to, talked about, lied
about nnd held up. hung up. robbed
and damn near ruined, and th i only
reason why I am dinging to life now
Is to see what will happen next."
Cupid's anew anil
re both barbed.
il's tail

xml | txt