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The Dupuyer acantha. [volume] (Dupuyer, Mont.) 1894-1904, March 05, 1896, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036266/1896-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DUPUYER
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DUPUYER, TETOÏJ COUNTY, 10OH[T., THUflSfîrïY, jl)fIlRCH 5, 1896.
If O. 26.
J. E. ERICKSOn,
attorney-at-ijaw,
©HOTEAU, - MONT.
James Sulfrove,
BTTO*nEY-flT «lfiw t
Ghoteau, - - Montana.
J.Q.BAIR,
hauiyer,
C hoteau,
M ontana.
CEO. W. lyiflGEE,
justice of tl?e Peace,
D upuyer, M ontana.
J-u.lia.ri F. Burd
Notary Public,
Deeds, Mortgages, and all kinds of
Legal Instruments drawn up.
CHOTEAU, - MONTANA.
T. W. LETT,
"Real Estate and Collections,
All Itustiiess Given Personal Attention.
CHOTEAU. - - MONT.
If. E. JElWIIfS.
CIVIL and HYDRAULIC
EnCINEER.
Pinns and Specifications of Dams and all
construction work a specialty.
C. E. T^ESCOTT,
U. s. commissioner,
Authorized to lteceivo F? lings and l«'lnal
Proofs ou Public Land.
W. M. St. CLfllK,
TJarber and fr{arr Dresser.
CHOTEAU, MONT.
Bath Rooms in Connection.
Ed. SMEft,
33a.rloer Shop,
CHOTEflU, 1VÎONT.
ALL WORK GUARANTEED.
©EI1IS fT)fIHTOn.
Boot and Si?oe leaker.
gHOP IN BÜRD'S STOICK,
ohoteau, . : montana.
BYRON CORSON.
watchmaker ani) jeweler.
Repairing a speciality. Mail
orders solicited. All work
guaranteed.
C hoteau,
M ontana.
W. n- TITUS,
FK/sîcian : and : Surgeon,
»UPUYER, MONT.
«J. E. Wamsley,
Physician and surieoh.
University of Virginia, Jefferson Medical
College, New York Post Graduate.
C hoteau, . . M ont.
H. BEAUPRE,
DENTIST,
Teeth Extracted Without Pain. All
Work Guaranteed.
#h#teau, . . M ont.
Ghoteau - Dupuyer
fe^Al'E LINE.
Bttily Round Trip Between Du»
puyer and Choteau.
Passenger Fare, 3.00
Round Trip, 5.00
Express Rates, 50c per hu*dred
pounds.
The Choteau House
Lîvery Stable,
W M. HODGSKISS, PROP.
First.Class Accommodations For
Sto:k of All Kinds.
•••d Rigs Furnished at Reason
able Rate«.
-THE
Hoiije ^estaüüai)!,
MRS. R. M. STEELE, P roprietress.
First-Class Meals at all Hours.
GOOD 3REÄD, PIES ÄTVD C/tKES FOR SÄLE
C^oteaU, lylont.
<T. W. JIJcK^IGHT,
Park flyeijUe, DUpUyet , fljoîjt.,
-Dealer in
General - Merchandise.
-Our Lines of
JDfy Goods, Groceries,
Boots arjd Sfjoes
ARE THE BEST 11ST ^OlSTTAlSrA
Terms Strictly Cash.
J. Hiûsfjfoerçj & Co.
. Deolcrs in.
Groceries,
Boots and Shoes,
HARDWARE, TINWARE, ETC.,
Dupuyer, - - F?oi\fai\a
We Have Everyil^irjçi
And of the best, usually carried
in stocks of General Merchandise.
We have a big surprise in store
for you.
GEO. A. FRY & CO.,
zbyistttim:, HVCOHSTT.
BUND'S
Casi) Store,
—FOR BARGAINS IN
MEN'S UNDERWEAR
flrjd Fiirrfistjir^s,
Boots and Shoes,
FRUITS ai)d IJOTIOIJS,
OHOTEAU IMIONT.
TJje ©apUyer flcai?tha
S ubscription, $3.00 P eb year.
Published Every Thursday
A Republican Newspaper dovoted to the
Interests of Dupuyer and Surrounding
Communities.
Entered at the post oflice at Dupuyer, Mont.,
as second-olass mail matter.
C. E. Trescott, Publisher.
Last week the senate recognized
the provisional government of Cu
ba belligerent and called upon the
president to use-his good offices
with Spain to secure the indepen
dence of Cuba. This action result
ed on Sunday in a public demon
stration in Barcelona, Spain. In
the afternoon of that day there
were 15,000 people present it a
meeting addressed by orators who
abused the Americans. This fired
the mob and they immediately set
out for the American consulate in
spite of the efforts of their leaders
to detain them. Arriving there
they began to howi against Ameri
ca and for their native country.
This did not long satisfy them and
they began to throw stones at the
building, breaking several win
dows. At this juncture the police
interfered and drove back the mob,
wounaing several. Students tore
up many American flags that they
found in the town and altogether
they had a high old time abusing
America by proxy.
One cf the Madris papers on
Monday declared that the utter»
ançes of the United States senate
consist in an unqualified and un»
reasoning desire for war and add
ed : "If the desire for war was in
response to a fault committed by
Spain the senators would be acom
plishing their duty, but no provo
cation has been given, and the
Americans judge rashly of a Span
ish-Amcrican war.
While all this beUicose talk was
going on across the water the bill
came up before the house on Mon
day and the struggling patriots in
Cut a were eulogized and sympa
thized with in a two hours' debate.
The rules were then suspended and
the resolutions of the house foreign
affairs committee were adopted as
a substitute for those of the senate
by an overwhelming majority of
263 to 17. The enthusiasm of the
members and spectators ran riot
several times and the opponents of
the resolution cut but a sorry fig
ure when thoy attempted a counter
demonstration.
While the people of Montana are
making efforts to secure immigrants
it shoi'ld be borne in mind that it
is not laborers we waut, but men
with money who can develop our
resources. The immigration com
mission should take care not to
offer any inducements to penniless
people who want to change their
residence.
A New Y"ork judge has attracted
public attention to himself by his
refusal to grant naturalization
papers to candidates for citizenship
unable to read and understand the
constitution.
Extracts from Carter's Speech,
The advocates of the free and
unlimited coinage of silver in the
republican party insist upon the
adoption of their views because
they believe that the principle for
which they contend is inherently
and eternally right. Their enthus
iasm in behalf of silver does not
detract from their devotion to
every elementary principle of the
republican party.
Should this bill in its present
form become a law it would either
utterly fail to bring about the re
pose in business affairs anticipated
or it would bring that repose at
the permanent expense of the pro
ducers of so-called raw material
the country over, and with special
injustice to the wool growers of
the nation. The much desired re
pose is not worth the price. The
adjustment would involve a moral
wrong and it would not therefore
be made politically right.
1 do not believe the republican
convention acted in bad faith. On
the contrary I am persuaded that
the principle announced favoring
I
gold and silver as the standard
money of the country was the ex
pression of the crystallized opinion
of well nigh a thousand represen
tative citizens, fresh from their
homes and town meetings, assem
bled in national convention to give
utterance to the views of a great
party on great questions, involv
ing the present and future prosper
ity and well-being of the nation.
It is my candid belief, often ex
pressed, that fully 90 per cent of
the American people favor bimet
allism, as opposed to either gold or
silver monometalism.
The great body of the thought
ful, every-day people of the coun
try understand the situation
perfectly, and if we hold steadily
by plain well known party princip
les the voters will arrange to give
the country relief in due season.
I am a firm believer in.the policy
of protection to American labor
and American industries. A large
majority of the people of Montana
are devoted to this doctrine, and
they have consistently supported
it notwithstanding they are pur
chasers of protected articles gen
erally and only receive a meagre
benefit through the duties on lead
and wool. Their adherence to the
doctrine rests on broad patriotic
views ol enlightened national pol
icy.
If you want a delicious pie get
some of that prepared mince meat
at McKnight's.
The Acantha's Tramp.
The tramp was wanderiug along
the foot of the mountains the other
day looking for a place to eat and
a soft rock on which to lay his head
when he came across his old friend
Sir William Cox. Greetings being
exchanged Sir William invited the
weary wayfarer to his cabin in tha
canyon. On their way they visit
ed several traps. Mr. Cox is en
gaged in trapping wowsers for their
hides and tallow. He has several
fine specimens of wowser skins in
his cabin, and as they bring from
$100 to $150 apiece, he expects to
soon retire from business and re
move to a warmer climate, where
he will engage in catching tugs
and butterflies for a Boston botan
ical society. He has always had a
love for botanical pursuits and will
doubtless nake some wonderful
discoveries. He is constructing a
butterfly net out of wowser sinews
now and has made a compartment
box for grubs out of an old beer
case he swiped from Billy Hägen.
Some county officers were in
Dupuyer last week and so was the
tramp. What a time he did have.
Every last one of them are candi
dates for renomination, and a bet
ter trio never struck town. As
the tramp eratically sid'ed up to
the bar for the steenth time he
swore by the trade of5 a treasurer
he would never go back on such
kind friends. And as he tool: a
soft doze in a chair he dreamed
that it was election time again and
that obnoxious treating and bribe
ry clause in the new codes was
being treated with deserved dis
dain, but he awoke to find that the
good samaritans were gone and he
was left to think the matter over
and drink cold water to cool his
parched tongue. Those codes will
be the means of driving him to
drink with their multiferous discre
pancies (those are good words; he
heard C. L. Bristol use them). The
men who got them up should have
the x rays turned on thier heads in
the interest of the missing link the
ory and the legislature that passed
them should be sent in starch of the
south pole.
"Why don't yon go to work?"
That is the question that ^greets
the tramp most often. A long
time ago he did work • once. It
waa in a country where wages were
good. He got thirty dollars per
month for seven montns and then
the rancher fired him because ho
had no more wortc for him. With
two hundred and ten dollars in his
pocket he wended Ins weary
way to towu, ragged and dirty.
Going to a store he purchased a
suit of clothes for
an overcoat for fifteen, a pair
twenty dollars,
,
of
shoes for five do'lars, underclothes
and socks for eight dollars, over
shirts for six dollars, a hat for five
dollars and got washed, shaved and
brushed up for one dollor. He
then gave the balance of his money
one hundred and fifty dollars, to
the hotel keeper, not reserving
anything for incidental expenses,
and sat down to wait, paying thir
ty dollars per month for Iiis boarc.
At the end of five months his mon
ey was gone and his clothes worn
out. When he was in debt for
board a few dollars he was offered
a job at twenty-five dollars per
month for six months He then!
did a little figuring and before day
break the next morning he stole a
suit of clothes and started "down
along. "
Wm. Clarke & Sons newly in
i vent f d l°ng ; eyed Helix needles
Can be P urchased at McKnight's
State News.
Fire is still raging in the Boze
man tunnel and it is thought that
the entire timber work wili be
consumed.
James Carr.ngton and Robt.
Coryell, two old time counterfeiters
have been arrested in Butte. They
had a full set of counterfeiters'
tools.
J. J. Hill has purchased 300
acres of land for the railroad com
pany just sou'h of the shops and
round house in Great Vails and
comprising the fiat that lies be
twecn the old yard limits and Sun
river. The purchase of this large
tract of land for yard purposes in
dicates that Hill has large ideas of
the future of Great Falls as a rail
road centre, and speaks louder
than words as to what he thinks
about the prospects of Great Falls
111 the years to come.
P. N. Ne'.soti, deputy sheep in
spector, is now visiting the various
camps in Choteau county that are
supposed to need attention and
seeing that quarantine regulations
are complied with. J. O. Pj,tter
sou's flocks have not yet shown
any extensive signs of disease,
ouly a few bucks showing signs of
it and these are being properly
cared for. John Patterson is not
quite so fortunate. ; he has thor
oughly dipped all his rams, abou
150 head of his ews band, and is
isolating the infected sheep as soon
as discovered. J. W. Woodcock
will begin dipping a band of 2,300
head of ewes on Friday next. In
this bunch as well as the buck herd
the disease has shjwii up etroinr
and prompt remedial measures
were considered advisable. C. G
Records is now building a largj
dipping tank in which his outfit
will be treated the Jearly part of
next week.
Alex. Ledeaux, a French ha.f
breed, was taken from the mission
to Great Fall"- last Wednesday be
cause he was deemed insane. At
his examination he told the court
that a wind was blowing in his
cars and he thought Father Red
mond, of the mission, had caused
it to be there, and ai a result he
did not like the church nor those
who attended the sacred edifice.
The Sunday before he secured a
rifle anu concealed himself in the
brush surrounding the chape! and,
just to freighteu them he said, with
a cunning smile, he took a shot at
the crowd as they were leaving the
, , 11. , . .. ,
structure. lhe bullet whistled j
,
31
uncomfortably close to members e
the congregation aud they ran him
down and placed him iu the hands
of Constable Hall, of Cascade, who
took him to Great Falls. Ladeaux
lost his wife recently and it is be
lieved her death unsettled his
mind. He was sent to the Warm
Springe asylum for treatment.
An organization has been formed
which is styled the Saloonkeepers,
Protective Association of Silver
j Bow County. The organization
starts off with about 70 members,
| and it is proposed to enlist in the
| organization all the saloonkeepers
i of the county. I'he object of the
'organization are to work for the!
j protection of the saloon interests,
it being considered that more can
bo done by working together than
by working at sword's points
The saloonkeerers will be or
1
tiauized
all over the state,and there will!
! brobably be a state organization, as
j. , „ ,
1 is the case 111 most Eastern states
The immediate object of the organ-!
ization is to compel everbody to pay
license. It is believed by the sa
loon keepers that favoritism is
j shown by certain officials, and that
! while most saloon men have to pay
a very high license, there are somo
' It is claimed that lots
that
who pay no license at all. The
pi oj actors of the as8ociati n state
that they have no intention of low.
« ring the present license, b t they
will insist that all be treated
alike Another object of the or
ganization is to compel grocery
stores to live up to their licensed
of grocers
n y p iy a whole; ale license
do a retail business, selling beet
! ; nd whisky in small quantities and
i.i some cases actually selling it
behind a bar.
Leave your order at McKnight's
for a pair of spurs with ' youfr
brand inlaid on them.
Choteau.
Postmaster Bard left for Helena
last Sunday on business.
Wm. Morrison, who has been
foreman [jon the Hobbius sheep
ranch for the past two years, left
for Rossland last Monday.
J. C. Ernmerson, who has been
in the county for al out a week
looking after busii ess matters,
returned to his 1 ome i.in Great
Falls on Tuesday.
Thomas Pei rs.ill retu *ned from
the Falls on Thursday and will
a ,-uir.e the role of rani her, having
taken possession of the Chezuia
ranch on the Teton.
Commissioners Jones and Miller
arrived 111 the city on Sunday even
ing and on Monday morning began
grinding the regular ^quarterly
grist of county business.
Wm. Ralsto i is back from Ross
land visiting with his family. Mr.
Ralstor, is jubilant over the pros
pects of the new.mining camp and
believes that it will develop into a
second Outte.
Last Tuesd îvjEùna Beaupre was
eleven ye.irs old and the happy
eve"t was celebrated by about 30
of her girl friends at the Beaupre
House That the little folks had a
good time goes without saying.
O11 Monday Bob Vance was taken
before Esquire Beaupre charged
with disturbing the peace. Upon
a plea of guilty the court gave him
the choice of leaving the county in
21 hours or take a term in the
county jail. oFIo accepted the
former and he is no longer with up.
Last Thursday S. C. Chezum
and family loft for Spokane, Wash
ington, which is to be their future
home. During their sojourn of 10
years in Teton county these good
people have made a host of friends
who arc sorry to lose them. May
they live long, be prosperous and
happy is the wish of all who know
them.
The band boys will give a dance
on Thursday evening for the bene
fit of Mr. Boweu aud family, who
lost their house and all.their house
hold effects and clothing in the fire
'ast week. Mr. Bo wen is a hard
working and industrious citizen
and is in every way worthy of the
efforts of those who are charitably
inclined.
Merchant Mi-Knight, and Ray
Oowell, of Birch creek, stopped in
th î county seat Saturday night on
their way to the Falls. Mr. Cow
e!l says he has struck a four foot
vein of No. 1 coal and feels elated
people of
over thé fact that the
Teton county v\iil not have to send
their money to Canada for fuel any
longer. We trust that his hopes
in regard to the mines may be fully
realized.
' >I0U o' lt ' nt0 Teton county,
Quarantine Notice.
Whereas, the disease known as
scab is prevalent among sheep
ranging in lhe counties adjacent
to the county of Teton,
Therefore I, S. L. Potter, by the
authority ve-ited in me as sheep
inspector, do hereby declare a
quarantine cf all sheep to bo
Any persons,- company or cor
poral ion bringing sheep into Teton
county is hereby notified that they
must uive the sheep inspector due
and full noiiee of such importation
. , r
that such sheep may be examim d
aud if necessary a quarantine da
elared upon the same.
f L P tt
'
A pc.und o good smoking tobac
co and a corn cob pipe for 25 cent»
atMcKnight'a.

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