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The Carbon County chronicle. [volume] (Red Lodge, Mont.) 1924-1924, April 04, 1924, Image 2

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036284/1924-04-04/ed-1/seq-2/

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These are Lie fundamental
Reasons why
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1 A firm and stable
ganization that has built
a uniformly good car of
economical price and
operation.
2 A chassis so designed
and coordinated that it
performs equally effici
entlyund er all conditions.
ô A wide variety of
body types that meets all
individual requirements
and establishes a stand
ard of quality and style.
4 Quick authorized
service available every
where throughout the
life of the car.
or
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When better automobiles are built
Buick, will build them î
We Are Now Showing
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The NEW BUCK MODELS I
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At Our New Garage
South Hauser, Corner of 12th
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We are fully equipped to take care of all car J
service and repairing. The mechanical de- *
partment is under the personal supervision |
o$ Carl Fluke. I
HARRY A. MOORE i
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Buick Dealer For Carbon County
Red Lodge, Montana
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The Osteopathic Way
Dr. L. E. TICHEINOR
Acute and
Chronic Diseases
Treated Osteo
pathically. Fallen
Arches Adjusted
Office Phone House Phone Obstetrical Cases
289-J
Meyer & Chapman
Bank Building
Red Lodge, Montana
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handled
the Ostéopathe
Way
"OSTEOPATHY ADJUSTS—NATURE CURES"
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PAINTS & VARNISHES
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Used Throughout the West Since 1889
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BEFORE YOU
REFINISH YOUR WALLS
—you'll be interested in knowing that you
can obtain any tint effect you may desire in
a finish that is washable. ...
And easy to put on. McMurty Flatcote goes I
on so smoothly that it is called "the liquid |
wallpaper." Never a sign of a brush stroke t\
—no overlap—and then, even after it's been |
on for months a little soap and water makes t
it almost as fresh and beautiful as new.
For a beautiful and thoroly satisfactory wall |
finish you can't beat FLATCOTE and every I
one who has used it will tell you so. By all |
means see a Flatcote color card and samples
before you decorate your walls. It pays.
CLARKS PAINT & PAPER STORE I
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204 So. Broadway
UNIONS ASK NEW
RAIL LABOR LAW
Complain That Present Fed
eral Board Is Unable to
. Adjust Disputes.
Following their repeated objections
to the method of settling labor Its
putes embodlod in the railroad labor
board, the sixteen standard railway
unions have now brought forward the
details of their owu program lor rail
labor legislation.
The program Is embodied In a new
railway labor bill Introduced by
Senator Howell, Republican, Nebras
ka, and Representative Barkley,
Democrat, Kentucky.
Union leaders have beeu working
for eighteen months on the proposed
legislation, and they emphasized that
they are all united In it. In addition,
It has the support of four marine
unions, and also of the American Fed
»ration of Labor.
Asserting that the railroad labor
board has created more dissension
than It has settled, and that the first
nationwide strike In railroad history—
the shopmen's—took place under Its
rule, the unions first cull for aboli
tion of this board, and the whole
theory on which It operated.
Experience has shown, they assert,
that the method of placing disputes
before an Independent and theoretlcal
ly Impartial, governmental body Is
unsuccessful. Disputes can best be
settled, they Insist, by conference be
tween the Interested parties them
selves. with outside arbitrators called
In only as a last resort.
The new bill, therefore, provides
as the first step In the settlement of
any dispute, the calling of a confer
ence between the road and the
affected organization's repreeenta
lives. Either side can ask lor such a
conference, and It must be held with
in twenty days thereafter.
If tills does not dispose of the dis
putes, either side may appeal to on«
of four national adjustment boards,
which divide the jurisdiction of the
various classes of work. Each board
will be mad» up of an equal number
of representatives from the unions
and the roads, appointed by the presi
dent, with salaries of $7.000 a year.
A majority can give a decision, which
must be forthcoming In 90 days.
It Is In these boards that the
unions place their greatest confidence.
The principle has been In successful^
operation on various railroads for
years and on ail roads during fed
eral control, and has also proved Its
efficiency In Canada, It Is asserted.
It Is emphasized that no third party,
possibly unfamiliar with the matters
at Issue. Intervenes in the problems
taken up.
The third step brings In the Im
partial mediators, however. A per
I minent board of five commissioners,
appointed by tlie President for seven
years, with salaries of $ 12.000 each
and headquarters at Washington is
provided. No member can hold a
union office, nr possess railroad se
curities.
Either side to a dispute cun In
voke this mediation board, or the
board can act Itself, If It sees fit. It
Is explained, however, that tills hoard
Is not a court vested with powers
of compulsion, but solely a mediating
and conciliating body.
If It falls. It must then urge ar
The bill provides that the
bltrnficr
arbitrating body shall consist ( of
either one or two representatives from
each party, who In turn shall pick
either one or two Impartial third
If the disputants cannot
parties.
select the Impartial member, or mem
bers. the mediation board Is nuthor
Ized to do so.
General Labor Note»
Wage Increases of approximately 5
per cent were grunted to members of
the Brotherhood of Locomotive Fire
men and Englnemen and Locomotive
engineers by the Delaware, Ijicka
wanna & Western railroad. The ngree
ment Is similar to that reached with
the New York Central.
lu Vienna the bank clerks, stenogra
phers and bookkeepers in offices have
won their movement to have offices
closed at 4 o'clock regularly Instead
of the usual Inter hours that have
ruled pretty well over the world. In
order to get the concession they had
to strike, however.
Longshoremen went back to work
on the Morgan line piers In New York
after John Mackln, pier supérlnten
dent, gave orders for 30 union lenders
to resume their Jobs. Union officials
were on hand to see that no nonunlc..
workers, whoso appearance on a pre
vIoub day caused 000 men to strike In
protest, wore hired Union truck loud
era. working at the rate of 3 or -1
cents fur every hundred pounds of
cargo, arc said to earn ns high as $ 10 fi
a week. The old wage rote was 2%
Denmark has a permanent court of
Industrial arbitration for the settle
ment of disputes between employers
and employees. The tribunal U nn
tiomd in character nnd no appeal lies
again* Its findings to any higher
oonrt -
cents n hundred pounds.
Members of the Canton branch of
the International Brotherhood of Sul
phltc Worker« and Paper Makers sur
\ rendered their union cards, more than
l.OOO in number, and notified officials
: 0 f the Champion Biber company that
ithey ware ready to return to work on
& ipr!«#? nonunion basis.
LUTHER NEWS
(Special Correspondence)
Don Britton was a Red Lodge
visitor Saturday.
Ben Krug was attending to busi
j ness in Red Lodge Monday,
freighte to Red
Sam Gillespie
Lodge Wednesday.
Charlse Vincent was trading in
Red Lodge Monday.
Alfred Vincent and Oscar Lamb
and Otia Hash are cutting and log
ging timber.
Inglert and Houghton have taken
the contract to saw the lumber on
the Luther ranch.
Grandpa Long, who hjjs been quite
sick the past week is improving
rapidly.
Mrs. J. M. Anderson and Miss
Marion Lenley drove to Red Lodge
Friday, returning Saturday.
The two cases of measles reported
in this vicinity last week are recov
ering nicely.
Reverend Peck preached an in
teresting sermon
church Sunday afternoon.
Otis and We.sly Hash and Frank
Boggie brought out freight for Milt
Waters Saturday.
Alfred Vincent Jr., has the con
tract for the erection of the ' coal
house for the Luther school.
M. Burnett, John Shaw, Wm.
Dell and Swan Youngstrom were out
'enforce' Thursday afternoon last,
collecting telephone rent.
at the M. E.
Slade Luther has taken a contract
to supply the ditch contractors with
60,000 feet of native lumber, *o be
furnished by July 15.
Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell Long came
over from their ranch Thursday and
Mrs. Long remained to help care for
Mr. Long's father.
The heavy snow fall seems to be
heavy and stockmen on the lower
yptnay creek are buying hay in this
vicinity.
Juluis Schraeder returned home on
Wednesday last from a five weeks
visit at Partland, Oregon and a short
stop at Spokane.
Willy Bellamy is employed at the
E. Schraeder ranch with the saw
mill crew that is sawing lumber this
week.
Milt Waters came out from Red
Lodge the first of the week and has
moved his family int othe rooms ad
joining the Luhter store.
Slade Luther made a trip to Red
Lodge Monday and brought out
lumber for the new coal house in
District No. 61.
Miss Myrtle Hennefin, who teaches
the Tony school went to Red Lodge
Monday to attend the teacher's
meeting.
J. C. Pogue, Luhter's teacher, at
tended the teacher's meeting in Red
Lodge on Tuesday, having gone in
Monday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Nicholas Bliudaur,
who left here last fall are expected
to return soon to occupy the house
on the Joe Boggie ranch.
Reverend
and Mrs. E. S. Peck
drove over from Fishtail last week.
They report the roads drifted with
snow and travel very slow.
The cottage prayer meeting was
hed at Mrs. Hattie Bunn's home
Tuesday night. After the meeting
Mrs. Bunn served coffee, sandwiches,
fruit and cake.
Inglert and Houghton made two
trips this week to the Rosebud can
yon to get the Brangs sawmill. They
expect to be sawing lumber for Slade
Luther by the first of the next week.
Mr. and Mrs. William Scilly are
making arrangements to leave here
soon, Mr. Scilly xpects to take up the
trucking business at Twin Bridges,
Idaho, where his father is superin
tendent of the sugar factory.
The Woman's Club met Wednes
day at Mrs. Preston Clappers' homo,
the regular place of meeting now.
Mrs. William Dell gave a talk on the
Fort Harrison hospital at Helena and
î its work. Mrs. J. M. Burnett gave
j a sketch of the unit system and Mrs.
! Wm. Luther served refreshments.
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NEWS OF BRIDGER
(From The Bridger Times)
i Mr. nnd Mrs. Carl Foust arc the
| p ; lre! , t8 0 f a HOrlj born < 5 unday
; s> w Rankin relurn „ d Sunday
- r a t ,
; , n ^ es concluding a
| znonths visit with Mrs. Rankin and
[ their two duugl.terc.
A. H. Wilson motored to Billings
! Tuesday and reports making the
'trip without the use of chains,
I says the roads arc drying up rapidly,
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piling his new house and a large
j barn was purchaged thjs wcek b
Lars P. Larson.
He
he will take a
Dr.
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Lumber and materials for com
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Dr. L. A. Gates ^parted Tuesday
morning for Chicago for the next
few weeks, where
C0UM0 n surgery in association with
Dr. Max Thorkel of that city. ~
Gates experts to be away four weeks
j or longer.
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Your announcements express your ideas,
printing you are sure of best results.
Let us co-operate with you in selection of stock, com
position and cuts, to make your ads or circulars more at
tractive. We give the same careful attention to large or
small orders and give you a completed job that will get
the results you are after.
Our prices are based on the Franklin Printing Price
List, which is used in all better printeries throughout
the United States.
With good
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FAIR TO THE CUSTOMER. FAIR TO THE PRINTER
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CARBON COUNTY CHRONICLE PRINTERS
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Mr. and Mrs. George C. Hardin re
turned Monday from Helena, where
Mrs. Hardin has been visiting since
being able to leave St. Peters hospi
tal.
George Hammer, who is employed
at the Mystic Lake power project,
visitor last week, arriving
was a
Friday to look after business inter
ests.
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Bennett ex
pect to bid farewell to Bridger
mate destination will
ington, where their daughter, Mrs.
C. E. Schwend now resides. They will
stop in route for a visit at Livingston
Verl Hummer had a birthday anni
versary last Friday and in honor of
the occasion his parents invited a
number of his young friends to as
sist him in properly celebrating the
event.
Mrs. R. E. DeWitt, who is rapidly
recovering from a recent illness ex
pects to leave the later part of the
month for Sparta, Wisconsin, where
she will enjoy an extended visit with
relatives.
W. H. Bunney, vice-president and
general manager of the Montana,
Wyoming and
Company passed this way Sunday
afternoon enroute to Butte to join M.
A. Zook of New York, president of
the road.
Little Miss Dorothy Barlow cele
brated her ninth birthday anniver
sary last Saturday and in honor of
the event, her grandmother, Mrs. J.
P. Rich, invited thirty little Misses
to help with a proper celebration.
Games furnished the entertainment.
Messrs Swansen and Cummmings
and two brothers of Manager A. C.
Grove of the Atlantic Oil Company
arrived Tuesday from Minneapolis to
visit the oil development operations
the company is carrying on in the
Red Buttee district.
be Wash
Southern Railroad
FROMBERGNEWS
(From The Fromberg Herald)
Two Russian families arrived in
Fromberg this week to work in the
beet fields during the coming season.
The Friendship Club met Wednes
day afternoon with Mrs. James Yed
licka. The attendance was large and
an interesting r.cet'ng held.
A number of school boys and
girls gathered :it the home of Miss
Helen McCall ;
irday evening. Mu
sic and dancing ..ok up the evening.
A. J. Spence
arrived in Fromberg
from Sattle r will visit for a time
with his son ô .re nee Spencer and
family.
Hazel, the i
c year old daught
er of Mr. and i.. 4 . Cootge Engelert
is at the pout of <1
in Fromberg, :..
,h at their home
from pneu
moma.
Charles Fin-e- i >• jpped off at
Fromberg Sun ' y e :cnng enroute to
his home at Ilycnaie, Nebraska,
from Basin, Wyoming, where he has
been on a business mission.
Mrs. Roy Dykes returned Wednes
day from Cabool, Mo.,, where she and
her husband spent the winter and ex
pected to locate. They did not like
it there, hence their decision to re
turn to the Trasure state.
Word cantc from Joseph Graham,
who is at Thermopolia, Wyoming,
that his condition is much improved
and that he is able to walk with the
Mr. Graham has
1 suffered severly for some time.
aid of crutches.
DINE IN COMFORT
Every convenience has been installed here
to make this restaurant a pleasant place
to dine.
We offer an appetizing variety
of wholesome and well-cooked
foods for your selection, and at
our low prices dining at home is
really more expensive.
Bring your family here — you
will like our prompt and
courteous service
Special Business-Men's Lunch
40c.
Busy Bee Cafe
V,
NOW IS THE TIME
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To arrange for the purchase of
a TRACTOR for your Spring
Farm Work.
We are agents for the Advance
and Rumley Tractors and the
great MINNEAPOLIS
THRESHING MACHINE
COMPANY'S PRODUCTS
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Plumbing
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So much of your Home Comfort
depends upon the Plumbing
that you want it done right—
and we know how to do it.
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Plumber's Supplies,
Shelf and Heavy Hardware
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CARBON PLUMBING & HEATING CO.
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Victor Aho, prop.
Red Lodge,
Montana

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