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The Carbon County chronicle. [volume] (Red Lodge, Mont.) 1924-1924, August 06, 1924, Image 2

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WILL ENRICH FARM
ANACONDA COMPANY FINDS NEW
SOURCE OF WEALTH IN THE
IDAHO PHOSPHATE BEDS
Will Dring Forth a Product which
will Enrich the Wheat and Con»
Lands of Western and Middle West
States.
Where once a prehistoric ocean
rolled over the present state of
Idaho, the Anaconda Copper Min
ing company has found a deposit
which will mean continued prosper
ity for the great American bread
basket—the fanning states of the
Middle West.
The story of this discovery, the
preparation of the phosphates at
Anaconda, the distribution of them
among American farmers, and the re
markable results of their use, were
told to the Butte Rotary club by Dr.
H. C. Gardiner, superintendent of the
Willow Glen experimental farm and
director of the phosphate production
for the Anaconda company.
The mono-calcium phosphate pro
duced at Anaconda for use as fer
tilizer will restore abandoned farms
to production, Dr. Gardiner said. It
will also make productive hundreds
of acres of land heretofore consid
ered sterile. It will keep farms pro
ducing when other wise they would
have been abandoned.
Like Human Skeleton
The micro-organism which com
poses the phosphate beds on the old
ocean floor of Idaho, is of the same
chemical composition as the human
skeleton. Dr. Gardiner said. Prehis
toric sea life has contributed to t he
formation of these phosphate beds
and from them American agriculture
will receive necessary and valuable
assistance. The organisms forming
the phosphate beds are composed of
tri-calcium phosphate. At Anaconda
this is reduced to mono-calcium
phosphate, when it Is ready for ship
ment to farmers in all parts of the
country.
The Anaconda company Is carrying
on a campaign of education among
farmers of the New England and
Middle Western states, to make
known the merits of the fertilizer.
Many of the experiments have been
worked out at Willow Glen farm.
Others have been performed by state
experimental farms and by practical
farmers n various parts of the Unit
ed States.
What It Will Do.
In Indiana an experiment was made
In feeding the super-phosphate to
hogs. One group of hogs was fed
corn straight tor 70 days and in
creased In weight 52 pounds per hog.
Another group was fed corn and
beans and each hog gained, on the
average, 99 pounds. Another group
was fed corn, beans super-phosphate
and wood ashes, and gained on the
average 130 pounds.
At Willow Glen farm the use of
super phosphate in silage Increased
the lamb crop 13 per cent, and culls
were very low.
In Minnesota the same use of su
per-phosphate reclaimed millions of
acres of peat land, where before the
wild hay was so thin and short that
It was not deemed worth cutting.
This same land is now producing
from 60 to 80 bushels of barley an
acre, and from 80 to 100 bushels of
oats. On one farm made possible by
the use of Anaconda super-phosphate
9
A
CS
PIRIN
Say "Bayer" - Insistl
For Pain Headache
Neuralgia Rheumatism
Lumbago Colds
Accept only a
Bayer package
which contains proven directions
Handy "Bayer" boxe» of 12 tablet»
bottle» of 24 and 100—Druggist»
AI Kl
Asplrt» la Om trat» mark of Bam Manu
factura »f MoaoaoaUcaclOaatar of BaUcrUeaeia
A Home School
and womOB, where
for younr
student» live in ploaimnt dormi
tories on the campuft and expenses
are very low—
BILLINGS
POLYTECHNIC
IISTITUTE
Practical Electricity
and
Radio Engineering
Business
Shorthand and Typewriting
Regular Academic or
High School Junior College
AUTO
Tractor Engineering
Music
Ren«) o* or»'«* for New (.»(«logue
ifelilnf »11 about course»:
FALL TERM OPENS SEPT. 22
Addrena
LEWI« T. RATON
Director
PalyUchal*. Mont.
—WHAT I AH OVERLAND
CHOOHER ACTUALLY
33
JOURNEY M A PRAIRI
By Martha Edgerton Plassmann
OST of the pioneers of Mon
tana and adjoining states,
made the journey overland
to the West in covered wagons,
drawn by oxen, horses, or mules.
It was a primitive mode of travel,
that is almost as obsolete in these
days of automobiles, as the tsvo
whceled carts in which, we read, the
of ancient Greece took
M
princesses
their outings, or with their maids,
went to the rivers to do their laun
dry work.
The moving pictures have made
us familiar with the appearance of
these vehicles (as the producer
visioned them)—so far as the ex
terior appearance is concerned—but
the "covered wagon" they depict
ed, differs in some respects from
those I learned to know so well
during a three months' journey
the Plains in 1863.
across
We outfitted at Omaha, then a
wretched little hamlet set in the
mud on the bank of the Missouri
river. It had but one notable build
ing—the state house—situated on a
bluff some distance from the town.
On this bluff, my cousin Lucia
and I picked wild strawberries, by
way of passing time, while we
were awaiting the conclusion of the
preparations for the
journey. In order to reach the
state house we had to follow the
broken board walks as far as they
extended and then take to the mud.
The man who kept the frame
hotel where we stopped, was
plunged into the depths of melan
choly. He had no faith in the fu
ture of the town, and was anxious
to sell out before the river engulf
ed the townsite. While we were at
Omaha, it rained nearly every day,
which did not tend to increase our
admiration of the place,
heartily sympathized with our inn
keeper.
At length, with all things in
readiness, one dismal rainy even
ing, the women and children of our
party were driven out in carriages
a few miles, where our small group
of covered wagons awaited us.
These we examined with consider
able curiosity, both without and
Within,
Unlike the wagons of the movies,
our wagons had the bows, over
which the canvas was stretched, of
equal height throughout the en
tire length. There was no seat
perched up in front, except on
those which carried freight. In
driving oxen, one walks by their
side, guiding them by voice or by
whip, not using the reins ; and ox
en w'ere to serve as our motive pow
er, as they were not so much cov
eted by the Indians, as horses or
mules. New and green, with de
corative touches of red, the wag
on boxes and wheels, might have
looked quite picturesque in the
sunshine, with their snow-white
canvas coverings; but the sun did
not shine; the rain kept up a steady
drip, drip, drip, that was depress
ing to hear, and a general air of
gloom overhung the scene.
The tent where my father, moth
er, and my
were
necessary
We
two small brothers
to sleep, was already set up,
awaiting our arrival. Lucia, my
six year old sister, and I, clambor
ed into our wagon. There we
found two benches on either side,
and a bed at the rear end. It be
ing both dangerous and revealing
to use a candle, we undressed by
the dim light of a lantern without.
Once in bed, there were but a few
inches betwen our faces and the
canvas overhead.
This was my first experience
in sleeping out of doors, and I was^
young enough to enjoy it. Morn
ing came all too soon, bringing
with it the unwelcome news that
cattle had disappeared, and
! could not be found. It was still
raining; but everyone was hungry
I and breakfast must be cooked on
jthe sheet-iron camp stove under a
protective covering. A disagree
able task in fair weather, the rain
increased the difficulties.
At the back of the Sanders wa
gon and of ours, were mess boxes
with hinged covers. In one of
these dishes—tin cups, plates, etc.
our
the stand of barley was higher than
the shoulders of a fairly tall man.
Depletion Moves Westward
The line of soil depletion is mov
ing westward, Dr. Gardiner said, and
the center of grain production In the
United States would be threatened
It not for the super-phosphate
j were
i fertilizer.
j The Anaconda company Is now try
jlng to get Its fertilizer plant on
j hasis where It will make some return
to the stockholders. Dr. Gardiner
j said, knowing that the phosphate
(production will do more than any
other single thing to maintain the
stability and prosperity of the great
J Middle West.
—were stored, and in the other
A table
provisions for the day.
improvised by removing the
front end boards from two
was
upper
of the wagon boxes, and inserting
them under the strip of board to
which the mess box was attached.
This was an unstable affair, but
served fairly well, if due precaution
was taken not to hit it.
A white cloth covered the table
on ordinary occasions, and on this
was an array of half-pint cups, a
pile of plates, and numerous spoons
all of tin. The knives and forks
cheap affairs, the latter evi
were
dently calculated for the use
those who were accustomed to
knives as food carriers. On the
table also, at that breakfast, were
sugar and milk, a huge pot of cof
fee, hot biscuits, butter that was
soon to be a memory, and a heaped
platter—likewise tin—of bacon, or
ham.
of
Each in his or her turn received
a filled plate, and a cup of coffee,
which was partaken standing gen
erally, or sitting on the ground, or
on a wagon tongue. The fare var
ied little from day to day. The
delicacies now provided for the
camper or tourist, were then un
known. Tinned meats, vegetables,
and fruits were not on the market
in 1863, although in 1864 large
cans of roast or boikd beef could
sometimes be purchased.
Fresh meats were unobtainable
except from the few military posts
along the way. Game was very
scarce, as might have been expect
ed near a road traversed during the
summer by an endless line of cov
ered wagons. Two or three times
a deer or an antelope was killed,
and then we feasted. I remember
one such occasion, when venison
and dumplings were served. My
brother Wright, later a page in
Montana's first legislature, had eat
en to repletion. Keeping close to
the table he moved restlessly
about, his eyes fixed longingly on
the main dish until he could remain
silent no longer, when he exclaim
ed: "Oh, dear! I wish I was hun
grier." And so did the rest of us ;
but we were ashamed to admit it.
The few cows we took with us
furnished milk for the younger
children, but barely enough for cof
fee. Some dried apples, and a half
a dozen cans of Ohio peaches, con
stituted our fruit supply, until we
reach the Laramie mountains, and
found wild currants enough for
one dessert of currant pie.
Not being natives of the South,
we soon tired of soda biscuits, and
bread was made, not of the sour
dough kind but raised with yeast
cakes Mrs. Sanders had brought
with her. It was set to rise in a
tub, and carried in the Sanders wa
gon covered with a white cloth.
T IS JUST
THAT—it heals
where other ag
encies fail. Why?
Because milk i s
probably the great
est tissue building,
disease fighting,
red blood builder,
known. It gives
your system that
vital energy needed to overcome chronic disease. Very few drugs
have curative powers. Nature alone, is responsible for the cure,
through that wonderful healing agency, the blood.
It is an acknowledged fact that the stomach is responsible for nine
ty per cent of all chronic diseases. Would you expect a sick stomach
to provide healthy blood? Hardly. Yet, you must have this
healthy blood before you can conquer disease. This is just what
the MILK DIET does—it supplies the human system with blood,
in such large quantities that disease is overpowered and eradicated.
I
MILK
IS NO "Faith Cure" and there Is no
psychological Influence brought to
bear in connection with this treatment.
It is strictly a scientifically administered diet that builds up
the system and overcomes disease. It is undoubtedly one of the
most successful methods for treating such chronic diseases as—
Nervous Prostration, General Debility, Autointoxication, Skin
troubles (such as pimples, Eczema, Sallowness, Etc.), Catarrh,
Biliiousness, Vleurlsy, Constipation, Dyspepsia, Indigestion,
Asthma, Hay Fever, Insomnia, Ulcer of the Stomach, Colitis,
(or Ulcer of the Bowels), Goiter, Neuralgia, Neurasthenia,
Acidity of the Stomach, Arthritis, Urticaria (or hives), Cystitis,
Diarrhea (or Dysent-ary), Dilation of the Stomach, Gastritis,
Gout, Lumbago, Sciatica, Migraine, Gallstones and Liver
Disorders, Rheumatism, Kidney Disease, Anaemic Conditions.
The Milk Diet
The Master Healer
Through careful management. It has been possible for us to
make our rates very much lower than Is usually charged In
other institutions for the same treatment. We are making It
possible for people of moderate circumstances to take this
wonderful treatment..
THE CHOICE IS YOURS
Thousands of people have been permanently cured of chronic disease
through this treatment. Many cases which are almost beyond belief.
If you are in the grip of some chronic disease or if you are trying to
regain your health, you cannot afford to ignore such a treatment as
this, where the benefits by far exceed the time and the trifling expense.
Boulder Hot Springs has instituted this treatment under the best of
medical supervision. Every precaution Is taken to see that the diet
Is administered correctly, under proper conditions and by competent
nurses. The milk Is from healthy cows that are properly fed and
properly kept..
This Is the season for Hay Fever and Asthma, but why look forward to
a recurrence of these troubles when they so readily respond to this
treatment.
We want you to personally Investigate this treatment. Ask your doctor
about It or ask anyone who has taken the treatment and see for your
self what marvellous results have been obtained.
To Introduce this wonderful treatment In Montana this
coupon will entitle the holder to a $5.00 discount on the
treatment. One coupon only good in a family.
$ 5.00
Boulder Hot Springs, Boulder, Montana.
I am troubled with
Milk from healthy and contented cows Is the greatest food on earth.
It has given thousands of people new health and vigor.
and would be pleased to receive your free advisory counsel,, as per
your offer, it being understood that I hereby Incur no obligation.
Name ..
BOULDER HOT SPRINGS
Town
-State.
BOULDER. MONTANA
k«>
SI
When it rose too high Mrs. San
ders kneaded it down. Once this
process was rendered unnecessary.
The Sanders baby, Wilbur E.,
wakening front a nap, rolled from
the bed into the tub. He was in
stantly recovered, with no injury
to the rising dough, although it
was considerably depressed for
some time after this experience.
The Platte river, along which we
journeyed, was as muddy as the
Missouri, and, 'being shallow, it
became too warm during the day to
be drinkable. Two canteens were
made for us in Omaha, each hold
ing a gallon. These were covered
with flannel. At night the can
tens were filled from the river,
and hung under the wagons with
the stoppers removed. By morn
ing the water had settled, and was
cold, remaining cool until night.
The stove was not taken down at
lunch time, hut we took what the
mess box held of bread, sliced ham,
sometimes raw, which we ate in
blissful ignorance of its danger,
and were thankful for what we re
ceived. And, Why not? It was
preferrable to a constant diet of
pemmican, which many gently
reared men learned to relish, when
living at fur trading posts. We
brought to our meals good, healthy
appetites stimulated by our out
door life.
The first day of our journey had
nothing to redeem its utter misery
due to the unfavorable weather,
and to the unaccustomed life. When
the cattle were found, it was too
late to leave camp, and the next
morning was a repetition of the
previous one. Again the half-wild
cattle had vanished. The male
personel of the party was made up
of two lawyers, two business men,
an ex-druggist. Mr. Chipman, hav
ing joined us in Omaha, our guide
and a boy. None of these knew
how to manage cattle, how to yoke
or unyoke them, or the signifi
cance of the commands "Gee" and
"Haw." Recognizing their ignor
ance, they hired a man from Oma
ha to instruct them.
Their teacher rode out from
(Continued on Agricultural Pag«)
Shave With cuticura soap
And double your razor efficiency as
well as promote skin purity, skin com
fort and skin health. No mug, no
slimy soap, no germs, no waste, no
Irritation even when shaved twice
dally. One soap for all uses—shaving,
bathing and shampooing.—Adv.
S. a HUSETH
«
McCon.vet.ran
1-JflyS Oî i OSH'J il/XprCSS
Events which occurred at Dead
Man's Butte, 4 4 years ago, were re
enacted in pageant, on that his
toric spot near Plevna, Montana,
recently, and witnessed by a large
delegation of Fallon county citi
zens.
The pageant was conduct
ed under the leadership pf Senator
C. C. Conger.
"'This part of pioneer state history
was reproduced through the help ofj
Senator George McCone who was a
party to the episode at the time.
The swooping down of the Indians
upon the lone mall carrier was so
well acted that it took but little Im
agination to vision it as real. The
killing of the rider, and the rifling of
the mall sacks, as well as the stealing
of the horses was as real as could
have been portrayed. The mall driv
er fell In the exact spot where the
original tragedy occurred. This spot
was marked by a few stones.
It was at this place that State Sen
ator George McCone of Dawson coun
ty, who was at that time in the mail
service, found the body of the vic
tim forty-four years ago. The Sena
tor again sat in the saddle with his
rifle under his arm, riding along the
flats and among the bills, looking for
the missing man, Just as be had ac
tually done when his work took him
regularly over the old Dakota mail
route.
According to the Senator's story,
he and another scout rode out from
their camp on the Little Missouri,
at a point near what is now the town
of Ollle, to the mouth of the Fallon
creek near Terry. Not finding any
BOYS and GIRLS!
You Can Get a $52.50
PIERCE BICYCLE
FREE!
Any boy or girl in Montana can secure one of these bicycles by
obtaining 17 new yearly subscriptions to The Great Falls Daily
Leader.
Make your vacation days count. Start now and earn a Bike
to ride to school this fall. It will be but little work to secure
the subscriptions, after which your bicycle will be promptly
sent to you.
Fill out and mail us this coupon:
THE LEADER CO.
Great Falls, Montana.
Send me instructions (or securing a $52.60 Fierce
Bicycle.
Name__-.—
Address
Parent's Name.
Age.
oi|HliH£HSi ;
the mall driver where he had fal
Ten when hit By the bullets from th«;
guns of the Indians. He at once'
summoned help, and wit hthe aid of
a broken shovel he dug a pit, wrap
ping the dead body in a blanket and
burying it at a spot which is still
marked by the stones that were piled
up over the grave.
MONTANA LIFE
IISOMICE COMPAIY
Inturone. In Fore* • $38,281,606
Admitted Audi • • $5,292,222
Dec. 31, 1923)
One of the strongest com
panies in the United States
in the ratio of Policyhold
ers' Surplus to Insurance
In Force.
Surplui lo Policyholders. $902,639
(Dee. 31, 1923)
As Enduring As The Mountains
A. f. JOHNSON
President
H. K. CUNNINGHAM
Vice President and Manager
REGISTRATION FOR
PRIMARY ELECTION
ÇJIIAlljTJ A T\CrDüACr
JllUWkJ l/LlJlvL/\uE(
TOTAL IS UNDER NUMBER THAT
WAS LISTED BEFORE LAST
GENERAL ELECTION
Several of the Counties Make Gains;
Registration for the 1020 Primary
Election was 280,221 ; A Decrease
of Almost 10,000.
A total of 211,450 voters from
1583 precincts registered In the 55
counties for the primary election
of August 26, next, according to a
tabulation of reports from coun
ties completed recently by Secre
tary of State Charles T. Stewart.
Registration for the primary el
ection of August, 1920, totalled 230,
221, the records show. Beaverhead.
Big Horn, Glacier, Granite, Park,
Prairie, Rosebud, Roosevelt, Toole
and Yellowstone counties showed
slight gains In their registrations
this year as compared to the last
primary prior to a presidential el
ection, all other counties falling
slightly below the 1920 mark.
The number of precincts and the
registration of voters for the August
primary election follows:
Free.
County
Beaverhead
Big Horn _
Blaine ..
Broadwater
Carbon_
Carter_
Cascade_
Chouteau ...
Custer_
Daniels_
Dawson
Deer Lodge_
Fallon_
Fergus ...
Flathead
GaJia,tln
Garfield _
Glacier_
Golden Valley _
Granite .
Hill _
Jefferson
Judith Basin
Lewis and Clark
Liberty_
Lincoln_
Madilon _
McCone_
Meagher ...
Mineral _
Missoula _
Musselshell
Park .
Phillips _
Pondera _
Powder River_
Powell __
krairia_
Ravalli _
Richland
Rosebud
Roosevelt
Sanders
Sheridan
Silver Bow _
Stillwater_
Sweet Grass_
Teton__—
Toole_
Treasure _
Valley_
Wheatland_
Wibaux_
Yellowstone _
Lake_
Voters
24
3.218
2,360
2,649
1,539
5,054
1.494
13,310
3,984
4.448
1,628
3.279
5,861
1,768
9,938
6,612
6,809
2,466
2,142
1,463
1,668
4,643
2,092
2,777
7,697
24
25
13
20
21
„ 70
50
41
_ 21
_ 86
18
-15,
. 76
37
__ 36
__ 38
__ 17
16
15
27
24
23
49
15
969
_ 23
-39
2,687
2,716
1,736
1,274
1,169
9,074
3,867
6.447
3,483
2.381
1.381
2,807
1,613
3,710
2.497
2,857
4,364
2,452
2,917
21,755
2,846
1,761
2,279
2,397
35
_13
9
39
_ 30
30
_ 16
_ 20
29
16
14
20
33
33
37
17
30
_81
_ 22
19
17
19
6
7 1 2
38
3,962
2,122
1.623 ,
10,248 J
4,379 I
9
16
46
_26
1,633 211,450
Totals
Named After Womanil
A story of timely aid given at a
critical moment by which a baby
girl was ushered into the world and
the mother's life probably saved
was told recently by those who
learned of the Incident at a Billings
hospital. The Good Samaritan in
this Incident was Mrs. Ralph Bun
ker of Roundup.
Mr. and Mrs. Bunker were driving
to Billings and, at a point in Yellow
stone county, they were hailed by the
driver of a small car. He was in
formed them that he was taking his
wife to the hospital but that the
stork was getting the best of the race
and he was at a loss as to what to
do. Mrs. Banker quickly changed to
the car with the sufferer and with
skill and kindness gave such atten
tion and relief as were possible un
der the clrcumstancf». Within a
few minutes a baby girl came Into the
world, and it was held lovingly In
Mrs. Bunkers arms as the Journey
was continued to the hospital.
Several hours after the arrival in
Billings, Mrs. Bunker again visited
the hospital to enquire as to the con
dition of her two patients and was
deeply gratified to learn that both
were in excellent heaith, In grati
tude to their preserver the parents
nemed their daughter Lucille,
BLAINE ASSOCIATION TO
HANDLE POTATO CROP
Since January 8th, 1924, the Blaine
County Marketing association has
shipped 16 carloads of hogs, a total
number of 1,318 hogs, bringing the
total of $16,000 to the farmers.
The association Is now endeavor
ing to complete arrangements with
a Chicago firm for the handling of
the potato crop. It has promise of
a representative being In Chinook
about the middle of August. The
I early potatoes are being shipped to
southern points for seed.
It is expecteed also that the bean
crop will be taken care of by the as
sociation. Secretary W. A. Gesell has
the promise of several concerns who
are seeking the crop. Up to this time
there have beeen no definite arrange
ments made.
J. N. Edwards is the new manager q
for the association at Harlem. He la
doing some very good work.

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