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The Carbon County chronicle. [volume] (Red Lodge, Mont.) 1924-1924, October 08, 1924, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036284/1924-10-08/ed-1/seq-2/

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WANA EDWARDS,
QUEEN MONTANA 111
ROSEBUD COUNTY ERIN (ESS IS
SKLE( TION OK THE STATE
FAIR JUDGES
As
The Treasure State
Represents
Montana Princess of Pelrolla At
International Petroleum
tlon at Tulsa, Okla.
Expos!
Miss Wann Edwards of Forsyth,
Rosebud county,
State
princess from
vviis, at the 1P24 Montana
fair, elected by the members of
her court to the coveted position
of Queen Montana 111. Following
her coronation, Queen Wann will
reign until tier successor is named
a year from now.
The selection and coronation
Queen Montana as an event of this
double
of
year's state fair, bears a
significance to the fortunate Queen
Wana. For,not only does the fair
beauty from Rosebud county, re-1
celve the coveted distinction of tie
ing Montana's Queen, but she is also
favored with the opportunity of
presenting her state at the Interna-j
tional Petroleum Exposition which Is
to be held in a few weeks at rulsa.
Oklahoma. At tills time, slm will
appear in the role of Petroleum
Princess from Montana.
At this Tulsa exposition, tlierv?,
w ill be princess reprsentatlves irom
all of the petroleum producing states
-—---[lutlon
.
j
|
Bar
m
4U ^
r
v '*3
1%
» fa
v<
V.
<■
m
Queen Montana III, Miss Wana Ed
wards of Forsyth, Rosebud County,
Who Is This Week Montana Prin
cess at Petroleum Show.
of the nation, and from these will be
selected the Queen Petrolla. This
trip of Montana's Queen to the Tul
sa show Is made possible by the
management of the Billings Daily
Gaette, who have arranged to de
fray all of the expenses of Queen
Montana and her chaperon escort.
In the voting at the state fair,
Miss Harriet Thompson of Billings,
Yellowstone county was second and
Miss Alva Larson of Choteau was
third.
Queen Wana is a most charming
Montana girl, the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Charles E. Edwards of
Forsyth, and a graduate nurse from
the Presybyterian hospital at Chi
cago. She is tall and stately in her
bearing, quietly reserved hut with a
gracious personality.
Queen Wane's court comprises à
corps of Montana's fairest maidens,
a represnetatlve from almost every
county In the state. These county
princesses who were present at her
court were as follows;
Miss Nora Larson, Seobey, Daniels county.
Mias Marlon Hatfield, Hamilton, liavalll
county.
Georgia B. Hannah. Circle. McCone county.
Irene Hendershott, Lavluu, Golden Valley
county.
Elizabeth
county.
Sheridan
Dagmar,
Ethyle bensch, Dccr Lodge, Powell county.
Adeline Brady, Wlnnett, Fergus county.
Catherine Grenier, Poison, Lake county.
Mildred Hale. Townsend, Broadwater
Ina Elser, Laurin, Madison county.
Alvah Larson, Choteau, Teton county.
Verna Heckathorn. Ekalnka. Carter comity.
Frances Myrlck, Harlowtown, Wheatlcnd
county.
Marguerite 8t. Dennis, Valler, Pondera
county.
Ruth Benner, Sidney, Richland county.
Nora Osborn, Jordan, Garfield county,
lone Gardner, Albcrton. Mineral county.
Harriet Thompson, Billings, Yellowstone
county.
Emma Smith, Malta, Phillips county.
Verona Stockwell, Musselshell county.
Alleen Stronach, Chester, Liberty county.
R usella Castllo, Paradise. Sanders county.
Elizabeth Butte, Klnsy, Custer county.
Adeline Collum. White Sulphur Springs,
Meagher county.
atherlnc Bnzard. Bozeman, Gallatin
Katherine Kalfellf, Zero. Prairie county.
Helen E. Rue, Biddle, Powder River
Dorothy Scanlon. Hardin. Rig Horn
Alice Buckley, Harlem. Blaine comity.
Lillian Knapp, Big Timber, Sweet Grass
county.
Florence Conghlln, Fort Benton, Choteau
county.
Gladys White, Stanford, J idlth Basin
Faye Merrlfleld, Rnpeljc. Stillwater county.
Rosemary Cavanaugh. Butte, Silver Bow
Dorcey Bonnell, Livingston. Park county.
Krona Wlgmore. Havre, Hill county.
Lucille Kelley, Shelby, Toole county.
Sylvia Morris, Baker, Fallon county.
Dorothy Janes. Culbertson. Roosevelt
Mary Tat tun. Glasgow, Valley county.
Gladys Mussulman.'Cut Bank, Glacier
Beatrice Bllyne. Wibaux county.
Freda Allum. Great Falls, Cascade county.
Ncllson,
FIRST RAILROAD COMES
TO OREGON TOWN AFTER
WAIT OF FIFTY YEARS
The town of Burns, Oregon,
has a railroad, the first In Its his
tory. Realizing a dream of Its
citizens, dating back nearly fifty
years, the first pasenger train
pulled Into town on September 24,
while hundreds of people from ev
ery section of the countryside
gathered to cheer th achievement.
Among the crowds that welcomed
the 18-coach Union Pacific train
were many children who had
never before seen one. The mad
Is an extension from Crane, Ore.,
and will he used mainly for ihe
transjiortntlon of lumber.
Back In 1877 a survey was made
through Burns for a railroad but
the plans fell through.
SUGAR FACTORY IS
RIVER GROWERS
|UTAH COMPANY AÜVISK8 THAT
, D1RECTOKS APPItOX J. I DAN
ACREAGE SIGNED l I
I Much Hard Work Remains for Citi
and Business .Men Despite
zeus
I he Virtual Assurance of the Fac
tory, Greenfield Warns.
The Direct -- of the Utah-Ida
ho Sugar com,.'««»)', second largest
beet sugar company in the United
States, have approved the propo
sition of building a million dol
lar sugar factory iu the Milk Riv
er valley next year, according to
statement given out recently by
A. W. Zieharlli, president of the
('hinook Commercial club.
Mr. Zlebarth received a commun
ication from W. H. Wattls. presl
J dent and general manager for the
| utah-Idaho company. In which it
was set forth that the directors of
the sugar company thoroughly ap
1 proved of the proposed factory, pro
re-jvlding at least 5,000 acres of sugar
beets were raised in the valley next
j year.
a recent meting of the Chinook
j c 0 i nme rcial club Mr. Zlebarth re
I ported that 6,COO acres of sugar
[beets had been signed up in the val
j 0 y between Lohman on the
a]J( j jj a shua on the east,
| lamls for
of agréments for sugar beet
j acreage have also been completed.
I The farmers and business men of
I this particular section of northern
Montana have been working to this
lend for a number of years, and they
I now feel asured that their hopes are
I to he realized. Charles D. Greenfield
who is development agent for the
I Great Northern railway in Montana,
! and who has been more or less in
[direction touch with the prelimin
ary work which has been in progress
In the Milk River valley, states that
[the residents of the valley are great
ly elated over the prospects now be
fore them.
"Three factors," said Mr. Green
field, "entered Into the development
[of the Milk River section, which has
culminated in a sugar factory being
located there. One was the migrat
ing to that section of men experienc
ed in the growing of sugar beets,
Another was the adaptability of the
land to the production of an excel
lent quality and large acre tonnage
west
Listing of
new sellers and the elrcu
All
M < h 1
^■Tvind Conveniences
^may be enjoyed in
" the Farm Home
with Dependable
DELG0-LIGHT
EASY
TERMS
LOW
PRICE
MUSHY ELECTRIC CO.,
Missoula and Kullspell, Montana.
Delco Light Products and Radio
Off
Cape
Race
PRING passengers on
the great ocean lin
ers had the magnifi
cent but awesome spec
tacle of an Iceberg more
than than a mile long
and towering 200 feet
high.
s
But It was "In custody"
of a guardian of the sea.
A United States coast
guard cutter trailed It
Incessantly and regular
ly reported Its position
to ships.
We like to feel that we
safeguard the shopping
safety ot the community
—so that the risk of un
wise expenditure Is elim
inated.
You will finds us con
scientious guardians of
your pocketbook.
A. C. M.
HARDWARE
HOUSE
Main at Quartz, Butte, Mont.
GUMP
TRUE 6HÜÄP8AC TEBISTI6S OF WE STERN TRBi
By Martha Edgerton Plassmann
OST persons living in Mon
tana, are familiar with the
exterior of an Indian tepee,
it is today; but few knew it
without and within, as it was when
white men first invaded these re
gions. Fortunately, several writ
. ers have furn
ished us with
descriptions of
early lodges,
w h e n buffalo
roamed the
plains, and
something more
substantial than
cotton cloth or
canvas was us
ed as a cover
ing. These de
scriptions, ek
1 ed out with in
formation gained from those now
living, who once occupied them,
give us a fair idea of how Indians
lived.
Some Indian tribes, like the
Mandans, lived in villages, and
raised corn and vegetables. These
had more substantial dwellings
than tepees, which were the homes
of the nomadic tribes that depend
ed upon hunting for a livelihood,
as did most of our northern In
dians.
Lodges differed greatly in size,
their covering ranging all the way
from eight to thirty bufalo hides,
the larger to accommodate poly
gamous families, where there were
sometimes eight or more wives.
Polygamy among the Indians
should not be judged from the
standpoint of a civilized people, but
as a custom forced upon them by
their mode of life. Because of the
hazards of the chase and war, the
number of men and women was
disproportionate; the latter being
in the majority. Without poly
gamy, the single women would
have been uncared for and objects
of charity.
None but the rich Indians could
afford to have many wives, and
these sometimes found it difficult
to provide food for them all, this
being gained by hunting, not by
purchase.
The women made the lodge cov
erings of tanned cow' buffalo hides,
cut to fit together, and sewed with
thread of sinew. Often these cov
erings were decorated with em
broidered or painted designs. The
Crows being especially skilful in
such work. A lodge of 28 hides
required thirty piles thirty-six
feet long—a horse could draw but
two of these, thus requiring 15
ponies for the transportation alone.
Before the northern Indians had
horses, moving day for them could
have been no holiday.
The larger lodge coverings were
M
as
A.
.Mr*. M. K. rittNHiiiunn
and the third was the decision of
the field men, and President Wattls
of the sugar company, after they had
made an inspection of the Aeet fields
recently and interviews with the men
who had shown them that the Milk
River country Is Ideal for the pro
duction ot sugar beets.
"Something over 6,000 acres, In
fact, nearly 6,000 acres, have been
signed up for the growing of sugar
beets in the valley next season. This
acreage embraces the entire valley.
Every community has entered en
thusiastically Into the work, and
there Is a probability that the acre
age will be Increased because the
factory now seams assured for next
year, rather than decreased.
"The landowners and
farmers
have co-operated in the enterprise,
but a great deal more Is yet to be
done to make the proposition an as
sured success. To produce the ton
age for the factory, sugar beet grow
ers are essential. These can be ob
tained and they will become perma
nent residents of the Milk River ar
ea, but to grow beets they must have
the land. The statement was made
by one of the sugar company offic
ials when the party visited the Chl
nook-Harlem section, that it was os
sentlal that 100 additional families
ly located In that territory this fall.;,
These families can be obtained, pro-;
vldod the land Is available for them
at reasonable prices and on terms
they can meet. Much.of the land
available for growing sugar beets,
j while It has been In cultivated crops,
I lacks buildings for human habita
tlon. It wil be necessary for land
owners to list their excess holdings
at attractive prices and terms, and
there must also be provision made
j for the houses for these new comers.
These houses are ont to shelter field
workers, but men with families who
are anxious to go to the .Milk River
area to establish their homes. To
accomplish the results that must he
achieved will require the best efforts
of landowners and business men and
bankers in the towns in the Milk
River section.'
eCuticura Comforts Baby's Skin
When red, rough and itching with hot
baths of Cuticura Soap and touches of
Cutloura Ointment,
now and then of that exquisitely scent
ed dusting powder, Cuticura Talcum,
one of the Indispensable Cuticura
Toilet Trio.—Adv.
Also make use
in two section- ,antl did. not reach |
the ground within lour inches. In -1
side the Jodg.- va - a leather lining
to the height six feet from the
ground where v. as attached to a
rawhide line tiiai ran from pole to
pole. Between 'die outside cover
and the inside ming remained a
space of ab« :t four inches, that
[dation and a draft
carry the smoke
neniug at the top of
furnished ven
that helped t
through the H
the lodge. 'I • lining, reflecting
the heat of the tire, in said to have
made the lodge comfortable, even
in the coldest weather. It was also
decorative; being painted "in three
long narrow, geometric figures,
distinctively lîlackfoot.
tribes may have used different de
signs or none at t|H
In one l odge described by
ten couches
Other
;r 1
Schultz, there we
around the interior,I except one side
of the doorway, with a slanting
back rest at the head and foot of
\ : u!
\ !
Vvl /
■ ■«'
J
fV
fnitia& Buffalo Slffn Lodge These Lodges Differed In Size, Their
Crow
Covering Ranging all the way from Eight to Thirty Buffalo Hides.
These Lodge Coverings Were Made by the Women of »ho Tribe.
T
each made of willows, and in the
triangular spaces between the
couches and on either side of the
door, were kept the personal be
longings of the occupants, and the
skin bags containing dried meat.
Until the advent of the traders,
Indians had no cooking utensils,
except those they made. We are
told of none made by the Black
feet, with one exception—the skin
bag in which they boiled meat.
This bag was fastened to a willow
hoop at the top, and suspended
from the lodge poles. It was par
tially filled with water, and pieces
of finely cut meat, and was cooked
by heated stones dropped into the
bag. The stones had to be re
peatedly heated before the meat
was sufficiently cooked, which was
when it changed color.
Meat was their staff of life, and
preferrably that of the buffalo.
The Indians called it "real food."
This was eaten without salt. The
employes of the Hudson Bay com
pany, at least at distant points,
lived upon meat the year round;
their sole treat being the Christmas
plum pudding. In summer there
were berries, a few edible roots,
and choke cherries, but there was
no sugar to sweeten the berries.
The women dried berries for win
ter use, and pounded up choke cher
ries, stones and all, which they
also dried, and cooked with meat.
It has been said that what pre
! vented the Indians from having
| scurV y from this almost exclusive
, -h
1 )' meat diet, was their eating a -
most all parts of the animal, such
: as the brain, liver, heart, kidney,
j ctc .Whether this be true, must be
, • , , , r ..„a»,»
I decided by someone beter versed in
1 dietetics than I.
j .One of the favorite dishes of
t ] ie I nc li anS was is-sap-wot-sists, a
, • , , _
1 ^. md of sausage, of which the
C rows were so inordinately tond,
' that it gave them â nickname. This
xvas mac i e 0 f t h e entrails thorough
, , . . _ _ , • ;«
>> 'fcaned, turned inside out the
outside fat being within. It is then
filled with tenderloin cut small,)
, an ,j
I
a fire. White
i men who have eaten ip-sap-wot
roasted over
;
[
RADIOS
and RADIO PAKTS
Batter I«« and Tube*
Repairing and Servicing
THE ELECTRIC A RADIO SHOP
Great Fall», Mont
425 Central Ave-,
sists, and are well Qualified
judge, pronounce it (or them), ex
«lient, despite the absence of salt '
Pemican
was made of thin slices j
of meat, dried and pounded. Ber-|to
nes or choke cherries were often
added, and the whole stored for
future use. [
According to Schultz, sewing j
was done by both men and women.
The lodge covers, their own cloth
ing, and the mocasins, were made
by the women. The men acted as
j
their own tailors, cutting and sew
ing the clothes they wore. From I
better knowledge of the Indians
we see that labor was not un
equally distributed between the
men and the women, as we were
formerly taught. It should j.
wavs he borne in mind that the
men were the hunters-the food*
providers; and the fighters-the
These
protectors of the family,
were no light obligations.
One writer liae well said: "The
general conception of the position
of the Indian woman needs to be
considerably modified. While there
is no question that the woman's
work was severe, yet there is abun
dant evidence that they performed
their tasks willingly, and took
great pride in doing their work
well."
The men bathed daily, and the
women frequently took sweat,
baths. (So state Schultz. McClin
tock says "women never took
sweat bath"). They were quite as
cleanly, I know from observation,
as the average man who lives long
in the wilderness, cut off from civ
ilization. When I was living at
Fort Benton, Indians frequently
camped near my house. I often
watched with amazement the ef
forts of the squaws to keep their
tepees clean, using brooms of wil
low twigs, to sweep the dirt floor.
They also took great pride in hav
ing their children look well. I of
ten thought that under such dis
couraging circumstances, I never
could have taken such pains.
Children were named by a me
1
j
I
I
|
1
A NEW OILLAMP FREE
I turn »4% Air
E. P. Johnson, 60!) W. Lake St,, Chi
cago. 111., the Inventor of a wonderful new
oil lamp that hums 94 % air and beats
gas or electricity, 1» offering to give one
free to the first user In each locality w
will help Introduce It. Write him for par
ticulars. Agents wanted.
!...
A Home School
tor young men and women, where
•tndrnt« live In dormi
tories on the rampui and expense«
are very low—
BILLINGS
POLYTECHNIC
INSTITUTE
Practical Electricity
and
Radio Engineering
Business
Shorthand and Typewriting
Regular Academic or
High School Junior College
AUTO
Tractor Engineering
Music
Sen*» at once tor New Catntngie
telling all »hunt cnnr.ee :
FHl TERM OPENS SEPT. 22
Addrr««
LKWIH T EATON
Dime tar
Polytechnic, Moat,
dicine man for something he had
seen, or dreamed of. A man could
take a new name every time he
counted a new coup, but a woman
rarely changed her name.
Marriage was largely a matter
of bargain and sale among the In
dians, as with most primitive peo-lff
tojpjç^ and was generally arranged bv
t b e ' father of the pir'l There
ë
was
no marriage ceremony, but after
the betrothal, the girl carried food
the lodge of her intended, and
made moccasins for the members
0 f his family. Thçn she and her
man wen t to live m their new
lodge,
.
was not necessary for a man to
,nar 7 Wlt ^ n hlS own hand, all its
members being regarded as rela
tives. He further savs: "A man
Me Clintock claims that i t
.. ......
he^indawMmt it
" qm«, um u wasi
, not P T er - fo . r hir ? t0 evei : mCe , t
h l s mother-in-law. It was a breach
of etiquette for him to go into the
! am 5 w ' th her * * * » he f
ended . hei : he must make amends
b y g'vmg her a good horse. From
W llc l ll a PP ears that the mother
in-law problem was not unknown
in primitive life.
r
A
A
; e 3
Ifin^S
use
CALUMET
hm
V — MH IIH
THE WORLD'S GREATEST
BAKING POWDER
the next time you bake—give
it just one honest and fair trial»
One test in your own kitchen
will prove to you that there is a
big difference between Calumet
and any other brand—that for
uniform and wholesome bat
ing it has no equal.
I6PI
Sale« a V« Time« Those ot Ary Other Brand
f
Land Bargain—$4.00 Per Acre
--BUYS 5,760 ACRES-
40 Per Cent Tillable. Abundance of Water for Stock. Rost Corn
Belt in Montana. $7,500 cash, balance seven year mortgage at
Six Per Cent : ■ : : : : : :
80S Third Ave
North
C. HI. McCUTCHEON
Great Falls
Montana
L IFE Insurance protection for women ir,
issued at the same rates and on the
same policies as are available to men by the
MONTANA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
)
Enduring as tha Mountains
A. C. JOHNSON
President.
H. B. CUNNINGHAM
Vice President and Manager
HELENA
MONTANA
SchoolBoy I* I
PEANUT BUTTER Builds Muscle
v
s
Why pay more
when you can get what
you want for LESS?
—It Is of interest to the farm
ers of Montana to know that a
great saving has b«en brought
about for their benefit In the
price of Tractor Fuel, hy Hie
Sunburst Refining company, an
Independent home company at
Great Falls.
purified, having
and work« fine In all types of kero
sene traetors and engines, Including
Fordsons, and glv
power than kerosene, which is high
er priced.
offensive odor
A
even more
This Tractor Distillate Is made
from Sunburst Montana erode «»II
by a Montana rompttny and It«
making gives
tana workmen and puts more Mon
tana dollars Into elrculatlon, for the
benefit of Montana.
ployment to >1
.—Sunburnt Tractor Distillate can be
obtained at the refinery at Great
Falls, In your «»•
about one-half the price of kero
sene, It Is white, looks like kero
sene, is thoroughly
Why pay mom tor high priced
krronene, when It ban been proven
that thin Tractor Distillate, cont
int much lea*, give« better résultat
INVESTIGATE!
ntafner« at
refined and
Address Inquiries to—
SUNBURST REFINING COMPANY
Montana
Great Falls
ns
ladependeot
Bend name and address
for a free road map ot
Montana (in colors) sent free on
request.
FREE!
(
V
j Indians were superstitious. They
j recognized their kinship to the
| lower animals, and believed they
i could help or injure them. They
worshipped the sun. It was some
j thing they could see, feel, and that
j they thought they understood. All
00 ^ came from it, and to it they
made oferings. Faith alone was
not for them—they must have
something tangible to worship.
The Piegans believed the Giant
Spring, near Great Falls, received
their offerings, and carried them
to the sun-god. It was a sacred
spot,
"And whatever is cast in here
When the boiling waters rise.
Passes yonder to the sun-god
Far away within the skies."
They prayed to the sun, and
™s|From the Ruins of Pompeii Hands of Fate
(Continued on the Agricultural Page)
the ancient Homans were the original of
this ring for Health, Happiness, Success.
Reproduced 1 n solid
sterling Silver end En
amel, set with your
birth stone. For La
or Men.
many times the price.
Money refunded If not
satisfactory. Slate size
and hlrlh month. $2,00;
pay Postman on arriv
al TH EE G NOV
ELTY to.. Dept. W,
218 De« raw 8t., Brooklyn, N. Y.
dl
Worth

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