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The Carbon County chronicle. [volume] (Red Lodge, Mont.) 1924-1924, October 22, 1924, Image 4

Image and text provided by Montana Historical Society; Helena, MT

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84036284/1924-10-22/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE ROYAL GIFT, THE MOST
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A large selection of beautiful lustre, and at |
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Up-to-date engraved wedding rings in
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HIGH GRADE WATCH AND
JEWELRY REPAIRING A SPECI ALL Y
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RYDEBESG, THE JEWELER
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REPUBLICAN STATE TICKET
For Secretary of State
CHARLES T. STEWART
This is a time when rigid economy must be practiced and enforced
by men who are properly trained and qualified to handle the import
ant business interests und responsible administrative affairs of the
State of Montana.
My record shows a business administration as understood by a
business man, and I will continue to fight inefficiency, waste and
unnecessary spending of the Slate's resourcs.
For Business Efficiency put a cross in the
square as shown above at the election Tues
day, November 4th, 1924
VOTE FOR
FRANK B. L1NDERMAN
Republican Nominee for
United States Senator
\
&
I
/
"I have no individual platform. Individual political platforms
j are promises of personal performances, and I do not feel competent
I to reconstruct all things for all men.
I will stand with President Calvin Coolidge in carrying out the
promises contained in the National Republican platform, which is my
j platform, and I promise always to be a Montana citizen and a Mon
tana Senator as well us a United States Senator.
I am anxious to sec taxes reduced, the fanner helped and our
border safeguarded in the interests of the new immigration law."
FRANK B. L1NDEBMAN
j A VOTE FOR UNDERMAN IS A VOTE FOR MONTANA.
Circulated and paid for by Lindermnn for Senator Club, W. R. Hop
kins, president, Helena, Montana.
PEOPLE WOULD PAY
IF RAILROADS WERE
GOVERNMENT OWNED
Third Party Plan Would
Take Revenue From
State* Involved.
;
If the railroads of the United States
should be taken over, owned and Op
I erated by the government, the vast
\ taxes now paid hy the railroads would
have to be paid by the people, oecord
' iug to Will It, Wood, member of con
gross from Indiana and chairman of
i the Republican National Congression
j al committee. Mr. Wood has made
a careful analysis of the situation,
noting the tax payments by the rail
roads to the several state governments
last year.
If the roads were owned by the
government they would be tax free
Just as the post office* now are. The
slates would still need the money,
Just as they do now, and us a result
additional tuxes would have to be lev
ied on the citizens.
Mr, Wood's complete analysis fol
lows:
"Robert M. I.u Follette, the Soclal
Ist-tblrd party candidate for Presi
dent, Is trying to convince 0,000,900
fanners that the surest cure for their
Ills Is to bring about government own
ership of all the railroads In the coun
try ; that, If this Is done, transporta
tion rates of all kinds would be Im
mediately reduced.
"There are a lot of things, however,
that would transpire If this scheme
were curried out, that Senator LaFol
lette Is woefully silent upon, lie Is
not telling the fumiers (hut the gov
ernment pay* no taxes on Us proper
ties und that It would pay no tuxes
on the railroads of the country If It
owned them. He Is not telling them
that the railroads are paying into the
various county nnd state treasuries of
I the United Slates more than $300,000,
000 annually, which sum would have
to be paid, In large part, hy the fann
er*. once the government began the
ownership of the railroads.
"Take the state of Wisconsin for In
stance: Last year the railroads paid
the state of Wisconsin $7.321,076 In
taxes. In the state of Minnesota the
railroads paid, last year, a total tax
to the state of $8,125,082. In Iowa they
paid $11,8-10,708 ; In Kansas. $0,730,310;
In Indiana, $13,004,027. In these live
stales alone the railroads paid $ 12 ,
431,034 of the public tux burden. I
have taken the figures In the above
named states because they are large
ly agricultural and In the event that
j the government became the owner of
the railroads of the country the fann
ers of these states would have to bear
the greatest part of the burden In pay
tug these additional taxes.
"In the state of lovvu If the LaFoI
Lette scheme were curried out, It would
mean an Increase of $32 In taxes an
, mmlly levied against each farm In the
state, or $2.80 for each man, woman
I and child in the state. In Kansas the
burden would be $40 against each farm
! or $3.00 for each resident of that state.
In Minnesota, where Mr. l.uFullette Is
making a strong appeal for votes, he
would take away from the farmer,
under the government ownership plan,
a tax Income now paid by the rail
roads and place it ns an additional as
sessment of $47 against each farm In
the state, or $3.80 against each person
residing In that commonwealth.
"I am told that, la one county In
Montana, the total tax paid by the rail
roads amounts to 38.51 per cent of the
In midsummer of this
entire levy.
j year there was $104,102 of the total
j tax assessed In that county delinquent,
j upon which a penalty had been laid.
This is convincing evidence that this
county was already taxed much more
than It was able to pay. Yet Mr. Lu
I Follette would take away 38% per
î cent of the tax revenue of this coun
! ty, now being paid by the railroads,
I and place It as an additional burden
; upon the Individual taxpayer.
j "In my awn state of Indiana, the
; railroads pay $13,01)4,027 In taxes an
| nunlly. The total tax of the state la
j $124,800,700. The railroads share of
j this tax Is over 10 per cent. If Mr.
LaFollette's scheme were put Into ef
j feet, the Individual taxpayer of Indl
| ana would have to pay this additional
sum of $13,094.027 each year. In Marl
on county the railroads pay annually
$715,388 In tnxes, a very substantial
Item in the total of the tnxes prald In
that county.
"The figures that I have given, ap
plicable to the five agricultural stales
named, differ only In degree from those
(hut might be given for every other
state In the Union.
"Not only would the farmers be bur
dened by the payment of these ad
ditional faxes, should the government
become the owners of the railroads,
but they would also have an additional
burden to bear, Wie size of which It
is hard to ascertain. In the shape of
deficits occurring In the operation of
the railroads of the country for main
tenance, extensions and upkeep.
"Some Idea of what this burden would
he, may be bad, however, by recalling
the experience during the period
of government operation of the rail
roads under the management of Wil
liam O. McAdoo, when the amount of
the deficit over the earnings of those
railroads taken over by the govern
ment was more than a million dollars
a day, exclusive of the payment of
exorbitant salaries to an army of offi
cers.
"The farmers of this country, before
Ihey afeept the panacea of government
j ownership of railroads, which Is but
o forerunner of the socialistic state,
will do well to 'Stop, Look and Listen.' "
Farmer Expects Big
Yield From Handful
Of Hulless Oats
Lewistown— Last year when Ed
ward Thomas was out rustling grain
A Record Made is the Best of Promises
Re-elect
SCOTT
LEAVITT
To Congress
Republican Ticket
"For the Groans! Good to th »
Croatia I Number"
CtramUtmé ted paid tor be Scetl témoin
That $3,000,000 Davis-Daly Deal
vr
A fair sample of the kind of campaign that is being waged in behalf of the proposed Metal Mines
License Tax is shown in the distortion of the story of the Davis-Daly Copper Company taxes.
The unfairness is apparent of using a single instance of assessment as typical of an entire in
dustry. Many cases might be cited where large tracts of land have entirely escaped assess
ment, but that is no reason for urging an increased tax upon land generally. But when the
facts of this single Instance are unfairly and incorrectly set forth, it is enough to discredit the
entire tax campaign against the mining industry.
Governor Dixon Stated
.As a Matter of Fact
in his speech at Dillon, Sept. 26, 1924 ;
"I am sorry I couldn't get the county treasurer
to give me some yard stick of measurement here;
but here Is what the Metal Mines Tax really
means. I think I can give it to you bo that you
will understand it. Last February the Davis-Daly
mine in Butte was sold and bought by the Ana
conda for three million dollars. They had gotten
into a little litigation in the federaJ court, and
finally a majority of the stockholders sold to the
Anaconda for three million dollars in cash. That
was last February—the Davis-Daly mine. And
McIntyre, the county treasurer of Silver Bow
County, certified to the tax commission, that the
tax that year on this three million dollar cash deal
was $2,B49; that was the entire taxes, net pro
ceeds, machinery, surface ground and everything,
on a three m illion dollar sale-was $2,649. ,r
The taxes paid by the Davis-Daly Copper Com
pany for 1923 were as follows :
Property Tax (County).... $ 2,141.08
Net Proceeds Tax (County) 11,087.66 $13,228.72
Property Tax (City).
Net Proceeds Tax (City)....
$ 1 , 112.12
994.83
$ 2,106.95
Metalliferous Mines
License Tax paid to State—
Colorado Mine .
Hibernia Mine .
Mount Moriah .....
$ 640.C8
. 2,917.34
$ 3,506.42
1.00
TOTAL TAXES PAID
$18,894.09
The Montana Mining Association has in its possession the original certificates from the County
Treasurer of Silver Bow County, Montana, and the City Treasurer of Butte, Montana, show
ing Davis-Daly tax payments, as given above. The certificates from County Treasui tt McIntyre
and City Treasurer Riley read as follows:
OFFICE OF
CITY TREASURER
OFFICE OF
COUNTY TREASURER
Silver Bow County, Montana.
Butte, Montana, Oct. 11th, 1924.
Butte, Montana, October 11, 1924.
Montana Mining Association,
Helena, Montana.
Gentlemen ;
Montana Mining Association,
Helena, Montana.
Gentlemen :
In response to your inquiry this will certify
that the taxes paid by the Davis-Daly Copper
Company for the year 1923 on its mines, ma
chinery, net proceeds and other property in Silver
Bow County amounted to the sura of $13,228 72.
This does not include its City taxes c r State
License Tax.
This office did not certify to the Tax Com
mission or any one else that the entire taxes of the
Davis-Daly Copper Company on the net proceeds,
machinery, surface ground and everything for
that year was the sum of $2,549, or any other sura
less than $13,228.72.
In response to your inquiry, this will certify
that the Davis Daly Copper Co. paid City Taxes
to the City of Butte for 1923 as follows:
Mining claims, buildings, and
machinery and supplies.
Net Proceeds ..
$ 1 , 112.12
. 994.83
TOTAL
$2,106.95
Yours very truly,
JOSEPH E. RILEY,
City Treasurer.
J. MeCARTHY, Deputy.
(Signed;)
Yours very truly,
II, A. McINTYRE,
County Treasurer.
(Signed;)
Company against the Davis-Daly Company; counter
claims were made by the Davis-Daly Company; each
company claiming the other company had mined mil
lions of dollars from its ore-bodies. The cost of de
velopment at great depths to prove these contentions
was tremendous.
The Governor's statement aa to the $3,000,000 value
of the Davis-Daly property is equally as erroneous as
hi* statement of the amount of taxes paid. The facts
are as follows:
The Davis Daly Copper Company owned a number
of raining claims adjoining claims of the Anacondr
Copper Mining Company. Ore bodies at great depth,
two thousand feet or deeper, had been developed in
the Davis Daly ground, and it was claimed by the
Anaconda Company that these ore bodies had their
tops, or apices, in the Anaconda Company's ground,
and were owned by the Anaconda Company.
Serious controversies arose. One suit to recover many
millions of dollars was Instituted by the Anaconda
The result of the whole situation was a compromise,
including the settlement of all controversies, the release
by each company of all claims against the other and
the conveyance of the Davis-Daly properties to
Anaconda Company, all In consideration of the pay
ment by the Anaconda Company of $3,000,000,
Mr. Dixon jumps to the conclusion that the amount
paid, ($3,000,000), was entirely for the purchase of the
property.
the
MONTANA MINING ASSOCIATION
By Chartes S. IHluffly, President
:
and other product* to be exhibited at
I the state fair, he ran across some hull
|Ie*s oats. There was just a little of
the grain and no one knew exactly
how it came to be growing there
w'here it came from.
or
Mr. Thomas
gave the oats, a smell handful, to Ly
I
man Royce. Early last July Mr.
Royce gave the grain to George Davis.
who planted it out at his place July
8 , it being so late that he had little
hope of its making anytWng.
However, the grain came along in
splendid shape, matured and from the
little handful of seed Mr. Davis got
BUSY BEE CAFE
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half a busketful of grain. It looks
very fine and Mr Davia estimates
that it will produce 100 bushels to the
He is going to use what
raised this year for planting in the
spring and will have quite a lot for
seed from that.
he
acre.

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