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The Carbon County news. [volume] (Red Lodge, Mont.) 1924-1931, November 12, 1925, Image 6

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By Betty Webster
Copyright 1925, by the Bonnet-Brown
Corporation, Chicago.
HOUSEHOLD HINTS
To Prevent Candles From Dripping
Either paint your candles with
water colors or varnish them with
plain shellac. This will prevent wax i
from running down the side of the
candles and will also make them
pretty.
I
To Clean White Furniture
Dissolve one teaspoon soda in 1
pint warm water. Rub on furniture |
with a clean, soft cloth. Then dry ]
with a clean dry cloth.
Rebake Cold Baked Potatoes
Dip potatoes in hot water before
placing in oven. Then put them in a
warm oven. Rebake slowly.
COOKING HINTS
Peanut Brittle Fluff
hi pound of peanut brittle.
% pound of marshmallows.
1 bottle whipping cream.
Method; Grind peanut brittle. Cut
up marshmallows. Whip cream stiff. 1
Mix peanut brittle and marshmallows !
with whipped cream. Either chill or
place in mold and pack in salt and ice. ]
Cucumber-Pineapple Salad
Either 1 package of lemon jello or
1 envelope of gelatin.
2-3 cup of cold water.
Salt.'
1 cup of boiling water.
1 cup of canned pineapple cut in
pieces.
1 cucumber (cut up).
% cup of sugar.
hi cup of chopped nuts.
Juice of 1 lemon (if gelatin is used).
Method: Dissolve gelatin in cold
i
On Your Table
At
Every
Meal
Blue Ribbon Bread
And delicious pastry
Purity Bakery
Phone 234
Personal
Greetings for 1925
Our sample book of Personal
Greeting Cards for Christmas has
arrived and awaits your inspec
tion.
This year perhaps to a greater ex
tent than ever before have they
been chosen with discrimination,
and the result is a line of samples
of distinctive design, and con
servatively priced.
The engraved personal Greeting
card is the socially accepted med
i u m of extending Christmas
wishes to your friends. A selec
tion now will insure their arrival
in plenty of time to send to your
friends, far and near.
We shall be pleased to show you
this beautiful line of cards.
CARBON COUNTY NEWS
water. Add boiling water, salt, sugar
and lemon. When it starts to stiffen,
add cucumber and pineapple. Put in
mold or individual molds and chill.
Serve on lettuce with mayonnaise
dressing.
All Year Relish
(Quite Different and Good)
Cut up fine—red and green peppers.
A little onion—cup up fine. Mix alto
gether with lemon juice, a little sugar
and desired seasoning. Serve with any
kind of meats.
BAKING HINTS
Quick Cake
1 cup of sugar.
Little salt.
2 eggs or 2 egg whites.
3 teaspoons of baking powder.
hi cup of shortening.
14 cup of milk.
2 scant cups of flour.
Flavoring.
Method: Mix ingredients alto
gether and beat 2 minutes. Bake in
a moderate oven.
Chinese Chews
1 cup of sugar.
1 teaspoon of baking powder,
1 cup of chopped dates,
% cup of pastry flour,
% teaspoon of salt.
1 cup of walnut meats.
2 eggs,
Method.: Mix dry ingredients. Add
nuts and dates and beaten eggs.
Spread in a thin sheet. Bake. Do not
let it get hard on edges. Cut in 114
in. squares. Cool. When cool enough
roll in balls and roll balls in granu
lated sugar. This makes 36 balls.
[Readers, Note: If you have any
questions concerning Recipes and
other Household Hints you would like
to ask Betty Webster—address her in
care of this paper.]
The story is told of a rather unim
pressive congressman that he once
declared in an address to the house,
"As Daniel Webster says in his dic
tionary."
"It was Noah who wrote the dic
tionary," whispered a colleague who
sat at the next desk.
"Noah nothing," replied the speaker
"Noah built the ark."
WRKLEYS
AFTER
EVERY
HI
MEAL
TTr
affords
benefit as well
as pleasure.
Healthful exercise for the teeth
and a spur to digestion. A long
lasting refreshment, soothing to
nerves and stomach.
The Great American
Sweetmeat, untouched i
by hands, full of J
fi flavor. I
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^CßSQWCENTENNi^i
HISTORY f
Ssà SKETCHES ? B
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The one hundred and fiftieth annivertary of the adoption
of the Declaration of Independence will be observed by the
Sesquicentennial International Exposition, which open« at
Philadelphia, June 1, 1926.
The Start of the Revolution
The difficulties between England
and her American Colonies which led
to the Revolutionary War and the
adoption of the Declaration of Inde
pendence, the one hundred and fiftieth
anniversary of which will be observed)
next year by the Sesquicentennial In
ternational Exposition at Philadelphia,
can be traced back to 1733.
In that year the British Parliament
passed the first of a series of Acta
which so tried the patience of the col
onists that they began thinking of
separate political existence.
The first Act, passed in 1773, was
known as the Molasses Act. It placed
a tax of six pence a gallon on mo
lasses. It was followed by the Sugar
Act of 1764, placing a tax on sugar,
and a year later by the Stamp Act,
which ordered a duty on all legal docu-J
ments, phamplets, newspapers, adver
tisements and almanacs.
The Stamp Act was repealed In
1766, and in 1767 the passage of the
Townshend Act placed a tax on tea,
glass, paper and painters' materials,
This "Xct particularly incensed the
Colonies. It provided that some of
the proceeds would pay the salaries of
colonial governors and judges, and
ordered the trial of cases growing out
of collecting of revenue to be heard
, . • . ... . .. .1
before judges without the presence of
juries.
At this time Connecticut sent a
representative to England to protest
against "Taxation without Represen
tation." Virginia passed a resolution
against the Acts, and Patrick Henry
delivered his famous speech, "Give me
liberty or give me death."
The people of the Colonies suffered
under these various forms of taxation,
but boycotts against taxed articles
became wide-spread. Then, on Decem
ber 16, 1773, a party of men disguised
as Indians boarded a British vessel
in Boston harbor and emptied its car
go of tea into the bay. On October 16,
1773, Philadelphia had its own tea
The NEW COUPE'
One of the Most Popular
Personal Cars Ever Produced
SCHOLARSHIPS TO
UNIVERSITY TO BE
GIVEN DESERVING
H. S. STUDENTS
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I 5 ®,
W. A. Clark, Jr., of Butte, has
agreed to pay every year beginning
the present term the tuition, board
and room of five promising high school
graduates who attend the State Uni
versity of Montana. These scholar
ships are awarded by a committee
composed of the university faculty and
three others nominated by the presi
dent of the university and appointed
by Mr. Clark. The scholarships are
tenable for only one year and the
holder is not eligible for a second year.
The first holders of the Clark scholar
ships are Ralph Olson of Butte, Doug
las Taylor of Hamilton, Lester Jones
of Miles City, Lawrence Sweetman of
Billings, and Clarence Hagen of Stev
ensville.
The scholars are chosen on the basis
of all-around activity in the high
school. Personal application is un
necessary although the committee of
awards considers all such applications.
Athletic coaches and high school prin
ciples suggest prominent and active
high school students and from the in
formation thus received the committee
makes its selection.
In addition to athletic ability the
the candidate must give promise of
being able to successfully carry uni
versity work. For this reason the
committee has refused to consider men
who graduate in the lowest third of
their high school classes.
The scholarships cover only actual
living expenses exclusive of clothes
and student supplies. The tuition of
the holders is paid directly to the uni
versity as well as the board and room
of those who live in the university res
idence halls. Holders of scholarships
living elsewhere are paid an amount
equivalent to board and room at the
men's dormitory.
The committee of award is com
posed of Dr. J. P. 8. Marshall and H.
L. Bickenbach of Missoula, Fred For
man of Butte, and President C. H.
Clapp, Dean R. H. Jesse, and W. E.
Schreiber of the university faculty.
Dm
THE NEW SENSATION OF THE CLOSED CAR FIELD $2700
Again Franklin shows the way. First to popularize the Sedan type, it now leads in de
veloping another growing field—that of the compact three-passenger closed car. Demand
shows that this Coupe is a real contribution to motoring delight Smart, handsome and
powerful, it is infinitely more practical and comfortable than anything of its kind in the
past. Note its stylish English coachboot rear, its single broad seat soft leather trim, wide
doors, extra large luggage space, and exclusive clear vision construction. Note also that •
it is priced only $65 above the Touring model. Its reception has been amazing. Present
output is double that of six months ago.
FRANKLIN COUPE
O. H. P. SHELLEY
Authorized Dealer
Red Lodge, Mont.
party in the State House Square, at
which strong resolutions were adopt
ed, refusing to pay the tax on tea. At
that meeting a committee was ap
pointed to wait on Captain Ayers, of
the ship "Polly," and instruct him not
to attempt to land his cargo. It was
was met by a crowd of eight thousand
on December 27 that the "Polly" ar
rived in the harbor and Captain Ayers
excited people. He was given to un
der stand that he must take the ship
back to England öfter one day's grace
allowed him to obtain food and water.
^ , •
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In Alaska Follows
Volcanic Eruption
eruption today of Mount Shishaldin on
Umnak Island, 800 miles southeast of
Cordova, in the Aleutian Island, a se
.. , , . ,, , .
vere earthquake was felt in the vicin
'.
Shishaldin volcano,
Cordova, Alaska, Nov. 7.—A wire
less message received here tonight re
ported that immediately following an
ity.
Dense clouds of smoke rolled from
The sky which was clear this morn
ing, was smoky and dark by evening
at Dutch Harbor on Unalaska Island,'
100 miles west of Mount Shishaldin.
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Museum of "Buffalo
Bill" Relics May
Be Located at Cody
Cody, Wyo.—Dedications are the
order of the year in Cody. Two years
ago the memorial to Col. William F.
Cody was dedicated. Last year the
and beautiful concrete
new road
bridge on the Cody Way to Yellow
stone which eliminated fear from the
wholesome thrills on this highway was
dedicated. Next year it is expected a'
museum to house the relics and mem
entoes of the days of the great scout,
"Buffalo Bill," will be erected and
dedicated in time for the yearly tour
ist traffic.
An organization of the descendants
and relatives of the late W. P. Cody
has just been held at the Drake Hotel
in Chicago and arrangement were
made for this project. It may also
be expected that the removal of the

rema.ns of Colonel Cody from Lookout
Mountain in Colorado to Cedar Moan
tain near Cody will be urged in the
near future.
Mrs. Mary Jester Allen, niece of
Colonel Cody and a writer of promi
nence in New York who has a ranch at
Cody, has been instrumenatl in having
Cody chosen as the location for this
museum.

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