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Red Lodge daily news combined with Carbon County news. [volume] (Red Lodge, Mont.) 1931-1936, October 15, 1931, Image 4

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Carbon County News
Published every Thursd ay at Red Lodge, Carbon Co., Montana
OFFICIAL PAPER OF CARBON COUNTY
PAPER OF THE CITY O* - RED LODGE, MONT.
OFFICIAL
O. H. P. SHELLEY, Editor and Owner
Subscription — Per year,
months, $1.50;
Entered at the Postoffice at
Red Lodge, Montana, as Mat
ter of the Second Class. Un
der the Act of Congress of
March 6, 1879.
$2.50; six
three months, $1. All sub
scriptions payable in advance
iMCi -ûe r
niiüW.
[in
i >
Utional Editorial A ssoc iation
m
-«sqjips*'
Advertising rates based on guaranteed circulation and furnished
upon application. Discount given on contracts.__
4
TELEPHONE NUMBER NINE
Red Lodge Daily News
Established October 13, 1931
O. H. P. SHELLEY, Editor and Owner
E. B. SHELLEY, Manager
MEMBER NATIONAL EDITORIAL ASSOCIATION
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
i
4
Published every afternoon of the year except Sunday,
" at Red Lodge, Montana.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for publi
cation of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in this paper and also the local news published herein.
Subscription per year by mail.
,$3.00
THURSDAY', OCTOBER 15, 1931
TAKE ACCOUNT, TOO, OF YOUR BLESSINGS
By GEOROE B. LOCKWOOD
Press dispatches carry the story of a Bulgarian At ho
committed suicide the other day because he had been or
dered deported to his native land from America. Every
day deportation is resisted by aliens illegally in the coun
try as if this tvere a sentence to death.
Fish
from Burgas, Bulgaria.
A pathetic story comes
in the Black Sea saw a boat drifting, apparently
ermen in t
empty. Investigating, they found in it four children, 4 to
12 years of age, completely exhausted. They had been
drifting in the boat for days, the eldest explained, and
they were "on their way to America. In theii natite til
lage of Constanza, Bulgaria, they had heard stories ol the
land where there was more happiness for children, and
leaving a note at home, they had run away.
Hundreds of millions of young people, young and old,
Scores
in other countries, dream of coining to America.
America lias absorbed millions of
of millions have come,
aliens during the past half century. They have come
■here empty handed. Here millions of them have found
opportunities undreamed of in the lands where they were
bom.
•v A few years ago il was, necessary for America to limit
this migration. Except., tor our immigration laws, it is
probable that a yearly entry of immigrants then rising
to a million, would long ago have risen to two millions.
This country slowed down this migration only because
the economic and social system of the .United States
libitum of the stock
could not permanently stand this
(
already here. .It was bringing some strength more
weakness to the republic which once boasted it was the
haven for the oppressed of all lands.
While the whole world would rush to America for
;reater prosperity and security if it could, Iioav much ap
iation of America is felt or voiced by those already
American children possess tvhat these poor Bul
children were ready to trust themselves to the
Do we suf

preci
here ?
ganan
wind and the Avaves in the hope of finding,
ficicnfly count the values of what we possess in this re
public of ours, or do avo spend m l of our time com
plaining' and finding fault?
The art of appreciation seems almost lost. We live
in an age of cynicism, of criticism, of almost universal
Now that Ave are in a temporary period of
fault finding.
depression, avc fail to take account of the fact that how
ever serious our plight, our adversity Avould be prosper
ity in the Old World. This habit of "kicking
coming almost universal even while. ive Avere in the midst
of prosperous days. The Bible tells of the race that
Avaxed fat and kicked'' and ultimately brought about
its oavu destruction. The lesson is worth thinking over.
When you are inclined to take a dark yieAv of tilings
in the country in which you have enjoyed so much that
makes for human happiness, think of the alien who killed
himself because he Avas about to be sent aAvav from Am
. ? >
was be
i 6
erica, and of the pathetic little group of children tossing
on the Black Sea hoping through their sufferings to
reach a happier land.
DID YOU KNOW TkAT
With its two national parka, YellôAvstpyfc'ànd Glacier,
and its vast stretch of mountain ràhge^Montana l|ads
the nation in scenic attractions. It is rapidly bridging its
immense distances Avith improved highways for the bene
fit of its people and tourists from other states, millions of
dollars being expended annually by the state for the stan
dardizing of trunk highways.
THE WEEK AT THE
STATE CAPITOL
(Bv United Press)
Helena, Mont., Oct. 14.—(UP)—
During the absence of Gov. J. E.
Erickson, Lieut. Gove F. A. Hazel
baker of Dillon, occupied the execu
tive chair. During his tenure of
office he issued two proclamations
—his first one urged the people to
support the Red Cross drive, and
the other proclaimed education
week.
Commissioner of Lands I. M.
Brandjord returned last week from
the sale of state lands at Harlow
ton. All the land advertised was
"sold, a total of 1,346 acres, and
brought an average of $14 an acre.
One section brought $34 an acre.
Dr. W. F. Cogswell, secretary of
the state board of health, has been
advised that the Indian Service
will open a medical office in Hel
ena. This follows a recent decision
that state and federal governments
should co-ordinate their health
work on reservations, avoid over
lapping and improve the results.
Assistant Surgeon I. R. White of
Washington, has been appointed to
fill the post.
Inheritance taxes totaling $162,
000 will be paid into state coffei*s
from the estate of James L. Ham
ilton of Butte. The state boai'd of
equalization has been advised of
the findings of the probate court,
and levied a tax on the $2,220,
491 left by the deceased.
Thp state board of examiners
last week agreed mn the sale of the
Hamilton laboratory to" the federal
government for $68,757. Legisla
tion providing for the transfer
from the state to the federal gov
ernment of the property was en
acted by Istate and national legis
latures last session.
The state railroad commission
has scheduled a sériés of 23 hear
ings, the first of which opens next
Monday, Oct. 19 at Bozeman.
Acting Governor Hazelbaker last
week honored the request of the
governor of Oklahoma for the re
turn of Paul Martin, held at Kalis
pell on Oklahoma charges. Martin
assertedly is involved in an Okla
homa bank robbery.
Miss Elizabeth Ix-eland, state su
perintendent of public instruction,
has been attending a series of
school institutés in Northeastern
Montana. Among the places visited
were Glasgow, Chinook, Malta and
Havre.
Scout Executive Visits.
Great Falls, Oct. 14.—(UP)—
James E. West, chief executive of
the Boy Scouts of America, will
visit Montana three weeks from
now and will address a conference
of leaders at Helena on Nov. 2.
Attorney Fined for Tardiness.
Phoenix, Ariz., Oct. 14.—(UP)
—It doesn't pay to be late when
Judge M. T. Phelps of Phoenix is
on the bench. William J. Fellows,
local attorney, was 15 minutes
late the other day and it cost him
$1 per minute—a total of $15—
for contempt of coui't.
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Photography Canadian National Railways
T HAT in certain sections of agricultural Canada oxen are still in com
mon use on farms? The photograph shows a yolk of oxen har
nessed to a hay wagon near Greenfield, Nova Scotia.
SHEEP TENDER
OF COUNTY IN
BO-PEEP ACT
Whether Joe Anderson, a sheep
camp tender who has been missing
since Thursday morning, was over
taken by an accident while absent
from his post, or whether he is
simply making an unannounced
visit to some out-of-the-country
town, is a question that his fam
ily and county authorities have
been unable to decide.
Last Thursday Anderson, who is
employed at a camp near the Mon
tana-Wyoming state line by John
McClellan, stockowner, was re
ported to be missing from his duty
by farmers who noticed the sheep
in his flock wandering unattended.
Sheriff Albert and Deputy Fair
grieve of Red Lodge, have been in
vestigating his absence this week.
His course was followed from
the sheep camp along the foothills
as far as the Lamport i-anch. One
of the dogs he had been using had
been left at the Chappel camp, but
caretakers there had no knowledge
of the owner's whereabouts.
In Red Lodge some knowledge of
the missing man was picked up,
when it was found that he had put
up his horse at the SheiTell Sag
endorf barn, and had left his other
sheep dog there. At that time he
had stated his intention of making
a trip to Columlbus.
He has not been reported from
that town, however, and no other
knowledge of him has reached his
family, who reside at Chance.
DOUBLE BOOKS
REVEALED IN
TEXAS PROBE
Edinbui'g, Tex., Oct. 14.—(UP)
—Two sets of books, one public and
the other private, wex - e kept by Hi
dalgo County officials duxdng a
thx-ee-year pexnod ending Dec. 31,
1930, an audit has just x'evealed.
"Rake-offs'
on road conti'acts,
overpayment on x-oad conti-acte
and other irregularities are report
ed by Ei'nst & Ernst, of Houston,
the accounting firm.
Fourteen former Hidalgo Coun
ty officials and others, and three
former officials of this city, will be
called for trial here Oct. 19 on va
rious charges gi'owing out of an
alleged conspiracy, which is sup
pcteed to have defrauded taxpayers
out of millions of dollars. The in
dictments were returned last
c
spring.
Besides records of the county,
books of drainage districts, road
districts and the old Edinburg
State Bank & Tnxst Company were
examined. The aduit indicates a
basis for suit to recover nearly
$1,000,000, and establishes the
county debt at $20,450,212.18.
The general audit Bays that an
examination of the dx-ainage dis
trict warrants "discloses that in
numerous instances they were
paid, or refunded, without being
endorsed by the payee, and others
which by a comparison of endorse
ments indicates that such endorse
ments are not in the handwriting
of the payee."
DEPRESSION HITS
RENO'S BUSINESS
Resorts Once Open Operate
Now in Secret with
Barred Doors
Reno, Nev., Oct. 14.—(UP)—To
the tune of depression Nevada's
illicit liquor ousmess has danced
"Home, Sweet Home" and many
resorts that once ran nearly wide
open now are operating on meager
scale behind closed, barred doors,
according to George Brady, fed
eral prohibition administrator for
the state of Nevada.
"There used to be eight or nine
stills along each little creek
around here," Brady said. "Now
you can look all around and never
find a still.
Of course, many of
the streams are dry now, but even
at that they just aren't doing the
business."
The state's dry chief believes
that the depression hits all busi
ness, legal and otherwise alike.
He says "a lot of the boys are
wondering where they're going to
eat this winter and they aren't
spending their money on booze."
And as business in the speakeasies
falls off so do customers have to
speak easier to gain admittance.
It was the prohibition adminis
trators claim that where formerly
many of his aides could walk into
a bar and buy a drink before
"knocking it over" they now were
excluded because they weren't
known.
Install Mill at Mine.
Helena, Oct. 14.—(UP)—Instal
lation of a mill at its mine proper
ties near Rimini is planned by
Montana Lead, Inc., it was an
nounced here last week.
Missoula, Oct. 14.—(UP)—There
now are more than 400 bison on
the buffalo preserve north of Mis
soula.
Old Prospector Still Searches.
Butte, Oct. 14.—(UP)—Gus Wis
ner, oldest prospector in the state,
visited Butte with a bag of sam
ples last week. Although 84, Wis
ner continuas his quest for gold in
the Gold Creek area, 12 miles
above Pioneer.
Farmers Union Meets at Falls.
Great Falls, Oct. 14.—(UP)—
The state convention of the Far
mers Union di'ew large delegations
of farmei's here this week. State
officials, among them Governor
Erickson and Commissioner of Ag
riculture Staffox-d, appeared on the
program.
Carbon Plumbing & Heating
ELECTRICAL SUPPLIES
Steam and Hot Water Heating : Sewer Work .
Water Mains Tapped ; Stove Repairs
Sheet Iron and Tin Work : General
Repairing
Phone 15-W
Victor Aho, Proprietor
10 Day
SPEND and SAVE
SALE
JUST WHAT YOU HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR
We are giving as a final windup of our Great 10
Day Sale ABSOLUTELY FREE to each purchaser
of a Winter Coat—A NEW FALL OR WINTER
HAT. Choose from our Fresh Stock of Newest
Style Hats authorized from New York. Both Men
and Women may take advantage of this offer.
..A Special range of Coat Values at only $14.95
Avith gorgeous Fur Sets. A Wonderful assortment
at this low price as we have added shipments just
unpacked.
BARGAINS! BARGAINS! IN ALL DEPART
MENTS. COME EXPECTING GREAT THINGS!
YOU'LL FIND THEM! YOU'LL FIND QUAL
ITY—VALUE—PRICES ASTONISHINGLY LOW!
PRICES THAT MEAN DOLLARS IN YOUR POC
KETBOOK! PLAN TO BE HERE—SAVE!
HOFFMAN DEPT. STORE
Edgar Wins One
And Loses One
(Continued from Page 1 )
from the Billings high school,
which re-outfitted its team this
year. The sport is receiving the
support of the townspeople, and is
gaining wide interest.
Coach Omdahl has his squad
working ismoothly at this stage of
the season, and is putting his boys
through a rigid work-out every
evening after school. Twenty-four
boys responded to the first call for
football, and eighteen are still on
the roster after the squad was
lightened.
The line-up includes:
Virgil Dowell.
Ned Newton .
Cliff Jensen .
Wilbur Webber .
Edward Reams .
Robert Steele .
Peter Ford .
Glenn Hummiston ...
Marvin Pavlocky ....
Norman McQuaid ..
Clarke Bennett.
This regular line-up is bolstered
by Bernard Carlson, Oral Dowell,
Andrew Blenske, Charles Orr,
Bruce Newton, Moe Messer, and
Tom Nelson.
Prominent on the squad are Web
ber and Ford. Webber has played
two good games at tackle, display
ing the habit of breaking through
the line to nail his men in their
own backfield. Ford, at center, is
the keystone of the Edgar line.
Pavlocky is an outstanding back
field man and his absence from the
team in the Columbus game was
noticeable.
This Saturday. Oct. 17, Edgar
will encounter Reeds Point, the
game to be played at the Yellow
stone county town. Other games on
the schedule are; Oct. 20, Laurel
at Edgar; Oct. 24, Columbus at Ed
gar; Oct. 27, Laurel at Laurel; and
Oct. 30, Worden at Edgar. The fi
nal game of the season will be
played with the Worden team. Ed
gar will have played a number of
hard games by that time, and ex
pects to he in trim to finish the
season with a win.
. R. E.
.L. E.
. R. G.
.L. G.
. R. T,
.L.T.
.C.
. F. B.
..Q.
R. H.
.L. H.
Gi'eat Falls. Oct. 14.—(UP)—
President Alfred Atkinson of Mon
tana State College has been blessed
on a kernal of rice "by an admir
friend in China. The gi-ain
when examined under a microscope
reveals a prayer of 250 letters. It
passed customs inspection here.
mg
a rd AY. Brewer of Bozeman, has
been honored with a scholarship in
iho medical school of Harvard
Honored With Scholarship.
Bozeman, Oct. 14.—(UP)—Leon
University.

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