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Greenbrier independent. [volume] (Lewisburg, Va. [W. Va.]) 1859-1980, May 06, 1921, Image 3

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THE UNIVERSAL CAR
The Tractor for the Farmer.
Goodyear Tires and Tubes.
PREST-O-LITE Storage Batteries.
We are a branch of the great Ford Service organization, the most ex
tensive as well as the most intensiye organization of its kind in exist
ence. It is our duty to uphold the high ideals of the Ford organization
in this territory, to deliver Csrs as promptly as possible, to give quick
and thorough repair service and courteous treatment to all customers.
Beginning Nay 1st
our Garage in Lewisburg will be in charge of Mr. Harry N. Clarkson.
He will carry in stock a complete line of Repair Parts, and will have
the proper shop equipment and competent mechanics to give prompt and
efficient Ford Service.
We also carry a complete line of Goodyear Tires and Tubes and
Prest-O-Lite Storage Batteries, and Repair parts for all makes of cars.
Clarkson & Tuckwiller,
Insist on Genuine Ford Parts. Ronceverte, W. Va.
ADJOURNED?
By ALICE BORDEN STEVENS
t g. hy McCiur? Newupaper Syndicate.)
i'->! :ni(i carry, ?l?>t ami carry! Holt's
? struck the stony ground :? nil
a< in regular swing ho skipped
u{.u'!i i lu* hill roud In his own eccen
tric way, one shoulder lifted hy the
rruicii. 1 1 10 other drooping with the
>>f the well knee.
"Have u ride?" Tho sweet voice
raii^' above the chug of the engine as
ile automobile came to a sudden stop.
?;<iiiii: !<? the village? I'll give you a
lift." Slic spoke in a careless, coni
?*!.?: j voice, as though every day she
l'H?k in unknown cripples and landed
|!"ii at unknown destinations.
I "Siire !" he cried, deftly lifting ldm
l-l' through the door to the hack seat
|'f t! ?? touring car. Doris Herkeley
?i'iti't to help. She released the
Irak. ?< atid slid into the road again.
|A'l:.-iv to, oh prince?"
I links." he replied,
I All right; here goes." The
-mis winding, now through woods
wnv along cliffs dipping to the
liver. Tlie car ran with an occasional
la't'l). "Hrake ottt of order? Can I
i*oh ltandall listened. "Knock*
PK. i<ti't she ? Oh, all right. I didn't
Pfnti t ft Jmi tt in; go on, please."
? ?'?ris laughed. "I am sensitive
??'"Ut my driving, I suppose. I've lia<l
V 'ii' I; all dav; uow do you dare ride
|ith i,s..v
I the death;" said Hob, more sol
P'lily iiuii) he intended.
I itiv,:::(i]y he was swearing at his
?"oilt'ii leg a i id luck generally; hut he
??'I kfio-.v the value of a hrave front,
J''1 ' ?'! It. With all the money in
? v'" rid. had tie a tight t ? ? ask any
?"'uisti hi runrry half a man? The
ii'1 snap resolution that had
iiit. i a remarkable aviator gave
1 : iiy a jo't as he limped through
J" hy deciding oil a future
>ure to please his glorious
K1' "lily to find it iuipossihle to his
hoily, however expert he might?
in t ho use of makeshift limbs
?><) t'lniv-. So, with his heart and soul
l'1'1"- "Thou art the girl." his mind
U'H ehiuiped down the lid of do
ff' v,h|i i ho iron of fair play.
? 11,,-r,.: j('s jammed again! Oh?
?!' Jump? You can't, of course!"
B '?ris tugged tit the wheel in despair
Uou''l 'tot move.
? going over?I'm sorry?"
s!''' held the wheel ns the feiu-e
I1;'"! wUh the Impact.
? -Mr pltcheil at right angles into
'"'I' of a tall sapling, mid slid,
B.I?' down its bending j
?'? i t'. the beach beneath, stopping
? front wheels In the water.
? ' v|! I' "f 20 feet was, thus broken,
! not lb ore exciting ihan a good' loop- j
the-loop 01 the park, hut tlio girt felt;
the gT'P of responsibility before there
was time for fear, and tlie man
cursed his impoteney 10 help as a man
who was not a wreck ? a tiling ? an
idiot ? might help. To be strong ? ami
useless: ? what u pain!
All was still. Doris unfolded from;
the bottom of the car where the drop 1
landed her, and peeped over the seat. :
"What? Aren't you dead? Thank
j heaven, though I've little rijrlit to even i
i speak of heaven, after risking your !
! life this way. How eonld I guess it'
! would act so? It did it this morning, j
j and .landed me in the ditch, but the j
j garage man said it was all right now." ;
j ?'Turned it too hard, that's all." !
I'.oh unscrambled the real and the ;
J artificial of his belongings and erepr j
j from the ear. Mohiing by the back
wheel, he handed her th?> eruteh.
"Can you vault? If you can, you 1
won't get wet. 1 don't know how we j
will get out of this.' lie looked up thej
| sheer faee of the? el iff, "but tirst. let's j
I get out of the machine, anyway. Sure, j
i you're all right?"
i "Why. they're alive!"
"Not after that full !" The voices j
came incredulously from above their i
heads.
Leaning over the rail, two seared '
faces took account of conditions he
low. "Can you walk?"
"Sure!" called JJob, "if we had a
chance." lie looked up and down ;he
rocky shore dubiously.
j "How is the car?"
i "It looks all right. : wet, of course."'
"Well, wait, and we'll yet ropes and
j things from tin* garage."
! When the climb was made with the
i aid of engines and pulleys ami many
! strong arms and ingenious mind*, two j
! people rather shaken now that It was |
over, sat In the back the girl i
smiling tremuhutsiv. but tiudlug t.-our- |
aire in the face of the man.
?'l>o you still want to go to the golf j
grounds," she snbt.
"Well ? under the circumstance*
"Say," broke in a gruff and practi
cal voice, "that engine would go if it ;
wasn't wet. As it Is. we're going to j
tow you > ome : take the wheel, one of ;
you !"
"Meeting adjourned." whispered
liob, ?ts he helped I 'oris over to the
driver's seat. "There's to be a happy
| ending Isn't there?"
She smiled and leaned a hit on his
shoulder as she pav>cM.
"Yes ? adjourned." she said, and he
braced his good fcot against the Iron (
rail, and dreamed strong dreams as
they went on their way I'erlnips .
there wan stilt In hba, after all, a
power to serve.
Norway ft to hnv* tiro new itreat
?teel works, largely to supply plates
for ship tmt'dJnr.
Cupid Astray
By FREDERICK HART
ll?j. 1921, by McOluro Newspaper SynUU-ule.) j
"M-e-e-ow I"
The wail of a oaf is no uncommon ;
tiling iu New York, aiul Edward Hunt- j
or did not think anything particularly j
about, this particular outburst: but as j
it ropentod itself he was struck with ?
the |?i:t in I iveness of the voice? -not sit j
all like t lie strident howls with which ,
tho common variety of alley-boast shut- i
tors th?* welkin and tho rest of folks j
in tho small hours. "Kitten in trouble," j
thought Edward Hunter, ami looked
nbout to tiiul tho on use of tin; noise. j
"Mp-c-i'-ow !" There was no doubt ?
about it iliis time. A youth of the
cat breed had undoubtedly gotten it
self into a scrape and was bewailing
tho fact. Interested, Hunter continued
to search with his eyes. A third repeti
tion of the heartbroken mowing caused
him to raise ids eyes heavenward, and
at lust lie saw the kitten. It was
clinging precariously to the cross-arm
at the top of a lamppost, afraid to
Jump and at the same time not at all
pleased with its present haven.
Hunter wondered how the little
thing had managed to perch itself so
high. Hut oven as ho wondered the I
kitten, with a desperate look in Its eye, j
gathered its small self into a furry j
bundle and launched ilself into the !
air, apparently trusting to the fate !
that watches over little cats for a safe !
landing.
It jumped straight at Hunter, and j
that youth, although surprised, man- j
aged to catch it and get it into a safe !
position in his arms. It seemed snr I
prised, bin recognizing in Hunter a |
man who was kind to kittens, accepted !
i lie situation philosophically and made
no attempt to escape. Hunter cuddled J
It sympathetically.
"Von poor litle cuss," he *.iid. "Hut i
all idgiit. I'll hot. and treed uio-U ??f j
l lie tine*. Wonder who you are? i
You're no common eat, that's sure."
The kitten responded with a faint j
niew ? a mew that had lost its <iu:dlt>
of woe, hr.t that still expressed long- .
I tigs of a sort. Hunter recognized rtie 1
primal yearning of the entire animal
fatally. j
"Hungry," he remarked to himself.
"Very well, then," he continued, ad
dressing Ids small charge, "we'll Ju*t ;
rati up to my place and I'll yee if ,
then? ore any rnb'o or anything in the .
Icebox."
At Hunter's bndudor apartment the j
kitten i?ro?x'eded to put Itself iu deadly i
and immediate peril of acute Indigo j
tlon h v cooyvming Uie greater oart. of
Tried to Play With the Veil and Was
Sternly Chidden.
*
a hall'-pim of milk nt record-breaking
speed. Hunter watched it anxiously,
hut It showed no immediate signs of
dissolution; In fuel, it curled itself up
on file rug went !?? sleep wllh :i i
contented little purr. Hunter removed
the dish and returned to the observa
tion of the infant fat.
He had noticed a thin rod ribbon
; around its neck as he caught it from
the lamppost ; but now, as it lay on its
side, he saw a tiny silver tag attached
to tl?e rihhon. He took it in his liu
! gers, gently for fear of awaking the
kitten, and with some difficulty de
ciphered the inscription. It waH a
street address ? nothing more.
"No. :M ltalston plare. Morristown,"
he said. "H'm ? must be a p?*t pussy.
I greatly fear you and I are going to
purt company before the sun sets. I'd
like to keep you, but you're probably
{ causing some old maid a succession of ,
heart attacks. When you wake up you
and I are going to make a trip to your
presumably distracted mistress. So
sleep while you can, for it's you for a
basket and the ferries."
He busied himself about the room
for a while; then, as the hour drew
ou toward noon, he went out, had'
> lunch at his club and returned to tlnd
the kitten very much awake and amus>
I lng Itself by experimenting with th?
' movables ??n h!s table. ipost of which
lay scattered ?n il>e tloor.
Hunter rescued the inkwell Ju*t in
t!u:e, and unceremoniously bundled
pussy into :i light basket. Tlion slit*
twa s.?t out for Morristown.
So. "4 Kalstou place proved to !??? an
attractive house vet in the midst of
a green. tree-shaded lawn, lie walked
up the path and rang the hell. A neat. |
white-capped tnahl answered hi< ring,
and lie was soon in the presence of his
imagined "ohl maid." Ills expectations
were dashed, however, for the owner
j of the stray, when she entered the |
room, caused him to spring to his foot !
with a llush on his face.
He knew that here was the one face j
I he had sought ali his life ? and he had i
I imagined her old and cranky! This
beautiful girl of twenty or so, with
light hair curling ahout a clear face, i
with the bluest eyes he had ever seen j
? Hunter found himself stammering '
something that he felt instinctively j
was banal.
"Hut 1 know you've had a lot of j
trouble with Skookum." So that was j
the kitten's name. How adorable she i
was! The girl, not the kitten, of [
course.
"No trouble at all," lie assured her. J
"I'm sure that it was u pleasure to ?
to return it to you." *
Ho laughed dellciously. "That's not
very complimentary to Skookum." she
replied.
"Oh. hut I didn't mean that ? at least,
not that way." He was fussed? he
was distinctly fussed, and getting more
so every minute, he thought. If only
she wouldn't look at u fellow that way !
It was disconcerting, very.
"I ? I think I must be going," he
stammered.
"Oh. but you must stay and have
tea." she cried. "And nt least let me
know to whom it Is that I am obliged."
His wits were returning. "My
name's Hunter ? Edward Hunter. And
I don't want you to feel obliged
to me. Hut it" you must, won't you
tell me to whom 1 owe this pleasure?"
She blushed ever so slightly.
"I'm Estelle Kastermun," she replied.
"I live here all alone with my mother.
I'm sure that I'm awfully glad to have
met you, Mr. Lluntcr. And now let's
have tea."
They had tea nnd much talk. And
Hunter departed ; but not without bav
ins extracted on Invitation to call
again.
???????
Some six months later Skookum,
vastly Improved in stature and dispo
sition, found the house in an unac
countable flutter. His mistress, who
had always paid bo much attention to
him, was dressed all in white, with a
long floating veil not at all like her
ordinary attire. Skookum tried to play
with the veil and was sternly chidden.
And there was music, and hundreds of
people about the place, none of whom
paid the least attention to Skookum.
And presently his mistress walked
slowly down the stairs and was met
by a man whom Skookum remembered
as his one-time benefactor; and a
I man i:i in:ick cloth??s said something,
ami ill*- oih?*r iuan kissed Ids mistress,
ami tliotv was (fn\<u slurrying ami
hurrying. Skookum felt very neg
| looted, ami was on the point of volo
. lug his feeling when his mistress ami
| i he man rushed up to him aud caught
him in their arms and kissed him amj
oaeh other indiscriminately.
j "lie's responsible for it all," said
1 the man. "Bless him!"
' "lie is the darling!*' said his mis
tress. "lie shall have cream for din
ner tonight."
And he did.
REMEMBERED FOR ONE SONG
Dr. Thomas Dunn English Practical
ly Unknown Except as the
Author of "Ben Bolt."
Pr. Thomas Dunn English did a
prodigious amount of work in his lil'e
i!me. hut all of it has been forgotten
except (he single song. "Ben Bolt." lie
was a physician, a journalist and a
politician, as well as a poet, an essay
ist and a novelist.
Dr. Knglisli was linrn in Philadel
phia June ifl). 1819. He was graduated
from the medical department of the
University of Pennsylvania, and after
ward studied law. He was a Demo
cratic member of the Fifty-second and
Fifty-third congresses. For a number
of years" he was n newspaper man. In
184'5 he wrote "Bon Bolt." The poem
attracted attention, and was widely
copied In England. Dr. English re
ceived no money for it. He put "Ben
Bolt" to music, but the sales were
light. In 1848 "The Battle of Buena
Vista" was presented in Pittsburgh,
and "Bon Bolt" was sung in one of th?j
scenes. The great popularity of th?
song dates from that time.
"Ben Bolt" was extensively parodied
for half a century. A race horse, a
ship and a steamboat were named for
lr. Dr. English remarked grimly that
the ship was wrecked, the steamboat
blown up and the horse turned out a
selling plater. Du Maurier for some
reason chose It when he wrote "Tril
by." thinking It to have been an old
English melody. This helped to keep
It alive.
Inauguration Biblea.
For his Inauguration President
Cleveland provided a Bible, little
larger than a human hand, that was
presented to him by his mother when
he was a child. In marked contrast
was McKlnley's Inaugural Bible, which
was a tremendous affair, bound in
morocco and presented to him by the
negro bishop of the country. Roose
velt used the same book as on the oc
casion of his assumption of the gov
ernorship of New York apd Woodrow
Wilson took the oath both times on
the Bible he had used when sworn Id
as governor of New Jersey.
Alter a bachelor passes the age rj
40 it's op. to him to marry a widow Sj
ha marries at all. HeU need a wlf?
Wtio knows how cranky men era.
SELLER'S MASTERCRAFT
Spring Housecleaning Sale.
You will want to take advantage of this Great Sale.
<3 PI f 17 R Q kitchen
uC,LLLi\J CABINETS.
"The Best Servant in Your House."
This i-, the limn of year wImmi women plan to I i trli t"f*n their household work rnticli as pos
sible during I ho summer. Ami for this reason wo arc making a special display of SKLLKKS
kl TCIIKN (?A 151 NETS ? those famous savers of time ami ell'orf.
V'ou will in* interested in seeing demonstrated the " 15 Famous Features" which have made
(he Sellers the choice of discriminating wernen everywhere.
Our display of Sprint; llousecleaning Supplies and Household Clilities will remind you of
many necessities and conveniences which will lighten the work of rejuvenating and refurnihhing
your home. T)o nol miss attending this important Sale, It will he of real interest and profit t<>
^very woman.
Sold on the Easy l'av Plan. $1.00 puts one in your kitchen, and #1.50
per week pays for it.
Whitc wtthvaSprinxs' The Bowling Hardware Co,

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